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Full text of "Undergraduate catalog"

ERRATA 

Page 32, first two lines immediately beneath, the caption STANDING 
COMMITTEES, UNIVERSITY, should read: 

"ENTRANCE: 

The Registrar and deans and directors of all colleges and divisions 
admitting freshmen." 

Page 79, second paragraph should read: 

"Except in the College of Law, no student will be granted a 
bachelor's degree from this University who has not done either a total 
of 90 hours of his work, or the last 30 hours 1 of it, in actual residence 
at the University." 




WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 

CATALOGUE NUMBER 

1932-1933 Sessions 

AN NOUNCEMENTS 

1933-1934 Sessions 




March One, Nineteen Hundred Thirty-three 

MORGANTOWN, WEST VIRGINIA 

Published by the University 



CONTENTS 



Page 

Calendars _ - 4-5 

Governing Boards - - 6 

PART I— STAFF OF INSTRUCTION, RESEARCH, AND EXTENSION 

Administrative Officers 9 

Staff of Instruction _ _ _ 11 

Military Staff - 24 

Athletic Staff _ _ „ 24 

University Demonstration High School Staff 25 

Library Staff _ _ _ 26 

Mining and Industrial Extension Staff 26 

Agricultural Experiment Station Staff — 27 

Agricultural Extension Division Staff 29 

Athletic Board of Control 32 

Standing Committees _ _ 32 

PART II— GENERAL INFORMATION 

History of the University 37 

Location _ _ - - 38 

Physical Plant _ 39 

Funds 42 

Government and Organization 43 

Living Accommodations _ - 63 

Admission to the University 65 

Registration _ + 71 

University Fees and Expenses 74 

Degrees . + - 77 

Examinations and Reports 81 

Discipline _ * 83 

Student Welfare 86 

Scholarships and Loan Funds _ 9 4 

Prizes, Trophies, and Medals 97 

Honor Societies - 100 

Other University Organizations 102 

Publications „ 104 

PART III— CURRICULAR REQUIREMENTS OF THE COLLEGES, 
SCHOOLS, AND DIVISIONS 

The College of Agriculture 107 

The College of Arts and Sciences „ ~ 119 

The College of Education 149 

The College of Engineering and Mechanic Arts and the School of Mines 159 

The Graduate School „ „ 179 

The College of Law 185 

The School of Medicine : 

Courses in Medicine 188 

Courses in Pharmacy „ 190 

The School of Music 194 

The Division of Physical Education _ 199 

PART IV— COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Agriculture - 207 

Arts and Sciences 222 

Education _ 267 

Engineering and Mechanic Arts 273 

Graduate Courses 207-312 

Law 286 

Medicine - 289 

Military Science and Tactics 293 

Mining Engineering _ 294 

Music .. 4 296 

Pharmacy 302 

Physical Education 305 

Summer Session in Law — 312 

PART V— DEGREES CONFERRED BY THE UNIVERSITY 

Degrees Conferred, 1931-1932: ■ 

Graduate Degrees 315 

Baccalaureate Degrees _ 318 

Degrees Conferred, 1870-1932 : 

Baccalaureate Degrees 331 

Graduate Degrees * _ 332 

Honorary Degrees 333 

PART VI— ALPHABETICAL LIST OF FACULTY AND STAFF 
Alphabetical List _ * 335 

PART VII— STUDENT ENROLLMENT 1932-1933 

List of Students Enrolled _... 367 

Classified Enrollment „ „„ 426 

Geographical Distribution of Enrollment 428 

Index __ _ * 429 



YEAR 1933 


JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


a 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T F 


S 


] 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 








1 


2 


3 


4 








1 


2 


3 


4 












1 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


? 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


IS 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


1? 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


22 


23 


?4 


25 


26 


27 


28 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


19 


20 


21 


22 


Z3 


24 


25 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


29 


30 


31 










26 


27 


28 










26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 




23 
30 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


8 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


w 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 










1 


2 


3 














1 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


? 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


28 


29 


30 


31 






25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 




23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


































30 


31 






















SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


w 


T 


F 


S 












1 


2 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 








1 


2 


3 


4 












1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


1? 


13 


14 


15 


lfi 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


1? 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


?? 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


?? 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


29 


30 


31 










26 27 


28 


29 


30 






24 
31 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


YEAR 1 934 


JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 




! 


? 


3 


4 


5 


6 










1 


2 


3 










1 


2 


3 


1 


? 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


7 


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9 


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12 


13 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


11 


12 


13 14 


15 


16 


17 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


18 


19 


20 21 


22 


23 


24 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


28 29 


30 


31 








25 


26 


27! 28 








25 


26 


27 


23 


29 


30 


31 


29 


30 












MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S I M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


8 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 










1 


2 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 








1 


2 


3 


4 


6 7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


3 4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


13 1 14 


15 


lfi 


17 


18 


19 


10 11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


lfi 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


V> 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


20 i 21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


17| 18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


7? 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 | 25 


27 1 28 


29 


30 31 






24' 25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


29 


30 


31 










26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 1 


SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 
1 


B 


M 

1 


T 

2 


w 

3 


T 

4 


F 

5 


S 
6 


s 


M 


T 


W 


T 

1 


2 


S 
3 


B 


M 


T W 


T 


F 


S 
1 


? 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


2 


3 


4 5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


9 


10 


11 12 


13 


14 


15 


Ifi 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


18 


19 


20 


21 


'22 


23 


24 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 '21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


n 


29 


30 


31 








26 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 




23 


24 


25 


26 


27 28 


29 


30 










































30 31 











The days that the University is in session are printed in light face type; Sundays, holidays, and vacations in 
bold face type. 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

1933 

May 26, Friday, to June 3, Saturday, inclusive 

Final examinations for second semester 

May 30, Tuesday Memorial Day, a holiday 

June 4, Sunday Baccalaureate exercises 

June 5. Monday Alumni Day 

June 6, Tuesday Commencement Day 

June 12, Monday.. ..Opening of Summer Session — registration of students 

June 13, Tuesday First recitations of Summer Session 

July 4, Tuesday Independence Day, a holiday 

July 21, Friday Close of first term, Summer Session 

July 22, Saturday 

Opening of second term, Summer Session — registration of students 

July 24, Monday First recitations of second term, Summer Session 

August 26, Saturday Close of Summer Session 

September 14, Thursday Opening of first semester 

September 14, 15, 16, Thursday, Friday and Saturday 

Freshman Week exercises including registration of freshmen 
September 18 and 19, Monday and Tuesday.. Registration of upper classmen 

September 20, Wednesday First recitations of first semester 

November 17, Friday Day for mid-semester reports 

November 30, Thursday, to December 3, Sunday, inclusive 

Thanksgiving recess 
December 21, Thursday, to January 3, Wednesday, inclusive 

Christmas recess 
1934 
January 20, Saturday, to January 27, Saturday, inclusive 

Final examinations for first semester 

January 30, Tuesday Opening of second semester 

January 30 and 31, Tuesday and Wednesday Registration of students 

February 1, Thursday First recitations of second semester 

March 28, Wednesday Day for mid-semester reports 

March 29, Thursday, to April 4, Wednesday, inclusive Easter recess 

May 30, Wednesday Memorial Day, a holiday 

June 4, Monday, to June 11, Monday, inclusive 

Final examinations for second semester 

June 10, Sunday Baccalaureate exercises 

June 11, Monday Alumni Day 

June 12, Tuesday : Commencement Day 

June 18, Monday... .Opening of Summer Session — registration of students 

June 19, Tuesday First recitations of Summer Session 

July 4, Wednesday Independence Day, a holiday 

July 27, Friday Close of first term, Summer Session 

July 28, Saturday 

Opening of second term, Summer Session — Registration of students 

July 30, Monday First recitations of second term, Summer Session 

September 1, Saturday Close of Summer Session 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 

MORGANTOWN 

Established February 7, 1867 

THE STATE BOARD OF CONTROL 

TERM EXPIRES 

H. N. BRADLEY, President, Charles Town June 30, 1935 

JOHN BAKER WHITE, Treasurer, Charleston June 30, 1937 

JAMES S. LAKIN, Charleston June 30, 1933 

HERMAN G. JOHNSON, Secretary, Charleston 

The State Board of Control has the direction of the financial and 
business affairs of the state educational institutions. 

THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

TERM EXPIRES 

EDWARD GRANDISON SMITH, President, Clarksburg... June 1, 1934 

DAVID ALLAN BURT, Vice President, Wheeling June 1, 1934 

FRANK HENNEN BABB, Keyser June 1, 1936 

HUGH IKE SHOTT, JR., Bluefleld June 1, 1933 

GERTRUDE ROBERTS, Huntington June 1, 1933 

ARTHUR BURKE KOONTZ, Charleston June 1, 1936 

CLEVELAND McSHERRY SEIBERT, Martinsburg ...June 1, 1933 

CHARLES THOMPSON NEFF, JR., Secretary, Morgantown 

The Board of Governors has charge of the educational and admin- 
istrative affairs of the University. 



Part I 

STAFF OF INSTRUCTION, RESEARCH 
AND EXTENSION 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 

GENERAL 

John Roscoe Turner, Ph. D., LL. D., President of the University. 
Robert Allen Armstrong, A. M., L. H. D., University Chaplain. 
Lloyd Lowndes Friend, M. A., Registrar of the University. 
Dennis Martin Willis, A. B., LL. M., Financial Secretary. 
Lonna Dennis Arnett, Ph. D., Librarian. 
Harry Everette Stone, A. M., Dean of Men. 
Ruth Douglas Noer, M. S., Dean of Women. 

THE COLLEGES, SCHOOLS AND DIVISIONS 

Wilson Porter Shortridge, Ph. D., Dean of the College of Arts and 
Sciences. 

Roland Parker Davis, Ph. D., Dean of the College of Engineering. 

Fred Denton Fromme, Ph. D., Dean of the College of Agriculture, and 
Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station. 

Thomas Porter Hardman, J. D., Dean of the College of Law. 

Earl Hudelson, Ph. D., Dean of the College of Education. 

John Nathan Simpson, A. B., M. D., Dean of the School of Medicine. 

Louis Black, Director of the School of Music. 

Stephen P. Burke, Ph. D., Chairman of the Graduate Council, and 
Director of the Engineering Experiment Station. 

Charles Elmer Lawall, E. M., M. S., Director of the School of Mines, 
and Director of Extension of the Industrial Sciences. 

Andrew Jackson Dadisman, Ph. D., Director of the Summer Session. 

Carl Peter Schott, Ph. D., Director of the Division of Physical Edu- 
cation. 

Geoffrey P. Baldwin, Major, Infantry (D. 0. L.), United States 
Army, Commandant of Cadets. 

Nat Terry Frame, D. Sc, Director of Agricultural Extension. 

THE COUNCIL OF ADMINISTRATION 

The President of the University and the Deans of the various 
colleges. 



10 Staff of Instruction, Research, and Extension 

THE GRADUATE COUNCIL 

Stephen P. Burke, Ph. D., Chairman of the Graduate Council, and 
Chairman of the Division of Industrial Sciences. 

Fred Denton From me, Ph. D., Chairman of the Division of Biology 
and Agriculture. 

Wilson Porter Shortridge, Ph. D., Chairman of the Division of Social 
Sciences. 

Earl Hudelson, Ph. D., Chairman of the Division of Education. 

OTHER ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 

Harry Adams Stansbury, B. S., Director of Athletics. 

Benjamin Walter King, A. M., University Editor and Statistician. 

Richard Aspinall, Ph. D., Extension Agent. 

Louise Keener, B. A., Secretary to the President. 

John Behny Grumbein, M. M. E., Superintendent of Buildings and 
Grounds. 

Emerson Carney, Manager, University Book Store. 

Bertha Browning Purinton, A. M., Assistant Registrar. 

J. Everett Long, A. B., Assistant to the Registrar. 

THE STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE 

Frederick Rendell Whittlesey, M. D., University Physician, Director 
of Student Health Service. 

Roy Roosevelt Summers, B. S., M. D., Assistant Director of Student 
Health Service. 

Mabel Love, R. N., University Nurse. 

THE DORMITORIES AND DINING HALLS 

Isabel Ray Hayes, Preceptress at the Woman's Hall. 

Elizabeth B. Abbott, Assistant Preceptress at the Woman's Hall 
Annex. 

Mayme Elizabeth Waddell, 1 B. S., Dietitian. 

Mildred Patterson, 2 Dietitian. 

Zola SHntEY, B. S., Assistant Dietitian. 



K)n leave, second semester, 1932-33. 
2 Second semester, 1932-33. 



Professors 11 

STAFF OF INSTRUCTION 

PROFESSORS 

Daniel Boardman Purinton, Ph. D., LL. D., President and Professor 
of Philosophy Emeritus. 

UFrank Butler Trotter, A. M., LL. D., President Emeritus and Pro- 
fessor of Latin. 

Clement Ross Jones, M. M- E., Dean Emeritus of the College of Engi- 
neering and Professor of Power Engineering. 

James Scott Stewart, 1 M. S., Professor of Mathematics Emeritus. 

Thomas Clark Atkeson, Ph. D., Professor of Animal Husbandry 
Emeritus. 

^Robert Allen Armstrong, A. M., L. H. D., Professor of the English 
Language and Literature. 

Alfred Jarrett Hare, A. M., Professor of the Latin Language and 
Literature Emeritus. 

^Jasper Newton Deahl, Ph. D., Professor of Education. 

ff J ames Morton Callahan, Ph. D., Professor of History and Political 
Science. 

John Nathan Simpson, A. B., M. D., Professor of Medicine. 

fiJoHN Harrington Cox, Ph. D., Litt. D., Professor of English 
Philology. 

tfJoHN Arndt Eiesland, Ph. D., Professor of Mathematics. 

^Albert Moore Reese, Ph. D., Professor of Zoology. 

^Oliver Perry Chitwood, Ph. D., LL. D., Professor of History. 

fiLouis Black, Professor of Music. 

1[Madison Stathers, Ph. D., Professor of Romance Languages. 

Enoch Howard Vickers, A. M., Professor of Economics and Sociology. 

^Roland Parker Davis, Ph. D., Professor of Structural and Hydraulic 
Engineering. 

^Friend Ebenezer Clark, Ph. D., Professor of Chemistry. 

^Leonard Marion Peairs, Ph. D., Professor of Entomology. 

John Behny Grumbein, M. M. E., Professor of Power Engineering. 

Alexander Hardie Form an, M. M. E., Ph. D., Professor of Electrical 

Engineering. 

HCharles Henry Ambler, Ph. D., Professor of History. 

HAlso member of 1933 Summer Session Staff, 
deceased, February 9, 1933. 



12 Staff of Instruction, Research, and Extension 

^Leslie David Hayes, M. E., Professor of Machine Design and Con- 
struction. 

Thomas Porter Hardman, M. A., J. D., Professor of Law. 
flWiLBUR Jones Kay, A. M., Professor of Public Speaking. 
^Edward Alexander Livesay, D. Sc, Professor of Animal Husbandry. 

George Paul Boomsliter, M. S. C. E., Professor of Mechanics. 

TJJames Herbert Gill, M. E., Professor of Machine Construction and 
Superintendent of Shops. 

HArleigh Lee Darby, A. M., Litt. D., Professor of French and Italian. 

IJDavid Dale Johnson, A. M., Litt. D., Professor of English. 

URachel Hartshorn Colwell, M. A., Professor of Home Economics, 

Samuel John Morris, M. D., Professor of Anatomy. 
^Lawrence Benjamin Hill, Ph. D., Professor of Education. 

Martin Loxley Bonar, 1 M. S., M. D., Professor of Pharmacology. 

HCarl Alfred Jacobson, Ph. D., Professor of Chemistry. 

fiWiLLARD Wellington Hodge, M. A., Professor of Chemical Engineer- 
ing. 

Leo Carlin, A. B., LL. B., Professor of Law. 
^Samuel Morris, Ph. D., Professor of Chemistry. 
1[Fred A. Molby, Ph. D., Professor of Physics. 
^Edward Silver Maclin, M. A., Professor of Industrial Education, 
HEdmund Charles Dickinson, A. B., J. D., Professor of Law. 

Edward Jerald Van Liere, M. D., Ph. D., Professor of Physiology. 
fiLouis August Rufener, Ph. D., Professor of Economics. 

Wilson Porter Shortridge, Ph. D., Professor of History. 

Floyd Earle Chidester, Ph. D., Professor of Zoology. 
^Gordon Alger Bergy, Ph. C., M. S., Professor of Pharmacy. 
IJRalph John Garber, Ph. D., Professor of Agronomy and Genetics. 
^Thomas Luther Harris, Ph. D., Professor of Sociology. 
HJohn E. Winter, Ph. D., Professor of Psychology. 

Arthur A. Hall, B. S. M. E., Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

^Perry Daniel Strausbaugh, Ph. D., Professor of Botany. 

^Andrew Jackson Dadisman, Ph. D., Professor of Farm Economics. 

iResigned, June 30, 1932. 

fAlso member of 1933 Summer Session Staff. 



Professors 13 

IJAllen Wilson Porterfield, Ph. D., Professor of German. 

URobert Cameron Colwell, Ph. D., Professor of Physics. 

^Charles Elmer Lawall, E. M., M. S., Professor of Mining Engineer- 
ing. 

UPerley Isaac Reed, Ph. D., Professor of Journalism. 

Gideon Stanhope Dodds, Ph. D., Professor of Histology and Em- 
bryology. 

^Claude Carl Spiker, Ph. D., Professor of French and Spanish. 

^Robert Clifton Spangler, Ph. D., Professor of Botany. 

James Wiggins Simonton, 1 A. B., J. D., S. J. D., Professor of Law. 

Clement Coleman Fenton, M. S., M. D., Professor of Pathology and 
Clinical Pathology. 

Sidney Longman Galpin, Ph. D., Professor of Geology. 

Robb Spalding Spray, Ph. D., Professor of Bacteriology and Hygiene. 
^Rebecca Luella Pollock, Ph. D., Professor of Education. 
^Elizabeth Mattingly Stalnaker, Ph. D., Professor of Psychology. 
^Hubert Hill, M. S., Professor of Chemistry. 
HCarl Peter Schott, Ph. D., Professor of Physical Education. 

Harry Oram Henderson, Ph. D., Professor of Dairy Husbandry. 

HJohn William Draper, Ph. D., Professor of English. 

Robert Barclay Dustman, Ph. D., Professor of Agricultural Chem- 
istry. 

Harry Edward Knowlton, Ph. D., Professor of Horticulture. 

ULewis Van Carpenter, M. S. C. E., M. S. San. Eng'g., Professor of 
Civil and Sanitary Engineering. 

^Walter Allos Koehler, Ch. E., Ph. D., Professor of Chemical and 
Ceramic Engineering. 

^Clayton Roberts Orton, Ph. D., Professor of Plant Pathology. 

John Fairfield Sly, Ph. D., Professor of Political Science. 

^[Earl Hudelson, Ph. D., Professor of Education. 

^Stephen Patrick Burke, Chem. E., Ph. D., Professor of Industrial 
Sciences. 

William Smith Downs, B. S. C. E., C. E., Acting Professor of Railway 
and Highway Engineering. 



iDeceased, May 24, 1932. 

«!Also member of 1933 Summer Session Staff. 



14 Staff of Instruction, Research, and Extension 

UBird Margaret Turner, Ph. D., Professor of Mathematics. 

flJo-HN Emlin Bohan, Ph. D., Professor of Education, 

TIForrest Wilbur Stemple, Ph. D., Professor of Education. 

^Clarence Newton Reynolds, Jr., Ph. D., Professor of Mathematics. 

UEarl Claudius Hamilton Davies, Ph. D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Horace Atwood, M. S. Agr., Professor Emeritus of Poultry Husbandry. 

^Howard Bushnell Allen, Ph. D., Professor of Agricultural Educa- 
tion. 

Geoffrey P. Baldwin, Major, Infantry (D. 0. L.), United States 
Army, Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

^Robert Dodge Baldwin, Ph. D., Professor of Education. 

fiCuRTis Chandler Williams, A. B., S. J. D., Professor of Law. 

TJLoNNA Dennis Arnett, Ph. D., Librarian, and Instructor in Library 

Science. 

Camden Page Fortney, B. S. C. E., Chairman, State Road Commission, 
Director of the School of Good Roads. 

Ellis Spence Tisdale, B. S. San. Eng'g., Director Division of Sanitary 
Engineering, State Department of Health, Director of Conference 
on Water Supply and Purification. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Edgar Lewis Andrews, M. S. Agr., Associate Professor of Poultry 
Husbandry. 

Lily Bell Sefton Deatrick, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
IJLeland Hart Taylor, Sc. D., Associate Professor of Zoology. 
flLouis Watson Chappell, A. M., Associate Professor of English. 

Leon H. Leonian, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Plant Pathology. 

John Harrison Rietz, 1 D. V. M., Associate Professor of Veterinary 
Medicine. 

Anthony Berg, M. S., Associate Professor of Plant Pathology. 

George Russell Crisler, Ph. D., M. D., Associate Professor of Physi- 
ology. 

Joseph Lester Hayman, Ph. C, M. S., Associate Professor of Pharma- 
cognosy. 
William Henry Pierre, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Agronomy. 
UROY A. Olney, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Agricultural Education. 



1 In cooperation with State Department of Agriculture. 
^Also member of 1933 Summer Session Staff. 



ASSOC" I ATE PROFFESORS 15 



Dickson Ward Parsons, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Agricultural 
Education. 

Jefferson Barnes Fordham, A. M., J. S. D., Associate Professor of 
Laic. 

•"Charles Mitrani, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Roinance Languages. 

IJOrpha Rex Ford, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Physics. 

c Armand Rene Collett, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Cheynistry. 

c Clarence Eugene Garland, Ph. D.. Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

^"Christopher George Brouzas, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Latin 
and Greek. 

•TJohn Donald Barnhart, Ph. D., Associate Professor of History. 

^Fred Manning Smith, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Eyiglish. 

Wilbert Hersman McGaw, 1 B. S., M. D.. Associate Professor of 
Anatomy. 

Lloyd Massena Thurston, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Dairy Hus- 
bandry. 

Thomas Clifford Billig, A. M., J. S. D., Associate Professor of Law. 

•"Walter Wardlaw Armentrout. Ph. D., Associate Professor of Farm 
Econoynics. 

Max Manley Hoover, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Agronomy. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

George Walter Grow. B. S. M. E.. M. S., Assistant Professor of Draw- 
ing and Machine Design. 

Charles Vinyard Wilson, M. S., Assistant Professor of Aniynal Hus- 
bandi-y. 

Kyle Chester Westover, M. S. Agr.. Assistant Professor of Horti- 
culture. 

Bennett Sexton White, B. S. M. E., Assistant Professor of Draiciyig 
and Machine Design. 

•"Carl Henry Cather, M. S., Assistant Professor of Mechanics. 

HJacob Saposnekow, M. A., Assistant Professo-r of Sociology. 

•"Nell Xesbitt, A. M.. Assistant Professor of Home Economics. 

Jean Elnora Richmond. A. M.. Assistant Professor of Home Econom- 
ics and Education. 

Ruth Douglas Xoer, M. S.. Assistant Professor of Home Economics. 



^esisrned. June 30, 1932. 
•"Also member of 1933 Summer Session Staff. 



16 Staff of Instruction, Research, and Extension 

fiRoY Ezekiel Nelson, M. S. C. E., M. S. Highway Eng'g., Assistant 
Professor of Railway and Highway Engineering. 

^William Anderson Staab, E. M., Assistant Professor of Mining Engi- 
neering. 

Walter Wadepuhl, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of German. 

IILydia Irene Hinkel, Mus. B., Assistant Professor of Music. 

^Grace Margaret Griffin, A. M., Assistant Professor of Physical Edu- 
cation, 

fiJOHN Harwood Longwell, A. M., Assistant Professor of Animal Hus- 
bandry. 

^George Henry Colebank, M. A., Assistant Professor of Education. 

Charles Lester Lazzell, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Beth Mae Palmer, M. S., Assistant Professor of Home Economics. 

HHarry Marion Fridley, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Geology. 

IIJohn Reginald Cresswell, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Philosophy. 

fiCARL Maynard Frasure, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Political 
Science. 

James H. C. Martens, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Geology. 

^Hannibal Albert Davis, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

HCharles Henry Vehse, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

^[Ferris Dewey Cornell, Jr., M. S., Assistant Professor of Farm 
Mechanics. 

^Robert Clark, A. M., Assistant Professor of Education. 

Edward Forstall Adams, 1 First Lieutenant, Infantry, United 
States Army (D. 0. L.), Assistant Professor of Military Science 
and Tactics. 

ULloyd Meredith Jones, 2 A. M., Assistant Professor of Physical Edu- 
cation and Director of Service Program for Men. 

IIHarry Lawrence Samuel, M. S. in Public Health, Assistant Professor 
of Physical Education and Director of Intramural Athletics. 

Stephen C. Whipple, B. S., Captain, Corps of Engineers, United 
States Army (D. 0. L.), Assistant Professor of Military Science 
and Tactics. 
ffVoLNEY W. Shepard, B. M., Assistant Professor of Music. 

Returned to United States Service with troops, February 1, 1933. 

2 On leave of absence, 1932-33. 

HAlso member of 1933 Summer Session Staff. 



Assistant Professors 17 



Iva Irene Sell, M. S., Assistant Professor of Home Economics and 
Education. 

^George Anderson Shipman, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Political 
Science. 

George Gordon Pohlman, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Agronomy. 

* Maurice Coffyn Holmes, Sc. D., Assistant Professor of Physics. 

George Augustus Bowling, M. S., Assistarit Professor of Dairy Hus- 
bandry. 

A. Earle Xeale, Assistant Professor of Athletics. 

Ira Errett Rodgers, A. B., Assistant Professor of Athletics. 

Kenneth Wood, B. M., Assistant Professor of Music. 

'Frank Edward Horack, Jr., S. J. D., Assistant Professor of Law. 

Henry Augustus Holden Pray, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Chemis- 
try. 

John Arthur Gibson, Jr., Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Arnold Waldemar Johnson, M. B. A., Assistant Professor of Account- 
ing. 

Stephen Fuller Crocker, A. M., Assistant Professor of English. 

Robert L. Xesbit, Captain, Infantry, United States Army (D. 0. 
L.), Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

Arthur Newell Smith, A. B., Assistant Professor of Athletics. 

Stephen Harrick, 1 A. B., Assistant Professor of Athletics. 

Willard L. Smith, Captain, Infantry, United States Army (D. 0. 
L.), Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

William Smith Downs, C. E., Assistant Professor of Railway and 
Highway Enginering. 

Ralph A. Lincoln, C. E., First Lieutenant, Corps of Engineers, 
United States Army (D. 0. L.), Assistant Professor of Military 
Science and Tactics. 

Michael Alphonse Rafferty, Ph. C, Assistant Professor of Bio- 
chemistry and Pharmacology. 

Norman Austin David, A. B., M. D., Assistant Professor of Pharma- 
cology. 



designed, June 30, 1932. 

•"Also member of 1933 Summer Session Staff. 



18 Staff of Instruction, Research, and Extension 

INSTRUCTORS 

Susan Maxwell Moore, A. B., Instructor in Piano. 

Grace Martin-Snee, B. M., Instructor in Piano and Pipe Organ. 

fiRuFUS Asa West, Instructor in Metal-working. 

IJRaymer Egbert Seaman, Instructor in Woodworking and Foundry 
Practice. 

^IClara Lytle, M. A., Instructor in English. 

Elizabeth Frost Reed, A. M., Instructor in English. 

Harold Malcolm Cather, M. S. M. E., Instructor in Drawing and 
Machine Design. 

Il William John Carl, Instructor in Foundry Practice. 

Charles McChesney Brady, B. S., M. D., Instructor in Physical Diag- 
nosis. 

Nelle Perrel, A. M., Instructor in Botany. 
IiWilliam Oliver Gnagey, Instructor in Machine Shop Practice. 
HGreek Sayre, A. M., Instructor in English. 
^Martha Theoda Fulton, A. M., Instructor in English. 
^IHelen Purinton Pettigrew, A. M., Instructor in English. 

Lee Leonard Amidon, M. S. M. E., Instructor in Power Engineering. 

George Ralph Maxwell, B. S., M. D., Instructor in Physical Diagnosis. 
^Sherman William Brown, M. A., Instructor in Romance Languages. 
IiRuth Jean Simonson, A. B., Instructor in Public Speaking. 

Nadine Page, M. A., Instructor in English. 
^IEvalyn Spurgeon Dixon, Ph. D., Instructor in History. 

Robert Russell Ashburn, 1 A. M., Instructor in French and Spanish. 
IiLydia Roesch, Ph. D., Instructor in German. 

Edwin Channing Jones, M. S. E. E., Instructor in Electrical Engi- 
neering. 

Jennings Bryan Taylor, M. S., Instructor in Anatomy. 

Cecil Benjamin Pride, A. B., M. D., Instructor in Principles and Prac- 
tice of Surgery. 

Ernest Thomas Wightman, M. S. Agr., Instructor in Poultry Hus- 
bandry. 

Sidney Baker Maynard, 2 M. A., Instructor in Sjmnish. 



x On leave, second semester, 1932-33. 

2 On leave, first semester, 1932-33. 

fAlso member of 1933 Summer Session Staff. 



Instructors 19 



Hubert Coleman Howard, M. A., Instructor in English. 

Warren Francis Manning, A. M., Instructor in French. 

Frederick Linck Geiler, B. Sc. Phar., Instructor in Pharmacy. 

Joseph Alphonso James, M. A., Instructor in French. 

Clyde Bernard Jenni, M. S. Ch. E., Instructor in Chemical Engi- 
neering. 

Charles Gauger, A. B., Instructor in Economics. 
^Beatrice Hurst, M. A., Instructor in Physical Education. 
^Beatrice Thomas, B. S., Instructor in Physical Education. 
fllRA Odell Myers, M. S., Instructor in Physics. 
c Earl Lemley Core, M. A., Instructor in Botany. 

Montelle Dietrich, M. S., Instructor in Home Economics. 
^Carter Richard Bishop, A. M., Instructor in English. 

Gerald Jenny, M. S., Instructor in Agricultural Journalism. 
<[Marja Steadman Fear, A. M., Part-time Instructor in Public Speaking. 

Arthur Pingree Dye, M. S. Agr., Instructor in Horticulture. 

Lloyd Raymond Gribble, M. S., Instructor in Zoology. 

^Thomas Edson Ennis, M. A., Instructor in History. 

Carl Christian Lienau, B. S. E. E., Instructor in Electrical Engi- 
neering. 

Arthur Cook McBride, B. A., Instructor in French. 

UPaul Holland Price, Ph. D., Instructor in Geology. 

Dana Wells, M. A., Instructor in Geology. 

Agnes Wynne McCall, B. S., Instructor in Physical Education. 

Charles Oliver Moody, M. S., M. D., Instructor in Pathology and 
Bacteriology. 

Earl Noel McCubbin, M. A. Agr., Instructor in Horticulture. 

William Henry Childs, M. S., Instructor in Horticulture. 

Mayme Elizabeth Waddell, 1 B. S., Instructor in Home Economics and 
Dietitian. 

Ruth Braden, M. A., Instructor in Home Economics. 

^[Russell Walter Cline, M. S., Instructor in Agricultural Education. 

Hugh William Hetherington, A. M., Instructor in English. 



iOn leave, second semester, 1932-33. 

IfAlso member of 1933 Summer Session Staff. 



20 Staff of Instruction, Research, and Extension 

TJames B. LOWTHER, M. A., Instructor in Public Speaking. 

Charles Danser Thomas, M. S., Instructor in Physics. 

George Raymond Rinehart, M. A., Instructor in Journalism. 

UMay Landstreet WlLT, M. A., Instructor in Education. 

c Sylvia Josephine Soupart, M. A., Instructor in Education. 

|LUCY May Coplin. Ph. B., Instructor in Education. 

•"Frederick Rendell Whittlesey. B. A., Instructor in Physical Diag- 
nosis. 

Marvin Lewis Vest, M. S., Instructor in Mathematics. 
Joseph K. Stewart. M. S., Instructor in Mathematics. 

Kenneth Douglas Hutchinson, M. A... Instructor in Business Ad- 

ministration. 

ULuciLE Strickland, M. A.. Instructor in Home Economics. 

Edward Herman Cubbon. B. S. P. E., Instructor in the Division of 
Physical Education. 

George Jackson Ratcliffe, B. S. P. E., Instructor in the Division of 
Physical Education. 

Mildred Peterson. Instructor in Institutional Management. 

LECTURERS 

Robert Tucker Donley*. A. B.. LL. B., Lecturer in Law. 
Vernon Frank Parry, M. S., Lecturer in Industrial Science. 

Fred Arthur Davis, B. S. C. E., Special Lecturer in Highway Engi- 
neering. 

ASSISTANTS 

Walter Alexander Mestrezat, Assistant in Music. 

Herman Deloss Stillman. Assistant in Woodworking. 

Harley L. Dearborn, Staff Sergeant, U. S. Army (D. E. M. L.), 
Assistant to Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

Henry T. Schultz. Staff Sergeant, Corps of Engineers, U. S. Army 
(D. E. M. L.), Assistant to Professor of Military Science and 
Tactics. 

Ella Louise Boggess, B. S., Assistant in Home Economics. 

'Second semester, 1932-33. 
r Also member of 1933 Summer Session Staff. 



Assistants 21 



Zola Shirey, B. S., Assistant in Home Economics and Assistant 
Dietitian. 

Dennis Hardesty Robinson, B. S., Assistant in Physiology. 

Rupert Wendell Powell, A. B., B. S., Assistant in Pharmacology and 
Biochemistry. 

Ralph Edward Talbott, A. B., Assistant in Anatomy and Histology. 

Francis Stadsvold, A. B., LL. B., Assistant in Athletics. 

Charles Cameron Tallman, LL. B., Assistant in Athletics. 

Walter Everett Mahan, A. B., Assistant in Athletics. 

Joseph E. Young, Sergeant, United States Army (D. E. M. L.), 
Assistant to Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

Carmelo Eugene De Angelis, B. S., Assistant in Pathology and 
Bacteriology. 

Elizabeth Virginia Hagy, B. S., Assistant in Home Economics. 

Orville James LiGHTHISER, Assistant in Pathology and Bacteriology. 

Rex Arthur Patterson, B. S., Assistant in Anatomy and Histology. 

Kenneth Brown Rothey, B. S., Assistant in Biochemistry and Pharma- 
cology. 

Bailey Sleeth, Ph. D., Assistant in Plant Pathology. 



Alvah John Washington Headlee, Ph. D., Graduate Assistant in 
Chemistry. 

Landis Seawell Bennett, M. S., Graduate Assistant in Agronomy. 

Robert Ross Robinson, Jr., B. S. Agr., Graduate Assistant in Agron- 
omy. 

Wendell Dawley Henry, M. S., Graduate Assistant in Plant Path- 
ology. 

Christine Arnold, A. B., Graduate Assistant in Chemistry. 

Gwendolen Auxier, M. S., Graduate Assistant in Zoology. 

Henry Withers Speiden, B. S. C. E., Graduate Assistant in Civil Engi- 
neering. 

Marlin Luther Steely, B. S. Ch. E., Graduate Assistant in Chemical 
Engineering. 

Marvin Howard Snyder, B. S., Graduate Assistant in Agronomy. 

Isaiah A. Wiles, M. S., Graduate Assistant in Zoology. 



22 Staff of Instruction, Research, and Extension 



Alfred Reeves Stanley, M. S., Graduate Assistant in Plant Pathology. 

Arnold Louis Keller, B. S. Agr., Graduate Assistant in Horticulture. 

Frances Lazzell, A. B., Graduate Assistant in Chemistry. 

Glen Sanford Watson, M. S., Graduate Assistant in Chemistry. 

Reginald Horton Downing, M. S., Graduate Assistant in Mathematics. 

Howard Gilmer Ashburn, A. B., Graduate Assistant in Chemistry. 

Harry Virgil Ashburn, A. B., Graduate Assistant in Chemistry. 

H. William Largent, A. B., Second Lieutenant, Infantry Reserve, 
Assistant in Military Science and Tactics. 

Frederick Frazier Riley, A. B., Second Lieutenant, Infantry Re- 
serve, Assistant in Military Science and Tactics. 

Leonard Carl Swing, B. S. Ch. E., Second Lieutenant, Infantry Re- 
serve, Assistant in Military Science and Tactics. 

Robert Compton Patterson, M. S., Second Lieutenant, Infantry 
Reserve, Assistant in Military Science and Tactics; Graduate 
Assistant in Zoology. 

Helen V. Spangler, A. B., Graduate Assistant in Botany. 

Joseph Myers Ashcroft, M. S., Graduate Assistant in Plant Pathology. 

John Byron Conn, A. B., Graduate Assistant in Chemistry. 

Earle Looney Elmore, A. B., Graduate Assistant in Chemistry. 

Benson Glenn Brand, A. B., Graduate Assistant in Chemistry. 

Charles Fleming Brown, M. S., Graduate Assistant in Chemistry. 

Joseph Bartlett Sutton, B. S. Ch. E., Graduate Assistant in Chemis- 
try. 

Anna Margo Levsen, B. A., Graduate Assistant in Mathematics. 

Naphtaly Herman Schmellner, M. S., Graduate Assistant in Mathe- 
matics. 

Andrew Kozak, B. S., Graduate Assistant in Mathematics. 

B. Irvan Speicher, M. S., Graduate Assistant in Botany. 

Lyle Eddy Herold, A. B., Graduate Assistant in Botany. 

Genevieve B. Clulo, A. M., Graduate Assistant in Botany. 

Frances Priscilla DeLancy, A. M., Graduate Assistant in Political 
Science. 

Carl Brandt Post, M. S., Graduate Assistant in Physics. 

Festus Paul Summers, A. M., Graduate Assistant in History. 



Visiting Instructors 23 



Clarence Edward Roth, A. M., Graduate Assistant in History. 

Peter Joseph Zucchero, A. B., Graduate Assistant in Zoology. 

Louis Ferdinand Hermann, B. S., Graduate Assistant in Dairy Hus- 
bandly. 

Louis John Manus, B. S., Graduate Assistant in Dairy Husbandry. 

Roy Walter Godley, B. S., Graduate Assistant in Animal Husbandry. 

Edmond Teerink Roetman, M. S. C. E., Graduate Assistant in Civil 
Engineering. 

Edmund E. Collins, A. B., Graduate Assistant in Chemistry. 

Marion Eugene Knight, A. B., Graduate Assistant in Education. 

Bertha Freda Marple, A. B., Graduate Assistant in Education. 

John L. Patterson, A. B., Graduate Assistant in Education. 

Paul Edwin Powers, A. B., Graduate Assistant in Education. 

VISITING INSTRUCTORS IN THE SUMMER SESSION 

John F. Bell, Ph. D., Professor of Economics, Temple University. 

Marion F. Breck, State Supervisor of Vocational Home Economics, 
Delaware. 

Alonzo Guy Eaton, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Zoology, Louisiana 
State Medical Center, New Orleans. 

Alvin C. Eurich, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Education, and 
Assistant Director of Bureau of Education Research, University of 
Minnesota. 

Charles Fairman, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Political Science. 
Williams College. 

Clement Tyson Goode, Ph. D., Professor of English, University of 
Richmond. 

Lloyd A. Helms, Ph. D., Professor of Economics and Business Ad- 
ministration, Geneva College. 

Ross Ludwig, B. S., Phys. Ed., Assistant in Botany. 

Ida M. Peters, Supervisor of Parkersburg School Libraries. 

Charles W. Ramsdell, Ph. D., Professor of History, University of 
Texas. 

George E. Simpson, Ph. D., Instructor in Sociology, Temple University. 

Dora V. Smith, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Education, University 



of Minnesota. 
Ira L. Warner, M. A., Lecturer in Education. 



24 Staff of Instruction, Research, and Extension 

MILITARY STAFF 
UNITED STATES ARMY OFFICERS 

Geoffrey P. Baldwin, Major, Infantry (D. 0. L.), Commandant. 

Stephen Carson Whipple, B. S., Captain, Corps of Engineers (D. 

0. L.). 
Willard L. Smith, Captain, Infantry (D. 0. L.). 
Robert LeRoy Nesbit, Captain, Infantry (D. 0. L.). 

Ralph A. Lincoln, C. E., First Lieutenant, Corps of Engineers, 
(D. 0. L.). 

Edward Forstall Adams, 1 First Lieutenant, Infantry (D. O. L.). 

Henry Thomas Schultz, First Sergeant (D. E. M. L.). 

Harley LeRoy Dearborn, Staff Sergeant (D. E. M. L.). 

Joseph E. Young, Sergeant (D. E. M. L.). 

RESERVE CORPS OFFICERS 

Robert Compton Patterson, M. S., Second Lieutenant, Infantry. 

Frederick Frazier Riley, A. B., Second Lieutenant, Infantry. 

Robert Christy Hilliard, Second Lieutenant, Infantry. 

H. William Largent, A. B., Second Lieutenant, Infantry. 

Edward Galaway Rodgers, Second Lieutenant, Engineer. 

Leonard Carl Swing, B. S. Ch. E., Second Lieutenant (C. W. S.). 

John McLean Adkins, Second Lieutenant, Engineer. 

Adrian H. Hall, Second Lieutenant, Engineer. 

Jack A. Millard, Second Lieutenant, Engineer. 

James Richard Nuzum, Jr., Second Lieutenant, Infantry. 

Norman W. Parsons, Second Lieutenant, Infantry. 

Richard Bailey Tibbs, Second Lieutenant, Infantry. 

Marvin Terrill Stewart, Second Lieutenant, Engineer. 

Victor H. Boomsliter, Jr., Second Lieutenant, Infantry. 

ATHLETIC STAFF 

Harry Adams Stansbury, B. S., Director of Athletics. 

Lowry McElvaine Stoops, A. B., Assistant Director of Athletics. 



'Returned to service with troops, February 1, 1933. 



Athletics 25 



David Alfred Christopher, A. M., Office Manager. 

A. Earle Neale, Assistant Professor of Athletics and Head Coach. 

Ira Errett Rodgers, A. B., Assistant Professor of Athletics and Assist- 
ant Coach. 

Arthur Newell Smith, A. B., Assistant Professor of Athletics and 
Coach of Track Athletics. 

Stephen Harrick, 1 A. B., Assistant Professor of Athletics and Coach 
of Wrestling. 

Francis Stadsvold, A. B., LL. B., Assistant in Athletics and Coach of 
Basketball. 

Charles Cameron Tallman, LL. B., Assistant in Athletics and Coach 
of Freshman Football. 

Walter Everett Mahan, A. B., LL. B., Assistant in Athletics and 
Assistant Coach of Football. 

Edward Vacheresse, Coach in Boxing. 

Carter L. Diffey, LL. B., Assistant Coach of Freshman Football. 

Dennis Edward Myers, A. B., Assistant Football Coach and Coach of 
Wrestling. 

UNIVERSITY DEMONSTRATION HIGH SCHOOL STAFF 

ff George Henry Colebank, M. A., Principal. 
TISylvia Soupart, A. M., English. 
IILucy May Coplin, Ph. B., Social Studies. 
UMay Landstreet Wilt, M. A., .Mathematics. 

Ervin Dorsey, M. S., Agriculture. 

Ella Louise Boggess, B. S., Home Economics. 

Lona Kate Meredith, A. B., Art. 
HGeorge Andrew Federer, Jr., M. A., Science. 

Olive Woodburn Coffroth, A. B., English. 

Ernest L. Zimmerman, B. S., Commerce. 

Edward C. Bowlby, Industrial Arts. 

Kermit A. Cook, A. M., Social Studies. 

Earle Montague Sprouse, Athletic Coach. 



iResigned, June 30, 1932. 

IfAlso member of 1933 Summer Session Staff. 



26 Staff of Instruction, Research, and Extension 

LIBRARY STAFF 

HLonna Dennis Arnett, Ph. D., Librarian. 

Jennie Delawder Boughner, A. B., Reference Librarian. 
^Evelyn Pratt Hite, A. B., Cataloguer. 

Eleanor Eddy Knutti, Director, Package Library Service. 

Andrew Valentine Wiley, A. B., Order and Bindery Clerk. 

Rosemarie Hechmer, B. S., Assistant Cataloguer. 

Lena May Mathews, Librarian, College of Law. 

Mary Louise Richardson, A. B., Assistant Reference Librarian. 

Margaret Virginia Reay, A. B., Assistant Cataloguer. 

Byrd Lea Pickens, M. A., Assistant Librarian in Charge of Reserve. 

Barbara Bierer, A. B., Assistant. 

Flora Boyers, Assistant, Package Library Service. 

Virginia Gilmore Madigan, B. S. H. E., Assistant in Library. 

Georgia Chorpening Wade, A. B., Assistant in Library. 

Mildred Arnett Reed, A. B., Assistant in Library. 

Frederick Wayne Ford, A. B., Assistant in Library. 

John Lewis Detch, Assistant in Law Library. 

Paul Stuart Hudgins, Assistant in Law Library, 

George William McQuain, Assistant in Law Library. 

Louis Schoolnic, Assistant in Law Library. 

MINING AND INDUSTRIAL EXTENSION STAFF 

MINING EXTENSION 

^Charles Elmer Law all, E. M., M. S., Director of Extension in the In- 
dustrial Sciences. 

^Dennis Lee McElroy, B. S. E. M., M. S., Assistant Director of Mining 
Extension. 

fi William Anderson Staab, E. M., Assistant Professor of Mining Engi- 
neering. 

HAndrew H. Smith, Supervisor of Mine Foreman Training. 

1[James Stanley Poundstone, Instructor in Mining Extension. 

fiCLYDE Graham Stout, Instructor in Mining Extension. 

KHobart Watson, Instructor in Mining Extension. 

^[William Brown Talbott, Instructor in Mining Extension. 

^Warren Rangeley Roberts, Instructor in Mining Extension. 

1[Wayne McVeigh Davis, Instructor in Mining Extension. 

AAlton M. Ayers, Instructor in Mining Extension. 

^Clarence Jackson Flippen, Instructor in Mining Extension. 

INDUSTRIAL EXTENSION 

Edward Silver Maclin, M. A., Professor of Industrial Education. 
Edwin Channing Jones, M. S. E. E., Instructor in Electrical Engi- 
neering. 



«!Also member of 1933 Summer Session Staff. 



Wkst Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station 27 

THE WEST VIRGINIA AGRICULTURAL 
EXPERIMENT STATION STAFF 

*Fred Denton Fromme, Ph. D., Director. 

William Earl Rumsey, B. S. Agr., 1 State Entomologist. 
♦Leonard Marion Peairs, Ph. D., Entomologist. 
♦Edward Alexander Livesay, D. Sc, Animal Husbandman. 
JRalph John Garber, Ph. D., Agronomist. 
♦Andrew Jackson Dadisman, Ph. D., Farm Economist. 
♦Harry Oram Henderson, Ph. D., Dairy Husbandman. 
♦Clayton Roberts Orton, Ph. D., Plant Pathologist. 
♦Harry Edward Knowlton, Ph. D., Horticulturist. 
♦Robert Barclay Dustman, Ph. D., Agricultural Chemist. 
♦Anthony Berg, M. S., Associate Plant Pathologist. 
♦Leon H. Leonian, Ph. D., Associate Plant Pathologist. 
♦John Harrison Rietz, D. V. M., 1 Associate Veterinarian. 
♦William Henry Pierre, Ph. D., Associate Agronomist. 

Felix John Schneiderhan, M. S., 2 Associate Plant Pathologist, in 
charge of University Experiment Farm. 
♦Lloyd Massena Thurston, Ph. D., Associate Dairy Husbandman. 
♦Walter Wardlaw Armentrout, Ph. D., Associate Farm Economist. 
♦Max Manley Hoover, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Agronomy. 

Charles Edward Weakley, Jr., M. A., Assistant Chemist. 

♦Charles Vinyard Wilson, M. S., Assistant Animal Husbandman. 

♦Kyle Chester Westover, M. S., Assistant Horticulturist. 

Theodore Clinton McIlvaine, 3 Ph. D.,* Assistant Agronomist, in 
charge of Lakin Experiment Farm. 

Theodoric Briant Leith, M. A., 1 Assista?it Chemist. 

Ross Homan Tuckwiller, B. S. Agr., 5 Assistant Animal Husbandman. 

Hazel Crabill Cameron, M. A., Research Specialist in Nutrition. 
♦John Harwood Longwell, A. M. Agr., Assistant Animal Husbandman. 
♦Ferris Dewey Cornell, Jr., M. S., Assistant Farm Mechanician. 
♦George Gordon Pohlman, Ph. D., Assistant Agronomist. 

♦Member of staffs of Instruction and Experiment Station. 
JMember of staffs of Instruction, Experiment Station, and Extension. 
*In cooperation with the State Department of Agriculture. 
2 In charge of University Experiment Farm, Kearneysville, West Virginia. 
3 In charge of Lakin Experiment Farm, Dakin, West Virginia. 
4 In cooperation with the United States Department of Agriculture. 
5 In cooperation with the United States Department of Agriculture, P. O., 
Lewisburg, West Virginia. 



28 Staff of Instruction, Research, and Extension 

fLEiF Verner, M. S., 2 Assistant Horticulturist. 
Earl Neil Moore, D. V. M., 1 Assistant Veterinarian. 

* George Augustus Bowling, M. S., Assistant Dairy Husbandman. 
Richard Atkins Ackerman, M. S., 3 Assistant Dairy Husbandman, in 

charge of Reymann Memorial Farms. 

Homer King Rowley, M. S. Agr., 1 Seed Analyst. 

Thomas Baird Clark, M. S., Assistant in Poidtry Research. 
*Earl Noel McCubbin, A. M. Agr., Assistant in Horticulture. 
fRoLAND Otto Stelzer, M. S., Assistant in Farm Economics. 

Edwin Gould, B. S. Agr., 2 Assistant in Entomology. 

Carlton Henry Bruce, B. S., 4 Assistant in Farm Economics. 

* Arthur Pingree Dye, M. S. Agr., Assistant in Horticulture. 
Ira Jeriah Duncan, B. S., Assistant in Agricultural Chemistry. 

Audrey Howard Van Landingham, M. S., Assistant in Agricultural 

Chemistry. 
*William Henry Childs, M. S., Assistant in Horticulture. 
*Ernest Thomas Wightman, M. S. Agr., Assistant in Poidtry Research. 
*Alfred Reeves Stanley, M. S., Graduate Assistant in Plant Pathology. 
*Landis Seawell Bennett, M. S., Graduate Assistant in Agronomy. 

* Wendell Dawley Henry, M. S., Graduate Assistant in Plant Pathology. 
*Arnold Louis Keller, B. S. Agr., Graduate Assistant in Horticulture. 

Marvin Howard Snyder, B. S. Agr., Graduate Assistant in Agronomy. 
Robert Ross Robinson, B. S. Agr., Graduate Assistant in Agronomy. 

* George Monroe Browning, B. S. Agr., Graduate Assistant in Agronomy. 
*Louis Ferdinand Herrmann, B. S., Graduate Assistant in Dairy Hus- 
bandry. 

*Louis John Manus, B. S., Graduate Assistant in Dairy Husbandai-y. 
*Roy Walter Godley, B. S., Graduate Assistant in Animal Husbandry. 

* Gerald Jenny, M. S., Agricultural Editor. 
*John Charles Johnston, Chief Clerk. 

STAFF COMMITTEES 

STATION PROJECTS: Messrs. Thurston, Wilson, and Orton. 
STATION PUBLICATIONS: Messrs. Hoover and Armentrout, and 
Miss Cameron. 



♦Member of staffs of Instruction and Experiment Station. 

tMember of staffs of Experiment Station and Extension. 

*In cooperation with the State Department of Agriculture. 

2 In field service, P. O., Kearneysville, West Virginia. 

3 In field service, P. O., Wardensville, West Virginia. 

*In field service, P. O., Martinsburg, West Virginia; resigned, June 30, 1932. 



West Virginia University Agricultural Extension 29 

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY AGRICULTURAL 
EXTENSION STAFF 

Fred Denton Fromme, Ph. D., Dean of the College of Agriculture. 

Nat Terry Frame, D. Sc, Director. 

William Henry Kendrick, B. S., 3 Assistant Director. 

Charles Henry Hartley, B. S. Agr., 2 Assistayit Director. 

^Gertrude Humphreys, A. B., 3 State Agent. 

John Oliver Knapp, B. S. Agr., 3 DistHct Agent. 

Hugh Willard Prettyman, B. S. Agr., 3 Extension Horticulturist in 
Marketing. 

Russell Henderson Gist, B. S. Agr., 3 District Agent. 
JRalph John Garber, Ph. D., Agronomist. 

Dee Crane, 3 Potato Specialist. 

Benjamin Franklin Creech, B. S. Agr., 3 Animal Husbandman. 

Ira Brooks Boggs, 3 State Boys' Club Agent. 

Ray Jerome Friant, B. S., 3 Agronomy Specialist. 

Edward Lee Shaw, B. S. Agr., Sheep Specialist. 

Everett Clifton Sherwood, M. S., 1 Plant Disease and Insect Specialist. 

Ralph Lee Mason, B. S. Agr., 4 Poultry Specialist. 

James Vincent Hopkins, M. S., 3 Dairy Specialist. 

Thomas Davis Gray, B. S. Hort., 3 Landscape Architect. 

Thomas Wesley Skuce, B. S., 3 Forestry Specialist. 

Charles Ellsworth Stockdale, M. S. Agr., 3 Extension Economist. 
fRoLAND Otto Stelzer, M. S., 3 Farm Management Specialist. 
|Leif Verner, M. S., 3 Extension Horticulturist. 

Elizabeth Margaret Eckhardt, M. A., Extension Rural Sociologist. 

Aaron Henry Rapking, B. D., 3 Extension Rural Sociologist. 

W alter Clinton Schnopp, B. S. Agr., 3 Extension Editor. 

Jeannetta Weil, Chief Clerk in charge of Clerks and Stenographers. 

■"Also member of 1933 Summer Session Staff. 

IMember of staffs of Instruction, Experiment Station, and Extension. 
fMember of staffs of Experiment Station and Extension. 
1 In cooperation with the State Department of Agriculture. 
2 In cooperation with the United States Department of Agriculture and the 
State Department of Agriculture. 

3 In cooperation with the United States Department of Agriculture. 
*In cooperation with the United States Department of Agriculture ; deceased, 
Januarv 13, 1933. 



30 Staff of Instruction, Research, and Extension 



AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION AGENTS 
COUNTY WORKERS 

County Name * Residence 

Barbour J. C. Boggess Philippi 

Berkeley W. N. McClung JYtartinsburg 

Boone W. A. Fryman Madison 

Braxton R. G. Ellyson Sutton 

Brooke W. C. Gist Wellsburg 

Cabell W. D. Click Huntington 

Calhoun Herman Bowers Grantsville 

Doddridge W. S. Miller West Union 

Fayette J. H. Miller Fayetteville 

Gilmer '. p. W. D. Parsons Glenville 

Grant C. L. Stickler Petersburg 

Greenbrier F. L. Miles Lewisburg 

Hampshire D. I. Law Romney 

Hancock W. C. Gumbel New Cumberland 

Hardy S. L. Dodd JVtoorefield 

Harrison J. M. Pierpoint Clarksburg 

Jefferson B. H. Holden Charles Town 

Kanawha T. Y. McGovran Charleston 

Marion W. E. McComas Fairmont 

Marshall L. L. Lough .Moundsville 

Mason A. G. Middleton Point Pleasant 

Mercer W. H. Roberts Princeton 

Min eral J. E. Prettyman Keyser 

Mingo E. M. McGlothlin Williamson 

Monongalia H. P. Muffly Morgantown 

Morgan H. C. C. Willey .Berkeley Springs 

Nicholas W. E. Simpson Summersville 

Ohio J. e. Romine .Wheeling 

Pendleton D. W. McFarland Franklin 

Pleasants C. C. Blake St. Marys 

Pocahontas C. P. Dorsey „Marlinton 

Preston F. J. Reed Kingwood 

Putnam B. A. Hensley Hurricane 

Raleigh E. D. Curry Beckley 

Randolph C. R. Underwood Elkins 

Ritchie H. R. Rymer Harrisville 

Roane H. L. Riggle Spencer 

Summers A. H. Lough Jiinton 

Upshur Glen L. Ford Euckhannon 

Wayne Claude Strother Wayne 

Webster H. A. Burton Cowen 

Wirt P. M. Hess Elizabeth 

Wood W. H. Sill... Parkersburg 



West Virginia University Agricultural Extension 31 



HOME DEMONSTRATION AGENTS 

County Name Residence 

Agent-at-Large Katherine Stump Morgantown 

Berkeley Esther Brucklacher Parkersburg 

Brooke Gladys Steele Wellsburg 

Cabell Alice I. Parker Huntington 

Doddridge Alice Kessel West Union 

Fayette Beatrice Foster Fayetteville 

Hardy Bessie Conklyn Moorefield 

Harrison Mabel Hiller Clarksburg 

Harrison Beatrice Scott (Assistant) Clarksburg 

Jackson Ocie Tune Ripley 

Kanawha Eleanor McClung Charleston 

Lewis Alpha Hartley Weston 

Logan Annie Handley Logan 

Marion Margaret F. Rexroad Fairmont 

Marshall .' Mae Ellyson Moundsville 

Mercer Anna Boggs Princeton 

Ohio Adele Bigelow Wheeling 

Pleasants-Tyler Roxy Downs St. Marys 

BoonSason " } : Gladys Scranage Barboursville 

Randolph Eleanor Bigelow Elkins 

Ritchie Beatrice E. Foster Harrisville 

Summers-Greenbrier } ., . „.., „. 

Monroe-Pocahontas { Marie Nlles Hmton 

Upshur-Barbour Abbie M. Russell Buckhannon 

Wayne Virginia Wilson .Wayne 

Wetzel Kathleen Stephenson New Martinsville 

Wood Mary Prichard Parkersburg 

BOYS' AND GIRLS' CLUB AGENTS 

Kanawha T. H. McGovran Charleston 

Wood Adele Harpold Parkersburg 



32 Staff of Instruction, Research, and Extension 

ATHLETIC BOARD 

FACULTY MEMBERS: 

Director Stansbury (ex-officio), Professor S. J. Morris, and Mr. 
C. H. Hartley. 

ALUMNI MEMBERS: 

Judge Charles G. Baker, Morgantown, W. Va., (term expires 
June 30, 1933). Mr. Fred E. Deem, Clarksburg, W. Va., (term 
expires June 30, 1934). 

STUDENT MEMBERS: 

Jacob Sebulsky, '32, (term expires June 30, 1933) 

, ...., (term expires June 30, ). 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

UNIVERSITY 

ENTRANCE: 

The Registrar and deans and directors of all colleges and divisions. 

CONVOCATION AND PUBLIC EXERCISES: 

Professors Armstrong, Shortridge, and Kay, and President of 
Student Council. 

PRIZES: 

Professor Strausbaugh, Associate Professors Barnhart and 
Armentrout, and Assistant Professor Frazure. 

LIBRARY: 

Dr. Arnettt, Professors R. C. Colwell, Jacobson, Ambler, and 
Johnson. 

WOMEN STUDENTS: 

Dean Noer, Professors R. H. Colwell, Pollock, and Turner, and 
Assistant Professor Griffin. 

UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS: 

Professors Johnson, Reed, Hodge, and Dickinson, Mr. Friend, 
and Mr. Schnopp. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS: 

Professors Reed, Chitwood, and Spangler. 

SUMMER SESSION: 

Director Dadisman, Mr. Friend, Dean Shortridge, Dean Fromme, 
and Dean Hudelson. 

MILITARY AND GYMNASIUM BOARD: 

Major Baldwin, Dean Simpson, and Director Schott. 

SOCIAL AFFAIRS: 

Professors Darby and Hodge, Dean Stone, Dean Noer, Major 
Baldwin, Associate Professor Lily Bell Deatrick, Assistant 
Professor Griffin, and Miss Isabel Hayes. 



Standing Committees 33 



STUDENT AND FRATERNITY STANDINGS: 
Professors Peairs and Reese, and Dean Noer. 

UNIVERSITY EXTENSION: 

Deans Fromme and Hudelson, Directors Frame and Lawall, and 
Mr. A SPIN ALL. 

STUDENT ENGLISH: 

Professors Armstrong, Boomsliter, Strausbaugh, Dadisman, and 
Porterfield (Secretary). 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS: 

Professor Grumbein, Mr. Dye, and Mr. Brooks. 

COLLEGE 

CONCERTS AND RECITALS: 

School of Music: Director Black and Assistant Professor Wood. 

ENGINEERING CURRICULA: 

College of Engineering and Mechanic Arts: Dean Davis, and Pro- 
fessors Carpenter, Forman, Hayes, Hodge, and Maclin. 

ENGINEERING SCHEDULES: 

Professor Hayes, Assistant Professor Carl Cather and Mr. Jennl 

ENGINEERING SOCIETY: 

College of Engineering and Mechanic Arts: Dean Emeritus Jones, 
Professors Grumbein, Forman, and Hodge, and Assistant Pro- 
fessor Nelson. 

FARM OPERATIONS: 

College of Agriculture : Professors Dadisman, Henderson, Garber, 
and Knowlton, Associate Professors Andrews and Allen, and 
Assistant Professor Wilson. 

INTRAMURAL ATHLETICS: 

Division of Physical Education: Assistant Professor Samuel, 
Professor Schott, Assistant Professor Jones, Director Stans- 
bury, and Senior Managers. 

LIBRARY: 

College of Engineering and Mechanic Arts: Professors Hayes and 
Carpenter. 

College of Agriculture and Agricultural Experiment Station: Pro- 
fessors Orton and Knowlton, Associate Professors Pierre and 
Thurston, and Miss Cameron. 

PLACEMENT AND RECOMMENDATION: 

Division of Physical Education: Professor Schott and Assistant 
Professor Griffin. 



34 Staff of Instruction, Research, and Extension 

SCHOLARSHIP: 

College of Arts and Sciences: Professors Winter, Harris, Morris, 
and Spiker, and Associate Professor Smith. 

College of Engineering and Mechanic Arts: Professors Grumbein, 
Hall, and Koehler. 

College of Agriculture: Professors Dadisman and Garber, and 
Assistant Professor Noer. 

College of Education: Professors Pollock, Bohan, and Stemple. 

School of Medicine: Professors VanLiere, Dodds, and Morris, and 
Assistant Professor Rafferty. 

School of Music: Assistant Professors Shepard and Hinkel. 

Division of Physical Education: Assistant Professors Jones, Sam- 
uel, and Griffin, and Miss Hurst. 

STUDENT COURSES AND HOURS: 

College of Agriculture : Dean Fromme, Professors Peairs and Col- 

well, and Assistant Professor Longwell. 
Division of Physical Education: Professor Schott and Assistant 

Professor Griffin. 

FRATERNITY ADVISERS 

Alpha Sigma Phi H. L. Samuel 

Beta Theta Pi A. M. Reese 

Delta Tau Delta C. M. Frasure 

Kappa Alpha R. A. Armstrong 

Kappa Sigma A. J. Dadisman 

Phi Alpha P. D. Strausbaugh 

Phi Delta Theta R. C. Colwell 

Phi Kappa Psi A. W. Porterflbld 

Phi Kappa Sigma C. T. Neff 

Phi Kappa Tau W. W. Hodge 

Phi Sigma Delta F. B. Trotter 

Phi Sigma Kappa S. B. Maynard 

Pi Kappa Alpha A. H. Forman 

Pi Kappa Phi E. C. Jones 

Pi Lambda Phi J. F. Sly 

Sigma Chi A. L. Darby 

Sigma Nu G. A. Shipman 

Sigma Phi Epsilon G. W. Grow 

Tau Epsilon Phi L. H. Taylor 

Tau Kappa Epsilon J. D. Barnhart 

Theta Chi J. H. Cox 

SORORITY SUPERVISION 

The University supervision of all sororities on the Campus is vested 
in the Committe on Women Students. 1 



iFor list of sororities, see page 102. 



Part 1 1 
GENERAL INFORMATION 



NOTICE 

In the interest of economy and efficiency, West Virginia University 
reserves the right, without further notice, to revise the organization, 
fees, offerings, and requirements herein announced. 

HISTORY 

West Virginia University originated from the national Land Grant 
Act of June 2, 1862, and the subsequent action of the Legislature in 
accepting and carrying out the provisions of the Act. On January 9, 
1866, the board of trustees of the Monongalia Academy at Morgantown 
tendered to the Legislature, for the use of the contemplated State or 
land grant college, all its property, including Woodburn Female Semi- 
nary, on condition that the college should be located at Morgantown. 
On January 30, 1867, the Legislature accepted the property and on 
February 7 passed an act permanently establishing "The Agricultural 
College of West Virginia" and authorizing the Governor to appoint 11 
suitable persons as a Board of Visitors. 

The Visitors held the first meeting on April 3, 1867, at which time 
they appointed Dr. Alexander Martin president, and established col- 
legiate, scientific, and agricultural departments of instruction. Military 
training was introduced at this time under the provisions of the Morrill 
Act. 

By an act of December 4, 1868, the name of the College was changed 
to "West Virginia University" and the "Board of Visitors" to the 
"Board of Regents." July 1, 1919, the "Board of Regents" was merged 
in the "State Board of Education." By an act passed April 14, 1927, 
the control of the University was vested in a "Board of Governors." 

Following the establishment of the University, expansion was rapid. 
The College of Law was added in 1878; the College of Engineering and 
Mechanic Arts in 1887; the Agricultural Experiment Station in 1888; the 
College of Agriculture and the School of Music in 1897; and the School 
of Medicine in 1902. 

With the opening of the new century, two decades of consistent 
growth were entered upon. The Department of Pharmacy was added to 
the School of Medicine in 1914; the Division of Agricultural Extension 
was organized in 1912 ; and Liberal Arts extension centers were 
established as early as 1916. 

In 1917, an extensive building program was inaugurated, which, 
while yet in progress, has added eight major units to the Campus. The 
Engineering Experiment Station was organized in 1921, and the School 
of Mines in 1926. In 1927 the work in Education, hitherto administered 
in a department of the College of Arts and Sciences, was transferred to 
the newly created College of Education. 



38 General Information 



Paralleling this development, faculties were methodically strength- 
ened, curricular adjustments steadily undertaken, and foundations laid 
for social, industrial, and scientific research agencies as bases for still 
broader fields of service. The complete movement culminated in the 
order of the Board of Governors of January, 1930, providing for the 
establishment of a Graduate School looking beyond the degrees of Master 
of Arts and Master of Science, which the University had steadily con- 
ferred for half a century, to the more advanced curricula leading to the 
degree and Doctor of Philosophy. 

The University has had 10 regular presidents: Alexander Martin, 
1867-1875; John W. Scott (acting), 1875-1877; John Rhey Thompson, 
1877-1881; Daniel Boardman Purinton (acting), 1881-1882; William L. 
Wilson, 1882-1883; Robert C. Berkeley (Chairmamn of the Faculty), 
1883-1885; Eli Marsh Turner, 1885-1893; Powell Benton Reynolds 
(acting), 1893-1895; James L. Goodnight, 1895-1897; Jerome Hall 
Raymond, 1897-1901; Daniel Boardman Purinton, 1901-1911; Thomas 
Edward Hodges, 1911-1914; Frank Butler Trotter, (acting) 1914-1916; 
1916-1928; John Roscoe Turner, 1928. 

LOCATION 

West Virginia University is located in Morgantown, the seat of Mo- 
nongalia county, immediately south of the Mason-Dixon line where it 
forms the boundary line between southwestern Pennsylvania and north- 
ern West Virginia. The West Virginia-Maryland boundary also is only 
a few miles distant to the eastward. 

A thriving city with 25,000 inhabitants in its trading area, Morgan- 
town is situated in the center of an important agricultural, quarrying, 
oil and gas, and bituminous coal mining region. It is noted also for its 
manufacture of fine glassware. 

Sixteen hours distant by rail from New York City and three hours 
from Pittsburgh, Morgantown may be reached from the east either 
through Grafton, W. Va., Pittsburgh or Connellsville, Pa., or M. & K. 
Junction, W. Va. It is served by four great railroads, the Baltimore 
and Ohio, the Pennsylvania, the Pittsburgh and Lake Erie (N. Y. C), 
and the Western Maryland (B. & O. [freight only]). 

Motorists can reach Morgantown from the National Pike through 
Uniontown or Washington, Pennsylvania, Wheeling, West Virginia, or 
Cumberland, Maryland, and from the Northwestern Turnpike (U. S. 
Route 50) through Oakland, Maryland, or Grafton, West Virginia. 

Morgantown is connected with the great national network of motor 
bus lines through the White Star system, and enjoys hourly local service 
with other surrounding towns and cities. 

Favored by its location 20 miles below the head of navigation on the 
Monongahela river, Morgantown has a wharf giving access to the nation's 
inland waterways system. 



Buildings and Grounds 39 



PHYSICAL PLANT 
BUILDINGS AM) GROUNDS 

West Virginia University's Campus comprises about 66 acres near 
the center of Morgantown on high ground overlooking the river and 
much of the surrounding countryside. The physical plant includes 26 
State owned buildings or structures on the Campus, four buildings 
leased from private owners, five demonstration and experimental farms 
near Morgantown, and three experimental farms and four agricultural 
extension centers located at suitable points throughout the State. 

The structures on the main Campus, with dates of construction or 
acquisition, are: Martin Hall (1870), Experiment Station Building 
(1873), Woodburn Hall (1874), Commencement Hall (1889), Science 
Hall (1893), Mechanical Hall (1902), Armory (1902), Old Library 
(1902), President's House (1905), Heating Plant (1906), Music Build- 
ing (1914), Horticulture Greenhouse (1915), Medical Building (1916), 
Oglebay Hall (1918), Woman's Hall (1919), Plant Pathology Green- 
house (1920), Law Building (1923), Mountaineer Field (1924), Cafe- 
teria (1924), Hall of Chemistry (1925), Men's Field House (1928), 
Elizabeth Moore Hall (1928), Faculty Club (1928), School of Music 
Annex (1928), University Library (1931), University Demonstration 
High School (1933). 

The farms, with dates of acquisition, are: Dairy Husbandry Farm 
175 acres (1899), Horticulture Farm, 62.5 acres (1916), Animal Hus- 
bandry Farm, 321 acres (1916), Poultry Husbandry Farm, 20 acres 
(1916), and Agronomy Farm, 102 acres (1916) near Morgantow T n; 
University Experiment Farm at Kearneysville, Jefferson County, 158 
acres (1930) ; Reymann Memorial Farms at Wardensville, Hardy County, 
930 acres (1927) ; and Lakin Branch Experiment Station at Lakin, 
Mason County, 74 acres, leased from the State Board of Control (1921). 

The agricultural extension centers, with dates of acquisition, are: 
the Demonstration Community Packing Plant at Inwood, Berkeley 
County (1919), the 4-H Club Camp at Jackson's Mill, Lewis County 
(1921), the Community Poultry Feeding and Egg Marketing Plant at 
Parkersburg, Wood County (1927), and the Recreation Center at 
Oglebay Park, Ohio County (1926). 

The following buildings are leased from private owners: Woman's 
Hall Annex (1907), Boughner House (1925), Infirmary (1925), and 
Home Management House (1917). 

The following brief outline indicates the buildings, farms, etc. used 
in whole or in part by the various divisions of the University. 

General Administration: Woodburn Hall, Science Hall, Men's 
Field House, President's House. 

Student Welfare: Martin Hall, Elizabeth Moore Hall, Men's 
Field House, Mountaineer Field, Commencement Hall, Infirmary, Wood- 
burn Hall, Armory, Medical Building. 



40 General Information 



Libraries: University Library, Law Building. 

Physical Plant Operation: Heating Plant, Woodburn Hall base- 
ment, Cafeteria basement, Mechanical Hall. 

College of Agriculture in cooperation with the Agricultural 
Experiment Station: Oglebay Hall, Oglebay Hall Annex, Experiment 
Station Building, Home Management House, Agronomy Farm, Animal 
Husbandry Farm, Horticulture Farm, Dairy Husbandry Farm, and 
Poultry Husbandry Farm. 

Agricultural Experiment Station : University Experiment Farm 
at Kearneysville, Reymann Memorial Farms at Wardensville, and the 
Lakin Branch Experiment Station at Lakin. 

Division of Agricultural Extension: Oglebay Hall, Experiment 
Station Building, and agricultural extension centers at Inwood, Jack- 
son's Mill, Parkersburg, and Oglebay Park, Wheeling. 

College of Arts and Sciences: Woodburn Hall, Martin Hall, 
Science Hall, Hall of Chemistry, Old Library. 

College of Education: Woodburn Hall, University Demonstra- 
tion High School. 

College of Engineering and Mechanic Arts: Mechanical Hall. 

College of Law: Law Building. 

School of Medicine: Courses in Medicine — Medical Building; 
Courses in Pharmacy — Woodburn Hall. 

Division of Military Science and Tactics: Armory, Mechanical 
Hall, Old Athletic Field (military drill). 

School of Mines: Mechanical Hall. 

School of Music: Music Building, School of Music Annex, Com- 
mencement Hall (organ). 

Division of Physical Education: Men's Field House, Elizabeth 
Moore Hall, Mountaineer Field, Woodburn Hall. 

Book Store: Law Building basement. 

Intercollegiate Athletics: Mountaineer Field, Men's Field 
House, Old Athletic Field. 

Faculty: Faculty Club. 

Dormitories: For Women — Woman's Hall, Woman's Hall Annex. 
For Men — Boughner House. 

Dining Halls: Woman's Hall, Cafeteria. 



Laboratories 41 



LABORATORIES 

The following is a list of the laboratories in the various colleges, 
schools, and divisions of the University: 

College of AGRICULTURE: Agricultural chemistry, agricultural 
statistics, agronomy and soils, animal husbandry, dairy husbandry, 
entomology, farm mechanics, fruit packing, genetics, horticulture, plant 
pathology, poultry husbandry, veterinary science, applied arts, clothing 
and textiles, foods and nutrition, home management, and institutional 
management. The College operates also several farms, greenhouses, 
experimental branch stations, and extension demonstration centers. 

College of Arts and Sciences: Biology, botany, chemistry, 
geology, journalism, physics, radio, psychology, and zoology. 

College of Education : Educational measurements and statistics, 
educational psychology, and directed teaching. 

College of Engineering and School of Mines: Chemical engi- 
neering, ceramics, metallurgy, electrical engineering, mechanical draw- 
ing, forging, electric welding, foundry, machine shop, woodworking, pipe- 
fitting, sheet-metal working, hydraulic engineering, surveying, road 
materials testing, other materials testing, power engineering, mining 
engineering, and oil and gas engineering. Each year advanced students 
are taken on inspection trips to typical industries or engineering projects. 

College of Law: Drafting of legal instruments and practice court. 

School of Medicine — Courses in Medicine: Anatomy, medical 
bacteriology, biochemistry, histology and embryology, pathology, physi- 
iology. pharmacology. 

School of Medicine — Courses in Pharmacy: Pharmacognosy, drug 
manufacturing, prescription laboratory, and pharmacy. 

School of Music: Studios in voice, piano and other stringed in- 
struments, pipe organ, orchestra and ensemble, and classes in directed 
teaching. 

Division of Physical Education: Gymnasium exercises, swim- 
ming, folk dancing, in-door and out-door games, intramural activities, 
wrestling, boxing, track and field, and directed teaching. 

Many of these laboratories are devoted not only to undergraduate 
instruction, but also to graduate study and research and to research 
projects being carried on by members of the staff. They are all ade- 
quately equipped. 

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 

The University Library comprises about 130,000 volumes. It sub- 
scribes for about 700 periodicals; not including the transactions of 
learned societies, or publications of educational institutions. 



42 General Information 



The publications on law are shelved in the College of Law building; 
the most important works on mathematics in the Department of Math- 
ematics; and those on German in that department. Other collections 
are found in the Library. 

The new Library building, completed in 1931, is but the first unit 
of a larger structure. It is modern Georgian style architecture, con- 
structed of Indiana limestone and brick, and, with equipment, cost about 
$400,000. Approximately 150 feet long and 130 feet wide, the building 
is three stories in height. 

On the first floor are four seminar rooms with adjacent studies, 
offices of administration, toilet rooms, storage space, bindery and un- 
packing rooms, and janitor's quarters. The stack room, in the center 
of the building, provides spaces for five floors of steel stacks, and 
shelving for about 300,000 volumes. 

On the second floor are two reading rooms and general delivery desk. 
A periodical reading room is located on the third floor. 

The stack room will be provided with equipment for mechanical 
delivery of books. One elevator is installed at present. Cubicles, or 
private compartments for study, for 52 students or professors are 
provided. The building will accommodate 450 readers. 

Students specializing in geology have access also to the voluminous 
library of the West Virginia Geological Survey. 

The Package Library collection, numbering from 12,000 to 15,000 
pieces, more than 1,800 volumes of dramas, books and programs for 
special occasions, is intended primarily for the University Extension 
Service. It is, however, open to students in the Department of Public 
Speaking for debate and dramatic work. 

Except during vacations and holidays, the Library is open from 
7:45 a. m. to 9:45 p. m., Monday to Friday; 7:45 a. m. to 7:45 p.m., 
Saturday; and 2 p. m. to 5 p. m., Sunday. During vacations the hours 
are from 8 a. m. to 12 noon. 

FUNDS 

The funds for maintaining the University and the Agricultural 
Experiment Station are derived from the following sources: (1) In- 
terest on the land grant endowment of $115,750; (2) the Morrill-Nelson 
fund; (3) the Hatch fund; (4) the Adams fund; (5) the Smith-Hughes 
and the Smith-Lever funds; (6) the Purnell fund; (7) the Capper- 
Ketcham fund; (8) Additional Federal Cooperative fund; (9) biennial 
appropriations by the Legislature; (10) fees and tuition; (11) income 
derived from the work of the Agricultural Experiment Station and the 
College of Agriculture as well as the income from dormitories, dining- 
halls, bookstore, student activities, etc.; and (12) contributions by 
private benefactors for the support of scholarships, loan funds and 
prizes. 



Government and Organization 43 

GOVERNMENT AND ORGANIZATION 

The financial and business affairs of the University, as well as of 
all other State institutions, are directed by the State Board of Control. 
This Board is composed of three members, all of whom are appointed 
by the Governor, who also designates one member to be the Board's 
president. 

The academic control of the University is vested in the Board of 
Governors. The Board is bi-partisan and consists of seven members 
who are appointed by the Governor for a term of four years. 

The University year is divided into two semesters of 18 weeks each, 
and a summer session of two terms of approximately six weeks each. 

The organization of the University, together with the dates of the 
establishment of the various colleges, etc., follows: 

Colleges : 

College of Arts and Sciences, 1867 

College of Law, 1878 

College of Engineering and Mechanic Arts, 1887 

College of Agriculture, 1897 

College of Education, 1927 

Schools : 

School of Music, 1897 
School of Medicine: 

Courses in Medicine, 1902 

Courses in Pharmacy, 1914 
School of Mines, 1926 
Graduate School, 1930 

Divisions : 

Division of Military Science and Tactics, 1867 
Division of Physical Education, 1928 

Experiment Stations and Research Bureaus: 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 1888 
Engineering Experiment Station, 1921 
Bureau for Government Research, 1931 

Extension Service: 

Agricultural Extension, 1912 
Mining and Industrial Extension, 1914 
Liberal Arts Extension, 1916 
Extension in Education, 1916 

The College of Arts and Sciences, the College of Engineering and 
Mechanic Arts, the College of Agriculture, the School of Mines, the 
Division of Physical Education, and the Department of Pharmacy of the 
School of Medicine are all degree-granting units admitting freshmen. 
The College of Law, the College of Education, and the School of Medicine 
(Courses in Medicine) are degree-granting professional colleges and 



44 General Information 



schools requiring from two to three years of academic training as a 
foundation for the professional work. All graduate instruction is ad- 
ministered by the Graduate School. 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

The University, through its liberal arts college, offers that academic 
training which is so essential today as a foundation for good citizenship, 
enlightened leadership, and effective professional or technical training. 
It puts thoroughness above breadth of offerings. It provides a curri- 
culum rigid enough to conserve the best in the cultural subjects, yet 
elastic enough to meet the varying talents and aptitudes of individual 
students. 

Present-day standards in business, industry, or the professions are 
becoming more and more exacting. Increasing emphasis is being placed 
upon a liberal education as a foundation for technical or professional 
work. As a consequence, the paths to the professions lead through this 
college. Pre-professional curricula have been arranged in law (three 
years), education (two years), medicine (two, three, or four years), 
and dentistry (two or three years). 

The instruction in the College of Arts and Sciences is administered 
through the following departments : botany ; chemistry ; classics ; 
economics, business administration, and sociology; English language and 
literature; geology, mineralogy and geography; Germanic languages 
and literatures; history; home economics; journalism; library science; 
mathematics; philosophy and psychology; physics; political science; 
public speaking; Romance languages and literatures; and zoology. 

The College of Arts and Sciences is organized into a lower division 
and an upper division. The lower division comprises the work of the 
first and second years, and the upper division the work of the third and 
fourth years. This organization became effective July 1, 1930, but 
students who entered this College prior to that date may either meet 
the requirements of the new plan or meet the former requirements. 

The work of the lower division is intended to complete what is 
usually termed "a general education." It rounds out the program of 
study pursued in the secondary school. It is based on the belief that the 
student should become familiar with different fields of knowledge to the 
end that he may select wisely the field for specialization. 

Students who meet all of the requirements of the lower division 
will, upon application, be awarded the Junior Certificate of the College 
of Arts and Sciences. This certificate, or equivalent, is required for 
admission to the upper division. 

Experience has shown that students whose average in all high 
school subjects was below 75%, or who ranked in the lowest one-fourth 
of the high school graduating class, or those who make a low score on 
the intelligence test, will probably not succeed in college work. Such 



Government and Organization 45 

students should generally not be encouraged to become candidates for 
a degree, or perhaps not even candidates for the junior certificate unless 
or until they demonstrate by work in this College that they are qualified 
for regular college work. Such students, as well as those who do not 
expect to spend more than one or two years in this College and who 
are not candidates for the junior certificate may, with the approval 
of the adviser, elect such lower division courses as they are qualified 
to pursue with profit. 

In the upper division, the work is based on the belief that an edu- 
cated man or woman should not only know the fundamentals of several 
branches of study but should have a rather thorough knowledge of some 
selected field. In the upper division, therefore, the student concentrates 
on a major and one or two minor subjects selected from the following 
list of subjects: English, public speaking, journalism, classics, German, 
French, Spanish, political science, history, economics, sociology, 
philosophy, psychology, physics, chemistry, mathematics, botany, zoology, 
entomology, geology, and home economics. 

Two baccalaureate degrees are granted in this College: Bachelor 
of Arts (A. B.) and Bachelor of Science (B. S.). The Bachelor of Arts 
degree is conferred upon those who pursue the four years of academic 
work in this College or upon those who pursue three years of work in 
this College and one year in either the College of Law or the 
School of Medicine. 1 

The Bachelor of Science degree is conferred upon those who pursue 
the curriculum in public health in this College or upon those who 
pursue the combined scientific and medical courses. 1 

As a part of the University Extension Service, the College of Arts 
and Sciences, since the year 1916, has conducted extension courses at 
several centers in various parts of the State, corresponding in every 
particular, as to class requirements and credits, with courses offered 
on the Campus. 

Bureau for Government Research: 

The Bureau for Government Research, established in the University 
in 1931, is an impartial, fact-finding, continuous organization, concerned 
with applying the principles of political science to modern problems of 
government : 

First, by gathering as complete a collection as possible of 
state and local documents, books, magazines, pamphlets, 
learned periodicals, and bibliographical guides pertaining to 
all phases of state and local government and administration. 

Second, by supplying information to all interested citizens 
and public officers upon technical questions pertaining to the 
public service, and by encouraging research in the funda- 
mental and permanent problems of West Virginia government 
and politics. 



x See pages 79 and 80, "Classification of Students.' 



46 General Information 



Third, by placing the services of the Bureau at the dis- 
posal of any legislative committee, interim commission, or 
administrative officer to gather factual material on any problem 
within the scope of the Bureau's activities. 

This Bureau, an integral part of the Department of Political Science, 
operates through a director, an advisory committee, and a small group of 
research associates. Moreover, it cooperates extensively with other re- 
search agencies of the University. The facilities of the Bureau are at 
the disposal of graduate students and research workers who may desire 
to conduct investigations within these fields. 

During the past two years the Bureau has been engaged in a study 
of the cost of criminal justice in West Virginia, in an examination of 
problems of county government, and in the establishment of an ordinance 
revision service for the incorporated municipalities of the State. . It 
has likewise, in conjunction with the West Virginia Taxpayers' Asso- 
ciation, made an extensive survey of the structure, service, and finance 
of local government in West Virginia. It also served as the staff 
agent of the Joint Committee on Efficiency and Economy which was 
appointed at the regular session of the 1933 Legislature. It prepares 
and issues a Public Affairs Bulletin dealing with significant movements 
in W T est Virginia and maintains contact with municipal research bureaus 
and leagues of municipalities throughout the United States and Canada. 

THE COLLEGE OF LAW 

The College of Law. established in 1878, is the oldest professional 
school in the University. A large part of the bench and bar of 
West Virginia have been enrolled among its students. Its course of 
instruction for the degree of Bachelor of Laws, originally requiring but 
one and later two years of law study, was, in 1912, fixed at three years. 
In 1913 a requirement of one year of college work for admission was 
added. In September, 1924, a requirement of two years of college work 
for admission became effective. In the fall of 1931 a requirement of 
three years of college work became effective. 

The purpose of the instruction given in the College of Law is to 
train the student thoroughly in the principles and procedure of the com- 
mon law with particular reference to their application or modification 
by decision and statute in West Virginia. In 1914 the College of Law 
was admitted to membership in the Association of American Law 
Schools. This is an association of the leading law schools of the United 
States organized for the purpose of establishing and maintaining high 
standards in legal education. 

Graduates of the College of Law are admitted without further ex- 
amination to the practice of law in West Virginia. 



Government and Organization 47 

THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AXD MECHANIC ARTS 

The purpose of the College of Engineering and Mechanic Arts is 
to instruct students in the fundamental sciences and arts upon which 
all engineering rests, and to impart such special and technical knowl- 
edge of the various branches of engineering as will enable its graduates 
to enter them and maintain themselves while gaining their professional 
experience. To accomplish this purpose the work of the college is 
classified under the following curricula: chemical engineering, civil 
engineering, electrical engineering, industrial education, and mechanical 
engineering. 

For those students desiring a broader training than is offered in 
the four-year curricula, a five-year course may be taken leading to two 
degrees. The latter course will also benefit those who desire to take 
their work more leisurely, since fewer semester hours are required in 
any given year. 

The work of the first year is common in chemical, civil, electrical, 
and mechanical engineering. This is also true for mining engineering, 
which however is in the School of Mines. Because of this common 
course, the student may postpone his choice of engineering branch until 
the end of the first year. By that time he becomes sufficiently acquainted 
with the various fields to make a wiser selection than would be possible 
on first entering college. In the second year differentiation starts, in- 
creasing year by year. 

The object of the chemical engineering curricula is to qualify 
students to design, build, and manage manufacturing plants, in which 
the products of manufacture are based on chemical processes, and to 
fit them for the professional employment as industrial chemists and 
chemical engineers. In addition to many courses which are required of 
all students, two options are offered in the upper-class work — one in 
metallurgy and the other in the field of ceramics. 

The course in civil engineering is planned to give the student a 
substantial foundation in the fields of highway, railway, sanitary, 
municipal, structural, and hydraulic engineering. The field of civil en- 
gineering is one of the broadest of engineering professions, and yet the 
work of the civil engineer rests upon a relatively compact body of 
scientific principles. In the third and fourth years the student has a 
choice between a general civil engineering option and a sanitary 
engineering option. If he takes the civil engineering option he may 
choose between work in hydraulic engineering and in highway 
engineering. 

The course in electrical engineering is planned to give the student 
a thorough grounding in the engineering features connected with the 
design, construction, and operation of the electrical part of engineering 
properties. A large proportion of the work in mechanical engineering 
is included in the electrical engineering course. In the professional 



48 General Information 



work of the last two years theory, problem work, design, and laboratory 
practice are combined to give the student a broad training. In the 
fourth year the student is given a choice between a number of options. 

Mechanical engineering deals essentially with the design and con- 
struction of machinery, the development and utilization of power, and 
the production in industry. To this end the student takes a consid- 
erable amount of shop work in addition to the theoretical courses in 
the fundamental sciences of mathematics, chemistry, and physics. In 
the upper-class work attention is given to machine design, power-plant 
design, refrigeration, heating and ventilation, as well as to production 
methods and industrial management. 

The object of the department of industrial education is to prepare 
men and women to teach vocational industrial subjects in secondary 
schools, vocational schools, and schools in industrial plants. 

Engineering Experiment Station: 

The chief functions of the Engineering Experiment Station are the 
encouragement and prosecution of research and investigations that will 
enhance the industrial and economic welfare of the people of West 
Virginia and the stimulation and training of graduate students in 
research activities. The research undertaken by the Station is pri- 
marily concerned therefore with investigations in the production, 
processing, and utilization of the natural resources of West Virginia; 
investigations that will aid the existing industries of the State and 
promote the development of new industries; and investigations that 
will aid in the planning, design, and development of the public works 
of the State. As a consequence of this program, the subjects receiving 
particular attention by the staff of the Station are coal, oil, gas, clays, 
stone, sand, timber, water power, sewerage, sanitation, and road building. 

The facilities of the Station include all the facilities for research 
of the Industrial Science Division of the Graduate School. In addition, 
through cooperation with the other divisions, additional facilities in 
related fields are made available. The staff of the Station is composed 
of the members of the staff of instruction of the Industrial Science 
Division engaged in the prosecution of Station projects, and also re- 
search fellows and graduate students who are pursuing investigations 
in connection with the program of the Station. 

The Station will assist in compiling surveys and in conducting 
investigations of the industrial requirements and possibilities of any 
region or community in the State. It cooperates with the West Vir- 
ginia University Bureau for Government Research, the Agricultural 
Experiment Station, the State Road Commission, the State Geological 
Survey, the State Department of Health, the School of Mines, the na- 
tional engineering societies, and state or national agencies whose assist- 
ance may promote the more effective fulfillment of the Station's functions. 



Government and Organization 49 

To aid industial organizations in this State that lack facilities and 
personnel to undertake important research and investigations which 
arise in the development of their operations, the Station stands ready, 
where time and facilities permit, to assist in the prosecution of investi- 
gations on their fundamental problems. Such services are free, but any 
special equipment, materials, or labor that may be needed must be sup- 
plied by the organization for which the work is done. 

The results of the studies, surveys, investigations, and research of 
the Experiment Station are published in bulletin form and may be ob- 
tained upon application to the Director of the Station. 

THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

All the agricultural and home economics work of the University is 
organized in the College of Agriculture. For the purpose of administra- 
tion, the College is divided into four branches: the Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station, organized for research and experimental work; resident 
instruction in agriculture; resident instruction in home economics; and 
extension work in agriculture, home economics, and boys' and girls' 
club work, given by the Division of Agricultural Extension to citizens 
of the State who are not in residence at the College. The work of the 
f»ur divisions is closely interrelated. Although some members of the 
staff devote full time to either college instruction, research, or exten- 
sion work, many others divide their time among two or three divisions. 

Instruction in Agriculture : 

The training offered in agriculture is directed to fit the student for 
farm life or for the professional and business fields. Graduates may 
engage in farming as managers or as farm owners, in the teaching of 
agriculture in high schools or colleges, in extension work as county agents 
or specialists, or in research work in experiment stations or in other 
organizations. They may engage in business related to farming such as 
dairy manufactures, meat processing, seeds and nursery stock, feeds and 
fertilizers, or in the rapidly expanding field of marketing. 

The curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Agriculture is designed to provide a broad and well-grounded training 
in the general field of agriculture so that fche graduate may be prepared 
for occupations requiring such general knowledge, and may have the 
necessary foundation for such specialization as he may elect to pursue. 

All candidates for the degree will follow a uniform curriculum for 
the first two years, which includes courses in the sciences that are 
fundamental to agriculture, together with certain specified courses in 
agriculture. During the last two years, the student is permitted a 
choice of one of four curricula — agricultural economics, animal in- 
dustry, plant industry, and teacher training. Certain basic courses in 
animal husbandry, dairy husbandry, and horticulture are required in 
each of these curricula. 



50 General Information 



For the use of the students, the following laboratories are main- 
tained in the College : agricultural chemistry, animal husbandry, dairy 
husbandry, entomology, farm economics, farm shop work, horticulture, 
nutrition, plant pathology, poultry husbandry, and veterinary science. 

Instruction in Home Economics : 

The course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Home 
Economics is planned for women students and especially for those who 
wish to teach home economics in vocational schools and other institutions 
or who wish to learn the business of home keeping. The aim of the 
course is to give women such training as will best prepare them to 
assume their responsibilities as members of a household and a com- 
munity. This training includes: (1) a knowledge of those sciences 
which are fundamental to an understanding of the principles of home 
economics; (2) technical courses in food and nutrition, the applied 
arts, clothing and textiles, health and child care, home management, 
and teacher training; (3) a general knowledge of the laws of produc- 
tion and consumption and social relationships obtained from courses in 
history and sociology; (4) an appreciation and intelligent use of English 
which is developed through courses in oral and written English and 
in study of English literature. 

To provide for this training a curriculum is suggested. Sufficient 
electives are allowed to permit the student to qualify for home eco- 
nomics, or to select other courses in which she is interested. 

The department occupies two floors of the wing of Oglebay Hall. 
On the first floor are two large, well-equipped food laboratories, a suite 
of rooms consisting of dining room, kitchen, and reception room, a tex- 
tile laboratory, a reading room, and the offices of the department. On 
the second floor are three laboratories equipped for work in clothing and 
applied arts. There is also on this floor a large recitation room. 

A modernly equipped house near the University is used for a Home 
Management Laboratory. 

West Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station: 

The Agricultural Experiment Station was established in the Uni- 
versity by the Board of Regents in 1888 by authority of an act of 
Congress known as the Hatch Act. Further support was given by acts 
of Congress known as the Adams Act, approved June 30, 1906, and the 
Purnell Act, approved February 24, 1925. From appropriations made 
by Congress under the three acts, the Station derives an annual income 
of $90,000. Under the Purnell Act the work of the Station is enlarged 
to include research in farm economics, rural sociology, and certain 
phases of home economics which relate to nutrition and the use of foods. 
The work of the Station is supported also by State appropriations. 

Investigations are being conducted by the Station in the fields of 



Government and Organization 51 

animal husbandry, dairy husbandry, poultry husbandry, field crops, 
horticulture, entomology, plant pathology, agricultural chemistry, soils, 
farm economics, farm mechanics, home economics, and veterinary science, 
the total number of investigations being classified into more than 70 
research projects. 

In addition to the five farms situated at Morgantown, described 
elsewhere in this bulletin, 1 branches of the Agricultural Experiment 
Station are maintained at Wardensville, Hardy county; Lakin, Mason 
county; and Kearneysville, Jefferson county. 

Experimental work is also being carried on at Lewisburg, Hillsboro, 
and elsewhere throughout the State. 

Agricultural Extension: 

By act of the Legislature of 1913, amended in 1915, "in order to 
promote the improvement and advancement of agriculture, domestic 
science, and rural life among the people of the several counties of the 
State," there was "created and established in the College of Agriculture 
an Agricultural Extension Division to be coordinate with the resident 
instruction division and the Agricultural Experiment Station" of the 
College. This service is financed and administered with the cooperation 
of Federal, State, and county governments. 

The work originally undertaken has been subsequently expanded to 
include the Demonstration Community Packing Plant, established at 
Inwood in 1919, for the purpose of teaching the most approved methods 
of picking, sorting, and packing of apples, peaches, and other fruits; 
the 4-H Club Camp for boys and girls, established at Jackson's Mill in 
1921, for the purpose of teaching standards of excellence in agriculture 
and home economics; the Community Poultry Feeding and Egg Market- 
ing Plant, established at Parkersburg in 1927; and the recreation center, 
established at Oglebay Park (Wheeling) in 1926, which has undertaken 
the task of developing adequate programs for improving the use of 
leisure time of both rural and urban citizens and for the training of 
community leaders. 

Short Courses and Special Schools: 

In addition to the instruction of collegiate grade offered, the College 
of Agriculture maintains a series of annual short courses and special 
schools for the benefit of adult residents in the State who wish to obtain, 
in brief periods, education in certain fields. This series includes the 
Dairy and Ice Cream Short Course, the Milk Testers' Short Course, the 
Livestock Extension School, the Horticulture Extension School, Farm 
and Home Week, and Junior Farmers' Week. 



^ee page 39. 



52 General Information 



THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

In 1901 a Department of Education was established in the College 
of Arts and Sciences of West Virginia University. Subsequently, de- 
partments of education grew up in the College of Agriculture, the 
College of Engineering, and the School of Music. In 1927 the College 
of Education was established by the Board of Governors of the Uni- 
versity to unify professional training for school service. 

The order of the Board of Governors creating the College of Edu- 
cation gives it "full control in the University of all professional teacher 
preparation, directive control in the University of all academic teacher 
preparation, and full control in the University in recommending to the 
State Department of Education for the certification of teachers, princi- 
pals, supervisors, and superintendents." 

Through its undergraduate and graduate courses, its laboratory 
school, and its encouragement and direction of educational investigation 
and research, the College of Education aims to contribute to the educa- 
tional efficiency of West Virginia by inculcating a liberal and more 
scientific conception of the functions of the public schools of the State 
and by directing the academic preparation and providing the professional 
training of secondary-school teachers, secondary-school principals, 
secondary-school supervisors, elementary-school principals, elementary- 
school supervisors, city superintendents, county superintendents, district 
superintendents, college teachers, educational counselors, and educational 
research specialists. The College of Education comprises the College 
with its resident courses of instruction and research facilities and the 
University Demonstration High School with its facilities for observa- 
ton, student teaching, and experimentation. 

The offerings of the College of Education are classified into depart- 
ments according to the positions for which they train. These depart- 
ments are as follows: general education, agricultural education, educa- 
tional administration, higher education, home economics education, in- 
dustrial education, educational materials and methods, music education, 
physical education, educational psychology, and educational supervision. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Education requires four years 
of college work, the first two years of which are done in the College of 
Arts and Sciences under the supervision of a special adviser. The 
student registers in the College of Education for the last two years. 

THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

The School of Music, established in the University in 1897, offerg 
two four-year curricula in applied music leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Music (B. Mus.), and one four-year curriculum in public 
school music leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Music 
Education (B. S. Mus. Ed.). The work in applied music may be piano, 
violin, pipe organ, or voice. The curriculum in public school music is 
designed for teachers of music with a second teaching subject. 



Government and Organization 53 

Special students in applied music, not working for credit, take 
private half-hour lessons. Students registered for credit attend one- 
hour recitations in classes of two students each. 

The School is located in two separate buildings, one containing five 
studios, three class rooms and eight practice rooms, the other contain- 
ing two studios. 

The equipment consists of 13 upright and eight grand pianos, and 
a three manual tubular pneumatic pipe organ located in Commencement 
Hall. 

Student Concerts: 

Each week, students as they are prepared, appear in a preliminary 
concert before faculty members. 

Those giving satisfactory performances appear in a monthly public 
concert. These concerts vary in grade from elementary to graduate and 
post-graduate recitals. The object is to afford opportunity for the 
students to apply in public the proficiency that has been developed in 
the studio. 

All music students are expected to attend the regular student re- 
citals, and to take part in them whenever so assigned, and to attend 
all concerts given under the auspices of the University. Absence from 
student concerts given will be treated as a "cut" in a major subject. 
They are expected to identify themselves with the various organizations 
of the school, and are required to enter any to which they are assigned 
by the director. 

Students of the School of Music are not allowed to take part in 
public programs or to join musical organizations without consent of 
their respective teachers and the Director of the School. 

Musical Organizations: 

The University Choir has been in existence for 24 years under the 
present director. It is open to all students who can sing a part. It 
functions as a choral society. It is the custom each year to study some 
great choral work and produce it. Miscellaneous programs are also 
given. 

The University Orchestra is open to all students who are proficient 
in the use of some orchestral instrument. A thorough drill is given in 
ensemble playing and members gain an insight into the higher forms 
of orchestral music. Rehearsals are held weekly and a credit of one 
hour is granted. 

An annual concert is given, besides other appearances during the 
year. 

The University Girls' Glee Club is open to all university girls who 
can sing a part. Rehearsals are held weekly. Students participating 
receive one hour of credit per semester. Local and out-of-town concerts 
are given during the year. 



54 General Information 



THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

Instruction in Medicine : 

Regular instruction in subjects preparatory to the study of medicine 
was first given in West Virginia University in 1871, the "chair of 
anatomy, physiology, and hygiene" having been established in that year. 
A curriculum covering the first two years of a standard four-year medi- 
cal course was provided in 1902, and the work was placed in charge of 
the College of Medicine with a resident faculty of six men. In 1912 
the College of Medicine became the School of Medicine. In reorganizing 
the work in medicine the Board of Regents retained the general character 
of the curriculum previously offered but provided for a larger faculty, 
more laboratories, and more adequate equipment. As at present con- 
stituted, the School of Medicine has its own dean and faculty but confers 
no degrees in medicine. However, it co-operates with the College of Arts 
and Sciences in granting the Bachelor of Science (B. S.) degree for two 
years of academic work and two years of medicine, or three years of 
academic and pharmacy work and two years of medicine. 

It is not affiliated with any other college or school of medicine, and 
its students may go where they like to complete their medical studies 
and receive the degree of M. D. The instruction in medicine is ad- 
ministered in the following departments : anatomy, biochemistry, medicine, 
pathology and bacteriology, pharmacology, physiology, and introductory 
surgery. The work in physical diagnosis and introductory surgery is in 
charge of practicing physicians, members of the local medical profession. 

The Department of Pharmacy : 

In response to the request of the West Virginia State Pharmaceutical 
Association, the Board of Regents in 1914 made provision for instruc- 
tion in pharmacy. The Department of Pharmacy was established in the 
School of Medicine, and a two-year course in pharmacy leading to the 
professional degree of Graduate in Pharmacy (Ph. G.) was offered. In 
1917 additional courses of three and four years were established leading 
respectively to the degrees of Pharmaceutical Chemist (Ph. C.) and Bach- 
elor of Science in Pharmacy (B. S. Phar.). The courses leading to the 
Ph. G. degree was discontinued July 1, 1924. The four-year course meets 
the recommendations of the American Pharmaceutical Association and 
the requirements of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. 

THE SCHOOL OF MINES 

The School of Mines, established at the University in 1926, was given 
a degree-granting status in July, 1930. For administrative purposes, the 
School of Mines is divided into two departments: (1) the Department of 
Mining Engineering, and (2) the Department of Mining and Industrial 
Extension. The departmental offices, laboratories, class-rooms, museum, 
and model-rooms are located in Mechanical Hall. 



Government and Organization 55 

Resident Instruction 
The School of Mines offers (1) a four-year course leading to the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Engineering of Mines, with options in 
coal-mining and oil and gas engineering; and (2) a combined science and 
engineering course, extending over five years, leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science (at the end of the fourth year), and Bachelor of 
Science in Engineering of Mines (at the end of the fifth year). 

Mining and Industrial Extension 

The Department of Mining and Industrial Extension in the School of 
Mines conducts courses of instruction in practical subjects in various 
sections of the State where groups of individuals wish to study and re- 
ceive training in subjects pertaining to their every-day work. The De- 
partment also aims to disseminate useful knowledge which has been 
amassed by research studies at the University to all classes of citizens 
in the State, and in this way to bring the University and its opportunities 
for learning to various groups of students who desire to enroll in its 
extension department. 

Short Course in Coal Mining: 

The Short Course in Coal Mining offered by the Department of 
Mining and Industrial Extension gives an opportunity to operators, 
officials, and employees of mining companies to obtain instruction pertain- 
ing to their work. The subjects covered in the short course are: 
explosives, methods of working, timbering, mine gases, mine ventilation, 
hoisting, haulage, mine drainage, safety lamps, mine management, 
electricity in mines, mine fires and explosions, safety organization and 
administration, mining arithmetic, and elementary drawing. 

Special attention is given to students desirous of preparing them- 
selves for the teaching of mining classes under the Smith-Hughes Act. 

At the close of the short course the West Virginia Department of 
Mines conducts an examination for mine foremen and fire bosses. 

Tuition is free. It is believed that $60.00 should cover all necessary 
expenses for the six weeks, excluding traveling expenses. 

The nineteenth annual session of the Short Course in Coal Mining 
will begin on Monday, June 12, and continue until Saturday, July 22, 
1933. For further information write for the special announcement of 
the Short Course in Coal Mining. 

Vocational Courses Offered in Summer Session: 

The following courses will be offered during the summer session: 
organization and administration of manual training, trade analysis and 
methods of teaching trade and related subjects, and vocational education; 
in the shops the following courses: woodworking, mechanical drawing, 
sheet metal work, machine shop practice, forging, and wood finishing. 



56 General Information 



Vocational Courses Offered in Extension: 

Courses in foreman training and other special courses for those in 
industry are offered in centers where there is sufficient interest. In 
cooperation with the University Extension Committee, Merchants' Short 
Courses are given for the merchants of the larger towns and surveys 
of industrial communities are made. The services of the Department are 
available for any city or town desiring to establish night schools and 
part-time schools. 

Extension courses in mining are offered under the direction of the 
University at various mining towns throughout the state. The in- 
struction in these courses is carried on by University extension in- 
structors who visit each center every week. At the present time the 
work is planned on a five-year basis to cover the following unit courses: 
mine gases, safety lamps, ventilation, timbering, explosives, haulage, 
drainage and pumping, mining methods, toremanship, electricity, mine 
fires and explosions, and coal geology. In each of these units courses 
particular emphasis is placed on safety features, state mining laws, and 
application of arithmetic. 

An intensive course for the training of mine foremen in cooperation 
with the Federal Board for Vocational Education is also offered in cer- 
tain sections of the state. . 

An annual conference on water purification is held each year in co- 
operation with the State Department of Health. A number of out of 
state engineers are invited to present papers at the conference. The 
State Department of Health and College of Engineering cooperate in the 
program. The papers presented at the conference are printed in bulletin 
form and the work is followed up by personal visits in the field. The 
conference is usually held at Charleston or Morgantown. These con- 
ferences are held under the supervision of Professor L. V. Carpenter. 

Confrences for men interested in the metering of electrical energy 
will be arranged to suit the convenience of those interested. Each group 
should consist of from eight to 12 men who have at least a working 
knowledge of elementary algebra and trigonometry. Conferences may be 
arranged by writing to Professor A. A. Hall, and are usually expected 
to be for 10 day periods devoted to current practices as well as to the 
basic theory of electrical meters, their connections and testing. 

A road school is offered in February in cooperation with the State 
Road Commission of West Virginia. This course is open to engineers 
interested in highway construction. The subjects road construction and 
road maintenance are treated in a practical manner, most of the teach- 
ing work being done by engineers in the employ of the commission. This 
school is conducted under the supervision of Professor W. S. Downs. 

An annual training school for firemen is conducted each year in 
cooperation with the State Fire Marshal, the National Board of Fire 
Underwriters and the West Virginia Inspection Bureau. This school is 
conducted under the supervision of Professor L. V. Carpenter. 



Government and Organization 57 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Provision for the establishment of the Graduate School was made by 
order of the Board of Governors of West Virginia University in January, 
1930. The functions of the Graduate School as instituted are two-fold: 
(1) to pursue research and investigations with particular reference to 
the problems of the state of West Virginia, and (2) to prepare and 
recommend to the Board of Governors candidates for the graduate de- 
grees of Master of Science, Master of Arts, and Doctor of Philosophy. 

The Graduate School is organized by divisions, based upon subject' 
matter, rather than by departments. The divisions are as follows: in- 
dustrial sciences, biology and agriculture, social sciences, and education. 

The Faculty of the Graduate School consists of the Dean of the 
Graduate School, the deans of the undergraduate colleges, members of the 
Graduate Council (consisting of the chairmen of the four divisions), and 
professors in charge of work open to graduate students only. 

The student body of the Graduate School consists of all students en- 
rolled in courses for graduate credit, except candidates for professional 
degrees. 

Application for admission to the Graduate School should be made in 
person or by letter some weeks prior to the opening of the semester for 
which the applicant desires to register. Applicants should possess 
bachelors' degrees from recognized institutions, or should have completed 
undergraduate work equivalent thereto. 

Admission to the Graduate School and enrollment in graduate 
courses do not necessarily imply acceptance of the applicant for an ad- 
vanced degree. Only upon evidence of suitable preparation, will an 
applicant be admitted as a candidate for a graduate degree. 

For more detailed information concerning the Graduate School, 
see the bulletin of that School, or the Graduate School section of this 
Catalogue. 

THE DIVISION OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

Requirements : 

West Virginia University, being one of the beneficiaries of the Act 
of Congress of 1862, has made instruction in military science and tactics 
compulsory for all freshman and sophomore men not specifically exempt. 
Military training was established in 1867 at the University's inception. 

The following is an excerpt from chapter eighteen, article eleven, of 
the Official Code of West Virginia, 1931 : 

Section 6. Military Training. Male students of suitable age in 
the University shall be required, under such regulations as the Board of 
Governors shall prescribe, to enroll in the department of military science. 
Said students shall serve for the time required by said regulations and 
shall be entitled to such special privileges and immunities as the Board 
of Governors may determine. The Board of Governors shall have 
authority to accept appropriations, material, and other benefits from the 



58 General Information 



Federal Government on account of any Federal law providing for aid to 
the West Virginia University for giving instruction in military science 
and to co-operate as far as practicable with the Federal Government for 
such purpose. 

The following orders have been adopted by the University Board of 
Governors : 

(1) Ordered that all male students, with the exceptions hereinafter 
named, shall enroll themselves in the Division of Military Science and 
Tactics and follow diligently the course of instruction provided therein 
Proficiency in this course shall be required for graduation. 

(2) Practical and theoretical instruction shall be given three hours 
per week throughout the school year to all students except those in ad- 
vanced classes who will be required to take five hours per week. A credit 
of 1 hour shall be given for each semester's work satisfactorily completed. 
Such credit shall be included in the computation of the student's standing 
at the end of each semester. 

(3) Every student enrolled in the Division of Military Science and 
Tactics, shall, at the time of his enrollment, deposit with the Financial 
Secretary of the University $10 to cover any loss or damage of govern- 
ment property occasioned through fault or neglect on the part of the 
Cadet. This sum less such deductions as are made for lost property or 
other reasons will be refunded to the Cadet at the expiration of the 
school term upon presentation to the Financial Secretary of certificate 
of property clearance. 

(4) The following classes of students shall not be required to enroll 
themselves in the Division of Military Science and Tactics, but may elect 
to do so : 

(i) All students who are citizens of a foreign country and who do 
not intend to become citizens of the United States. 

(ii) All students who at the date of entrance into the University are 
more than 23 years of age, and former students over 23 years of age who 
re-enter the University after an absence of three years. 

(iii) All graduate students. 

(iv) All students whose studies are entirely in the School of Music. 

(v) All students who are taking only the short course, or the special 
winter course, or extension work in the University. 

(vi) All students who at the time of matriculation have completed 
not less than 58 hours of work, and all who have credit for 4 hours of 
military science or 1 unit of entrance credit in military from a recognized 
military academy. Those having one, two, or three hours' credit of 
military science will be exempt from a like number of semesters. 
Similarly, each Citizens' Military Training Camp successfully completed 
may be used for an exemption from one semester. In the latter case, 
however, the student will never be eligible to enroll in the Advanced 
Course (third and fourth years). 



Government and Organization 59 

(vii) All students who are physically unable to perform military 
duty. 

(5) Exemptions for cases (i) to (vi) will be determined by the 
adviser from the student's record. 

(6) A board, to be known as the Military and Gymnasium Board, 
shall be composed of the Commandant of Cadets, and director of phy- 
sical training, and a surgeon of the Corps of Cadets, designated by the 
President. The Board shall act upon claims for exemption from mili- 
tary services under case (vii). 

(7) Applicants for exemption on the ground of physical disability 
shall be carefully examined by a surgeon of the Corps. 

(8) Students exempt under case (vii) shall, upon recommendation 
of the Military and Gymnasium Board be required to register for such 
physical training as they can take until they have earned a credit equal 
to that given for the prescribed military work. 

(9) In none of the preceding cases shall the student absent him- 
self until his application has been acted upon. 

(10) It shall be the duty of the Commandant of Cadets to notify 
the Registrar and student's adviser whether the Military and Gymnasium 
Board exempts a student or recommends that he be required to register 
for other work in place of military drill. 

(11) Whenever the cause for exemption shall no longer exist, it 
shall be the duty of the student to present himself for drill at the next 
drill period. 

(12) Students may appeal from the decision of the Commandant 
of Cadets or the Military and Gymnasium Board, in which case the ap- 
peal shall be decided by the Council of Administration. 

Organization: 

The Division is in charge of and instruction is directed by a United 
States Army field officer, detailed by the War Department, as Command- 
ant of Cadets. His staff is composed of five line officers and three non- 
commissioned officers — all United States Army personnel; one band leader 
and assistant; and eight student assistants, members of the Officers' Re- 
serve Corps. 

The Corps of Cadets is organized as a regiment of three battalions — ■ 
six companies of infantry, three companies of engineers, and a band. 
Students in the College of Engineering and Mechanic Arts are enrolled 
in the engineering unit. All others are enrolled in the infantry unit. 

Armory: 

The Armory, completed in 1902, is a large story-and-a-half brick 
structure providing a drill hall 60 by 120 feet for use of the Cadets 
during inclement weather. The building is the headquarters of the Corps 
of Cadets and all of their equipment is housed therein. The Command- 



60 General Information 



ant of Cadets and his aids have their offices on the first floor of the build- 
ing. The Cadet Band practices in the building, and most of the general 
University social functions are held there. 

histruction in Military Science: 

The curriculum in military science and tactics embraces four years 
of work. Three hours a week are required for the first two years. Five 
hours a week for the last two years are optional. Those electing the last 
two years are required to attend one summer camp for six weeks, for 
which all expenses are paid. 

One hour of credit is given for each course satisfactorily completed. 

Inspection of the Corps of Cadets is made, once each year, by the 
Commanding General, Fifth Corps Area, or by a board of officers ap- 
pointed by him. Other inspections are made at varying periods by offi- 
cers of the Fifth Corps Area. 

Rewards: 

Graduates of the Division of Military Science and Tactics are eligible, 
within five years after graduation, to commissions as first lieutenants 
in the National Guard of the State, without examination. They are also 
eligible to commissions as second lieutenants in the Officers' Reserve 
Corps, and are exempt from examinations in subjects completed in this 
Division for promotion to first lieutenant in the Officers' Reserve Corps. 

The names of the most distinguished Cadets of the graduating class 
are sent to the Adjutant General of the Army and to the Adjutant Gen- 
eral of the State. 

The Board of Governors of the University offers special rewards for 
excellence in military science and tactics. For a list of these rewards, 
see page 100. 

Allowances : 

A uniform for each Cadet is furnished by the Federal government. 
Cadets are required to wear this uniform at drill and inspection. Cadets 
electing the last two years are given an allowance for uniforms. 

Band instruments are furnished by the Federal and State govern- 
ments, which also provide expert instruction in band music. After com- 
pleting two years in the Band, qualified Cadets registering for further 
instruction and completing the year receive allowances approximating 
$65.00. 

THE DIVISIOX OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

History and Purpose: 

The Division of Physical Education was established on the Campus 
in 1928 in response to the need of the student body for a wholesome 
physical activity program. The principal responsibility of the Division 



Government and Organization 61 



is to organize and develop the recreational program of the student group 
and to prepare teachers of physical education for the high schools of the 
State. 

The Division has a further responsibility, that of safeguarding the 
health conditions of the students during their period of residence and at 
the same time providing leadership and facilities for a regular program 
of physical activity which will meet the individual needs, capacities, and 
interests of every student group on the Campus. The Division has the 
additional responsibility of teaching every man and woman in the Uni- 
versity one or more activities which they can use during their leisure 
time and after their period of residence in the University. 

Finally, the Division of Physical Education must provide profes- 
sional training for those students whose interests lie in physical edu- 
cation or recreation in the secondary schools or municipal departments 
of the State, and as a result wish to prepare themselves to teach phy- 
sical education, coach athletic teams, or direct recreation in the city 
systems within the State. 

In cooperation with the College of Education, the Division of Phy- 
sical Education maintains a Bureau of Recommendation or Teachers' 
Placement Bureau 1 which makes available to school officials the creden- 
tials of students or alumni who are candidates for school positions. 

Organization : 

For purposes of administration and instruction the Division of 
Physical Education is organized into the following departments : 

I. Service program for men. 

II. Service program for women. 

III. Intramural athletics. 

IV. Health service. 
V. Teacher training. 

Through the first four departments, the Division serves the student 
body of all departments of the University by providing (a) a systematic 
program of physical education and recreation, and (b) a student health 
service designed to safeguard the health conditions on the Campus. For 
a more detailed description of the service programs, intramural athletic 
activities, and health service, see pages 90, 92, and 93. 

The department of teacher training is organized to provide pro- 
fessional training for all men and women who are desirous of becoming 
teachers of physical education in the high schools or directors of 
recreation in municipal systems. During the past decade there has been 
an ever-increasing interest in the physical activities of the boys and girls 
of school age as well as in inter-institutional athletics. In 1927 the state 
of West Virginia adopted a statewide program of physical education for 
all secondary-schools of the State. To meet this need for adequately 



a See page &4. 



62 General Information 



trained teachers of physical education, this Division has outlined a 
curriculum in professional training leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Physical Education (B. S. Phys. Ed.). 1 

SUMMER SESSIOX 

The thirty-fifth summer session of the University will be held from 
June 12 to August 26, 1933. The session will be made up of two terms — 
the first of six weeks and the second of five weeks. The first term will 
begin Monday, June 12, and end Friday, July 21. The second term will 
begin Saturday, July 22, and end Friday, August 26. Classes will be 
held on Saturdays during the second term. 

The requirements for admission and the character of the work 
offered are the same for the summer session as for the regular year. 

The first general assembly of the summer session is the Convocation 
held in Commencement Hall on Thursday evening of the first week. The 
principal feature of this assembly is the address delivered by some 
nationally-known educator. All students are expected to attend this 
assembly. 

Courses for Teachers: 

Many of the students enrolled for the summer session are school 
superintendents, principals, supervisors, and teachers. To meet the needs 
of these groups a wide range of both professional and subject-matter 
courses are offered for undergraduate and graduate students. Many of 
these courses are not given in the regular year. 

The University laboratory demonstration school, integrated with the 
College of Education, is operated during the summer as well as during 
the regular year. 

Field Courses: 

Field courses in botany and zoology will be offered during the first 
term with six hours of credit for the six weeks. Students taking these 
courses will spend the entire time in the field, camping and traveling by 
automobile. Dr. P. D. Strausbaugh, head of the Department of Botany, 
will be in charge of the work in botany; and Dr. L. H. Taylor of the 
Department of Zoology will be in charge of the work in zoology. Stu- 
dents interested in these courses should communicate with the instructors 
as early as possible. 

Advanced students in geology may participate in the work of the 
West Virginia Geological Survey and receive as much as four hours of 
credit for such work. 

Research Work in the Social Sciences: 

During the second term seniors and graduate students may use the 
facilities of the Library of Congress, Washington, D. C, for research. 
Dr. O. P. Chitwood, Professor of History, will be in charge of the work. 



] See pages 199 to 202. 



Living Accommodations 



Those interested in library problems in history, economics, English, 
Sociology, or political science should communicate with Dr. Chitwood. 

Courses in Library Training: 

During the first term four courses in Library Training will be 
offered for the professional training of school and public librarians. This 
work will be followed during the second term by a two-hour course in 
adolescent literature for librarians and junior and senior high school 
teachers. 

Clay Modeling: 

During the first term special work will be offered in clay-modeling. 
This work may be taken for credit or without credit. 

LIVING ACCOMMODATIONS 
MEN 

The matter of furnishing information to new male students in the 
University regarding suitable boarding and rooming places is in charge 
of the Dean of Men. On arrival in Morgantown, all men should go 
directly to Martin Hall, where they will find complete lists of approved 
rooming and boarding places, and also upper-classmen who will assist 
them in finding rooms and in matriculating. During the opening days 
of the semester, committees from the various religious groups and 
associations meet new students at trains and buses and are ready to 
render the newcomers every assistance possible. 

Freshmen who are "pledged" by the various social fraternities on the 
Campus are permitted to live in the chapter houses. Living costs in the 
fraternities are governed, generally speaking, by the fraternities them- 
selves. On December 1, 1932, there were 425 men rooming in 25 frater- 
nity chapter houses at the University and 600 boarding in these same 
houses. 

Prospective students desiring any information concerning living 
accommodations in advance of their arrival in Morgantown may address 
H. E. Stone, Dean of Men, West Virginia University. 

WOMEN 

All girls in the University (except those living at home) are re- 
quired to live in the dormitories, sorority houses, or in rooming houses 
approved by the Dean of Women. Unmarried students are not permitted 
to live in unchaperoned apartments. Changes in rooming places made 
after the beginning of a semester may be made only with the Dean's 
approval. Lists of approvad rooming houses and other desired informa- 
tion may be obtained by prospective students in advance of their arrival 
in Morgantown by addressing Miss Ruth D. Noer, Dean of Women, West 
Virginia University. 

The Woman's Hall has room for 108 students and has a dining 
room which accommodates 300. The Woman's Hall Annex has rooms 



64 General Information 



for 44. Applications for rooms in the University dormitories should be 
made to Miss Isabel Hayes, Preceptress, Woman's Hall, West Virginia 
University. Rooms in the dormitories may be engaged for a year in 
advance, upon the payment of a retaining fee of $10.00. This amount 
is refunded at the end of the year, less any deductions for damages to 
room or furnishings. A student who, for any good reason, desires to 
relinquish a room thus engaged may have the fee refunded if she gives 
notice before August 15. If a student withdraws from the University for 
any reason other than illness her room rent cannot be refunded, unless 
it is possible to obtain a substitute. No girl may remove from a dormi- 
tory unless her place can be filled. 

The cost of rooms in the dormitories for women is as follows: 

Woman's Hall Per Year 

First and second floor front $90.00 

First and second floor rear 85.00 

Third floor front 85.00 

Third floor rear 80.00 

Annex Per Year 

Single room $65.00 

Double room $50 to $60.00 

Per Semester 
Board in the dining hall (in advance) $103.50 

BOARD AND LODGING 

Board and lodging may be obtained in Morgantown for from $5.50 to 
$8 a week. Furnished rooms may be obtained at from $1.50 to $2.50 
a week, for each tenant with two in a room; with one in a room the 
cost ranges from $2 to $4 a week. Board in private homes or in stu- 
dent's boarding clubs costs from $4.00 to $5.50 a week. 

Cafeteria: 

The Cafeteria for University students, members of the faculty, and 
administrative staffs was established in 1924, soon after the building 
which houses it was completed. The purpose of the Cafeteria is to fur- 
nish wholesome and substantial meals to its University patrons at a 
reasonable cost and without profit to the University. The Cafeteria is 
located between Mechanical Hall and the old Library. In addition to the 
regular cafeteria service, it operates a boarding club for both men and 
women at $4 a week. 

UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE 

The University Book Store, located in the basement of the Law 
Building, is maintained for the convenience of the students. It is open 
during customary business hours and keeps on hand constantly text- 
books, stationery, drafting-room instruments and supplies, etc., which are 
available to the students at a reasonable price. 



Admission to the University 65 

ADMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY 
ADMISSION TO THE UNDERGRADUATE COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 

Methods of Admission 

Students are admitted to the University either by examination or 
on certificate from an accredited secondary school. In the latter case 
the certificates must set forth the work of the student in detail. Diplomas 
or certificates of a general nature are not sufficient. 

Candidates for admission to the University must be at least 16 
years of age. They must present certificates of good moral character 
and, if from other colleges or universities, must present letters of 
honorable dismissal. 

Candidates for admission who do not present entrance certificates, 
or who come from other institutions of learning without letters of 
honorable dismissal, may at the discretion of the Committee on En- 
trance, be allowed to register provisionally. In every such case, the 
Registrar will make immediate inquiry of the institution from which the 
applicant comes, and if satisfactory certificates of credit and good stand- 
ing cannot be obtained the registration will be cancelled and the fees 
paid by the applicant will be returned. A provisional registration will 
not ordinarily be continued for a longer period than o»e week. 

Entrance Unit Defined 

The requirements for admission to the various colleges of the Uni- 
versity are stated in terms of units. 

A unit in any subject represents the amount of work that may be 
done in a standard high school in a year of 36 weeks, with five recitation 
periods per week, of not less than 40 minutes each. In courses where 
laboratory work is required, from two to three hours of laboratory work 
is considered the equivalent of one hour of recitation according to the 
amount of outside preparation required in connection with such work. 

Graduates of accredited schools 1 receive credit for the work certified, 
with the understanding, however, that no student may enter any college 
of the University until he has .credit for 15 units, i. e., the work of a 
standard four-year high school course. 

Certification of Entrance Units 
Graduates of the State normal schools and of all other schools in 
good standing will receive credit for work properly certified. 

Certificates of entrance units should be on the blank form prescribed 
by the University or on a similar form, so that credit values may be 
readily computed. These certificates should be sent in to the Registrar at 
least two weeks before the applicant presents himself for matriculation. 
Failure to do this may result in vexatious delay in registration and may 
render the student liable to the payment of the $2 late registration fee. 



x In accrediting West Virginia secondary schools the University follows the 
classification made by the State Supervisor of High Schools. 



66 General Information 



After the certificate has been considered by the Committe on Entrance 
and the credits recorded, it becomes the property of the University and is 
permanently filed in the Registrar's office. 

Prescribed and Elective Units 

A. Fifteen units of high school work are required for entrance to 
the University. Those who are going into the College of Education must 
make up an additional unit during the first or second year, in order to 
comply with the teacher training requirements of the State Board of 
Education. 

B. The following groups are required: 



(1) Four units in English 1 

(2) Three units in a second subject 

(3) Two units in each of two other subjects 



C. The work indicated in A must include: For admission to all 
colleges and schools, 2 units in mathematics — 1 unit in algebra and 1 
unit in plane geometry. For admission to the College of Engineering, 
Wz units in algebra, 1 unit in plane geometry, and % unit in solid 
geometry. 2 For admission to the School of Medicine, 2 units in a foreign 
language and 1 unit in history. For admission to the College of Educa- 
tion, 3 units in social studies and 2 units in science, including biology. 
For admission to the Course in Public Health, IY2 units in algebra, 1 
unit in plane geometry, V2 unit in solid geometry, and 2 units in either 
French or German are required. 

D. Work in the following subjects not to exceed the number of units 
placed after each subject will be accepted: 

Subjects Units Subjects Units 

English 4 Science 3 

Foreign Langu^ &y::;:;:;:::::::::::::::::::z 

Greek 3 glfe 



French 3 **»< 

German 3 ft 

Spanish 3 Geolog ? 

Italian 3 



General Science 

Physical Geography V% 

Education 2 Physiology % 

X A student may enter with only 3 units in English, but in that case he 
must take 6 hours in college English as elective above the minimum require- 
ment for the degree for which he is a candidate. For this additional work he 
will receive college credit. 

2 Students may enter with only one unit of algebra, or without solid geom- 
etry, but they will be irregular in their schedules. 

8 A group of 2 or 3 units in science may be made by combining 1 unit each 
of any of the following : physics, chemistry, botany, biology, zoology, geology, 
general science. 

4 If a student presents either botany or zoology for entrance he may not 
have credit for more than y 2 unit of biology ; if he presents both botany and 
zoology, no credit in biology will be allowed. 

5 Not less than 2 units of one foreign language will be accepted for en- 
trance unless supplemented by further work in college in the same language to 
complete a minimum equivalent to 2 units of entrance. Six hours of college 
work are regarded as equivalent to 1 unit in a foreign language. 



Admission to the University 67 

Mathematics Commercial geography % 



Commercial law Vi 



Algebra 2 

Plane geometry 1 

Solid geometry % Vocational subjects (not to ex- 
Trigonometry % ceed 4 units) 

Agriculture 3 

History and Economics 1 Household arts 3 

History 3 Manual training 3 

Civics 1 Bookkeeping or bookkeeping 

Economics 1 and commercial arithmetic 2 

Sociology 1 Commercial arithmetic 

(alone) % 

Drawing Shorthand 1 

Free-hand drawing 1 Typewriting 1 

Mechanical drawing 1 Physica i education 1 

Music (applied) 2 Hygiene and Sanitation 1 

Special Requirements 

College ef Law: 

The following persons will be admitted to the College of Law as 
candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Laws: 

1. Graduates of colleges of approved standing. 

2. Those having credit (a) for 15 units preparatory work and 
(b) for not less than three years of work of collegiate grade in an in- 
stitution of approved standing. Work will not be accepted for entrance 
unless the grade therefor carries 1 honor point per credit hour or its 
equivalent. Such work if done in an institution other than West Vir- 
ginia University must, as a minimum, entitle the student to not less than 
90 hours of credit in the College of Arts and Sciences of West Virginia 
University. No course may be counted for entrance to the College of 
Law unless such course would count toward the Bachelor of Arts degree 
in West Virginia University. 

College of Education: 

The requirement for admission to the College of Education shall be 
the completion of (a) 16 units of preparatory work and (b) 58 hours of 
approved college work, with an average of at least 1 honor point per 
credit hour. Candidates for the bachelor's degree in Education register 
for their first two years of work in the College of Arts and Sciences. 
Freshmen and sophomores who expect to enter the College of Education 
will indicate their intention when they register. Their studies will be 
directed by Professor Elizabeth Stalnaker, adviser for pre-education 
students. Such students should so order their courses of study as to meet 
junior standing and fulfill the curricular requirements for the certifica- 
tion of teachers. 



X A group of 3 units may be formed by combining 2 units of history with 
1 unit of civics, economics, or sociology, or with % unit each of any two of 
these subjects. 



68 General Information 



School of Medicine: 

In addition to the 15 units of secondary school credit listed above, 
the students must have credit for 66 hours, either in the College of Arts 
and Sciences of West Virginia University or in another instituton of 
equal grade. 

In accordance wth the regulations of the Association of American 
Medical Colleges, a schedule covering two years of pre-medical college 
work has been arranged. 1 This schedule includes 4 hours of organic 
chemistry, 8 hours of biology, 6 hours of English, and 8 hours of physics. 

Medical students are urged by the Association to take psychology, 
more chemistry and college mathematics, and a year of modern foreign 
language, preferably French or German. 

Many of the medical schools feel that a physician should have a 
broader training in non-scientific courses, in order that he may be of 
the greatest usefulness to hi? community, and that this may be attained 
by extending the pre-medical college work to three years. A small 
group of colleges requires a four-year college course and a bachelor's 
degree for entrance. 

Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts (with the fourth 
year in the School of Medicine) will register during their first three 
years in the College of Arts and Sciences, and during their fourth year 
in both the College of Arts and Sciences and the School of Medicine. 
The College of Arts and Sciences grants the degree. 

Candidate for the Bachelor of Science degree (with the last two 
years in the School of Medicine will register during their first two or 
three years in the College of Arts and Sciences, and during their last two 
years in both the College of Arts and Sciences and the School of Medi- 
cine. The degree is granted jointly by the College of Arts and Sciences 
and the School of Medicine. 

School of Music: 

Students may enter the School of Music at any time, although, of 
course, it is to their advantage to enter at the beginning of a semester. 
Students will not be permitted to register for any courses in music for 
credit toward any degree (A. B. or B. Mus., or B. S. Mus. Ed.) without 
passing an examination in solfeggio, or demonstrating to the satisfaction 
of the head of the department their ability to read music of moderate 
difficulty. They must evidence a mastery of the elements of music, and 
must have completed two years of piano study. 

Conditional Admission 

Students who have credit for 15 units of secondary school work 
but who can not meet the specific requirements (see B and C above) of 
the college they desire to enter may register as conditional freshmen in 



^ee pages 124 and 128. 



Admission to the University 69 

that college. Such students must make up all deficiencies before they 
can be classified as sophomores. 

Under no circumstances will students be admitted to the course in 
medicine without having completed 15 units of secondary school work and 
60 hours of college work, including English 1 and 2; Chemistry 3, 4, and 
36; Zoology 1 and 2; and Physics 1, 2, 3, and 4; which are required by 
the American Medical Association. But students who lack the remaining 
6 hours of college work may be admitted to the course conditionally, and 
must find opportunity to remove the condition during the summer 
session, or elsewhere, before enrolling for the second year in the School 
of Medicine. 

Special Students 

Persons who do not desire to become candidates for a degree may, 
by permission of the Committee on Entrance and of the faculty or dean 
of the college which they desire to enter, be admitted as special students, 
subject to the following provisions: 

1. Special students must as a rule be 21 years of age. 

2. Special students must satisfy at least 9 units of the require- 
ments for admission, including 2 units of English. 

3. Every application for admission as a special student must be 
presented in writing to the Committee on Entrance and must set forth 
fully the applicant's reason, together with a detailed statement of the 
studies he desires to pursue. 

4. Special students are subjected in all respects to the usual rules 
relating to registration and scholarship. They may be assigned to 
classes for which they apply, it being understood, however, that admis- 
sion to any class rests entirely with the instructor in charge, and further, 
that admission to any class when so granted does not necessarily imply 
credit for prerequisites. 

5. In the School of Mines, special provisions are made for those 
taking strictly vocational courses. 

. Advanced standing 

Applicants for advanced standing on account of work of college 
grade done before entrance to the University should be made to the Com- 
mittee on Entrance not later than two weeks after the applicant's 
matriculation. Certificates of college credit must be presented on a 
separate form from the entrance units. 

- If no certificates are offered or if those offered are considered by the 
Committee on Entrance to be irregular or insufficient, the Committee will 
arrange for an examination of the applicant. In this case the dean of 
the proper college will issue examination cards on which after examina- 
tion the head of each department will report to the Committee on 
Entrance the numbers, names, and credit values of the courses, if any, 
for which the applicant is entitled to credit. 



70 General Information 



College of Law: 

Applicants for admission to advanced standing in the College of Law 
must satisfy the following requirements: 

1. Compliance with the requirements for admission to the first 
year class. 

2. For admission to the second-year class, applicants must have 
successfully pursued the study of law in residence for at least one year 
in an approved law school, where they have received credit for courses 
equivalent to those required for admission to the second-year class in 
the College of Law. 

3. For admission to the third year class, applicants must have 
successfully pursued the study of law in residence for at least two years 
in an approved law school, where they have received credit for courses 
equivalent to those required for admission to the third year class in the 
College of Law. 

No credit will be given for work done in a law office. 

School of Music- 
Advanced standing in piano is given only by examination. Persons 
desiring such advanced standing should enroll in piano at the beginning 
of the semester and after they have become thoroughly familiar with the 
requirements for each semester's work, they may take a special examina- 
tion in which they will prove their ability to meet the requirements as 
outlined. If desired an estimate may be made in advance by the head of 
the department as to the probable number of hours that may be gained 
by this examination but it will be unofficial until the examination is taken. 

ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Applicants holding bachelors' degrees from West Virginia University 
or from other institutions within the State approved by the State Board 
of Education and authorized to confer such degrees, or from institutions 
without the State standardized by membership in one of the associations 
of colleges and secondary schools, will be admitted to the Graduate 
School by making formal application to the Chairman of the Graduate 
Council and presenting an official transcript of the credits upon which 
their bachelors' degrees are based. Graduates of non-approved institu- 
tions may be admitted provisionally with the understanding that any de- 
ficiencies in their undergraduate training will be promptly removed. 

Application for admission to the Graduate School should be made 
either in person or by letter some weeks prior to the opening of -the 
semester for which registration is desired. Blank forms may be obtained 
from the Chairman of the Graduate Council. The application must be 
in the hands of the Council at the time the student presents himself 
for registration for graduate courses. If the student contemplates enter- 
ing upon candidacy for an advanced degree he should announce in his 
application his choice of a major field of study. 



Registration 71 



Students eligible for admission to the Graduate School who wish to 
further their education without reference to a higher degree will be ad- 
mitted to the Graduate School and may elect any course for which they 
can satisfy the prerequisites. 

REGISTRATION 

Persons who are not registered as students in the University and 
who are not members of its administrative or teaching staffs, shall not 
be admitted to regular attendance in University classes. 

Time and Place of Registration: 

All students are expected to register on the days set apart for 
registration at the beginning of each semester or term of the University. 

Freshman registration for the year 1933-34 will take place, with all 
necessary assistance, in the Field House during Freshman Week, Thurs- 
day, Friday, and Saturday, September 14, 15, and 16. 

Upperclassmen will register for the year 1933-34 on Monday and 
Tuesday, September 18 and 19. 

All upperclassmen register in the Field House, with the exception of 
students in the College of Engineering and School of Mines, who register 
in Mechanical Hall; students in the College of Law, who register in the 
Law Building; and medical students, who register in the Medical Build- 
ing. 

Immediately upon completion of their registration, all students are 
expected to pay their fees at the office of the Financial Secretary in 
Science Hall. 

Freshman Week: 

Freshman Week activities were inaugurated at the University in 
September, 1929. The days set apart for these events in 1933 are Sep- 
tember 14, 15, and 16. Attendance at these exercises is required of every 
entering freshman. A program of lectures, directions to entering stu- 
dents, exercises, and recreation is arranged to enable freshmen to ad- 
just themselves the more easily to the environment of University life. 
Every freshman should be on the Campus and report at the meeting 
in Commencement Hall at nine o'clock in the forenoon of Thursday, 
September 14, 1933. 

Medical Examination : 

During registration week all male freshmen will report at the Field 
House for assignment of lockers and baskets, for appointment for phy- 
sical and medical examinations, and for physical achievement tests. 

Freshmen women will report during registration week at Elizabeth 
Moore Hall for similar examinations and tests. 

These examinations and tests will be the guide in the selection of 
a proper program of physical education for individual students. 



72 General Information 



College Credit Defined: 

A college credit or semester-hour represents the amount of work done 
in one semester (18 weeks), in one recitation hour with two prepara- 
tion hours a week. From two to three hours of laboratory work are con- 
sidered equivalent to one hour of recitation, according to the amount of 
outside work assigned in connection with the laboratory hours. 

Numbering of Courses: 

Courses offered in the various colleges and schools of the Univer- 
sity are numbered so as to indicate the rank (freshman, sophomore, 
junior, senior, or graduate) of the students for whom they are intended. 
See page 206. 

Adviser : 

The college in which a student is enrolled shall have jurisdiction 
over the course of study of that student. Each student, upon entering 
the University, is assigned to an adviser in such college who approves 
the student's program of studies and assists him generally in his 
registration. Changes in registration must always have the approval of 
the adviser. 

Maximum and Minimum Work: 

The maximum and minimum number of hours per semester as well 

as the maximum number of hours per year for which a student may 
register during the regular session of the University is as follows : 

Minimum Maximum 

Hours per Hours per 

Semester Semester Year 

Agriculture 14 20 

Arts and Sciences 14 18 34 1 

Education 18 35 

Engineering and Mechanic Arts .... 14 20 

Home Economics „ 14 18 34 

Law 13 16 

Medicine 17 20 

Mines, School of 14 20 

Music 14 18 34 

Pharmacy 14 20 

Physical Education: 

Freshmen 14 20 32 

All others 14 20 38 

A student may carry courses not in excess of 6 hours' credit 2 each 
term of the summer session, but any student who, during the last 
semester or full summer session in residence, has earned 2Y2 honor 
points (Arts and Sciences standard) for each hour of registration may 
petition the Committee on Scholarship of the college concerned to take 
work not in excess of 8 hours. However, only 6 hours of credit shall be 



Exclusive of one hour of physical education per semester. 
-'Five hours in the College of Law. 



Registration 73 



allowed unless the student shall maintain a general standing entitling 
him to 2^2 honor points for each hour of registration. 

A student desiring to do irregular work, more or less than the pre- 
scribed number of hours in any college, must obtain permission from 
the Committee on Scholarship in his college. This permission is not valid 
until it has been reported to the Registrar for record. 

Registration for more than the specified maximum work shall be per- 
mitted only for removal of conditions or better adjustment of sched- 
ules, and not in any case for the purpose of shortening the time reg- 
ularly required for the work of the degree sought by the student. 

Late Registration: 

No student will be permitted to register in the University after the 
eighteenth day of a semester or the ninth day of either term of the 
summer session, without the special permission of the dean of the 
college which he proposes to enter. No student registering late will be 
permitted to enroll for more hours of work than the number of weeks 
in actual attendance without the permission of the Committee on Scholar- 
ship of the college concerned. 

Substitution for Required Courses: 

A student who desires to substitute another course in place of any 
course prescribed in his curriculum or required for the degree toward 
which he is working, must obtain permission for such substitution from 
the Committee on Scholarship in his college, but there can be no substitu- 
tion from group to group. 

Visitors: 

Students who are registered in the University may be permitted to 
attend classes as visitors, provided they shall have obtained the written 
permission of their advisers and of the instructors in the classes they 
desire to visit. Members of the administrative or teaching staffs, or 
other regular employees of the University, may be permitted to attend 
classes as visitors, provided they shall have obtained the written per- 
mission of the heads of their departments and of the instructors in the 
classes which they desire to visit. 

No record shall be kept of the work and attendance of persons ad- 
mitted to classes as visitors and no credit shall be given for their work in 
such classes. 

Persons eligible to attend classes in the University as visitors may 
obtain the proper permission blanks from the Registrar. 

Withdrawal from the University : 

A student who desires to withdraw from the University must apply 
to the Registrar for permission. When the withdrawal permit has been 
obtained it must be presented by the student to his adviser for his ap- 
proval and signature. It must then be filed by the student in the 
Registrar's office. See page 77 for provisions regarding refunds. 



74 General Information 



Students who withdraw from the University without permission will 
at the end of the semester receive a grade of "F" in each of the subjects 
for which they are registered and will be indefinitely suspended from the 
University. Students may not withdraw from the University or from 
any of the classes for which they are enrolled in the last two weeks of 
the semester. 

UNIVERSITY FEES AND EXPENSES 

(Subject to change without notice) 

All fees are due and payable at the Financial Secretary's office on 
the day of registration. 1 All students registering during the academic 
year 1933-34, or during the Summer Session of 1933, pay the following 
fees: 

REGISTRATION FEES 
Full-time Students 2 

Resident? Non-Resident 
Regular Academic Year (per semester) : 
In the Colleges of Agriculture, Arts and 

Sciences, Education, and Engineering 

and Mechanic Arts; the Graduate 

School and the School of Mines; and 

the Division of Physical Education ..$ 32.50 $107.50 

In the College of Law and the School of 

Medicine (including Pharmacy) 57.50 182.50 

In the School of Music — candidates for 

degrees in music pay: 

1. Regular registration fee 32.50 107.50 

2. Plus tuition fees for applied 
music* in excess of $32.50 if a 
resident; in excess of $107.50 if a 
non-resident. 



1 Students who have not paid their fees before the close of office hours of 
the second Saturday following the opening of a semester or a summer term, 
shall be dropped from the rolls of the University, and the Registrar shall 
notify their instructors that their class cards are to be withdrawn. 

2 A full-time student is one who is registered for 10 or more semester-hours 
of work during each semester of the regular academic year, or for 4 or more 
semester-hours of work during each term of the summer session. A full-time 
student during the regular academic year receives a student activity book which 
entitles him to admission to all out-door athletic events and, by the payment of 
an additional nominal amount at each event, entitles him to admission to all 
in-door athletic events held in the Field House. A full-time student during 
the regular academic year or during the summer session is entitled to free 
medical consultation and advice from the University physician. A moderate 
charge is made for room-calls, Infirmary bed care, x-rays, special laboratory 
tests, drugs furnished by the University Pharmacy, minor operations, treat- 
ment of fractures and dislocations, and intravenous treatment. 

3 No person shall be considered eligible to register in the University as a 
resident student who has not been an actual and legal resident of the state of 
West Virginia for at least twelve consecutive months next preceding his first 
registration. Exceptions to the above regulation may be made in the following 
cases: (1) In the case of a student whose parents have become legal residents 
and citizens of West Virginia after such student's first registration in the Uni- 
versity. (2) In the case of a former student who re-enters the University after 
an interim of non-attendance and who has become a legal resident of the state 
of West Virginia, his residence having been established at least twelve months 
prior to his re-registration. 

4 Tuition fees for applied music (voice, piano, violin, pipe-organ) appear 
on page 75 under the caption "Special Students Registered in the School of 
Music." 



University Fees and Expenses 75 

Summer Session: 5 

One term only 25.00 35.00 

First and second terms 30.00 40.00 

Part-Time Students 6 

FOR EACH SEMESTER HOUR 

Resident? Non-Resident 
Regular Academic Year: 

In the Colleges of Agriculture, Arts and 
Sciences, Education, and Engineering 
and Mechanic Arts; the Graduate 
School and the School of Mines; and 
the Division of Physical Education .... $ 3.00 $ 8.00 

In the College of Law and the School of 

Medicine (including Pharmacy) 4.00 12.50 

Summer Session: 
In all colleges, schools, and divisions, ex- 
cept the College of Law, the School of 
Medicine (including Pharmacy), and 
the School of Music 7 5.00 7.00 

SPECIAL FEES 

Late Registration Fee 8 $ 2.00 

Diploma Fee 9 10.00 

Student's Record Fee 10 1.00 

Junior Certificate 1.00 

SCHOOL OF MUSIC FEES 

1. Students Registered for Degrees in the School of Music: 
Resident students, $32.50 plus tuition fees for applied music (piano, 
voice, violin, pipe-organ) in excess of $32.50. 

Non-resident students, $107.50 plus tuition fees for applied music 
(piano, voice, violin, pipe-organ) in excess of $107.50. 

2. Special Students Registered in the School of Music: 

(a) Theory Courses — Special students registered in the School of 
Music for theory courses in music shall pay $5 per credit-hour 
for these courses. 

•This fee, which covers matriculation, incidentals, laboratory charges, and 
medical service, is the only fee required, except in the College of Law, the 
School of Medicine, and the School of Music (applied music), where tuition 
fees are charged. 

6 A part-time student is one who is registered for fewer than 10 semester- 
hours per semester during the regular academic year ; or for fewer than 4 
semester-hours per term during the summer session. 

T This fee covers matriculation, incidentals, and laboratory charges, and is 
the only fee required, except in the College of Law, the School of Medicine (in- 
cluding Pharmacy), and the School of Music (applied music), where tuition 
fees are charged. 

8 As a reward for prompt registration, this fee is not charged to students 
who procure class cards during the regular registration days set forth in the 
calendar on page 5. Students whose work is exclusively in music are excused 
from payment of the $2 late registration fee. 

9 The diploma fee is payable by all students at the beginning of the semester 
or term in which they expect to receive their degrees or diplomas. 

10 One transcript of a student's record is furnished by the Registrar with- 
out charge. This fee is charged for furnishing an additional transcript. 



76 General Information 



(b) Applied Music — Special students registered in the School of 
Music for courses in applied music shall pay tuition fees as 
follows: 

FOR EACH SEMESTER 

Lesson Per Week 
Voice: One Two Three 

Head of Department $35 $55 $70 

Piano : 

Head of Department 35 55 70 

Assistant 25 40 

Violin : 

Head of Department 25 40 

Orchestra Class — 1 hour 5 

Pipe Organ 30 50 

Ensemble: 

Public School Music — class of 4 .. 5 

Piano majors 20 

Piano Sight Playing — class of 4, 1 
hour per week 10 

(c) Special Work in Another College or School — Special students 
registered in the School of Music who take special work in an- 
other college or school of the University shall pay music fees 
plus the regular rate per credit-hour for the work they are 
taking in another college or school. 

3. Students Registered in Other Schools and Colleges: 

(a) Theory Courses — Students registered in other schools and col- 
leges of the University may enroll for theory courses in the 
School of Music without paying additional fees. 

(b) Applied Music — Students in other schools and colleges of the 
University who enroll for one or more courses in applied music 
shall pay the regular fees required in the school or college in 
which they are registered plus the fees paid by special students 
in the School of Music for the courses for which they are regis- 
tered in the School of Music. 

4. Piano and Pipe Organ Practice: 

(a) Piano for Practice — one hour a day, will be furnished at $6 a 
semester; two hours a day at $10 a semester; three hours a day 
at $14 a semester; four hours a day at $18 a semester. 

(b) Pipe Organ Practice — one hour a day at $10 per semester. 

DEPOSITS 

Students using property of the United States government in the 
Division of Military Science and Tactics, and those in various laboratory 
courses where expensive or fragile apparatus is used, are required to 
make a deposit to cover breakage and other loss. The unexpended bal- 
ance of the deposit is returned to the student at the close of the semester. 

The deposits required are as follows: 

Breakage Deposit in Chemistry $ 5 

Breakage Deposit in Pharmacy 10 

Military Science Deposit 10 



Degrees 77 

REFUNDING OF FEES 

A student who withdraws regularly 1 from the University may ar- 
range for a refund of fees by submitting to the Financial Secretary his 
original fee receipt bearing an endorsement by the Registrar stating that 
his withdrawal has been regular, together with the unused portion of 
his Student Activity Book. Fees will be returned in accordance with 
the following schedule: 

Amount of Refund 

During the first and second weeks All fees less $2.50 

During the third and fourth weeks 80 per cent of fees 

During the fifth and sixth weeks 60 per cent of fees 

During the seventh and eighth weeks 40 per cent of fees 
Beginning with ninth week No refunds allowed 

COST OF YEAR'S WORK 

A student's text-books will cost from $10 to $40 a year, and his 
registration fees $65 to $115 if a resident; or $215 to $365 if a non- 
resident. Students in engineering will use drawing instruments costing 
from $15 to $25. The laboratory breakage deposit fee required ranges 
from $5 to $10, a part of which is usaully returned at the end of 
the year. In military science, there is a $10 deposit required to cover 
military equipment in the custody of the student, practically all of which 
is returned to the student when he accounts for his equipment. Board 
and room may be obtained at from $200 to $300 a year. A student's 
washing will cost from $18 to $24 a year. Traveling expenses, slothing, 
and other miscellaneous items will depend largely upon the tastes and 
habits of the individual student. In general, however, it may be said 
that the legitimate cost of a nine months' term of residence at the 
University ranges from $450 to $700 a year. 

DEGREES 

All University degrees are conferred by the Board of Governors 
upon recommendation of the Faculty. Degrees are granted at the close 
of the term or semester in which the students complete their work. 

Candidates must be present in person to receive their degrees unless 
excused by the Board of Governors. 

BACCALAUREATE DEGREES 

Credits and Honor Points Required: 

Less than 6 hours in an ancient or modern language will not be 
counted toward any University degree, diploma, or certificates unless 
work in the same language has been offered for entrance. 

Six hours of English composition and rhetoric (English 1 and 2) 
are required of all candidates for the bachelor's degree in all colleges, 
schools, and divisions. 

x See page 73, under the capiton "Withdrawal from the University." 



78 General Information 



Four hours of military science and tactics are required of all fresh- 
man and sophomore men not specifically exempt. 1 

Two hours of physical education for men, to be taken during the 
first year in residence, and four hours of physical education for women, 
to be taken during the first and second years in residence, are required 
for graduation of students presenting fewer than 58 semester hours, 
unless previous credit has been allowed. 

Each baccalaureate degree is conditioned upon the completion of 
a specified number of semester hours of credit. For a tabular state- 
ment of the number of credit hours required for each degree, see the 
last column on page 80, under the caption "Classification of Students." 

All divisions of the University require minimum standards of 
scholastic quality. These are expressed in terms of honor points. 
Honor points are based only on grades earned at West Virginia Uni- 
versity and all courses taken in this institution which are offered to- 
wards credit requirements for the degree for which the student is a 
candidate shall be included in the computation of honor points. The 
student must maintain an average of one honor point per credit hour 
in order to be eligible for graduation, except in the College of Law 
which requires 50 honor points. The College of Education, in addition 
to a general average of 1 honor point per credit hour in all subjects, 
requires an average of 1.2 honor points per credit hour in Education. 

In order to be eligible for recommendation for any West Virginia 
high school teaching certificate, every student in West Virginia Uni- 
versity who desires any such certificate, and who attains junior standing 
after May 1, 1933, must have a general honor-point average of 1.0 and 
an honor-point average of 1.2 in each teaching field and in Education. 

In the College of Agriculture, the College of Arts and Sciences, the 
College of Education, the School of Music, and the Division of Physical 
Education, students may decrease the total number of credit hours 
required for graduation by doing work of superior quality. For each 
8 honor points in excess of 1 honor point per credit hour, the number 
of credit hours required for graduation may be diminished by one. 
This does not, however, excuse students from courses required for the 
degree. 

It is the student's responsibility to keep informed on his honor point 
standing. This information may be seeured at any time from the dean 
or director of the college or division in which the student is registered.' 

Requirements as to Residence: 

Students who come to the University from other colleges or univer- 
sities are advised to make the transfer not later than the beginning of 
their third year and in no case will a student who matriculates in the 
University later than October 1 in any year be permitted to receive a 
degree at the next Commencement. 



J See page 57. 

2 For further description of the honor-point system see page 82. 



Degrees 79 

In special cases students who desire to leave the University at the 
close of their third year to enter another institution with the purpose 
of taking a combined course leading to two degrees or of preparing 
for graduate study may, upon application beforehand to the Committee 
on Scholarship of the college in which they are registered, be permitted 
to do the work of the fourth year, or a part thereof, at such other 
institution and to receive the bachelor's degree from the University upon 
the presentation of the proper credits. 

Except in the College of Law, no student will be granted a bachelor's 
degree from this University who has not done either a total of 90 hours 
of his work or at least 30 hours 1 of it in actual residence at the Uni- 
versity. 

No student may receive the degree of Bachelor of Laws without at 
least one year of residence in the University and the successful passing 
of courses aggregating 28 hours pursued in. the College of Law. 

Work Done Out of Residence: 

It is the policy of the University to discourage the taking of regular 
residence courses in absentia. In the case of courses begun at the Uni- 
versity and not completed because of illness or for other acceptable 
reasons, however, permission to complete the work in absentia under the 
direction of the regular University instructors giving the courses may 
be granted by the Committee on Scholarship; but in such case credit 
should be given only upon report of a grade of not less than "C" on 
final examination. 

The foregoing regulation does not apply to University extension 
courses. 

Adviser: 

Each student, upon entering the University, is assigned to an ad- 
viser, whose duty it is to assist the student in his registration, keep a 
record of his work, and report his registration and standing to the 
Registrar as required. The adviser approves the student's program of 
studies, sees that all prescribed work is taken in proper sequence, ap- 
proves the selection of elective courses, and assists the student generally 
in so planning his course of study that he may proceed systematically 
and without conflicts. Changes in registration must always have the 
approval of the adviser. The student will look to his adviser for 
guidance in all matters pertaining to his work. 

Classification of Students: 

The following is a statement of the number of semester-hours re- 
quired for classification as second-year, third-year, and fourth-year 
students and for graduation, according to the curricula in the several 
colleges, schools, and divisions. First-year students must satisfy the 
requirements for admission as set forth on pages 65 to 70, inclusive. 

+ v, 1Fo ^ the de £ ree of Bachelor of Science in Education, at least 10 hours of 
the residence work must be in education. 



80 General Information 



Hours Required to 
Classify As 



S S3 * §■« 

COLLEGE AND DEGREE ^ >L -+j £ & 

CO --c 3T 3 

ARTS AND SCIENCES || || £| g£ 
Bachelor of Arts (A. B.) 

Regular 25 58 92 128 

Pre-medical 32 66 100 132 

Combined (Medicine) 1 32 66 100 135 

Combined (Law) 2 25 60 96 124 

Bachelor of Science (B. S.) 

In Public Health 34 71 109 144 

Combined (Medicine) 3 „... 32 66 101 142 

Combined (Pharmacy and Medicine) 4 37 73 110 186 

AGRICULTURE 

B. S. in Agriculture (B. S. Agr.) 26 64 100 144 

B. S. in Home Economics (B. S. H. E.) 25 58 92 128 

EDUCATION 

B. S. in Education (B. E. Ed.) 58 94 130 

ENGINEERING 5 

Bachelor of Science (B. S) 27 60 94 131 

B. S. in Chem. Eng'g. (B. S. Ch. E.) 30 70 110 150 

B. S. in Civil Eng'g. (B. S. C. E.) 30 70 110 150 

B. S. in Elec. Eng'g. (B. S. E. E.) _ 30 70 110 150 

B. S. in Mech. Eng'g. (B. S. M. E.) 30 70 110 150 

B. S. in Indus. Ed. (B. S. I. E.) 27 60 94 133 

LAW 

Bachelor of Laws (LL. B.) 22 50 84 

SCHOOL OF MINES 5 

B. S. in Eng'g. of Mines (B. S. E. M.) 30 70 110 150 

SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

Bachelor of Music (B. Mus.) 34 68 102 136 

Bachelor of Science in Music Education 

(B. S. Mus. Ed.) _ 32 66 98 130 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE — Courses in Pharmacy 
B. S. in Pharmacy (B. S. Phar.) 

Retail Pharmacy 37 73 108 143 

Industrial Pharmacy _ 37 73 107 145 

DIVISION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

B. S. in Phys. Ed. (B. S. Phys. Ed.) 24 58 92 128 

GRADUATE DEGREES 

The degree of Master of Arts (A. M.) is offered by the Division of 
Social Sciences and the Division of Education. 

The degree of Master of Science (M. S.) is offered by the Division 
of Industrial Sciences and the Division of Biology and Agriculture. In 
addition, the degrees of Master of Science in Chemical Engineering (M. 
S. Ch. E.)i Master of Science in Civil Engineering (M. S. C. E.), Master 

x Fourth year in School of Medicine, 
fourth year in College of Law. 
3 Third and fourth years in School of Medicine. 
'Fourth and fifth years in the School of Medicine. 

8 Students matriculating with 58 or more hours of credit may graduate 
with 148 hours, since physical education is not required of these students. 



Examinations and Reports 81 

of Science in Electrical Engineering (M. S. E. E.), Master of Science in 
Mechanical Engineering (M. S. M. E.), and Master of Science in Engi- 
neering of Mines (M. S. E. M.) are conferred by the Division of In- 
dustrial Sciences. 

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy (Ph. D.) is offered by all 
divisions of the Graduate School. 

PROFESSIOXAL ENGINEERING DEGREES 

The following professional degrees are conferred upon graduates 
of the College of Engineering and Mechanic Arts of West Virginia 
University on the basis of practical experience and study in absentia, 
the presentation of a thesis, and an oral final examination: 

Chemical Engineer (Ch. E.) 
Civil Engineer (C. E.) 
Electrical Engineer (E. E.) 
Engineer of Mines (E. M.) 
Mechanical Engineer (M. E.) 

EXAMINATIONS AND REPORTS 
COURSES 

As a rule, all courses extend through one semester only. 1 

EXAMINATIONS 

Mid-Semester and Final Examinations. In practically all courses 
offered in the University, the student receives both a preliminary or 
mid-semester grade and a final grade. The mid-semester standing of a 
student is based on the daily recitation grades and a special test given 
during one or more regular recitation periods. Mid-semester grades are 
not entered on the Registrar's records. The final grade is based on the 
class standing for the entire semester and on a written final examina- 
tion 2 to which a special period of two or three hours is devoted, except 
that the manner of determining the final grade of seniors and graduate 
students provisionally approved for graduation at the end of the 
semester or term is left with the head of the department. Any student 
not satisfied with his grade, however, has the right to take the exam- 
ination with his class if he so desires. 

Examination Periods. Mid-semester examinations are held during 
the regular academic year only, and usually during the week of each 
semester immediately preceding the day for mid-semester reports as 

1 In the College of Law, all courses extend either throughout the entire 
year or through one semester. No credit will be given for less than an entire 
course except by special order of the Committee on Scholarship. Grades given 
at the end of the first semester in courses extending throughout the year are 
mereiy indicative of the quality of work done by the student to that point 
and do not give credit for the part of the course so far pursued. Such first 
semester grade may be considered in determining the final grade. 

J See 12 per cent rule under "Absences" on pages 83 and 84. 



82 General Information 



set forth in the University Calendar. Final examinations are held dur- 
ing the last week of each semester of the academic year, and during the 
last two days of each term of the summer session. 

Absence from Examinations. Students are required to take all 
regular examinations. If a student attends a course throughout the 
semester and is absent from examination without permission, the in- 
structor shall count the examination as zero and report the final grade 
as F. If, in the opinion of the instructor, the absence of the student 
was for a satisfactory reason, the fact will be recorded on the students 
class ticket, the grade of I will be returned, and the student may, upon 
application to the instructor, take the examination at a later date. 

SCHOLASTIC STANDING 

Marking System: 

The student's scholastic record for a semester is indicated by the 
following system in use at the University: 

A — excellent (given only to students of superior ability and 
attainment) 

B — good (given to those students who are well above the 
average but who are not in the highest group) 

C — fair (average students) 

D — poor but passing 2 

E — Condition 

F — failure 

I — incomplete 

W — all withdrawals prior to mid-semester 
WP — withdrew passing subsequent to mid-semester. 
WF — withdrew failing subsequent to mid-semester. 

Honor Points: 

The quality of a student's work shall be indicated by honor points.* 

A tabulation, showing the number of honor points, if any, and the 
grades for which they are given in the various divisions of the Univer- 
sity follows: 

Grade A+ A B+ B C+ C D F 
All colleges, schools, and divisions 

except the College of Law 3 .... 2 .... 1 

College of Law 6 5 4 3 2 1 — 1 



x In the College of Law the sign + after the grades A, B, or C will be 
used to indicate differences in standing between students receiving the same 
letter grade. In the Graduate School, no credits are acceptable toward an 
advanced degree with a rank lower than C. 

2 Students are permitted to re-registcr in any course for which a grade 
of D has been received. In such cases the second grade shall supersede the 
first and be final. 
3 See page 78. 



Discipline 83 



Conditions and Failures: 

If the final grade of a student in any course is "F" it is recorded as 
a "failure," and the student must take the course again if he desires to 
receive credit for it. If the final grade is "I" it is recorded as "incom- 
plete." If a grade of "I" is not removed within the following semester 
by the satisfactory completion of the work of the course it becomes a 
failure unless special permission to postpone the completion of the 
work is obtained from the committee on scholarship of the college in 
which the student is registered. A student receiving a grade of "E" 
may be given a second examination in the subject in which such grade 
is received, provided he applies for it at the time of his registration. 
A grade of "E" not removed within the following semester becomes a 
failure unless special permission to postpone the examination is obtained 
from the Committee on Scholarship of the college in which the student 
is registered. If the final grade after a second examination is again 
"E" it is recorded as a "failure." No grade higher than "C" shall be 
reported for the removal of a condition. 



REPORTS 

Mid-semester grades are reported to students' advisers and to deans, 
but are not recorded in the office of the Registrar. 

Final grades are reported by instructors to students' advisers and 
by them directly to the Registrar's office. 

A report of each student's work is made at the close of the semes- 
ter or summer session either to the student himself or to his parents 
or guardian. 

DISCIPLINE 

The rules and regulations which students are required to observe 
are few, simple, and reasonable: civil and orderly conduct; punctuality 
and regularity in attendance upon all required exercises; reasonable 
diligence in the performance of the work prescribed ; and abstinence 
from vices. 

Students who do not comply with these requirements will not be 
allowed to remain in the University. 

All matters of discipline are in charge of the President of the 
University in consultation with the dean of the college or head of the 
division of the University in which the student concerned is enrolled. 

ABSENCES 

Each instructor shall be responsible for the attendance of students 
in his classes, and shall report an excessive number of absences to the 
dean of the college in which the student is registered for such action 
as may be deemed advisable. 



84 General Information 



University men who find it necessary to be absent from classes by 
reason of absence from Morgantown while the University is in session 
must obtain permission in advance from the Dean of Men, and Uni- 
versity women from the Dean of Women. 

If a student's absences in any course exceed 12 per cent of the 
total number of recitations in the course he is barred from taking the 
final examination unless special permission to take such examination is 
given him by the dean of the college concerned and by the instructor. 

DELINQUENT STUDENTS 

The dean of each college shall make suitable and effective pro- 
visions for handling delinquent students registered in his college, subject 
to the general regulations. 

Probation and Suspension: 

Any student who fails to make a passing grade in courses amount- 
ing to at least half of the total number of semester hours for which he 
is registered shall, unless restored to probationary standing, be suspended 
from the University for the succeeding semester, except that a fresh- 
man subject to the operation of this rule at the end of one semester in 
residence shall be placed on probation for the succeeding semester. 

If, however, the student is enrolled in the School of Medicine, or if 
the failure resulted from the abandonment of any class, or from with- 
drawal from the University without permission, or from absence from 
examination without reasonable excuse, the suspension becomes indefinite. 

If a student suspended by the operation of the above rule re-enters 
the University and again becomes subject to it, his suspension becomes 
indefinite. 

Any student who fails to make a passing grade in courses amount- 
ing to at least half of the total number of semester hours for which he 
is registered, as shown by the preliminary or mid-semester report, shall 
be placed on probation for the remainder of the semester. 

The dean of each college shall make periodic reports of the prob- 
lems arising from delinquent students to the Council of Administration. 

All actions of the Committee on Scholarship and the dean of the 
college that affect the standing of a student shall be reported by the 
dean to the Registrar. 

Duties of Instructors : 

Instructors shall report the names of delinquent students to their 
respective advisers at the beginning of each school month except the 
month in which a mid-semester examination occurs and at such other 
times as the occasion may arise. 

In the event that a student who has not been previously reported 
for delinquency fails in a subject, the instructor must report to the 
student's dean the reason for the failure. 



Discipline 85 



No report should be made by an instructor until after a conference 
with the student. If the delinquency is a minor or temporary one, the 
instructor may await the result of his conference before reporting. 
Delinquent reports should include all failures to make a passing average 
and unsatisfactory work on the part of those who are capable of doing 
a higher grade of work. 

All reports shall be made on special blanks and a copy of the report 
should be given to the student. 

Duties of Advisers: 

All advisers, upon the receipt of the delinquent reports, shall have 
conferences with the students concerned and shall endeavor to make such 
recommendations and adjustments as may be within their power. 

If the delinquency is due to continued wilful neglect or to failure in 
one-half of the work for which the student is registered, the adviser 
shall report the case to the dean of his college, who may, at his discre- 
tion, place the student under the jurisdiction of the Committee on 
Scholarship, and thereafter the adviser shall carry out the orders and 
instructions imposed by the dean or the Committee. 

Duties of the Committee on Scholarship : 

The Committee on Scholarship shall have authority to proceed 
according to its best judgment in regard to delinquent students referred 
to it for its consideration. 

All orders of the Committee shall become effective when approved 
by the dean of the college. 

In the exercise of its authority, the Committee shall not suspend a 
student during a semester except for wilful neglect and in cases where 
the student's class grades are so low that further class attendance would 
be a waste of time. No suspension shall become effective until approved 
by the dean of the college. 

STUDEXT MARRIAGES 

If any student under the age of 21 years, who has not been pre- 
viously married, intends to marry within the school year, he or she 
must obtain the consent of the parents 1 or guardian, before such mar- 
riage shall be celebrated, in accordance with the provisions of section 
8, chapter 48, revised Official Code of West Virginia, 1931. 

In order to insure obedience to both the letter and the spirit of this 
statute and the policy of the University such student must, not less 
than one week before the celebration of said marriage, show satisfactory 
evidence to the Dean of Men (or the Dean of Women in case the student 
is a woman) that the consent of the parents or guardian as required 
by that statute has been obtained. 



2 Or of the parent living, or, if the parents be living separate and apart, 
•or the one to whom was awarded the custody of such person. 



86 General Information 



In the event that such student does not make such showing to the 
Dean of Men or Dean of Women, whether the marriage be celebrated 
within or without the State, he or she shall, from the date of the celebra- 
tion of such marriage, be automatically suspended, and may only be 
reinstated upon showing satisfactory reason to the Council of Admin- 
istration why he or she failed to comply with this regulation. 

Where both parties to the marriage are students and one has not 
complied with the above rule, both shall be suspended as provided above. 

STUDENT WELFARE 
CONVOCATION 

Convocation is held every Wednesday morning at ten o'clock in 
Commencement Hall, under the direction of the Chaplain. No classes or 
University exercises are held at this hour, and opportunity is afforded 
for all members of the University, both instructors and students, to 
attend the meeting. The hour is occupied by lectures and addresses, 
discussions of student interests and problems, and the consideration of 
questions relating to the general University welfare. 

In connection with the weekly Convocation, brief devotional exer- 
cises are held. The singing at these exercises is in charge of the Director 
of the School of Music. Attendance is entirely voluntary. 

SOCIAL, CENTER FOR WOMEN 

On the upper Campus, opposite Commencement Hall, is Elizabeth 
Moore Hall for women, completed in 1928. The building provides for 
social, recreational, and physical education activities for women students, 
and was named as a memorial to Mrs. Elizabeth I. Moore. The building 
is so arranged that facilities for social activities constitute a separate 
unit. 

STUDENT DEANS 
The Dean of Women: 

All of the interests of the women students in the University are 
in charge of a special executive officer of the University, the Dean of 
Women. She is a member of the Committee on Women Students and 
the Committee on Social Affairs. The Dean's office is on the second 
floor of Elizabeth Moore Hall. 

The Dean of Men: 

The Dean of Men is the contact officer between the Administration 
and the men students of the University. He exercises a friendly super- 
vision over the moral, social, and intellectual life of undergraduates. 
He is a member of the Committee on Social Affairs. The Dean's office 
is in Martin Hall. 



Student Welfare 87 



STU D E XT GO V E R X 1 1 K X 1 

The Student Council: 

The Student Council is the governing board of the student body. 
It is considered a standing committee of the student body and is em- 
powered to carry out all actions resolved upon. All actions of the 
Student Council are binding upon the student body, except that priv- 
eleges of a referendum are available under special provision. 

The Student Council is composed of nine members, elected annually, 
by the student body. These members are as follows : the President of 
the student body who is an ex-officio member; the presidents of the 
freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior classes; two members (man and 
woman) of the junior class (elected as sophomores) ; and two members 
(man and woman) of the senior class (elected as juniors). 

A secretary and a treasurer of the Student Council are appointed 
annually by the Student Council from its own membership. 

Wo)> : ent Government Association: 

All women students of the University are members of the Women's 
Student Government Association. The purpose of this Association is 
to regulate all matters pertaining to the student-life of its members ; 
to further in every way a spirit of friendliness and unity among the 
women of the University; to increase their sense of responsibility; and 
to be a medium for maintaining high scholastic and social standards. 

The responsibility for directing the work of the Association res: = 
with the Executive Council which is composed of the following members: 
a president, two vice-presidents, a secretary, a treasurer, and a repre- 
sentative from each class. These officers are elected annually by the 

ciation. 

The Committee on Women Students, 1 appointed by the President of 
the Un: -rrves as the Advisory Board of the Association. 

In 1921 the Association was admitted to active membership in the 
Intercollegiate Association of Student Government for Women Students. 

RELIGIOUS FOUNDATIONS AXD SOCIETIES 

F I ' 

As at most state university centers, various State and national 
church boards have established at West Virginia University foundations 
for the religious education and nurture of students. Four men, known 
as University pastors, center their work in these foundations, coun- 
selling students and looking after student interests. For the promotion 
of common ends, the foundations are grouped into an organization, with 
student representatives, known as the Council of Religious Agencies. 
Individual faculty men act as advisers. The churches of Morgantown 

ad a warm welcome to students of all faiths. The physical plant 
and equipment of each church is available for social, educational, and 
recreational activities of students. 



: Page 32. 



88 General Information 



Newman Hall, 1481 University avenue, is the center established 
by the West Virginia diocese of the Roman Catholic Church for students 
of that and other faiths. The Rev. Dr. Roderick MacEachen is the 
resident chaplain. Newman Hall is a beautiful building of English 
collegiate architecture, immediately adjacent to the Campus. It is 
equipped with dormitory facilities for 20 students, and also includes a 
chapel, dining room, lounge, game room, and library. 

Hillel Foundation, 348 High street, has as its director Rabbi 
Henry E. Kagan. The center provides social rooms, auditorium, and a 
game room. Nationally-known lecturers are brought to the Campus by 
this organization. Debating and dramatic clubs are organized and classes 
in religious education are conducted. The West Virginia University 
center is one of a great national organization of such groups established 
for the welfare of Jewish and other students. 

Trinity House, 233 Willey street, under the direction of the Rev. 
William Gregg Gehri, rector of Trinity church, is the center for welfare 
and social activities sponsored by the West Virginia diocese of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church in its program for students in the Uni- 
versity. This Church was the pioneer in establishing a student center 
at the University. The original project was housed in the building now 
used as the Woman's Hall Annex. 

Baptist Student Center, 544 Spruce street, offers facilities for 
recreational, social, and religious work among University students. The 
Rev. Julius Fishbach, pastor of the First Baptist church of Morgan- 
town, is in charge of the center. 

Westminster Foundation, 466 High street, is conducted by the 
Rev. J. Leslie French as the official representative of both the Northern 
and Southern synods of the Presbyterian Church of West Virginia. Wes- 
minster House is a social and educational center for University stu- 
dents. It has dormitory facilities for 14 women students, social parlors, 
class rooms, and a counselor's office. 

Wesley Foundation, 136 Willey street, has as its pastor the Rev. 
Durward Brown. Wesley House provides social, class, and committee 
rooms, and a small dormitory for women students. It is the headquar- 
ters for Methodist Episcopal students. A varied program of social, edu- 
cational, and religious activities is offered. 

Other Churches, while not having special buildings and workers, 
carry on an important work in ministering to the religious and social 
needs and welfare of University students of their particular faiths as 
well as many of still other faiths. 



Student Welfare 89 



Societies : 

Young Women's Christian Association is a voluntary group of 
women in the University organized for the purpose of promoting and 
directing widely varied activities for a religious motive. 

Through its national and international organization, the Y. W. C. A. 
joins in fellowship with students throughout the World. Membership 
in the Campus organization is open to all women students in the Uni- 
versity who are in agreement with its purpose. Each year representa- 
tives of the Campus "Y" are sent to all intercollegiate conferences at 
Forest Park and elsewhere. The Y. W. C. A. headquarters are located 
on the second floor of Elizabeth Moore Hall. 

Church Organizations. The following organizations have been 
established by Morgantown churches for the purpose of providing 
wholesome social activities for the students: 

Chi Beta Sigma — Methodist Protestant 
Girls Friendly Society — Protestant Episcopal 
Kappa Phi — Methodist Episcopal 
Phi Chi Delta — Presbyterian 
Theta Epsilon — Baptist. 

Cosmopolitan Club is an organization, non-sectarian in nature, com- 
posed, largely, of students in the University who are natives or citizens 
of foreign countries. The aims of the organization are fellowship, moral 
and social welfare, and the promotion of international understanding. 

STUDENT SOCIAL LIFE 

The social life of the students in the University is under the general 
supervision of the Committee on Social Affairs. This Committee has 
supervision of every social function given by the University or by any 
organization within it, including fraternities, sororities, and other stu- 
dent societies. Such social functions as balls, dances, picnics, excursions, 
and receptions are supervised by this Committee. The Committee ap- 
proves all dance programs, supervises the issuance of invitations for 
functions of a general University nature, and sees that all social affairs 
held in the University are properly conducted. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Physical training and hygiene are under the supervision of the 
Division of Physical Education. 

Two hours of physical education for men, to be taken during the 
first year in residence, and four hours of physical education for women, 
to be taken during the first and second years in residence, are required 
for graduation of students presenting fewer than 58 semester hours, 
unless previous credit has been allowed. 



90 General Information 



Each student who is required to register for physical education is 
given a complete medical and physical examination at the beginning of 
the University school year to determine his general fitness for active 
participation in University activities. 

Facilities 

Men's Field House : 

The Men's Field House, completed in 1928, is located on the lower 
Campus near the Monongahela river. Four tennis courts have been con- 
structed nearby. There are now immediately adjacent to the Field House 
eight regulation horseshoe pitching courts, and four archery ranges of 
standard size. 

The Field House contains the administrative offices of the Division 
of Physical Education. This building, constructed of brick, steel, and 
concrete, is modern in every particular. It provides facilities (including 
lockers and showers) for physical education classes, intramural ath- 
letics, and intercollegiate athletics. 

Elizabeth Moore Hall for Women: 

This building on the upper Campus, completed in 1928, provides 
social, recreational, and physical education facilities for women students. 

The offices of the Department of Physical Education for Women 
are in this building. The two floors on the slope of the hill below the 
main or entrance floor are devoted almost exclusively to athletic facilities 
for the girls. On one of these floors is a fully equipped gymnasium, 
which may be utilized for basketball or other indoor sports, or as a 
small auditorium; on the other floor is a modern swimming-pool. 

Students who have physical defects or who, for some other reason, 
are physically incapable of engaging in a regular physical education pro- 
gram, will have exercises prescribed to fit the needs of each. 

Service Programs 
Service Program for Men: 

The courses offered in this department are designed to meet the 
needs of the men of the University for an organized program of recrea- 
tion during their period of residence in the University. It is the three- 
fold purpose of the department, (1) to develop skill in from one to 
twelve recreational activities which can and will be pursued in leisure 
time after the period of residence in the University; (2) to establish 
habits of regular participation in outdoor or indoor physical activity; 
and (3) to establish favorable attitudes toward wholesome play. 

Physical Education 1 and 2 will meet the University requirement of 
2 hours' credit in physical education as a prerequisite for graduation 
of all students subject to this requirement. 

During registration week all freshmen will report at the Men's 
Field House for assignment of lockers and baskets, and for appointment 
for physical and medical examination and physical achievement tests. 



Student Welfare 91 



These examinations and tests will be the guide in the selection of a 
program of physical education for the individual student. See Bulletin 
of the Department of Service Program for Men. 

Service Program for Women: 

The courses offered in this department are designed to meet the 
needs of the women of the University for an organized program of 
recreation during their period of residence in the University. The Uni- 
versity provides four semesters of physical education of three periods 
each week. These periods cover indoor and outdoor work as well as 
lectures on personal hygiene. 

Each female student subject to the above requirement must learn to 
swim and to play skilfully one highly organized sport and one individual 
sport, must meet a definite standard in rhythm, and must gain a knowl- 
edge of hygiene in relation to wholesome living. 

Intramural Athletics 

Intramural Athletics for Men: 

The Department of Intramural Athletics for Men is organized as 
one of the departments of the Division of Physical Education. It is 
the aim of this department to encourage the entire student body of the 
University to participate in organized athletic sports and wholesome, 
active recreation. Competition will be promoted between student groups, 
faculty groups and individuals. The units which are now the natural 
groups on the campus, such as class, fraternity, and unorganized or 
non-fraternity groups, will form the basis for activities in competitive 
sports and recreation. It is the aim of the department to foster a spirit 
of fair play and good sportsmanship in all competition. 

All students regularly enrolled in any department in the Univer- 
sity shall be eligible to enjoy the intramural privileges, except that 
they must satisfy certain eligibility requirements for the various activ- 
ities. All students who are members of the Varsity or freshman squads 
in a sport, or who have earned a Varsity award (WV) in a sport, shall 
be ineligible for intramural competition in that particular sport. All 
students who have won a varsity award in a sport from another institu- 
tion of college rank shall be ineligible for intramural competition in that 
particular sport. Winning a Varsity award in one sport such as basket- 
ball will not bar a student from participation in another intramural sport 
such as baseball. See Handbook of the Department of Intramural Ath- 
letics. 

All competitions conducted by the Department are under the con- 
trol of the Administrative Board, composed of the Director of Physical 
Education, Director of Intramural Athletics, Director of the Service Pro- 
gram for Men, Director of Intercollegiate Athletics, Supervisor of Activi- 
ties, and the senior managers. The coaches of the various Varsity sports 
are ex-officio members of the Administrative Board and vote on ques- 



92 General Information 



tions of eligibility or protests which concern the particular sport they 
may coach. 

The following activities are conducted during the fall season: speed- 
ball, cross-country and wrestling. Other activities may be promoted 
during this season when there is sufficient interest on the part of the stu- 
dents and where facilities are available. Leagues will be organized to 
accommodate classes, fraternities, and non-fraternity or unorganized 
groups. 

The following activities are conducted during the winter season: 
basketball, indoor track, relays, bowling, basketball free-throwing, hand- 
ball, and wrestling. Arrangements will be made later for intramural 
competition in swimming. 

The following activities are conducted during the spring season: 
tennis, playground baseball, baseball, horseshoes, and outdoor track and 
field. 

IntramurcU Athletics for Women: 

The Women's Athletic Association, together with the Women's De- 
partment of the Division of Physical Education, sponsors all the intra- 
mural athletic activities for women. It is the aim of these two groups to 
encourage all women students to participate in organized sports as a 
recreational activity. Competition takes place between the organized 
groups on the Campus such as sorority, dormitory, church, independent, 
and class groups. 

All women enrolled in the University are eligible to play in any 
intramural tournament, provided they satisfy the eligibility requirements 
which are: (1) All freshman women must play with their dormitory, 
church, or independent team, and not with the sorority to which they are 
pledged. (2) Only two physical education majors may play on any one 
team. Inter-class tournaments in volleyball, basketball, baseball, and 
field and track are held each year for the professional students in 
physical education. 

The following activities are conducted : during the fall season — ■ 
horseshoes and volleyball; during the winter season — ring tennis, swim- 
ming, badminton, basketball, and ping-pong: during the spring season — 
tennis, baseball, archery, and track and field. As the demand for more 
activities develops, the facilities will be increased and the program 
broadened. 

HEALTH SERVICE 

In September, 1929, the Health Service, maintained for University 
students during the regular and summer sessions, was placed under the 
administration of the Division of Physical Education. It is organized to 
provide medical service to the students of the University as well as to 
supervise the health conditions of the Campus. Each full-time student, 
during the regular academic year or during the summer session, is 



Student Welfare 93 



entitled to free medical consultation and advice from the University 
physician. A moderate charge is made for room-calls, Infirmary bed 
care, x-rays, special laboratory tests, drugs furnished by the University 
Pharmacy, minor operations, treatment of fractures and dislocations, and 
intravenous treatment. 

The University maintains a student infirmary, in which are located 
the offices of the physicians and nurses and a five-bed ward for limited 
treatment. This is not to be construed as a general hospital service for 
the student body, nor does the University render nursing service at the 
rooms of the students. The student nurse is available only for such 
services as may be rendered at the Infirmary. 

Students wishing to avail themselves of the Health Service are 
expected to call at the office of the University physician in the Infirmary. 
The physicians' office hours are from 9 a. m. to 12 noon daily except Sun- 
day, and from 2 p. m. to 5 p. m. daily except Saturday and Sunday. 

The University Pharmacy is in the basement of Woodburn Hall. 
Prescriptions may be filled between 11 a. m. and 12 noon every day except 
Sunday, and between 2:30 p. m. and 4:30 p. m. every day except Satur- 
day and Sunday. 

IXTER COLLEGIATE ATHLETICS 

The Department of Intercollegiate Athletics is under the supervision 
of the Director of Intercollegiate Athletics and the Athletic Board, com- 
posed of the Director, two members of the Faculty, two University 
alumni, and two students. Football, baseball, basketball, boxing, 
wrestling, track, cross country, tennis, and rifle teams are organized and 
trained each season. All intercollegiate athletics are under the control of 
the Council of Administration. Questions of athletic eligibility are de- 
termined by the Faculty, through the Athletic Board. 

Mountaineer Field: 

On the north border of the lower Campus is located the Stadium, 
enclosing Mountaineer Field. This monolithic concrete and steel structure 
was erected in 1924, largely through subscriptions of alumni and former 
students but also with the help of other contributors. It has a seating 
capacity of 34,000. Mountaineer Field provides facilities for intramural 
and intercollegiate football, and track and field events. The Old Athletic 
Field is used for baseball, football and track and field practice. 

EMPLOYMENT SERVICE 

Student Employment: 

An employment service for women students is maintained in the 
office of the Dean of Women for the assistance of earnest, capable, and 
worthy applicants. Prospective women students, desiring information on 
the subject before their arrival in Morgantown, should address Miss 
Ruth D. Noer, Dean of Women, West Virginia University. 



94 General Information 



Male students desiring work may avail themselves of the employment 
bureau maintained in the office of H. E. Stone, Dean of Men, West Vir- 
ginia University, where application blanks may be filed before arrival in 
Morgantown, or after enrollment. 

Unless absolutely necessary, freshmen should not attempt to do work 
in self-support, in addition to regular University curricular w T ork, at least 
until after mid-semester grades have been received. Experience has 
made it clear that only the exceptional student can engage in ''outside" 
work or activities during the first semester without danger of scholastic 
failure. 

Teachers' Placement Bureau: 

The College of Education in cooperation with other departments of 
the University maintains a Placement Bureau which makes available to 
school officials the credentials of students and alumni who are candidates 
for school positions. The facilities of the Bureau are available to stu- 
dents in both the regular and summer sessions. No charge is made for 
this service. 

Blanks for registration will be furnished upon application. The 
regular annual enrollment in the Bureau takes place the second week in 
February. 

While a conscientious effort is made to place all worthy applicants, 
no one is assured a position. General letters of recommendation are 
not given to candidates. Information in the files of the Bureau is re- 
garded as confidential. The Bureau cannot undertake to furnish copies 
of its records to commercial or other private placement bureaus. 

Pharmacists' Register: 

A pharmacists' register for the benefit of both the employer and 
employee has been established by the Department of Pharmacy. No 
charge is made for services rendered. 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUNDS 

Several individuals, as well as national patriotic, educational, fra- 
ternal, and religious organizations, have established scholarships, loan 
funds, prizes, trophies, and medals for students in the University. Very 
few of these are available to freshmen. 

SCHOLARSHIP IX TENOR VOICE 

For the purpose of fostering the development of musical talent 
among students in the School of Music, Director Black each year con- 
tributes without charge to the possessor of a suitable tenor voice private 
lessons in voice of the value of S110. 



Scholarships and Loan Funds 95 

LOAN FUNDS 

American Bankers Association Foundation for Education in 
Economics Loan Scholarships — The American Bankers Association 
Foundation for Education in Economics has assigned to West Virginia 
University three scholarships of $250 each. These scholarships will be 
"awarded only to deserving students of integrity, intelligence, character, 
competency, and aptitude, whose means of support are dependent wholly 
or in part on their own labor, to enable them to continue the study of 
courses in banking and economics in classes of junior grade or above. 
Scholarship of the highest rank will not be a definite requirement for a 
loan scholarship award; however, the Foundation desires to encourage 
students who will become leaders in professional or business life and does 
not wish loan scholarships granted to mediocre or inferior students." The 
holder of one of these scholarships is eligible for one re-appointment. 
The loan is without interest until the first day of the second January 
after the recipient leaves the University. Beginning on that date, interest 
accrues at the rate of five (59^) per cent per year, and repayment of both 
principal and interest in sums of not less than $10 monthly must likewise 
then begin. 

Walter Haines South Memorial Scholarship — To perpetuate the 
name of her deceased brother, a graduate of the University, Mrs. 
Frederick J. Knutti of Morgantown has recently created The Walter 
Haines South Memorial Scholarship. This scholarship, open to deserving 
boys, involves a total of $500 per annum. This fund has been placed in 
the hands of the West Virginia University Student Loan Fund Corpora- 
tion for administration. Under the plan of operation of this fund, some 
one person will be selected who will receive the entire amount of this 
scholarship fund, without interest, while he is an undergraduate. The 
amount lent will be repaid over a period of four years after graduation. 

The J. D. Finley Loan Fund — A fund of $1,000 has been con- 
tributed to the University by the trustees of the estate of the Hon. J. D. 
Finley of Pittsburgh, Pa., in accordance with his last will and testament, 
to be used as loans to deserving students in the School of Medicine. 

Theodore Smith Loan Fund — On Sunday afternoon, April 13, 1930, 
Theodore Smith, a sophomore in mining engineering, was drowned in an 
accident that occurred while he was canoeing on the Monongahela river, 
just below Lock No. 10. The tragic death of this popular student dis- 
closed the fact that he was being financed through the University by the 
Hon. James Elwood Jones. The youth, a person of high honor, had 
voluntarily taken out a life insurance policy of $2,000 with Mr. Jones as 
beneficiary. The payment of the amount of the policy was a distinct 
surprise to Mr. Jones, who had helped the young man with no expectation 
of and no agreement providing for repayment.. In deference to the 



96 General Information 



memory of Theodore Smith, Mr. Jones turned the $2,000 over to the Uni- 
versity for the establishment of the Theodore Smith Loan Fund to per- 
petuate the youth's name. 

Revolving Loan Fund for Men — A revolving fund to meet financial 
emergencies that come to college men was established in October, 1931. 
About $1,200 was raised by public subscriptions of faculty members, 
students, business men, and alumni. 

The General Committee in charge of this fund includes the president 
of the student body, the editor of the Athenaeum, and the Dean of Men. 
Dean H. E. Stone, founder of the fund, is treasurer. 

Loans are made in small amounts and for short periods of time. No 
loans from this fund are made until after registration. 

Other Loan Funds for Men — The Morgantown Rotary Club has 
established an emergency loan fund for University men. Application for 
loans should be made to the Dean of Men who acts as adviser for the 
fund. 

Several other loan funds are available for men who by their records 
at the West Virginia University have demonstrated their ability and 
integrity. These include the Knights Templar fund and the Scottish Rite 
fund established by masonic bodies. Information concerning these funds 
may be obtained from the Dean of Men. 

Loan Funds for Women — There are several loans available to 
women at West Virginia University. These have been provided by 
various agencies interested in higher education for women. 

The following is a list of these agencies: 

Elizabeth Ludington Hagans Chapter of the D. A. R. 

Colonel John Evans Chapter of the D. A. R. 

Knights Templar 

West Virginia Federation of Women's Clubs 

The Campus Club 

The Farm Girls 

The Methodist Episcopal Church 

Women's Student Government Association 

Rhododendron 

The P. E. O. Sisterhood 

Students should do no more borrowing than is absolutely necessary, 
but it is often wiser for students of good scholastic ability to borrow 
rather than to carry a burden of work so heavy as to interfere with good 
scholastic performance. 

Loans are available in amounts varying from $50 to $400, preference 
being given to junior and senior students. Applications for loans may be 
made through the office of the Dean of W T omen. 



Prizes, Trophies, and Medals 97 

PRIZES, TROPHIES, AND MEDALS 

PRIZES 

Awards for prizes in the University are made in accordance with 
the following rules: 

No composition, in whole or in part shall be submitted in com- 
petition for two prizes. 

Only students pursuing courses leading to baccalaureate degrees 
are eligible for any prize offered, except for the James F. Brown prize. 

Xo student shall be eligible to enter any contest who has not been 
a resident student in this University for at least one semester preceding 
the semester in which the contest is to be held, and who, unless he be a 
competitor for the James F. Brown prize, is not a resident student in 
good standing in the University in the semester in which the contest is 
held. 

No successful contestant may become for a second time a compet- 
itor for the same prize. 

If in any contest the judges find no manuscript of sufficient merit, 
there shall be no award of the prize for that year. 

Students intending to compete in any essay-writing contest must 
notify the chairman of the Committee on Prizes not later than March 
15. Three typewritten copies of each essay must be in the hands of the 
chairman of the committee not later than May 15. 

The conditions upon which the awards in the several contests are 
made may be learned upon application to the President's office, or to the 
members of the Committee on Prizes. 

The William Jennings Bryan Prize — The Hon. William Jennings 
Bryan, before his death, gave a sum of money, the actual income of which 
is offered as a prize to the student in the University who shall write the 
best essay on some subject in the science of government. The amount of 
the prize for the present is $21. The subject assigned for the year 
1933-34 is: "The Reorganization of Local Rural Government in West 
Virginia." 

The Tax Commission Prize — The honorable members of the State 
Tax Commission of 1902, namely, W. P. Hubbard, Henry G. Davis, John 
K. Thompson, L. J. Williams, and J. H. Holt, gave the sum of $1,350, 
later increased by unawarded sums to $1,500, the income of which is to be 
used annually as a prize for the "best original work bearing on matters 
of taxation in West Virginia." The conditions of the competition are 
determined by the Council of Administration. The amount of the prize 
at present is $90. The subject assigned for 1933-34 is: "Means of 
Rendering More Effective the Assessment of Personal Property for 
Taxation in West Virginia." 

The James F. Brown Prize — The Hon. James F. Brown, an alumnus 
of the University, "with a desire to stimulate the young men of the State 
to fuller consideration of the 'inalienable right' of mankind, and especially 



98 General Information 



those guaranteed by the Constitution of the State and of the United 
States," has contributed $5,000 to the University, the income of which is 
to be "used as a prize for the best essay or paper each year on the subject 
of the individual liberties of the citizens as guaranteed by the Constitu- 
tion." The income may be given as a single prize, or it may be divided 
into a first and second prize. For the present the award will be made as 
a single prize, $300 in amount. Any senior or any graduate of any 
college of the University, within one year after receiving any bachelor's 
degree, may compete for this prize, but no holder of any graduate degree 
may become a competitor. The subject assigned for 1933-34 is: "The 
Requirement of Due Process in Judicial Proceedings." 

The National Association of Drug Clerks Prize — Annual prizes 
consisting of life-memberships in the National Association of Drug 
Clerks, valued at $20 each, are awarded pharmacy seniors for the highest 
scholarship attained in pharmacy, chemistry, and materia medica. 

The Kappa Psi Prize— Beta Eta chapter of Kappa Psi, pharmaceu- 
tical fraternity, awards annually a prize of $10 to the first-year student 
in the Department of Pharmacy who has made the best scholastic record 
at the end of the first semester. 

The West Virginia State Pharmaceutical Association Prize— 
The West Virginia State Pharmaceutical Association offers to the student 
making the best set of drawings in Pharmacy 10 a set of more than 170 
crude drugs, in separate boxes, contained in a large cabinet. Each box 
is labelled with the correct Latin title, common name, and habitat. This 
prize is valuable to the student in pharmacy; especially so in the study 
of pharmacognosy. 

The American Law Book Company Prize — The American Law 
Book Company has continued its offer of a set of Corpus Juris complete 
to date to the student in the course in Use of Law Books who makes the 
highest grade in the series of tests furnished by the Company. 

The Waitman Barbe Memorial Prize — The English Club of West 
Virginia University offers an annual prize of $25 in memory of Waitman 
Barbe, poet, scholar, and adviser of the English Club during his long 
term of service on the Faculty. The prize shall be awarded to some stu- 
dent regularly enrolled as a junior or senior in West Virginia University, 
for creative work in the field of literature, either in prose or poetry or 
both. The minimum length of such composition must be 4,000 words in 
prose or 100 lines in poetry. 

The Board of Governors Military Essay Prize; — The Board of 
Governors of West Virginia University each year offers a prize of $50 to 
the Cadet in the Division of Military Science and Tactics "who shall write 
the best essay on preparation against war." 



Prizes, Trophies, and Medals 99 

TROPHIES 

The Inter-Fraternity Scholarship Trophy — Professor Arleigh 
Lee Darby of the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures 
offers a silver cup known as the Inter-Fraternity Scholastic Trophy. It 
is awarded at the end of the University year to the fraternity having the 
highest average scholarship standing for that year and is to remain in 
the possession of that fraternity during the following year. The cup 
becomes the permanent property of the fraternity that first wins it five 
times. 

The Order of B'nai B'rith Trophy — The Hillel Foundaion of the 
Order of B'nai B'rith offers a cup to the fraternity on the Campus having 
the highest scholastic standing for the year regardless of whether or not 
the fraternity holds membership in the Inter-Fraternity Council. There 
are at present 25 organizations eligible to compete for this trophy. The 
Hillel Foundation offers also a smaller trophy which accompanies the 
larger one and which becomes at once the property of the fraternity 
which wins possession of the larger trophy. 

The Alfred Jarrett Hare Trophy — Professor Alfred Jarrett Hare 
offers a silver cup to the sorority which has the highest scholastic stand- 
ing for the year. 

The George C. Baker Trophy — The Hon. George C. Baker, graduate 
of the College of Law, offers a silver loving cup, possession of which is 
awarded each year to the Club Court in the College of Law winning the 
inter-club competition. 

The A. G. Spalding Trophy — The A. G. Spalding Company, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa., branch, offers a handsome trophy to the fraternity scoring the 
highest number of points in the all-year athletic competition for fraterni- 
ties. This trophy becomes the permanent possession of the organization 
winning it once. 

The Sport Shop Trophy — Mr. Carl P. Leatherwood, graduate of the 
University and a former four-sport Varsity athlete, offers a handsome 
trophy to the fraternity scoring the second highest number of points in 
the all-year athletic competition for fraternities. This trophy becomes 
the permanent possession of the organization winning it once. 

The Morgantown Post Trophy — The Morgantown Post ,evening 
newspaper, offers annually a trophy which is symbolic of the inter- 
fraternity championship in basketball and is the permanent possession of 
the organization winning it once. 

The Spring Football Trophy — The Department of Intramural 
Athletics of the Division of Physical Education offers a handsome trophy 
to the individual making the best showing in the Spring football practice 



100 General Information 



of the Varsity squad. This trophy is awarded on the following basis: (1) 
improvement in practice; (2) attitude; (3) attendance; (4) probable 
value to next Fall's Varsity. 

A committee consisting of the Head Coach of Football and his 
assistants and the football Captain shall judge as to whom the award 
shall be made. Individuals who have a Varsity letter in football shall 
not be considered eligible for the award. 

MEDALS 

The Board of Governors Military Medals — The Board of Gover- 
nors of West Virginia University offers the following medals as special 
rewards for excellence in military training: (1) To the Cadet having the 
highest record for shooting on the University rifle team, a gold medal; 
(2) to the Cadet having the second highest record for shooting on the 
University rifle team, a silver medal; (3) to the Cadet on the freshman 
rifle team with the highest aggregate score, a bronze medal; and (4) to 
the Cadet having the best record for military training and discipline, a 
gold medal. 

The Lehn and Fink Medal — Through the generosity of Lehn and 
Fink, manufacturing chemists of New York City, the Department of 
Pharmacy awards each year to the senior pharmacy student who, in the 
opinion of the Faculty of the Department of Pharmacy, attains the 
highest scholarship, a gold medal. The medal is appropriately engraved. 

The Walter E. Dandy Medal — In 1926, Dean John N. Simpson of 
the School of Medicine established the Walter E. Dandy Gold Medal to be 
awarded to the student of the graduating class of the School of Medicine 
who is judged by the Faculty to be the most excellent. 

In making this award, the factors of personality and adaptability, 
as well as marks in the different courses will be taken into consideration. 

HONOR SOCIETIES 

Phi Beta Kappa. The Alpha of West Virginia Chapter of the Phi 
Beta Kappa Society is established at the University. Stated meetings 
or public exercises of the society are held twice annually: the anniver- 
sary meeting on December 5, and the annual meeting during Commence- 
ment Week. The honor of membership may be conferred upon candidates 
for the degree of Bachelor of Arts who have maintained a high scholar- 
ship rank during their college course; also upon members of the Faculty 
and alumni of the University, and upon distinguished citizens of the 
State. 

Sigma Xi Club. The national organization of the Society of the 
Sigma Xi is represented in the University by the Sigma Xi Club of West 
Virginia University. The purpose of the national society and of the 
local club is the encouragement of scientific research. 



Honor Societies 101 



Tau Beta Pi. The West Virginia Alpha chapter of the national 
engineering honor association of Tau Beta Pi was established in the 
College of Engineering in 1922. Students who rank in scholarship 
among the upper one-eighth of their class are eligible to election in their 
third year and all who rank among the upper one-fourth of the class 
are likewise eligible in their fourth year. These together with alumni 
and honorary members constitute the chapter. 

Alpha Zeta. The West Virginia chapter of Alpha Zeta, the 
national agricultural honor fraternity, was instituted in the College of 
Agriculture in 1921. Sophomores and upper classmen who maintain high 
standing in scholarship and rank among the upper two-fifths of their re- 
spective classes are eligible to membership. 

Phi Upsilon Omicron. The Lambda chapter of Phi Upsilon 
Omicron, one of the national professional organizations in home eco- 
nomics, was established at the University in November, 1923. Its 
purpose is to promote the moral and intellectual development of its 
members, to help to develop leadership, and to advance home economics. 
Membership is open to juniors and seniors in home economics who rank 
in the upper two-fifths of the class in scholarship. 

Phi Lambda Upsilon. Tau chapter of Phi Lambda Upsilon, na- 
tional chemical honor fraternity, was established at the University in 
1924. The chief object of the society is the promotion and protection 
of high scholarship and original investigation in all branches of pure 
and applied chemistry. Seniors and juniors who have attained a high 
standard of scholarship and character are eligible for membership in the 
chapter. 

Sigma Gamma Epsilon. Upsilon chapter was established at West 
Virginia University in 1927. The fraternity has for its objects the 
social, scholastic and scientific advancement of its members, the extension 
of the relations of friendship and assistance between the universities and 
scientific schools with recognized standing in the United States and 
Canada, and the upbuilding of a national college society devoted to the 
advancement of geology, mining, metallurgy, and ceramics. Seniors and 
juniors in the courses indicated, who have attained high scholarship rank 
are eligible for membership. 

Order of the Coif. A chapter of the Order of the Coif, a national 
law school honor society, was installed in 1925. Its members are selected 
by the Law faculty from the 10 per cent of the senior class in the College 
of Law ranking highest in scholarship. 

Phi Epsilon Phi. Phi Epsilon Phi, botanical honor fraternity, was 
founded at West Virginia University in 1929. The fraternity has for its 
purpose the promotion of high scholarship, the inciting of interest in 
botanical research, and the encouragement of professional ideals. Seniors 



102 General Information 



and graduate students who are engaged in botanical work and who have 
attained a high standard of scholarship and character are eligible for 
membership in the organization. 

Kappa Tau Alpha. National journalistic honor society with scholar- 
ship standards similar to Phi Beta Kappa. The West Virginia chapter 
was established in 1930. 

Sigma Pi Sigma. Theta chapter of Sigma Pi Sigma, national physics 
honor fraternity, was installed in the University in 1929. The formal 
statement of the objects of the fraternity is: "To reward high scholar- 
ship and promote interest in the advanced study of physics, to stimulate 
individual research, and to enable its members to keep pace with the 
progress of science." A student elected to membership must be taking 
some course in physics at the time of his election. Graduate students 
who are taking advanced work in physics and related subjects are 
eligible for membership. 

Kappa Delta Pi. Kappa Delta Pi, national honorary educational 
society, installed Alpha Upsilon chapter at West Virginia University, 
July 21, 1927. Election to this fraternity is conditioned upon high 
scholarship and desirable personal and professional qualities. 

OTHER UNIVERSITY ORGANIZATIONS 

There are in the University various fraternities, sororities, societies, 
and clubs devoted chiefly to the social, educational, and athletic interests 
of the students. Some of the more important of these organizations are: 

NATIONAL AND GREEK LETTER SOCIETIES 

Social Fraternities 
Men 

Alpha Sigma Phi Phi Sigma Kappa 

Beta Theta Pi Pi Kappa Alpha 

Delta Tau Delta Pi Kappa Phi 

Kappa Alpha Pi Lambda Phi 

Kappa Sigma higma Chi 

Phi Alpha Sigma Nu 

Phi Delta Theta Sigma Phi Epsilon 

Phi Kappa Psi Tau Epsilon Phi 

Phi Kappa Sigma Tau Kappa Epsilon 

Phi Kappa Tau Theta Chi 
Phi Sigma Delta 

Inter-Fraternity Council 

Women 

Alpha Delta Pi Kappa Kappa Gamma 

Alpha Phi • Phi Mu 

Alpha Xi Delta Pi Beta Phi 

Chi Omega Sigma Sigma Sigma 1 

Delta Gamma Theta Upsilon 

Gamma Phi Beta Pan-Hellenic Association 



'Local. 



Other University Organizations 



103 



Professional Fhatbrniti es 

Men and Women 



Alpha Omega (Physical Education) 

Beta Pi Theta (French) 

Chi Sigma Delta (Economics) 

Delta Xu Tau (Pre-Law) 1 

Delta I'hi Alpha (German) 

Delta Sigma Rho (Forensic) 

Eta Sigma Phi (Latin) 

Kappa Beta Pi (Legal, Women) 



Kappa Kappa Psi (Band) 

Kappa Psi (Pharmacy) 

Phi Alpha Delta (Law) 

Phi Beta Pi (Medical) 

I'hi Delta Phi (Law) 

Phi Sigma Nu (Local, Medical) 

Sigma Pi Psi (Pharmacy) 

Theta Kappa Psi (Medical) 



NATIONAL AND LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS 



Sphinx (Senior, Men) 

Mountain (Senior, Men) 

Scabbard and Blade (Military) 

English Club 

La Tertulia (Spanish) 

Engineering Society 

Cadet Hop Association 

University Bird Club (Zoology) 

Rowan Rifles (Military) 

Journal iers (Journalistic, Men) 

Agricultural Council (Inter-Class) 

Ph> sical Education Club 

Club Courts (Men, Law) 

Torch and Serpent (Sophomore, Men) 

Fi Bater Cappar (Men, Humorous) 

University Band (Military) 

University Vo-Ag Club 

Anthony Dairy Club 

Grey friars 

Red Dragon Casteliers (Military) 

Block and Bridle (Agricultural) 

Philosophy Club 

Mortar Board (Senior, Women) 



Beowulf Gedryht (English) 

Dramatic Club 

Rhododendron (Junior, Women) 

Li-Toon-A\va (Sophomore, Women) 

University Girls' Glee Club 

University Choir 

Order of the Coffin (Women, Law) 

Orchesis (Women, Physical Education) 

Matrix (Women, Journalistic) 

Home Economics Club 

Women's Athletic Association 

Swimming Club (Women) 

Press Club 

Women's Athletic Council 

University 4-H Club 

Philhellenic Club (Inter-Sorority) 

University Orchestra 

Varsity Club (Letter Men) 

Scientific Society 

Greek Club 

French Club (Entre Nous) 

Council of Religious Agencies 

University Grange 



Student Branches of the following : 

American Society of Civil Engineers 

American Society of Mechanical Engineers 

American Institute of Electrical Engineers 

American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers 

FACULTY ORGANIZATIONS 

American Association of University Professors. The West Virginia 
branch of the American Association of University Professors now has a 
membership of more than fifty. The present officers are: Dr. Claude 
Carl Spiker, president; Mrs. Lily Bell Deatrick, secretary. 

Faculty Club. The Faculty Club of the University organized on 
March 10, 1921, is composed of the teaching and research staff of the 
institution. The former residence of the late Dr. I. C. White, obtained 
by the University through the purchase of a large tract of land imme- 
diately adjacent to the Campus, has been converted into a club house 
and residence for the Faculty Club. Meals are served to members and 



Local 



104 General Information 



their guests. The club rooms are a center for social activities of members 
of the Faculty. 

Campus Club. The Campus Club, is purely a social organization 
made up of members of the Staff and their wives and husbands. The 
Campus Club holds meetings regularly twice each month, and special 
meetings and functions at other times. 

Cornell Club. The Cornell Club is composed of resident Faculty 
members who hold degrees from Cornell University. Regular meetings 
are held by the organization, the purposes of which are largely social. 

West Virginia Alumni Association of Johns Hopkins. The West Vir- 
ginia Alumni Association of Johns Hopkins was founded in 1913 and 
holds annual meetings on February 22, the anniversary of the establish- 
ment of Johns Hopkins University. Graduates and former students of 
Johns Hopkins are eligible for membership. During 1931-32 Dr. Eliza- 
beth M. Stalnaker is president, and Dr. Albert M. Reese is secretary. 

PUBLICATIONS 
Univers ity Publications : 

The following publications are issued regularly at the University: 

1. The West Virginia University Bulletins, issued monthly or semi- 
monthly during the University year. The series includes the Catalogue 
of the University and the Announcements of the various separate col- 
leges, schools, and divisions. 

2. The various bulletins and circulars of the Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station. 

3. The Bulletins of the College of Engineering and Mechanic Arts. 

4. Circulars of the Agricultural Extension Division, including the 
Farm Women's Club leaflets, the 4-H Suggestions, the West Virginia 
Farm News (in cooperation with West Virginia Farm Bureau), and 
special pamphlets. 

5. The West Virginia Law Quarterly, the official publication of the 
West Virginia Bar Association, edited by the Faculty of the College of 
Law. 

6. The Proceedings of the West Virginia Academy of Science. 

7. Agricultural News Service bulletins published weekly by the 
College of Agriculture. 

Student Publications: 

The Athenaeum, the tri-weekly University newspaper, is published 
by the journalism students. The editorial and managerial staff is elected 
by the student body. 

The Monticola, student yearbook of the University, is published by 
the junior class. 

All student publications are under the supervision of the Committee 
on Student Publications. 



Part III 

CURRICULAR REQUIREMENTS OF THE 
COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, AND DIVISIONS 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

For the purpose of administration, the College of Agriculture is 
divided into four branches: the Agricultural Experiment Station, 
organized for research and experimental work; resident instruction in 
agriculture; resident instruction in home economics; and extension work 
in agriculture, home economics, and boys' and girls' club work, carried on 
by the Division of Agricultural Extension. The descriptive matter on the 
pages which follow outlines the curricular requirements for resident in- 
struction in agriculture and home economics as well as the requirements 
for certification of teachers in these two fields. A more complete state- 
ment of the organization and purposes of the College of Agriculture, in- 
cluding a brief description of the work of the Agricultural Experiment 
Station and the Agricultural Extension Division, may be found on 
page 49. 

The attention of students is directed to the general requirements of 
the University concerning entrance, admission with advanced standing, 
requirements as to residence, classification of students, examinations, 
grades, and honor points, as set forth in the General Information section 
(Part II) of this Catalogue. 

For courses of instruction, see pages 207 to 221. 

AGRICULTURE 

THE BACCALAUREATE DEGREE IN AGRICULTURE 

The curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agri- 
culture is designed to provide a broad and well-grounded training in the 
general field of agriculture so that the student may be prepared for 
occupations requiring such general knowledge, and may have the founda- 
tion for such specialization as he may elect to pursue. 

CREDITS AND HONOR POINTS 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture may be conferred 
upon any student who satisfies the entrance requirements and offers 144 
hours' credit for college courses, including all requirements set forth 
below. 1 

The student must receive at least as many honor points as credits 
in order to be eligible for graduation. 

REQUIRED AND ELECTIVE SUBJECTS 

All the courses for the first two years are definitely required 
as set forth in the curriculum which follows. Modification will be per- 
mitted only under very unusual circumstances and must have the 
sanction of the Committee on Courses and Hours. Students who are 



1 A student may decrease the total number of hours required for graduation 
by doing - work of superior quality. For details of this plan, see page 78. 



10s Curricular Requirements 

not required to take military science must substitute elective credits. 
Agriculture 5, required of students deficient in farm practice, must be 
completed before the third year. The attention of the student is also 
directed to the regulation which requires the completion of first year 
English, English 1 and 2 or their equivalent, before any upper-division 
courses may be pursued for credit towards the degree. 

During the last two years the student is permitted a choice of one 
of four curricula — agricultural economics, animal industry, plant in- 
dustry, and teacher training. The choice of a curriculum should be de- 
termined by the objectives of the student and should be guided by his 
aptitudes as revealed during the work of the first two years. Students 
desiring to qualify as teachers of agriculture or science in high schools 
should elect the curriculum in teacher training, while those desiring 
special training in agricultural business and marketing should select the 
curriculum in agricultural economics. The curricula in animal industry 
and plant industry are designed for students who may wish to follow 
any of the several fields that are included under each of these broad 
divisions, or who wish general preparation. It should be noted that all 
four curricula are elastic enough to provide special preparation for the 
student who desires to enter the field of county agent work. 

The required courses for the last two years are stated in the out- 
lines of the four curricula. It is to be noted that, regardless of the 
curriculum chosen, Animal Husbandry 102, Dairy Husbandry 101, 
Horticulture 101, and Horticulture 102 are required of all students. 
Electives may be chosen, without restriction as to college or depart- 
ment, with the approval of the advisory committee. However, the re- 
quired and elective hours taken in the College of Agriculture must 
amount to no fewer than 60 hours in all. Provision is made for upper- 
division students who may wish to elect certain lower-division subjects 
such as languages. 

Provision is also made for the occasional student who may wish 
to pursue a rather broad program of electives during the last two years. 
Special programs for such students will be arranged with the approval 
an'd guidance of the Committee on Courses and Hours and will con- 
form to the general requirements for the degree. 

ADVISER 

The Dean of the College of Agriculture will act as adviser for all 
agricultural students and will assign students to other advisers whom 
he may designate. 



The College of Agriculture 



109 



CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURE FOR FIRST AND SECOND 

YEARS 



First Yeak 



First Semester Hrs. 

Agriculture 1 — Intro, to Agr 1 

Botany 1 — General Botany 4 

Chemistry 3 — Inorganic Chem... 4 

English 1 — Comp. and Rhet 3 

Zoology 1 — Invertebrate Z'logy 4 

Military Science 1 

Physical Education 1 1 



18 



Second Semester 



Hrs. 



Agriculture 2 — Intro, to Agr 1 

Botany 2 — General Botany 4 

Chemistry 4 — Inorganic Chem... 4 

English 2— Comp. and Rhet 3 

Zoology 2 — Vertebrate Zoology 4 

Military Science 1 

Physical Education 1 1 



18 



First Semester 



Second Yeak 
Hrs. 



Agronomy 1 — Farm Crops 5 

Chemistry 31 2 — Organic Chem. 4 

Economics 1 — Prin. of Econ 3 

Geol. 4 — Geol. for Agr. Students 3 

Botany 141 — Bacteriology 3 

Military Science 1 



Second Semester* 



Hrs. 



Animal Husb. 1 — Animal Nutr. 3 

Agronomy 2 — Soils 3 

Farm Economics 2 — Farm Eco. 3 

Entomology 2 — Entomology 4 

Poultry 1 — Poultry Husb 4 

Military Science 1 



19 



18 



OPTIONAL CURRICULA FOR THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 

On completion of the work of the first and second years, the 
student may elect one of the following curricula: agricultural economics, 
animal industry, plant industry, or teacher training. Students desiring 
training in agriculture other than that provided by these curricula will 
be permitted to pursue a program of electives subject to the guidance 
and approval of the Committee on Courses and Hours. 



CURRICULUM IX AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 
Third Year 



First Semester 



Hrs. 



Second Semester 



Hrs, 



Animal Husbandry 102* — Live- 
stock Produc. and Manage- 
ment 5 

Dairy Husbandry 101 4 — Prin. of 
Dairying 5 

Hort. 101 4 — Principles of Hort. 4 

Farm Economics 131 — Market- 
ing Agr. Products 3 



17 



Hort. 102*— Principles of Hort. 4 

Farm Mechanics 153 — Farm 
Mechanics 3 

Plant Path. 107— Market Path- 
ology 2 

Econ. Ill — Money, Credit, and 
Banking 3 

Electives 6 



be 



18 

:cepted 



1 Only 2 hours of physical education in the service program wil 
toward graduation in the College of Agriculture. 

2 Chemistry 233 may be substituted. 

3 In addition to the courses listed above, 2 hours in farm practice must be 
earned by students with insufficient farm experience. This requirement must :>e 
met before the beginning of the junior year (See Agriculture 5). 

*These courses are required of all students. 



110 



Curricular Requirements 



First Semester 



Fourth Year 
Hrs. 



Vet. Sc. 102 — Animal Pathology 3 

Farm Econ. 233 — Coop. Market- 
ing: of Agr. Products 3 or 4 

Farm Economics 107 — Farm 
Records and Accounts 2 

Electives 10 



18 or 19 



Second Semester 



Hrs. 



Farm Economics 104 — Farm 
Management 3 

Economics 112 — Public Finance 4 

Farm Economics 218— Agricul- 
tural Statistics 2 

Electives 9 



18 



CURRICULUM IN ANIMAL INDUSTRY 



First Semester 



Third Year 
Hrs. 



Second Semester 



Hrs. 



Animal Husbandry 102 1 — Live- 
stock Production and Manage- 
ment 5 

Dairy Husbandry 101 1 — Prin- 
ciples of Dairying 5 

Physics 1 and 3 — Introductory 
Physics 4 

Electives 4 



18 



Animal Husbandry 162 — Mutton 
and Wool Production 3 

Genetics 111 2 — Elementary 

Genetics 3 

Physics 2 and 4 — Introductory 
Physics 4 

Electives 8 



18 



Fourth Year 



First Semester Hrs. 

Veterinary Science 102 — Animal 
Pathology 3 

Poultry Husbandry 103 — Ad- 
vanced Poultry Husbandry.... 2 

Horticulture 101 1 — Principles of 
Horticulture 4 

Animal Husbandry 203 — Ad- 
vanced Animal Nutrition 3 

Electives 5 



Second Semester Hrs. 
Dairy Husbandry 222 — Milk 

Production 4 

Horticulture 102 1 — Principles of 

Horticulture 4 

Electives 10 



18 



17 
CURRICULUM IN PLANT INDUSTRY 



First Semester 



Third Year 
Hrs. 



Animal Husbandry 102 1 — Live- 
stock Production and Manage- 
ment 5 

Dairy Husbandry 101 1 — Prin- 
ciples of Dairying 5 

Horticulture 10F — Principles of 
Horticulture 4 

Physics 1 and 3 — Introductory 
Physics 4 



Second Semester 



Hrs. 



Horticulture 102 1 — Principles of 
Horticulture 4 

Physics 2 and 4 — Introductory 
Physics 4 

Mathematics 3 2 or 3 

Electives 7 or 8 



18 



18 



: These courses are required of all students. 

-If possible, Genetics 221 should be substituted. 

? The student may elect Mathematics 3 or 4. 



The College of Agriculture 



111 



Fouim'h Year 



First Semester Hrs. 

Botany 221— Plant Physiology.. 4 
Plant Pathology 103 — Economic 

Plant Pathology 3 

Genetics 221— Genetics 3 

Entomology 103 — Economic En- 
tomology 3 

Electives 5 



Second Semester Hrs. 
Electives 17 



18 

CURRICULUM IX TEACHER TRAINING 

The State Board of Education has set up definite requirements 
applicable to all college graduates desiring to teach in West Virginia 
high schools. These requirements specify the kind and number of 
various sciences and agricultural courses as well as courses in profes- 
sional education subjects, all of which are necessary to qualify gradu- 
ates for certification. The following curriculum, which embodies such 
courses required for certification, is designed to prepare the qualify- 
ing student for a teaching career in the specialized field of vocational 
agriculture, with provision for teaching biology and general science as 
a second subject. 

A complete statement of the requirements for certification to teach 
subjects related to agriculture will be found in the announcements of 
the College of Education. 



Third Year 



First Semester Hrs. 

Animal Husbandry 102 1 — Live- 
stock Production and Manage- 
ment 5 

Dairy Husbandry 101 1 — Prin- 
ciples of Dairying... 5 

Horticulture 101 1 — Principles of 
Horticulture 4 

Plant or Animal Pathology 3 

Farm Economics . 107 — Farm 
Records and Accounts 2 



19 



Second Semester 



Hrs. 



Horticulture 102 1 — Principles of 
Horticulture 4 

Farm Economics 104 — Farm 
Management 3 

;|: English 13 (or equivalent elec- 
tive) 2 or 3 

Agricultural Education 101 — 
Problems of Rural Education, 
or Agricultural Education 233 
— Rural Organization 2 or 3 

Farm Mechanics 152 — Farm 
Shop Work 2 

Agriculture elective 3 

*Ed. Psy. 106 — Educational 
Psychology 3 



19 or 20 



♦Required for teachers of vocational agriculture only. Students who wish to 
teach science or serve as county agents should substitute certain other courses 
approved by their advisers. 

ir rhese courses are required of all students. 



112 



Curricular Requirements 



Fourth Year 



First Sernester Hrs. 

*Physics 1 and 3 — Introductory 
Physics 4 

*Ed. Ad. 109— Secondary Edu- 
cation 3 

Farm Economics 131 — Market- 
ing- Agricultural Products.... 3 

*Physical Education 180 — Public 
School Health 2 

♦Agricultural Education 160 — ■ 
Materials and Methods of 
Teaching Vocational Agricul- 
ture 3 

Public Speaking 11 — Effective 
Speaking, or Journalism 1 — 
Newspaper Reporting 3 

18 



Second Semester His. 

Physics 2 and 4 — Introductory 
Physics 4 

^Ed. Psy. 112 — Tests and 
Measures 2 

Physical Education 178 — Prin- 
ciples of Physical Education 2 

Agricultural Education 224 — 
Student Teaching 4 

Agricultural Education 120 — 
Principles of Vocational 
Teaching 3 

Farm Mechanics 153 — Farm 
Mechanics 3 



18 



SHORT COURSES AND SPECIAL SCHOOLS 

In addition to the instruction of collegiate grade offered, the College 
of Agriculture maintains a series of annual short courses and special 
schools for the benefit of adult residents in the State who wish to 
obtain, in brief periods, education in certain fields. The first ten-day 
Milk and Ice Cream short course at Morgantown was sponsored by the 
Department of Dairy Husbandry in 1931 for dairy plant operators and 
workers. In the same year a Milk Testers' course of one week was 
held. In 1932 a two-day course in the manufacture of sweet-curd 
cottage cheese was instituted at Morgantown and Charleston. 

The Department of Animal Husbandry for four years has carried 
on a two-day Livestock Extension school at Petersburg, Grant county, 
for the benefit of growers in the South Branch Valley of the Potomac 
River. Subjects discussed include feeding, breeding, sanitation, and 
marketing of beef cattle, sheep, and swine. 

Inwood, in Berkeley county, is the center of the Horticulture Ex- 
tension school, held for seven years jointly with the Agricultural Ex- 
tension Division and the West Virginia Horticultural Society. To 
accommodate the largest possible number of orchardists the school in 
1932 was held in two places — at Inwood and at Romney, Hampshire 
county. The two-day sessions concern the many production, disease 
control, and marketing problems of the Panhandle fruit grower. 

Good attendance and intelligent interest in these schools attest 
their value as a service of the College. Other functions which annually 
draw hundreds of visitors include Farm and Home Week, held in 
February at Morgantown; Junior Farmers' Week, held at Morgan- 
town in October for the benefit of many of the high school students 
throughout the state who are studying vocational agriculture; and the 
Farmers' Field Days of the Agricultural Experiment Station at Morgan- 
town and at the branches of the Station situated at Kearneysville, 
Lakin, and Wardensville. 



♦Required for teachers of vocational agriculture only. Students who wish to 
teach science or serve as county agents should substitute certain other course* 
approved by their advisers. 



The College of Agriculture 113 

HOME ECONOMICS 

THE BACCALAUREATE DEGREE IN HOME ECONOMICS 

The course leading: to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Home 
Economics is planned for women students, and especially for those who 
wish to teach home economics in vocational schools and other institutions, 
or who wish to learn the business of home-keeping. To provide for this 
training, a curriculum is suggested. Sufficient electives are allowed to 
permit the student to qualify for home economics, or to select other 
courses in which she is interested. 1 

CREDITS AND HONOR POIXTS REQUIRED 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Home Economics will be 
conferred upon any student who satisfies the entrance requirements 
and offers 128 hours' credit of college courses, including all require- 
ments set forth below. 2 The student must receive at least as many 
honor points as credits in order to be eligible for graduation. For a 
complete description of the honor point system see pages 78 and 82. 

Of the 128 hours required for the degree, 82 hours are prescribed 
as indicated in the curriculum which follows. The remaining 46 hours 
must be elected from courses approved by the adviser. The required 
and elective courses in the subject of home economics must amount to 
no fewer than 40 hours in all. 

ADVISER 

The head of the Department of Home Economics will act as adviser. 

All students who wish to enter the University for the purpose of 
taking home economics should confer with the head of the department 
before registering. 

COURSES REQUIRED OF ALL STUDENTS IX HOME ECONOMICS 

Subject Hrs. 

English 1 and 2— English Composition 6 

English literature 6 

Chemistry „ 8 

History 4 

Biological science (including Botany 141) 10 

Economics or sociology 4 

Physical education 4 

Total — 42 



^ee page 50. 

2 A student may decrease the total number of hours required for graduation 
by doing work of superior quality. For details of this plan, see page 78. 



114 



Curricular Requirements 



Home Economics — 

Foods 10 

Textiles and clothing 8 

Applied arts 8 

Home management 6 

Child development 2 

Electives » 6 

Total — 

General electives 

Total 



40 
46 

128 



CURRICULUM SUGGESTED 

The curriculum given below is suggestive as regards subjects, and 
may be varied by the adviser to meet the needs of individual students, 
but the curriculum indicates the subjects which are usually advised for 
students who desire to take major work in home economics. 



First Yeah 



First Semester Hrs. 

English 1 3 

Home Economics 31 4 

History 27 or 4 3 

Chemistry 3 4 

Physical Education 1 

Home Economics 1 1 



Second Semester Hrs. 

English 2 3 

Home Economics 17 4 

History 28 or 5 3 

Chemistry 4 4 

Physical Education 1 



16 



15 



Second Year 



First Semester Hrs. 

Botany l 1 4 

Home Economics 3 4 

Physical Education 1 

English 3 

Electives" 4 



Second Semester Hrs. 

Zoology 51 4 

Home Economics 4 4 

Phvsical Education 1 

English 3 

Electives 2 4 



16 



16 



Third Year 



First Semester Hrs. 

Home Economics 107 4 

Sociology 101 3 

Electives 3 6 



13 



Second Semester Hrs. 

Home Economics 122 4 

Home Economics 135 4 

Home Economics 240 2 

Sociology 108 2 

Botany 141 3 

Electives 4 2 



17 



Zoology 1 and 2, or Biology 1 and 2, or Botany 1 and 2 are possible. 

2 Economics 1 and Psychology 1 suggested. 

3 Chemistry 31 suggested. 

♦Sociology 210 — The Family — suggested. 



The College of Agriculture 115 

Fourth Year 
First Semester Hrs. Second Semester Hrs. 

Home Economics 251 2 Home Economics 254 3 

Electives 14 Electives 13 

16 16 

TEACHER TRAINING CURRICULUM 
Third Year 
First Semester Hrs. Second Semester Hrs. 

Home Economics 107 4 Home Economics 135 4 

Sociology 101 3 Sociology 110 2 

Ed. Psy. 106 3 Ed. Ad. 109 3 

Home Economics 122 4 Ed. M. and M. 120 3 

Electives 2 Botany 141 3 

■ — Home Economics 240 2 

16 — 

17 
Fourth Year 

First Semester Hrs. Second Semester Hrs. 

Home Economics 163 2 Home Economics 262 2 

Home Economics 251 2 Home Economics 254 3 

Home Economics 252 3 Ed. Sup. 224 1 3 

Ed. Sup. 214 2 Ed. Psy. 112 2 

Education (Elective) 2 Electives 6 

Electives 5 ■ — 

— 16 

16 

Students who are looking forward to further work in nutrition as 
cafeteria managers or hospital dietitians should take Chemistry 31, 5, 
6, and 222, Zoology 1 and 2, physiological chemistry, and Home 
Economics 105, 108, 215, 216, and 212. 

Students who wish to do further work in clothing and textiles 
should take Chemistry 31 and 5, Economics 1 and 2, and Home 
Economics 125 and 226. 

Students who wish to teach home economics must meet some one 
of the certificate requirements as specified under requirements for 
certification. 

RECOMMENDATION FOR CERTIFICATION OF TEACHERS 

Students who wish to obtain a high school certificate to teach home 
economics must meet the requirements of the State Board of Education, 
the College of Education, and the Department of Home Economics 
in the College of Agriculture. Recommendation for certification is made 
by the Department of Home Economics to the dean of the College of 
Education. 

Three types of high school certificates in home economics are 
possible: (1) for teachers of home economics only; (2) for teachers 
of home economics with a second teaching subject; and (3) for teachers 
of vocational home economics. 



x Home Economics 252 and Ed. Sup. 224 should be alternated. 



116 Curricular Requirements 

Students transferring from other institutions should ordinarily do 
so not later than the junior year. A minimum residence of the entire 
senior year is required and students with irregular schedules or who 
wish a secondary teaching subject will require a longer time. A 
suggestive curriculum is given on pages 113 and 114. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR TEACHERS OF HOME ECONOMICS ONLY 

I. Courses (minimum hours) Hrs. Total 

1. English and Public Speaking 12 

2. Science 18 

(a) Chemistry 8 

(b) Biology (including bacteriology) 10 

3. Social Science 12 

(a) History (social and economic) 6 

(b) Principles of Economics 3 

(c) Sociology (including family and child welfare) 3 

4. Health and Physical Education 6 

5. Education as prescribed for High School Certificate 20 

6. Home Economics 40 

Foods and Nutrition 12 

(a) Food Study including laboratory practice in food 

preparation (8 hrs.) 

(b) Dietetics (4 hrs.) 

Textiles and Clothing 10 

(a) Textiles (3 hrs.) 

(b) Clothing Selection and Construction (7 hrs.) 

Applied Arts 8 

(a) Principles of Design (4 hrs.) 

(b) Home Planning and Furnishing (4 hrs.) 

Home Management 8 

(a) Economics of the Household (3 hrs.) 

(b) Mechanics of the Household (2 hrs.) 

(c) Home Management House (3 hrs.) 

Child Care and Development : 2 

7. Electives 20 

Total 128 

Such general subjects as English, chemistry, biology, and history 
should be completed before the third year. Economics courses should 
be completed by the close of the third year and should be prerequisite 
or parallel to home management courses. Chemistry courses should be 
prerequisite to all food co arses. Biology and chemistry subjects should 
be prerequisite to courses in nutrition and dietetics. 

II. Scholarship: 

A satisfactory quality of work with a general average of 1 
honor point per credit hour and with an average of 1.2 honor 
points per credit hour in each teaching field and in Education. 



The College of Agriculture 117 

III. Teaching Ability: 

As demonstrated in a semester of directed teaching given in the 
University High School or other approved schools under super- 
vision of the Department of Home Economics and the College of 
Education. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR TEACHERS OF HOME ECONOMICS WITH 
A SECOND TEACHING SUBJECT 

Students who wish to prepare for a second teaching subject with 
home economics may make the following combinations as prescribed 
by the State Board of Education: 

1. Home Economics and Biology 

(a) In the above curriculum substitute in the electives 10 
hours of biology to make the requirement of 20 hours of 
biology. 

2. Home Economics and Chemistry 

(a) In the above curriculum substitute in the electives 8 hours 
of chemistry. 

3. Home Economics and Fine Arts 

(a) In the above curriculum substitute 30 hours of fine arts. 
No other combinations are possible with home economics. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR TEACHERS OF VOCATIONAL HOME 

ECONOMICS 

Students who wish to obtain the vocational home economics certifi- 
cate must meet the requirements for the high school certificate to teach 
home economics only as well as for the vocational home economics 
certificate. 
I. Courses (minimum hours) Hrs. Total 

General 

English and Public Speaking 12 

Chemistry 8 

Botany or Biology or Zoology, including Bacteriology 10 

History, Economics and Sociology 12 

Physical Education and Health 6 48 

Professional 

Ed. Psy. 106, 112, and 214, Ed. Ad. 109, and Ed. 

M. and M. 120, or their equivalent 13 

Ed. M. and M. 163 and Ed. Sup. 224 5 

Electives 2 20 

Technical 
Home Economics 

Foods and Nutrition 14 

Textiles and Clothing 10 

Applied Arts 8 

Home Management 8 

Home Economics in vocational schools 2 

Child Development 2 44 

Electives 16 

128 



118 Curricular Requirements 

II. Scholarship: 

A satisfactory quality of work with a general average of 1 honor 
point per credit hour and with an average of 1.2 honor points 
per credit hour in each teaching field and in Education. 

III. Teaching Ability: 

Of superior quality, as demonstrated in a semester of directed 
teaching at the University High School and at an approved voca- 
tional high school under supervision of the home economics de- 
partment in the College of Agriculture and the College of Edu- 
cation. 

IV. Home-Making Experience: 

1. Residence in the University Home Management House of 
sufficient length to show the abilities necessary in the manage- 
ment of the home. 

2. Home practice of satisfactory quality, or supervised project,, 
or both. 

3. Managerial abilities and standards of finished dishes as 
demonstrated by simple group feeding. 

4. Child-care project. 

V. Personality Traits: 

A superior standard of personal characteristics as shown by- 
rating scales and approved by the departmental staff. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 119 

THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 
ORGANIZATION AND PURPOSE 

The College of Arts and Sciences includes a lower division and an 
upper division. The lower division consists of the work of the first 
and second years, and the upper division consists of the work of the 
third and fourth years. 1 

MAIN OBJECTIVES 

The curriculum of the College of Arts and Sciences has three main 
objectives: 

1. General Culture. The work of the lower division is intended to 
complete what is usually termed "a general education." It rounds out 
the program of study pursued in the high school. It is based on the 
belief that the student should become familiar with different fields of 
knowledge to the end that he may select wisely the field for specializa- 
tion. This general culture should include studies in English, at least one 
foreign language, natural science, and the social sciences. In the selec- 
tion of subjects or groups in the lower division, the student should be 
guided somewhat by the nature of the subjects taken in the high school 
so that by the close of the second year he will have a general 
acquaintance with various fields of knowledge. 

Students who meet all of the requirements of the lower division will, 
upon application, be awarded the junior certificate in the College of Arts 
and Sciences. See curriculum for lower division, pages 122 and 123. 

Students who are not qualified for regular college work, as well as 
those who do not expect to spend more than one or two years in this 
College and are not candidates for the junior certificate, may, with the 
approval of the adviser, select such lower division courses as they are 
qualified to pursue with profit. 

2. Opportunity for Specialization. The work of the upper division 
is intended to provide intensive study in one or two fields of knowledge. 
It is based on the belief that an educated man or woman should not only 
know the fundamentals of several branches of study but should have a 
rather thorough knowledge of some selected field. In the upper division, 
therefore, the student concentrates on a major and one or two minors, 
selected from the following subjects: botany, chemistry, classics, eco- 
nomics, English, entomology, French, geology, German, history, home 
economics, journalism, mathematics, philosophy, physics, political science, 
psychology, public speaking, sociology, Spanish, and zoology. 



iThis organization became effective July 1, 1930, but students who entered 
this College prior to that date may either meet the new requirements or meet the 
requirements in effect prior to July 1, 1930. 



120 Curricular Requirements 

3. A Reasonable Freedom of Electives. The curriculum of this 
college is sufficiently flexible to meet the needs and tastes of individual 
students without, at the same time, exposing the students to the disad- 
vantages of a free elective system. 

ADVISERS 

Lower Division. Each student in the lower division is assigned to 
an adviser who will assist in registration and who will have general 
supervision over the work of the student. Electives are chosen and 
changes in the program are made with the approval of the adviser. 
Students are urged to confer with advisers in respect to any difficulties or 
mal-adjustments in college life. 

Upper Division. Each student in the upper division is assigned to 
an adviser in the department to which the major subject belongs. The 
program of study and all changes in class assignments must be approved 
by the adviser. 

TEACHING CERTIFICATES 

The College of Education is authorized by the Board of Governors 
to recommend all applicants for teaching certificates. 

Teaching certificates may be secured by students registered in the 
College of Arts and Sciences as well as by students registered in the 
College of Education, provided they meet the requirements for teaching 
subjects as outlined by the College of Education (or the State Depart- 
ment of Education). 

For specific requirements in regard to teaching fields see pages 150, 
to 158. 

Candidates for the A. B. degree who wish to qualify for teaching 
certificates should indicate this fact to their adviser and plan their entire 
course with this in view. Unless this is done by the end of the freshman 
year, students may encounter difficulties in qualifying for the certificate 
by the time that they receive the degree. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 121 



REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL DEGREES 

Foreign Language. Fewer than 6 hours in an ancient or modern 
language will not be counted towards any degree, diploma, or certificate 
in this College unless work in the same language has been offered for 
entrance. 

Electives. At least 6 hours must be taken in each subject offered 
as an elective, but not more than 9 hours in isolated courses of less than 
6 hours each, elected with the approval of the adviser, may be offered. 

Work not to exceed 15 hours in the College of Law, the College of 
Agriculture, 1 the College of Engineering and School of Mines, 2 the School 
of Music, or the Division of Physical Education, 4 or 20 hours in the 
College of Education, may be included in the list of elective credits 
offered by students in the College of Arts and Sciences. The total 
number of hours elected from other colleges shall not, however, exceed 
24 hours in all. 

Major Subject. The maximum amount of credit allowed in any 
one subject is ordinarily 36 hours. Subject to the approval of the 
Scholarship Committee, the amount of work in the major may be ex- 
tended, but in no case shall it exceed 54 hours in any department. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

The Bachelor of Arts degree in the College of Arts and Sciences is 
conferred upon any student who complies with the general regulations of 
the University concerning degrees, satisfies all entrance, college, and de- 
partmental requirements, and completes any one of the following courses 
of study: 

A. Regular Course (128 hours) 

B. Pre-Medical Course (132 hours) 

C. Combined Courses: 

(a) Arts and Law (124 hours) 

(b) Arts and Medicine (135 hours) 

1 The agricultural electives include Agricultural Education 101, 134, 168 and 
233 : Agronomy 1 and 2 ; Animal Husbandry 1, 102, and 222 ; Dairy Hus- 
bandry 101 ; Farm Economics 2 ; Horticulture 101 and 102 ; and Poultry 
Husbandry 1. In addition, the following courses are regular electives in the 
College of Arts and Sciences : Farm Economics 131, Dairy Husbandry 218, and 
all courses in entomology, genetics, and plant pathology. 

2 The engineering and mining electives include Chemical Engineering 205, 
206, 220, and 221 ; Civil Engineering 1, 2, 3, 10. and 115 ; Electrical Engineering 
100, 101. 102, 103, 200. 201, 202, 203. 205. and 206; Industrial Education 101, 
103, and 105 ; Mechanical Engineering 20, 23, 24, 26, 29, 207, 221, 222, and 
226 ; Mechanics 101, 102, 103, and 104 ; and Mining Engineering 106 and 203. In 
addition to the above, the student may elect with the consent of his adviser, 
when his major is physics, Mechanical Engineering 1 to 13s and 101 to 107 
(10 Hrs.). 

3 The music electives include Theory of Music 1, 2, and 103 to 114 ; Public 
School Music 73, 74, 75, 76. 179, and 180 ; Voice 109, 110, 111, and 112 ; En- 
semble 153 and 154; and Piano or Voice or Violin or Organ, 16 hours each. 

♦The electives in physical education are Physical Education 75, 76, 78, 150, 
166, 167. 175, 276, and 277. 



122 Curricular Requirements 

Students transferring to West Virginia University from other in- 
stitutions should ordinarily do so not later than the beginning of the 
third year. Such students must meet all the requirements of the lower 
division. All deficiencies for the junior certificate must be met as soon as 
possible after admission to this College, whereupon such student may 
register regularly in the upper division. 

A. REGULAR COURSE (128 HOURS) 

Four years in the College of Arts and Sciences 
Lower Division Curriculum 

(a) General University Requirements. 

Military Science 1 — 4 hours. 

Physical Education (men) 2 — 2 hours. 

Physical Education (women) 2 — 4 hours. 

(b) Natural Science. At least 8 hours of a laboratory science chosen 
from the following list: botany, chemistry, geology, physics, zoology, 
biology. 

(c) Foreign Language. The purpose of this requirement is to provide 
the student with a reading knowledge of at least one foreign lan- 
guage. The minimum requirement is 12 hours in not more than 
two languages. The language work should ordinarily be a continua- 
tion of that done in high school to the point where the student has 
a fair reading knowledge of that language. For good and sufficient 
reasons a language other than that taken in high school may be 
substituted with the approval of the adviser. A student who con- 
templates a complete college course and possibly graduate work 
should, while in the lower division, acquire a reading knowledge of 
one language and the beginning course in a second language. 
Ordinarily these languages should be French and German. Some 
of the student's elective hours may be used to supplement the 
minimum requirement of 12 hours in a foreign language. 

(d) English Composition. Ordinarily 6 hours of English composition 
(English 1 and 2) will be required of all freshmen. In case a 
freshman is not qualified to meet the requirements in English 1, 
as shown by placement or other tests, he (or she) will be assigned 



x Military science is required of all male students except those who at the 
time of matriculation are 23 years of age or have completed not less than 58 
hours of work, and all who have credit for 4 hours of military science or 1 
unit of entrance credit in military academy. 

2 Two hours of physical education for men, to be taken during the first year 
of residence, and four hours of physical education for women, to be taken during 
the first and second years in residence, are required for graduation of students 
presenting fewer than 58 semester hours, unless previous credit has been allowed. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 123 

to English 1C, which carries 3 hours of University credit. Upon 
the successful completion of the work in English 1C the student will 
register for the regular work in English 1. 

(e) Additional. At least 6 hours in each of three of the following: 

(1) English (additional to d), Journalism, or Public Speaking. 

(2) Foreign language (additional to c). 

(3) Mathematics. 

(4) History. 

(5) Political Science. 

(6) Economics or Sociology. 

(7) Philosophy and Psychology. 

(8) Home Economics. 

(9) Natural Science (additional to b). 

(f ) Electives, under the supervision of the adviser, to make a total of 
64 hours. Ordinarily freshmen should register for required courses. 
Electives should be used in the second year chiefly in meeting the 
preliminary requirements of the departments in which the student 
expects to do the work of the major and minor (or minors) in the 
upper division. 

Upper Division Curriculum 

1. A major sequence of 18 to 24 hours of upper division courses, 
preceded by the proper lower division courses prescribed as prepara- 
tion for the major. This work should represent a coherent and 
progressive sequence of courses as outlined in the departmental 
announcements. The major subject will be selected when the stu- 
dent registers in the upper division, but the student must plan the 
work in the lower division in such way as will meet the depart- 
mental requirements for the major and minor. 

2. A minor sequence of 9 to 12 hours of upper division courses in 
some department closely related to the major department. At the 
option of the major department, a second minor of 6 hours may be 
required in a second department closely related to the major de- 
partment. 

3. Electives, under the supervision of the departmental adviser, to 
make a total of 128 hours. 1 At least 52 of the 64 hours in the upper 
division must be selected from upper division courses. A depart- 
mental adviser may permit a student in the upper division to elect 
lower division courses to an amount not exceeding 12 hours when 
such action will be an advantage to the student in connection with 
the major or minor sequence, but honor points will count only at the 
rate of 1 honor point per credit hour. 



1 A student may decrease the total number of hours required for graduation 
by doing work of superior quality. For details of this plan, see page 78. 



124 



Curricular Requirements 



B. PRE-MEDICAL COURSE (13 2 HOURS) 

Four years in the College of Arts and Sciences 
First Year 



First Semester Hrs. 

English 1 3 

Chemistry 3 4 

Zoology 1 4 

Modern Language 3 

Military Science 1 

Physical Education 1 



Second Semester Hrs. 

English 2 3 

Chemistry 4 4 

Zoology 2 4 

Modern Language 3 

Military Science 1 

Physical Education 1 



16 



16 



Second Year 



First Semester 



Hrs. 



Second Semester 



Physics 1 3 

Phvsics 3 1 

Chemistry 15 3 

Chemistry 63 3 

Psychology 1 or Zoology or 

Pharmacy 2 3 

Modern Language 3 

Military Science 1 



17 



Hrs. 

Physics 2 3 

Physics 4 1 

Chemistry 36 6 

Psychology 1 or Zoology or 

Pharmacy 12 3 

Modern Language 3 

Military Science 1 



First Semester 



Third Year 
Hrs. 



Second Semester 



17 



Hr 



English 3 3 

Econ. 101 or Soc. 101 3 

History 104 or 133 or Pol. Sc. 4 3 

Zoology 231 or Physics 3 

Mod. Lang, or Math, or Psyc. 

122 3 

Chemistry 107 2 



17 



Fourth 
First Semester Hrs. 

Chemistry 105 4 

Zoology 207 or 231 or Botany 1 
or Geology 2 or Physics ........ 3 

English or Economics or Socio- 
logy or History or Political 
Science 6 

Modern Language or Mathe- 
matics or Psychology 124 or 
free elective 3 



16 



English 4 3 

Econ. 102 or Sociology 3 

History 105 or 134 or Pol. Sc. 5 3 
Mod. Lang, or Math, or Psyc. 

219 or Zoology 3 

Chemistry 238 5 



17 



Year 



Second Semester 



Hrs. 



Chemistry 262 4 

Zoology 252 or 118 or Botany 2 
or Geology 3 or Physics 3 

English or Economics or Socio- 
logy or History or Political 
Science 6 

Modern Language or Mathe- 
matics or Psychology or free 
elective 3 



16 



All pre-medical students are advised to have two units of high school 
Latin, or Latin 1 and 2. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 125 

French and German are the modern languages preferred. The re- 
quirement in this course is a reading knowledge of both French and Ger- 
man, with a minimum requirement of 18 hours divided between the two 
languages. If two units of a language are not presented for entrance, 
the minimum requirement in that language is 6 hours. 

C. COMBINED COURSES 
(A) Akts and Law 

Three years (96 hours) in the College of Arts and Sciences, and one year 
(28 hours) in the College of Law 

A prelegal course has two main objectives. The first is to enable the 
student to acquire a general cultural background, which is in harmony 
with the chief purpose of the College of Arts and Sciences. The second 
is to help the student to secure a more specialized background for the 
legal course that is to follow. 

These objectives can be attained more effectively by taking the 
regular four-year Arts and Science course, during the last two years of 
which the student may choose his major and minor with particular 
reference to his legal work. In addition to securing the Bachelor of Arts 
degree, it will qualify him for admission to almost any law school. 

To enable students to receive the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and 
Bachelor of Laws in a shorter period of time a special course has been 
arranged by which the student may complete the required studies in the 
College of Arts and Sciences in three years, and after passing the entire 
first year of work in the College of Law be awarded the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. This course satisfies the entrance requirements to the 
College of Law, but permits less freedom in choosing electives. The 
student should confer with the Pre-Law adviser as soon as he enters the 
University. The following schedule is suggested as being adapted to the 
above course: 

First Year 

First Semester Hrs. Second Semester Hrs. 

English 1 3 English 2 3 

Science 4 Science 4 

(Any one of the following, (A continuation of the course 

Botany, Chemistry, Geol- taken the first semester) 

ogy, Physics, Zoology, Bio- Language 3 

logy) (A continuation of the course 

Language 3 taken the first semester) 

( One of the following, French, History 28 3 

German, Latin 1 ) Military 1 

History 27 3 Physical Education 1 



Military 1 

Physical Education 1 15 



15 



^atin 1 and 2 are recommended for students not having entrance credit of 
2 units in this subject. 



126 



Curricular Requirements 



Second Year 



First Semester 



Hrs. 



English 3 3 

Language 3 

History 52 3 

Political Science 4 3 

Electives 3 

(Lower division classes should 
be taken in the departments 
in which the student may 
wish to do upper division 
work as, Economics 1; 
Sociology 1; Psychology 1; 
or other elementary courses 
in other departments as 
Mathematics) 
Military 1 



16 



Second Semester Hrs. 

English 4 3 

Language 3 

(If 10 hours of language have 
been passed the first year 
an elective may be substi- 
tuted) 

History 53 3 

Political Science 5 3 

Electives 3 

Military 1 



16 



Third Year 



First Semester Hrs. 

Pre-Law major 6 

Pre-Law minor 3 

Electives 6-9 

~16~ 
or more 



Second Semester Hrs. 

Pre-Law major 6 

Pre-Law minor 6 

Electives 3-6 

16 
or more 



Fourth year (28 hours) in the College of Law 



(B) Arts and Medicine 

Three years (100 hours) in the College of Arts and Sciences, and one year 
(35 hours) in the School of Medicine 

The first three years (100 hours) of this course, which leads to the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts, are identical with the first three years of 
Pre-Medical Course B, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts. The 
fourth year (35 hours) is taken in the School of Medicine. For a list 
of the courses in medicine, see pages 188 and 189. 

All pre-medical students are advised to have two units of high school 
Latin, or Latin 1 and 2. 

French and German are the modern languages preferred. In this 
course, the minimum requirement is 12 hours, which may be in two 
languages. If two units of a language are not presented for entrance, 
the minimum requirement in that language is 6 hours. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 127 

REQUIREMENTS FOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

The Bachelor of Science degree in the College of Arts and Sciences 
is conferred upon any student who complies with the general regulations 
of the University concerning degrees, satisfies all entrance, college, and 
departmental requirements, and completes one of the following courses 
of study: 

(1) Course in Public Health (144 hours) 

(2) Combined Courses: 

(A) Science and Medicine (142 hours) 

(B) Science, Pharmacy, and Medicine (186 hours) 

(1) COURSE IN PUBLIC HEALTH (14 4 HOURS) 

Four years in the College of Arts and Sciences 

The object of the four-year course in Public Health is to prepare 
men to take charge of municipal health laboratories, to become executive 
secretaries of health units, and to act as sanitarians and health officers. 

The curriculum includes fundamental courses in chemistry and 
biology, together with such engineering and medical subjects as pecu- 
liarly apply to sanitary science. Not the least important feature is the 
inclusion of practical field work under the direction of the State Depart- 
ment of Health. The degree of Bachelor of Science (in Public Health) 
will be conferred upon students who satisfactorily complete the curricu- 
lum outlined on this page. Candidates for this degree will register in 
the College of Arts and Sciences with a member of the Department of 
Zoology as adviser. 

Students who have completed this course are qualified to enter a 
school of medicine or to take up specialized graduate study. 

First Year 

First Semester Hrs. Second Semester Hrs. 

Eng. 1 — Comp. and Rhet 3 Eng. 2 — Comp. and Rhet 3 

French or German 3 French or German 3 

Chem. 3 — Inor. Chem « 4 Chem. 4 — Inor. Chem 4 

Math. 3— Advanced Algebra .... 3 Math. 4— Trig 2 

Hygiene and Sanitation 1 M. E. 20 — Mech. Draw 3 

Military Science 1 Military Science 1 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

16 17 
Summer Field Practice 1— State Department of Health 2 

Second Year 
First Semester Hrs. Second Semester Hrs. 

English or Public Speaking 3 Chem. 6 — Quan. Anal 4 

Chem. 5— Qual. Anal 4 Mathematics 3 

Zool. 1 — Invert. Zoology 4 Ent. 2 — Entomology 4 

Zool. 125— Limnology 2 Zool. 2 — Vertebrate Zool 4 

Military Science 1 Zool. 16 — Economic Zool 2 

— Military Science 1 

17 — 

18 



128 Curricular Requirements 

Summer Field Practice 2 — State Department of Health 1 

Zoology 126s — Advanced Limnology; 100 hours in field and laboratory 1 

Thikd Year 

First Semester Hrs. Second Semester Hrs. 

Zoology 51 — Physiology 4 Geology 102 — General Geology.. 4 

Physics 1 and 3 4 Phvsics 2 and 4 4 

Chemistry 233— Org. Chem 5 Me'd. Bact. 105— Parasitology .... 5 

Entomology 180 2 Veterinary Science 206 3 

Chemistry 163— Phys. Chem 3 Elective 2 

18 18 

Summer Field Practice 3 — State Department of Health ; Epidemiology, 
Public Health Law and Administration 2 

Fourth Yeah 

First Semester Hrs. Second Semester Hrs. 

C. E. 202— Water Purification.... 3 Ch. E. 202— Water Examination 2 

Bact. 106— Hygiene 2 Psychology 1 3 

Bact. 208 — Advanced Political Science 107 3 

Bacteriology 2 Zool. 210— Prin. of Biol 3 

C. E. 117— Municipal Eng'g 2 Soc. 101— Prin. of Soc 3 

Biochemistry 101 6 Soc. 108— Prob. of Child Welf. 2 

Dairy Husb. 107— Milk and Elective 2 



Pub. Health 2 

17 



18 



(2) COMBINED COURSES 

(A) Science and Medicine 

Two years (66 hours) in the College of Arts and Sciences, and two years 
(76 hours) in the School of Medicine 

This course, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science, has the 
bare minimum requirements and little of the cultural subjects. It re- 
quires a total of 142 hours. The first two years (66 hours) of this 
course are identical with the first two years of Pre-Medical Course B 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts. The last two years (76 
hours) are taken in the School of Medicine. For a list of the courses 
in medicine, see pages 188 and 189. 

All pre-medical students are advised to have two units of high school 
Latin, or Latin 1 and 2. French and German are the modern languages 
preferred. If two units of either language are not presented for entrance, 
the minimum requirement is 6 hours in the same language; otherwise, 
12 hours. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 



129 



(B) Science. Pharmacy, and Medicine 

Three ytars (110 hours) in the College of Arts and Sciences and Depart- 
ment of Pharmacy, and two years (76 hours) in the School of Medicine 

The bachelor of Science degree in the College of Arts and Sciences 
with the School of Medicine is conferred upon any student who complies 
with the general regulations of the University concerning degrees, satis- 
fies all entrance, college, and departmental requirements, and completes 
the following curriculum, including two years in medicine, aggregating 

187 hours: 

First Year 



First Semester Hrs. 

English 1 — Comp. and Rhet 3 

Zoology 1 — Invert. Zoology 4 

Phar. 1 — Theoretical Pharmacy 3 
Phar. 2 — Pharmaceutical Arith- 
metic and Stoichiom 3 

Chem. 3 — Inorganic Chem 4 

Physical Education 1 1 

Military Science 1 1 



19 



Second Semester Hrs. 

English 2— Comp. and Rhet 3 

Zoology 2 — Vertebrate Zoology.. 4 
Phar. 3 — Adv. Pharmaceutical 

Arithmetic 2 

Phar. 10— Vegetable Histology.. 3 
Chem. 4 — Inorganic Chemistry.. 4 

Physical Education 2 1 

Military Science 2 1 



18 



Second Year 



First Semester Hrs. 

German 1 — Elementary German 3 
Phar. 9 — Pharmaceut. Latin .... 2 
Phar. 4 — Operative Phar. 

Lectures 2 

Phar. 11 — Pharmacognosy 3 

Phar. 5 — Operative Phar 3 

Chem. 5 — Qual. Anal 4 

Military Science 3 1 



Second Semester Hrs. 
German 2 — Elementary German 3 
Phar. 6— The Art of Compound- 
ing 4 

Phar. 12 — Pharmacognosy 3 

Phar. 8 — Pharmaceutical Juris- 
prudence 1 

Phar. 7 — Art of Compounding .. 2 

Chem. 6 — Quan. Anal 4 

Military Science 4 1 



18 
Third Year 



18 



First Semester Hrs. 

Physics 1 — Intro. Physics 3 

Physics 3 — Intro. Phys. Lab 1 

Psychology 1 — Intro, to 

Psychology 3 

Phar. 106 — Pharmaceutical 

Chemistry 2 

Chem. 163— Physical Chem 3 

German 121 — Scientific German 3 
Elective 3 



Second Semester Hrs. 

Physics 2 — Intro. Physics 3 

Physics 4 — Itnro. Phys. Lab 1 

Phar. 107 — Pharmaceutical 

Chemistry 2 

Chemistry 136 — Organic Chem... 6 
German 122 — Scientific German 3 
Elective 4 



19 



18 



Fourth and Fifth Years 
Curriculum as prescribed in the School of Medicine. 1 

^or a detailed list of the courses in medicine, see pages 188 and 189. 



130 



Curricular Requirements 



PRE-PROFESSIONAL COURSES 

Not leading to degrees in the College of Arts and Sciences 
(1) PRE-DENTAL COURSES 

The following courses are planned for students preparing for the 
study of dentistry. In case a student expects to enter a certain school of 
dentistry these courses may be changed to suit his needs. 

(A) ONE YEAR COURSE 

A course preparing for schools of dentistry requiring for entrance 
one year of pre-dental work. This course has the bare minimum require- 
ments and little of cultural value. 



First Semester 



Hrs. 



English 1 3 



Chemistry 3 

Zoology 1 , 

Physics 1 

Physics 3 

Military Science 

Physical Education 



. 4 
. 4 
. 3 
. 1 
. 1 
. 1 

17 



Second Semester 



Hrs. 



English 2 , 3 

Chemistry 4 4 

Zoology 2 4 

Physics 2 3 

Physics 4 1 

Military Science 1 

Physical Education 1 



17 



(B) TWO YEAR COURSE 

A course preparing for schools of dentistry requiring for entrance 
two years of pre-dental work. This course has, in addition to the 
minimum requirements, certain courses of general cultural value. 



First Year 



First Semester Hrs. 

English 1 3 

Chemistry 3 4 

Zoology 1 w... 4 

German or French 3 

Military Science 1 

Physical Education 1 



16 



Second Semester Hrs. 

English 2 3 

Chemistry 4 4 

Zoology 2 4 

German or French 3 

Military Science 1 

Physical Education 1 



16 



Second Year 



First Semester Hrs. 

Physics 1 3 

Physics 3 1 

Chemistry 15 3 

Chemistry 63 3 

Psychology 1 or Zoology 231 .... 3 
German or French or English 3 3 
Military Science 1 



17 



Second Semester Hrs. 

2 3 

4 1 



Physics 
Physics 
Chemistry 36 6 



Psychology 1 or Zoology 210 
German or French or English 4 
Military Science 



3 

3 

. 1 

17 



The College of Arts and Sciences 131 

(C) THREE YEAR COURSE 

A course preparing for schools of dentistry requiring for entrance 
three years of pre-dental work. The first two years (66 hours) of this 
course are identical with course B except that during the second year 
French or German are taken instead of English 3 and 4. 

Third Year 

First Semester Hrs. Second Semester Hrs. 

English 3 3 English 4 3 

Economics 101 or Sociology 101 Economics 102 or History 105 

or History 104 or History 133 or History 134 or Political 

or Political Science or Modern Science 5 or Modern Language 9 

Language 9 Chemistry 238 5 

Physics 221 or Psychology 116 — 

or Psychology 124 3 17 

Chemistry 107 2 

17 

(2) PRE-EDUCATION 

Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education are 
registered in the College of Arts and Sciences until they have completed 
fifty-eight hours or more of academic work in the lower division of the 
College. They are then transferred to the College of Education. Dur- 
ing the Pre-Education period students are advised to complete as many 
as possible of the general courses required by the College of Education 
which are as follows: 

Subject Minimum Hours 

English, Journalism, and Public Speaking 20 

Social Studies 15 

Sciences, or Agriculture, or Industrial Subjects, or Home 

Economics, or Mathematics 15 

Health and Physical Education 6 

Upon the successful completion of the entire 64 hours of work in the 
lower division Pre-Education students are eligible for the Junior Certi- 
ficate of the College of Arts and Sciences. 



132 Curricular Requirements 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 

BOTANY 
COURSES SUGGESTED FOR BOTANY MAJORS 

(64 hours required in each division) 

Lower Division 

Subject Hrs. Subject Hrs. 

English Composition 6 Physical Education 2 

German 12 French 6 

Botany 1 and 2 8 Psychology 6 

Military Science 4 English Literature 6 

Electives 

Chemistry 1 and 2 8 Zoology 1 and 2 8 

Botany 4 3 Botany 31 4 

Upper Division 

Subject Hrs, Subject Hrs. 

Physics 1, 2, 3, and 4 8 Botany 211 and 212 8 

Education (for tch. cert.) 20 Botany 221 4 

Geology (for tch. cert.) 6 Botany 214 2 

Botany 251 2 

Botany 253 and 254 2 

Electives 

Botany 141 3 Botany 222 4 

Botany 232 and 234 8 Plant Pathology 202 5 

Genetics 221 3 

Courses in chemistry, physics, zoology, or geology may be selected 
by those majors who wish to minor in one of these departments. 

Prospective teachers should confer with the College of Education in 
regard to the 20 hours required in that college ; also in regard to a second 
teaching subject and the other requirements for certification. 

CHEMISTRY 

Chemistry 1, 2, and 9; or Chemistry 3 and 4 are prerequisite to all 
courses in chemistry. Chemistry 5, 6, 233, 238, 260, and 261 are required 
of students whose major is chemistry. Exceptions are sometimes made 
for students entering with advanced standing. 

Students entering the University with the intention of studying 
chemistry as a profession leading to a degree in the College of Arts and 
Sciences, with major in chemistry, should take Mathematics 3 and 4 and 
Chemistry 3 during the first semester of their first year. 

A deposit is required of all students who take laboratory courses. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 133 

CLASSICS 

The Department of Classics offers courses in the Greek and Latin 
languages and in classical civilization. Courses in the department 
are intended not only to give students a thorough knowledge of the 
Greek and Latin languages and literatures, but also to acquaint them 
with the classical culture in general. A student with major in Latin 
should plan to include at least 6 hours of Greek in his course, preferably 
in the sophomore year. 

Courses suggested for Classics majors with English as a second 
teaching field for certification in West Virginia. 

Freshman Year 
First Semester Hrs. Second Semester Hrs. 

English 1 3 English 2 3 

English 3 1 3 English 4 1 3 

Latin (according to prepara- Latin 3 

tion) 3 Laboratory Science 2 4 

Laboratory Science 2 4 Physical Education 1 

Physical Education 1 Electives 2 

Electives 2 

Sophomore Year 
First Semester Hrs. Second Semester Hrs. 

English 65 1 3 Journalism 15 1 3 

Latin 3 Latin 3 

Greek 1 3 Greek 2 3 

Sociology or Economics 3 Sociology or Economics 3 

Physical Education 1 Public Speaking 1 3 

Electives 3 Electives 2 

For the junior and senior years not even general suggestions can be 
made. Attention will be paid to the individual needs of each student. 

ECONOMICS, BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, AND SOCIOLOGY 

Any student who elects economics or sociology as a major subject 
must take at least 24 hours of work in this department and at least 6 
hours in history or political science. 

SUGGESTED LOWER DIVISION PROGRAM FOR MAJORS 
IX ECOXOMICS 

Economics 1 and 2 are prerequisites for all upper division courses 
in economics except Economics 103 and 110. Students who contemplate 
economics as a major subject should include also in their lower division 
courses of study Political Science U and 5 and an additional 6 hours to be 
selected from the following: Economics 21 and 22, Sociology 1, and 
suitable courses in English or American history. They will best meet 
these requirements, along with the general requirements for the lower 
division, by arranging their schedules in the following manner: 

1 Students wishing to offer social science for certification may substitute 
history for this course. 

2 Students who wish to have social studies as the second teaching field may 
elect geology for the laboratory science. 



134 



Curricular Requirements 



First Year 

Subject Hrs. 

English 6 

Foreign Languages 6 

Laboratory Science 8 

Military Science 2 

Physical Education 2 

Required Groups 9 



33 



Second Yeah 

Subject Hrs. 

Foreign Languages 6 

Military Science 2 

Required Groups 3 

Economics 1 and 2 6 

Pol. Sc. 4 and 5 6 

Select from Econ. 21 and 22, 
Soc. 1, and suitable courses in 

Eng. or Am. History 6 

Remainder Elective 2 



31 
SUGGESTED PROGRAM IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Students who are majoring in economics and who are definitely 
planning to go into business as a career, will find it helpful to plan their 
schedules in accordance with the following recommended program: 



Third Year 

First Semester Hour 

Business 101, Principles of Accounting 3 

Business 121, Marketing 3 

Economics 111, Money, Credit, and Banking 3 

Economics 113, Business Organization 3 

Approved electives 6 

Second Semester 

Business 102, Principles of Accounting 3 

Business 122, Marketing _. 3 

Economics 112, Public Finance 4 

Economics 114, Business Finance 3 

Approved electives 3 

Fourth Year 

Approved electives in Upper Division — Economics, to com- 
plete major 6 

Approved free electives 26 

COURSES SUGGESTED FOR SOCIOLOGY MAJORS 



Second Year 

Subject Hrs. 

Sociology 1 — Intro, to Soc 3 

Economics 1 — Prin. of Econ 3 

Economics 2 — Prin. of Econ 3 

Military 2 

History 6 

Political Science 6 

Group Requirements and Elec- 
tives 9 



32 



Third Year 

Subject Hrs. 

Sociology 103 — Rural Sociology 3 

Sociology 105 — Urban Soc 3 

Sociology 234 — Probs. Depend- 
ents and Defectives 3 

Sociology 108 — Probs. Child 

Welf 2 

Psychology 1 — Intro, to Psyc. .. 3 

Psyc. 116— Soc. Psyc 3 

Journ. 1 — N'pr. Rpt'g 3 

Genetics 111— (Col. of Agr.) .... 2 
Electives 10 



32 



The College of Arts and Sciences 135 

Fourth Yeah 

Subject Hrs. 

Sociology 210— The Family .... 3 
Sociology 232 — Immigration .. 3 
Sociology 240— Social Control.. 3 
Sociology 241 — Community 

Org 3 

Sociology 242 — Introduction 

to Social Work 3 

Sociology 233 — Probs. Crime and 

Delinquency 3 

Electives 14 

32 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

To be received as a major student in the Department of English the 
student must have credit for the following lower division courses in 
English, or equivalent: English 1, 2, and 3, English 4, 29, or 65, English 
13 or 14 ; in all, 8 hours in addition to the general college requirement of 
6 hours in English composition (English 1 and 2). 

A major student will usually be expected to complete 24 hours of 
upper division courses in English, including: 

(a) English 142, 181, 234, and 235. 

(b) A six-hour sequence in any one of the following groups of 
courses : 

(1) English 230, 231, 232, 272; 

(2) English 239, 240, 241; 

(3) English 142, 235, 243, 245, 246, 247, 248; 

(4) English 249, 250, 251, 262, 263; 

(5) English 166, 167, 267, 269, 270. 

A major student will also be required to complete at least 20 hours 
in some one of the following foreign languages: French, Latin, German. 
At least 12 hours in a second foreign language are recommended but are 
not absolutely required. 

Six hours of English history, History 27 and 28, are also required 
of major students. 

Candidates for the degree of Master of Arts who have not taken 

courses 230, 231, 234, and 235 or their equivalent as undergraduates 

must include these courses in their graduate program. Course 391 is 
also required of all English graduate majors. 



136 



Curricular Requirements 



For the guidance of students and advisers the following program is 
suggested as a convenient combination of the University, departmental, 
and certification requirements for English majors: 



First Yeah 



First Semester Hrs. 

English 1 3 

Eng. 3, or elective 3 

Foreign Language 3 

History 27 3 

Science 4 

Phys. Ed. and Military Science 1 2 



Second Semester Hrs. 

English 2 3 

English 4, or elective 3 

Foreign Language 3 

History 28 3 

Science 4 

Phys. Ed. and Military Science 1 2 



18 



18 



Second Year 



First Semester Hrs. 

English 13, Journ., or elective 2 

*Eng. 65, or 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 

*Public Speaking 3 

Social Science 3 

Second For. Lang, or elective .. 3 

Phys. Ed. or Military Science 1 1 



18 



Second Semester Hrs. 

English 14, or 13, or elective .. 2 

^English 29, or 4 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Social Science 3 

Second For. Lang, or elective .. 3 
Public Speaking or Elective .... 2 
Phys. Ed. or Military Science 1 1 



17 



Third Year 



First Semester Hrs. 

English 181 or 142 3 

^English 160 or 275 2 

Foreign Language 3 

Second For. Lang, or *Phys. 

Ed. 178 3 

-Ed. Psy. 106 and Ed. Ad. 109.... 6 
^English 113, or elective 2 



19 



Second Semester Hrs. 

English 142 or 182 3 

-English 161 or 274 2 

Foreign Language 3 

Second For. Lang, or *Phys. 
Ed. 180 (Public School 

Health) 3 

*Ed. Psy. 112 and Ed. M and 

M 120 5 

*English 115, or elective 2 



Fourth Year 



First Semester 



Hrs. 



English 235 3 

*Ed. Sup. 224 and Ed. M. and 

M. 161 5 

Foreign Lang., or elective 3 

^English 276, or elective 3 

Elective 3 



17 



Second Semester 



18 



Hrs. 



English 234 3 

*Education, or elective 5 

For. Lang., or elective 3 

^English 277, or elective 3 

Elective 2 



16 



"Courses required (or alternative) for teacher's certification but not re- 
quired for English majors. 

1 Physical education is not included in the 34 hours maximum registration 
for students in the College of Arts and Sciences. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 137 



CERTIFICATION WITH ENGLISH AS A TEACHING FIELD 

A major in English may meet the requirements for the A. B. degree, 
and also the requirements of the State Board of Education for teacher's 
certification, with English and French or with English and Latin as 
teaching fields, in four years, or eight semesters. Other combinations, 
such as English and social studies, or English and physical education, 
will usually require somewhat more than four years, and students who 
desire these combinations should consult the proper departmental adviser 
in planning their courses. 

For the convenience of students, the English requirements of the 
State Board of Education, with the corresponding English courses which 
most nearly satisfy them are listed below: 

1. English Composition — total of 9 hours required: 

Subjects Required Hrs. Courses Hrs. 

Oral and Written Eng 5 English 1 and 2 6 

How to Explain 2 English 13 2 

Advanced Composition 1 2 English 14, 113, 115 2 

9 10 

2. Literature — total of 15 hours required: 

Subjects Required Hrs. Courses Hrs. 

American Literature 3 English 65 or 166 3 

English Literature 4 English 3 and 4 6 

World Literature 3 English 185 2 

Contemp. Literature 2 Eng. 160, 161, or 262 2 

Shakespeare 3 English 142 or 235 3 

Bible Literature 2 English 181 or 182 3 or 2 



Free Reading 4 

21 



19-18 



3. Literary Types — total of 4 hours required: 

Subjects Required Hrs. Courses Hrs. 

Narrative Poetry 2 English 274 2 

Lyric Poetry 2 English 275 2 

Great Essays 2 English 277 3 

The English Novel 2 English 276 3 

The Short Story 2 English 175 2 

Study of an Author 2 Eng. 153, 234, or 263 3 

12 15 

4. Special Activities — total of 6 hours required: 

Subjects Required Hrs. Courses Hrs. 
Study English Language" 3 English 29 or 230 3 



~ J Journalism may be substituted for advanced composition. 
r Other subjects in this group are offered in other departments. 



138 



Curricular Requirements 



GEOLOGY, MINERALOGY, AND GEOGRAPHY 

Each student majoring in geology is required to present credit for 
Geology 163s or its equivalent in completing the following schedule: 



COURSES SUGGESTED FOR MAJORS IX GEOLOGY 
First Year 



First Semester 



Hrs. 



Second Semester 



Hrs. 



Military Science 1 

Physical Training 1 

French or German 3 

Eng. 1 — Comp. and Rhet 3 

Math. 3— Algebra 3 

Chem. 3 — Inorganic Chemistry.. 4 



15 



Military Science 1 

Physical Training 1 

French or German 3 

Eng. 2— Comp. and Rhet 3 

Math. 4 — Trigonometry 2 

Chem. 4 — Inorganic Chemistry.. 4 
Elective 3 



17 



Second Year 



First Semester 



Hrs. 



Military Science 1 

French or German 3 

Geol. 1 — Physiography 4 

History or Economics 3 

English, Journalism, or Public 

Speaking 3 

M. E. 20— Drawing 2 



16 



Second Semester 



Hrs. 

Military Science 1 

French or German 3 

Geol. 2 — Minerals and Rocks.... 4 

History or Economics 3 

English, Journalism, or Public 

Speaking 3 

C. E. 1— Surveying 3 



17 



Third Year 



First Semester Hrs. 

Geology 103 — Historical 4 

Phys. 1 — Introductory Physics.. 3 
Phys. 3 — Physics Laboratory .. 1 

Chem. 105 4 

Elective 4 or 5 



16 or 17 



Second Semester Hrs. 

Geol. 204— Palentology 4 

Phys. 2 — Introductory Physics.. 3 
Phys. 4 — Physics Laboratory .. 1 

Chemistry 106 5 

Elective 4 or 5 



17 or 18 



Fourth Year 



First Semester 



Hrs. 



Second Semester 



Hrs. 



Geology 206 — Sedimentation .... 4 

Geol. 284 — Mineralogy 4 

Chemistry 233 — Organic 5 

Elective 3 or 4 



16 or 17 



Geol. 208 — Advanced Physio- 
graphy 3 

Geol. 285 — Microscopic 
Mineralogy 4 

Elective 9 or 10 



16 or 17 



SEQUENCES 
Lower Division: 

Geology 1 and 3 give a general view of the subject. 

Geology 2 and 11 introduce rocks and minerals and their uses. 

Geology 1 and 9 is a combination for students in education. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 139 

Upper Division: 

Geology 102 or 1, 103 and 204 provide a good minor sequence for 
majors in botany or zoology. 

Geology 284 and 285, or 2 and 285 are courses well fitted to majors 
in chemistry or physics. 

Geology 102 or 2, and 111 is a sequence suggested for majors in 
economics. If time permits, Geology 3 or 103 should be in- 
cluded in this group. 

Geology 116 and 208 continue the lower division courses for students 
of education. Geology 108 is also desirable in this group. 

Geology 102 or 1, 103 or 3, and 108, is a good general sequence. 

GERMANIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 

The chief objective of the department is to enable the student to 
read thoughtful German without the aid of a dictionary. Of German 1, 
2, 3, and 4, each is prerequisite to the next following, and the four com- 
bined are prerequisite to all other courses. 

Students majoring in German are advised to base their schedules on 
upper division courses from the following subjects, which are listed here 
in the order of their importance: German, education, English, European 
history, Latin, Romance languages, modern philosophy, and Greek. Those 
who are not planning to teach German may omit the courses in educa- 
tion, but the sequence of subjects, from the angle of their desirability for 
a major in German, remains the same. 

HISTORY 

Before graduation history majors are required to complete 18 hours 
in upper division courses, including History 276, introduction to historical 
method and bibliography. Six hours in political science and 6 hours in 
economics are also required in addition to the special requirements for 
the A. B. degree. Students who expect to major in history should com- 
plete the following subjects, or their equivalents, in their first and second 
years: English, 6 hours; French or German, 12 hours; history, 12 
hours, which should include History 52 and 53 ; zoology, botany, geology, 
or biology, 8 hours; political science, 6 hours; and economics, 6 hours. In 
planning further work in history, students should consult the department 
in order that advanced courses may be properly correlated, as well as 
suited to individual needs and tastes. One lower division "year course" 
or equivalent is prerequisite for a major, but prospective majors are ad- 
vised to take two such courses. Students who major in history must 
secure the advice of the Department of History. 



140 Curricular Requirements 



HOME ECONOiMICS 

Courses in this subject are offered in the College of Arts and Sciences 
and in the College of Agriculture. 

Students in the College of Arts and Sciences who select Home 
Economics as a major must complete the lower division requirements with 
the following changes: 

(b) NATURAL SCIENCE. Chemistry 8 hours, and Botany 
or Biology or Zoology 8 hours. 

(e) ADDITIONAL. At least 6 hours in each of three of the 
following : 

(1) English 

(4) History 

(5) Political Science 

(6) Economics or Sociology 

(7) Philosophy and Psychology 

(8) Home Economics 

(g) ELECTIVES include Home Economics 15, 16, or 19, 31, 
3, 4. 

In the upper division, Home Economics 107, 122, 135, 240, 151, 154, 
or 152 should be taken, and the total hours must not exceed 36 in this 
College. Courses in the biological and social sciences are especially 
suggested. 

Students who are preparing to teach home economics must meet the 
requirements of the State Board of Education or the College of Educa- 
tion. 

The head of the Department of Home Economics in the College of 
Agriculture acts as adviser. 

JOURNALISM 

The Department of Journalism performs four closely related func- 
tions: instruction in 14 journalism courses, management of the University 
Bureau of Information, supervision of student-publication enterprises, 
and professional service both to State newspaper editors and publishers 
and to advisers and staffs of high school publications. 

The journalism curriculum is designed for three classes of students: 
(1) those wishing to make journalistic training and practice the nucleus 
of a liberal education in modern content; (2) those looking forward to a 
business or a profession that requires familiarity with successful public- 
relations methods; (3) those contemplating reporting and literary work, 
or the editing and management of newspapers or special periodicals, as a 
career. 

The journalism laboratory is equipped like the city room of a news- 
paper and contains typewriters, a "U" copy desk and other work tables, 
a "morgue," and reference books. Connected with it are reading, edi- 
torial, conference, and lecture rooms. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 



141 



Major students are required to earn at least 30 hours of credit in 
the courses named below, and at least 12 hours of credit in some related 
minor subject. They are expected to do extensive practical work on the 
college tri-weekly newspaper and State newspapers, and also to spend the 
summer at the end of their third year on the staff of an approved news- 
paper. 

Before or soon after entering the University, students planning to 
major in journalism should learn the touch system of typewriting. After 
the first eight weeks in Journalism 1, all written work must be done on 
a typewriter. 

Major students in journalism will use the following flexible curricu- 
lum as their schedule of studies from year to year. Courses in journalism 
are not open to freshmen. 



CURRICULUM FOR JOURNALISM MAJORS 

First Year 



First Semester 



Hrs. 



Eng. 1 — Comp. and Rhetoric .. 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Science 4 

Eng. 4 — English Literature .... 3 

Military Science (men) 1 

Phys. Ed. (men and women) .. 1 

Electives .....1-3 



16-18 



Second Semester 



Hrs, 



Eng. 2 — Comp. and Rhetoric .. 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Science 4 

Hist. 5 — Europe since 1815 .... 3 

Military Science (men) 1 

Phys. Ed. (men and women) .. 1 

Electives 1-3 



16-18 



Second Year 



First Semester Hrs. 

Jour. 1 — Newspaper Reporting 3 

Hist. 52— U. S. to 1840 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Psyc. 1 — Intro, to Psychology.. 3 
Pol. Sc. 4 — European States 

Sys 3 

Military Science (men) 1 

Phys. Ed. (women) : 1 

Electives 0-2 



16-18 



Second Semester Hrs. 

Jour. 2 — Newspaper Reporting 3 

Hist. 53— U. S. since 1840 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Phil. 4— Intro, to Philosophy .. 3 
Pol. Sc. 5— Am. Fed. System .. 3 

Military Science (men) 1 

Phys. Ed. (women) 1 

Electives 0-2 



16-18 



First Semester 



Third Year 
Hrs. 



Jour. 103 — Copy Editing 3 

Jour. 220— Feature Writing .... 3 
Pol. Sc. 106— Am. State and 

Local Government 3 

Econ. 101 — Prin. of Economics 3 
Electives 4-6 



16-18 



Second Semester 



Hrs. 



Jour. 104— Copy Editing 3 

Jour. 127 — Hist. Amer. Jour... 3 
Pol. Sc. 262 — International 

Gov., or Pol. Sc. 220— Hist. 

of Political Thought 3 

Econ. 102 — Prin. of Economics 3 
Electives 4-6 

16-18 



142 



Curricular Requirements 



Electives 



First Semester Hrs. 

Business Organization 3 

Marketing 3 

Business Management 3 

American Literature 3 

Adv. Composition ■ 2 

International Relations 3 

Argumentation : 3 

Intro, to Sociology 3 



Second Semester Hrs. 

Community Newspaper 2 

Newspaper Advertising 3 

Money, Credit, and Banking .. 3 

Marketing 3 

Browning 3 

History of West Virginia 3 

Debating 3 

Urban Sociology 3 

American City Government .... 3 



First Semester 



Fourth Year 
Hrs. 



Second Semester 



Hrs. 



Jour. 230— Editorial Writing .. 3 
Jour. 128 — Advanced Report'g 3 

Eng. 142 — Shakespeare 3 

Psy. 116— Social Psy., or Soc. 

101— Intro, to Soc 3 

Electives 4—6 



16-18 



Jour. 231 — Journalism Ethics.. 3 
Jour. 125 — Newspaper 

Management 2 

Hist. 259 — Recent Am. History 3 
Econ. 140 — Labor Problems, or 

Econ. 112— Pub. Finance ....3-4 
Electives 5—6 



16-18 



Electives 



First Semester 



Hrs. 



Econ. of Public Utilities 3 

Business Law 3 

English Language 3 

Old Testament 3 

Short Story Writing 2 

Victorian Literature 2 

Novel 3 

Recon. and Nat. Development.. 3 

International Law 3 

Ancient and Medieval 

Philosophy 3 

Race Problems 3 

Social Origins 3 

Prob. of Crime and Delinquency 3 



Second Semester Hrs. 

Journalistic Crit. Writing 2 

Teaching Jour. Writing 2 

Types of Am. Fiction 3 

Modern Drama 3 

New Testament 2 

Essay 3 

Contemporary Philosophy 3 

Philosophy of Religion 3 

Immigration 3 

Social Control 3 



MATHEMATICS 

College of Arts and Sciences. Students who enter from high 
school with only 1 unit of algebra and 1 unit of plane geometry must 
elect Mathematics 9 before being admitted to any further courses, except 
Mathematics 2 and 10. 

Students who wish to fulfill requirements for mathematics as a 
teaching subject are advised to take Mathematics 2, 3, 4, 5, and 107 
and 108, or 207 and 208, or in case the student enters with only 1 unit in 
algebra and 1 unit in plane geometry, Mathematics 2, 9, 10, 5, and 107 
and 108, or 207 and 208. 

Preparation for the Major. Mathematics 2, 3, 4, 5. Students 
who have only 1 unit in algebra, Mathematics 2, 9, 10, 5. If a student 



The College of Arts and Sciences 143 

comes well prepared in mathematics the upper division courses, Mathe- 
matics 107 and 108, may be taken while he is still a student in the lower 
division. 

The Major. Mathematics 107, 108, 240, 241, 242, and one of the 
following courses, 243, 244, and 290. 

MEDICINE 

Students who have completed 66 hours in the College of Arts and 
Sciences, as outlined on pages 124 and 128, may complete the require- 
ments for the Bachelor of Science degree by taking the courses prescribed 
by the School of Medicine in the curriculum on pages 188 and 189. 

Students who have completed 100 hours in the College of Arts and 
Sciences, as outlined on pages 124 and 126, may complete the require- 
ments for the Bachelor of Arts degree by taking the first 35 hours 
listed by the School of Medicine in the curriculum on pages 188 and 189. 

Students who have completed 110 hours in the College of Arts and 
Sciences and the Department of Pharmacy, as outlined on page 129, may 
complete the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science by 
taking the course prescribed by the School of Medicine in the curriculum 
on pages 188 and 189. 

PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY 

There is such wide diversity in the preparation, needs, and aims of 
individual students that the department cannot lay down inflexible rules 
with regard to sequence of courses. 

Psychology 1 is prerequisite to all other courses in the department. 

In general, lower division courses precede upper division courses. 
The upper division courses are arranged in the order best suited to a 
progressive development of the fields of philosophy and psychology re- 
spectively. 

Majors. Students who desire to do their major work in this depart- 
ment should first consult with the head of the department. 

There are various fields of work open to those who major in either 
philosophy or psychology, some of which are as follows: 

Ph ilosoph y Majors : 

1. Teaching. Preparation for graduate study with a view to teach- 
ing in university, college, seminary or normal school. 

2. The ministry. 

3. General culture for those not planning to undertake a specific 
type of work. 

Psychology Majors: 

1. Teaching psychology in university, college or normal school. 

2. Clinical work in public schools or hospitals; or social service. 

3. Vocational guidance. 



144 Curricular Requirements 

4. Personnel work in industry. 

5. Preparation for certain phases of psychiatry. 

6. Consulting psychologist. 

A major includes at least 24 hours of work in the department. Stu- 
dents may major in either philosophy or psychology. Majoring in either 
of these branches will include at least one course in the other. 

The sequence of courses for each major will be arranged so as to 
give the student the best foundation for the type of work he wishes to 
pursue. 

Related Courses. Various departments offer courses of special 
value to students of philosophy and psychology. Following is a list of 
these courses. 

For students in philosophy: classical civilization (Greek life and 
thought) ; ancient or medieval history, or both; sociology; at least 12 
hours in one of the sciences, or mathematics. 

For students in psychology: zoology; physiology; neurology; socio- 
logy; education; and political science. 

Students whose work shows a marked deficiency in English will be 
required to take a course in advanced composition. 

Students who expect to continue their study "of philosophy or 
psychology in a graduate school, either here or elsewhere, are advised to 
take at least 12 hours of both German and French. 

PHYSICS 

The various courses offered in physics are designed to meet the 
needs of the students in the Colleges of Arts and Sciences, Agriculture, 
and Engineering, the School of Music, and the School of Medicine. Alt 
the courses are divided into lower and upper divisions. 

The courses of the lower division will satisfy the requirements of all 
the colleges so far as physics is concerned. Majors in physics or mathe- 
matics will choose courses from the upper group at the beginning of the 
third year. 

COURSES SUGGESTED FOR PHYSICS MAJORS 

First Year — English, algebra, trigonometry, introductory physics, 
French, some required subjects. 

Second Year — analytical geometry, calculus, problems in physics, 
German, general physical laboratory or chemistry (or radio or 
photography), public speaking, some required subjects. 

Third Year — light, electrical measurements, advanced radio, dif- 
ferential equations, German, some required subjects. 

Fourth Year — modern electrical theory or electricity and magnet- 
ism, theoretical mechanics, vector analysis, intermediate physi- 
cal laboratory. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 145 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Students who expect to select political science as their major subject 
should, while in the lower division, receive credit for Political Science 4 
and 5, History 4, 5, 52, and 53, and Economics 1 and 2 or Sociology 1 and 
2. Political Science 4 and 5 constitute the basic work in this department, 
and they, or their equivalent, are prerequisite to all courses in the upper 
division. The major requirement is 24 hours of upper division courses. 
There should be a first minor of 12 hours in upper division courses in 
history or economics, and a second minor of 6 hours in upper division 
courses in the other subject. With the approval of the departmental 
adviser, part of the required work in the major may be taken in the 
College of Law. 

Upper division courses in the major and minor will be selected, with 
the approval of the adviser, according to individual interests and needs. 

At the beginning of his third year, each major in the department 
who, in the judgment of the departmental adviser, is qualified for such 
work, will (and other qualified students may) elect a field of concentra- 
tion in political science by enrolling in one of the courses listed on page 
258. The work is conducted by individual conferences between student 
and instructor based upon thorough reading and investigation in selected 
topics within his field of interest, as well as in related subjects that the 
student has been unable to cover in course work. 

COURSES SUGGESTED FOR POLITICAL SCIENCE MAJORS 

First Year 

First Semester Hrs. Second Semester Hrs. 

English 1 3 English 2 3 

Biology 4 Biology 4 

French or German 3 French or German 3 

History 4 3 History 5 3 

Military 1 Military 1 

Phy. Ed. (women) 1 Phy. Ed. (women) 1 

Phy. Ed. (men) 1 Phy. Ed. (men) 1 

. 14-15 14-15 

Second Year 

First Semester Hrs. Second Semester Hrs. 

Political Science 4 3 Political Science 5 3 

French or German 3 French or German 3 

History 52 3 History 53 3 

Economics 1 or Sociology 1 3 Economics 2 or Sociology 2 3 

Psychology 1 3 Philosophy 4 3 

Military 1 Military 1 

Phys. Ed. (women) 1 Phys. Ed. (women) 1 

Elective 2 Elective 2 

18 18 



146 Curricular Requirements 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 

The instruction in this department aims to serve the following ends 
which are both cultural and practical: to prepare men and women in 
business and professional life to meet the ever increasing demands for 
effective private and public speaking; to prepare qualified teachers of 
reading, drama, public speaking, and debate for positions in secondary 
schools and colleges; to train qualified students for the public platform 
as lecturers, readers, actors, demonstrators, etc.; to develop the in- 
terpretative powers of prospective teachers of literature; to give general 
cultural training to all who seek to derive greater enjoyment from the 
reading of good literature and from attending the theatre. 

Forensic Activities. An extensive program of intra-mural and 
inter-collegiate debate contests is fostered by the department in con- 
junction with Delta Sigma Rho, the honorary forensic fraternity. 

Plays. The classes in play production and the Dramatic Club give 
a number of public and semi-public plays each year. 

Public Readings. Numerous opportunities are afforded to students 
who show exceptional ability as readers and story tellers to appear as 
entertainers before clubs, schools, churches, and civic associations. Ad- 
vanced students and faculty members also present a series of Sunday 
afternoon recitals on the Campus. 

Majors. A minimum of 30 semester hours is required of majors, 
and 15 semester hours for speech minors. To assist in planning the 
schedules the following distribution of hours is recommended: to those 
seeking a teacher's certificate with Speech and English as a first teaching 
subject and Foreign Language or Social Sciences as a second teaching 
subject the distribution as shown in column two is recommended: 

Subjects Hours Hours 

Speech 30 30 

English, Journalism, Lib. Sci 20 28 

Foreign Languages 16 12 or 20 

Social Studies 16 24 or 12 

Science and Mathematics 16 8 

Psychology and Philosophy 16 

Physical Education 4 6 

Electives 10 4 

Education 20 

128 128-132 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 

Courses 1 and 2 or two years of high school credit will be required 
for entrance to courses 5, 6, 7, and 8. Usually students who have had 
two years' study of the language in high school should take courses 5 and 
6. Students who have done three years of work in high school should 

take courses 7 and 8. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 



147 



Prospective major students, and students who expect to do more 
advanced work in language, should not take more than 6 hours in courses 
5, 6, 7, and 8. Prospective major students who have a grade of B or 
better in 6 hours taken from courses 5, 6, 7, and 8 should take courses 9 
and 10 in the second year. 

Students whose grades have consistently fallen below B in language 
work in the lower division should not select Romance languages as a 
major subject. 

No student who has not completed French 9, 10, 115, 116, and 231 
or Spanish 9, 10, 116, 221, and 222 will be recommended as a teacher of 
these subjects. 

In order to be recommended by this Department for the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts a student must have completed, in addition to special 
requirements for the A. B. degree, one of the following combinations: 



PROGRAM FOR MAJOR STUDENTS 



French 
Subject Hrs. 

French 9 or 109 3 

French 10 or 110 3 

French 115 3 

French 116 3 

French 221 3 

French 222 3 

French 231 2 

Spanish 6 to 12 

History 4 and 5, or History 104 
and 105 6 



Spanish 
Subject Hrs. 

Spanish 9 or 109 3 

Spanish 10 or 110 3 

Spanish 115 3 

Spanish 116 3 

Spanish 221 3 

Spanish 222 3 

French 9 to 12 

History 4 and 5, or History 104 
and 105 6 



A SUGGESTED DISTRIBUTIOX OF COURSES 

First Year 



Subject Hrs. 

One Romance language 6 

English 1 and 2 : 6 

A laboratory science 8 



Subject Hrs. 

Physical Education 2 

Military Science (when re- 
quired) 2 

Electives 8 to 10 



Second Year 

Subject Hrs. Subject Hrs. 
Two Romance languages (6 Electives and lower division 
hours each) 12 preparation for minor sub- 
History 4 and 5 6 ject 12 to 14 

Military Science (when re- 
quired) 2 

Third Year 

Subject Hrs. Subject Hrs. 

French or Spanish 109 and 110 French or Spanish 115 and 116 6 

— (if not completed in second Minor subject and electives 20 

year) 6 



148 Curricular Requirements 

Fourth Year 

Subject Hrs. Subject Hrs. 
French — or Spanish 221 and French 231, or elective in 
222 6 Spanish 2 

Minor subject and electives 24 

ZOOLOGY 

Zoology 1, 2, 118, and 210 are of special interest to teachers. 
Zoology 1 and 2 are required of students preparing to enter the study of 
medicine, and of students in agriculture. Zoology 4 is required of stu- 
dents in physical education. 

Prospective teachers should confer with the College of Education in 
regard to the required 20 hours in that college; also in regard to a second 
teaching subject and the other requirements for certification. 

COURSES SUGGESTED FOR ZOOLOGY MAJORS 

Lower Division 

Subject Hrs. Subject Hrs. 

Military Science 4 Three-Sub. Requirement — 

Physical Education 2-4 (1) French 6 

For. Lang. — German 12 (2) Psychology 6 

English Comp 6 (3) Botany 1 and 2 8 

Zool. 1 and 2 8 English 3 and 4 6 

Electives 
Chemistry 3 and 4 8 Other Subjects 6 

Upper Division 

Subject Hrs. Subject Hrs. 

Physics 1, 2, 3, and 4 8 Zoology 118 3 

Botany 9 Zool. 207 (not open to 3-year 

Chemistry 115 (pre-med.) 3 meds.) : 3 

Chem. 163 (pre-med.) 3 Zoology 210 3 

Chemistry 136 6 Zoology 231 3 

Geology (for tch. cert.) 6 Zool. 234 (not open to 3-year 

Education (for tch. cert.) 20 meds.) 2 

Zoology 240 1 

Electives 

Zoology 235 6 Zoology 253 3 

Zoology 252 3 Genetics 221 3 



The College of Education 149 

THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

FUNCTIONS 

The order of the Board of Governors creating the College of Educa- 
tion gives it "full control in the University of all professional teacher 
preparation, directive control in the University of all academic teacher 
preparation, and full control in the University in recommending to the 
State Department of Education for the certification of teachers, princi- 
pals, supervisors, and superintendents." 

Through its undergraduate and graduate courses, its laboratory 
school, 1 and its encouragement and direction of educational investigation 
and research, the College of Education aims to contribute to the educa- 
tional efficiency of West Virginia by inculcating a liberal and more 
scientific conception of the functions of the public schools of the State 
and by directing the academic preparation and providing the profes- 
sional training of secondary-school teachers, secondary-school principals, 
secondary-school supervisors, elementary-school principals, elementary 
school supervisors, city superintendents, county superintendents, district 
superintendents, college teachers, educational counselors, and educational 
research specialists. 

ORGANIZATION 

The College of Education comprises the College with its resident 
courses of instruction and facilities for research and the University 
Demonstration High School with its facilities for observation, student 
teaching, practice supervision, and experimentation. 

The offerings of the College of Education are organized according 
to the educational positions for which they train. The names of the 
departments and their primary functions are as follows: 

General Education (Gen. Ed.) For educational orientation, per- 
spective, and integration and for mastery of the terms and techniques 
of educational research. 

Educational Administration (Ed. Ad.). For the professional 
training of principals and superintendents. 

Educational Materials and Methods (Ed. M. and M.). For the 
requisite undergraduate professional preparation and the graduate pro- 
fessional training of teachers. 

Educational Psychology (Ed. Psy.). For the fundamental pro- 
fessional preparation of all educational workers and the professional 
training of teachers, supervisors, counselors, and research specialists. 

Educational Supervision (Ed. Sup.). For the professional train- 
ing of supervisors and administrators. 



l See page 39. 



150 Curricular Requirements 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The attention of students is directed to the general requirements of 
the University concerning entrance, admission with advanced standing, 
classification of students, examinations, marks, and honor points, as set 
forth in the General Information section (Part II) of this Catalogue. 

CREDITS AND HOXOR POINTS REQUIRED 

To be eligible for recommendation for graduation, a student in the 
College of Education must present 130 semester-hours of college credit 
with a general average of 1 honor point per credit hour and with an 
average of 1.2 honor points per hour in each teaching field and in 
Education. 1 At least 100 of the 130 hours must be in academic subjects. 

Candidates for the B. S. in Education must satisfy the general 
requirements (see below) and must select and pursue one of the teach- 
ing combinations" listed on page 152. The two teaching subjects must 
be completed as to the selection of courses indicated on pages 152 to 158. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B. S. IX EDUCATION 

Subject Minimum Hrs. 

English, Journalism, and Public Speaking 20 

Social Studies 15 

Sciences, or Agriculture, or Industrial Subjects, or Home 

Economics, or Mathematics 15 

Health and Physical Education 3 6 

Education 20 

RECOMMENDATION FOR TEACHING CERTIFICATE 

No person may teach in the public schools of West Virginia who 
has not been issued a certificate by the State Department of Education. 
All West Virginia University applicants for certificates must be recom- 
mended by the Dean of the College of Education as having complied 
with all legal requirements for the State certificate. 

Detailed information about certification may be had from Professor 
Robert Clark of the College of Education or from Teacher Training 
Bulletin No. 7, or the latest revision of that Bulletin, issued by the 
State Department of Education, Charleston. 



1 A student may decrease the total number of hours required for graduation 
by doing work of superior quality. For details of this plan, see page 78. 

2 In the selection of teaching combinations care should be taken ; for some 
subjects are over-supplied with teachers, while in others the demand exceeds 
the supply. 

3 The courses offered by the Division of Physical Education which may be 
used to meet this requirement are Physical Education 1, 2, 178, and 180 for men, 
and 1, 2, 3. 4, and 180 for women. 



The College of Education 151 



REQUIREMENTS FOR CERTIFICATION OF HIGH SCHOOL 

TEACHERS 

In drawing up these requirements, first consideration was given to 
the exigencies of the teaching situation. The great majority of high 
school positions are in small schools where the teacher is required 
to olfer instruction in at least two different fields. Moreover, most of 
the teachers in large high schools have been and will continue to be 
recruited from the faculties of small high schools. In order, therefore, 
that teachers may be adequately prepared to meet the actual situation 
and to uphold and improve the efficiency of the schools, it is necessary 
in training and certificating them to maintain the following standards: 

1. Recommendation will be based upon evidence of satisfactory 
scholarship, interest in educational work, special professional training, 
and proper professional attitude. A candidate must, furthermore, have 
attained the age of eighteen years, be of good moral character, and 
be mentally and physically qualified to perform the duties of a teacher. 

2. All persons desiring to be certified to teach in high schools 
in West Virginia must be graduates of standard or approved colleges 
or universities, except as provided for in the requirements for special 
and provisional high school certificates. 

3. To qualify for a first-class high school certificate, a candidate 
must be prepared to teach in at least two subject groups or high school 
teaching fields, as, for example, mathematics and the physical sciences. 1 
For approved combinations, see below. 

4. Every West Virginia University applicant for a first-class high 
school teaching certificate must meet the honor-point average required 
for graduation from his college and must average at least 1.2 honor 
points per credit hour in each teaching field in which he desires to be 
recommended for a certificate. 2 

5. Completion of a minimum course program is required in each 
teaching field in which an applicant desires to be recommended for 
a certificate. See approved subject-matter curricula, pages 152 to 158. 

Changes in choice of teaching combinations are almost certain to 
entail a time penalty. Combinations should therefore be chosen de- 
liberately and adhered to. 



Exceptions to this requirement are made only in the following subjects : 
agriculture, commerce, the fine arts, home economics, the industrial arts, music, 
and physical education. ' 

2 Graduates of the College of Education must have an honor-point average of 
at least 1.2 in Education courses also. 



152 Curricular Requirements 

TEACHING COMBINATIONS REQUIRED FOR FIRST-CLASS HIGH 
SCHOOL CERTIFICATE 

With the exception of special certificates, 1 the State Department 
of Education of West Virginia will issue first-class high school teach- 
ing certificates in the following combinations only: 

1. Agriculture and any one of the following: biology and general 
science, the industrial arts, physical education, or the physical sciences. 

2. Biology and general science and any one of the following: 
agriculture, home economics, mathematics, the social studies, or the 
physical sciences. 

3. Commerce and either English or the social studies. 

4. English and any of one of the following: commerce, the fine 
arts, French, German, Latin, music, the social studies, or Spanish. 

5. Fine arts and any one of the following: English, home economics, 
or the social studies. 

6. Home economics and any one of the following: biology, 2 chem- 
istry, 5 the fine arts, or physical education. 

7. Industrial arts and any one of the following: agriculture, 
mathematics, physical education, or the physical sciences. 

8. Mathematics and any one of the following: biology and general 
science, the industrial arts, the physical sciences, or the social studies. 

9. Music and any one of the following: English, the modern 
languages, physical education, or the social studies. 

10. Physical sciences and any one of the following: agriculture, 
biology and general science, the industrial arts, mathematics, or the 
social studies. 

11. Social studies and any one of the following: biology and 
general science, commerce, English, the fine arts, French, Latin, 
mathematics, music, or the physical sciences. 

Physical education may be taken as a second or third teaching 
subject with any of the above combinations. The minimum require- 
ment is 15 hours as outlined in the curriculum in the State Manual 
of Physical Education. See also page 204. 

APPROVED SUBJECT-MATTER CURRICULA 

Teachers of Agriculture 
(See pages 108, 110, and 111.) 



1 Exceptions to this requirement are made only in the following subjects : 
agriculture, commerce, the fine arts, home economics, the industrial arts, music, 
and physical education. 

twenty hours. 

'Sixteen hours. 



The College of Education 153 

Teachers of Biology and General Science 

Minimum requirements: Hours 

Biology 20 

Approved courses: Hour* 

Botany 1 and 2 — General Botany 8 

Botany 4 — Systematic Botany 4 

Botany 31— Plant Ecology 4 

Botany 141 — Bacteriology 3 

Botany 235 — Field Studies in Botany 6 

Entomology 2 — Entomology 4 

Zoology 1 and 2 and 4 and 10 8 

Zoology 51 — Physiology and Hygiene 4 

Zoology 125 — Limnology 2 

Zoology 261s — Field Zoology 6 

Chemistry — (from list approved for chemistry teachers) 8 

Physics — (from list approved for physics teachers) 8 

Geography and Geology 6 

Approved courses : Hours 

Geology 1 — Physiography 4 

Geology 9 — Geol. and Geog. Influences 2 

Geology 102 — General Geology 3 

Geology 108 — Geology of West Virginia 2 

Teachers of Chemistry and physics 

Minimum requirements: Hours 

Chemistry 16 

Approved courses: Hours 

Chem. 1, 2, and 9 or 3 and 4 10 

Chem. 5 or 105 — Qualitative Analysis 4 

Chem. 6 or 106 — Quantitative Analvsis 4 

Chem. 63— Physical Chemistry 3 

Chem. 218 — Dairv Chemistry 3 

Chem. 222— Food Analysis 3 

Chem. 233 — Organic Chemistry 5 

Chem. 238 — Organic Chemistry 4 

Physics 16 

Approved courses: Hours 

Physics 1, 2, 3, 4. and 9 or 10; or 105, 106, 107 and 108 

— (general) 10 

Physics 13 — Introductory Radio 3 

Physics 14 — Introductory Radio 3 

Physics 17 — General Laboratory 2 

Physics 116 — Photography 2 

Physics 121— Light 3 

Physics 123 — Electrical Measurements 3 

Physics 124— Radio 3 

Mathematics 6 

Geography and Geology 6 

Approved courses: Hours 

Geology 1 — Physiography 4 

Geology 9 — Geologic and Geographic Influences 2 

Geology 102 — General Geology 3 

Geology 108 — Geology of West Virginia 2 



154 Curricular Requirements 

Teachers of Commercial Subjects 

Minimum requirements: Hours 

Economics and Business Administration 36 

Approved courses: Hours 

Economics 1 or 101 and 2 or 102 — Principles of 
Economics (prerequisite to all courses in Business 

Administration) 6 

Economics 111 — Money, Credit, and Banking 3 

Economics 131 — Statistics 3 

or 

Mathematics 128— Mathematical Theory of Investment 3 

Bus. Ad. 101 and 102 — Principles of Accounting 6 

Bus. Ad. 121— Marketing , .3 

Bus. Ad. 125 — Advertising 3 

Bus. Ad. 126 — Retail Store Management 3 

Bus. Ad. 127 — Foreign Trade Methods (commerce) 3 

or 

Economics 114 — Business Finance 3 

Bus. Ad. 131 — Business Management 3 

Bus. Ad. 141 — Business Law 3 

Bus. Ad. 148 — Sales Management 3 

Social Studies 8 

History 5 

Georgraphy 3 

In order to get a first-class certificate to teach commerce, students 
must submit evidence of training or experience in stenography, typewrit- 
ing, commercial correspondence, and office practice. 

Teachers of English 

Hours 

Minimum requirements 40 

Students should elect 25 hours from the following approved courses 
in English and do the remaining hours in the allied fields of journal- 
ism, library methods, and public speaking. 

Approved courses in English: Hours 

English 1 and 2 — Composition and Rhetoric 6 

English 3 and 4 — English Literature 6 

English 13 — Expository Writing 2 

English 65 — American Literature 3 

English 142 — Shakespeare 3 

English 160 — Contemporary Poetry 2 

English 161 — Contemporary Prose 2 

English 175— Short Story 2 

English 185 — Masterpieces of World Literature 2 

English 230 — English Language 3 

English 261 — Aspects of the Drama 2 

English 274 — Narrative Poetry 2 

English 275 — Lyric Poetry 2 

English 276— The English Novel 3 



The College of Education 155 

Approved courses in journalism: Hours 

Journalism 1 — Newspaper Reporting 3 

Journalism 221 — Journalistic Critical Writing 2 

or 
Journalism 230 — Editorial Writing 3 

Approved courses in library methods: 
Library Methods 1 and 2 — Library Methods 4 

Approved courses in public speaking: 

Public Speaking 3 — Beginning Interpretation 3 

Public Speaking 11 — Elements of Effective Speaking.... 3 

Public Speaking 125— Story Telling 3 

Public Speaking 133— Play Production 3 

Teachers of French 

Hours 

Minimum requirements 20 

Approved courses: Hours 

French 5 — Fiction of the Nineteenth Century 3 

and 

French 6 — Drama of the Nineteenth Century 3 

or 

French 7 or 107 — Advanced Readings 3 

and 

French 8 or 108 — Advanced Readings 3 

French 9 or 109 — Grammar and Pronunciation 3 

French 10 or 110 — Advanced Conversation 3 

French 115 — Classical School 3 

French 116 — Classical School After Moliere 3 

French 221 — Romantic Movement 3 

French 222 — French Literature since 1850 3 

French 231 — Phonetics and Pronunciation 2 

A total of 20 hours in French is required for recommendation for 
a certificate. For students not having had two years of high school 
French, additional college French will be required. 

Teachers of German 

Minimum requirements: Hours 

German 1 20 

Approved courses: Hours 

German 1 and 2 — Elementary German 6 

German 3 and 4 or 104 — Intermediate German 6 

German 121 — Scientific German 3 

German 241 and 242— Faust 6 

German 245 and 246 — History of German Literature.... 6 

German 251 and 252 — History of German Language .. 4 

English 6 

Approved courses: Hours 

English 231— Old English 3 

English 232— Beowulf— Early Middle English 3 

x Two units of entrance credit are required in German. 



156 Curricular Requirements 



Teachers of Home Economics 
(See pages 115 to 118.) 

Teachers of Latin 
Minimum requirements. Hours 

With No Entrance Credit in Latin 30 

With 1 Unit of Entrance Credit in Latin 25 

With 2 or More Units of Entrance Credit in Latin 20 

Approved courses: Hours 

Latin 14 — Roman Comedy 3 

Latin 21 — Roman Prose Literature 3 

Latin 22 — The Elegy and the Epigram 3 

Latin 23 — Livy 3 

Latin 24— The Lyric Poets 3 

Latin 25 — Latin Composition 3 

Latin 227— Vulgar Latin 3 

Latin 8 — Cicero's De Senectute and De Amicitia 3 

Latin 234— History 3 

Latin 235— Epic 3 

Teachers of Mathematics 
Minimum requirements: Hours 

With 2 Units of Entrance Credit , 17 

With 3 or More Units of Entrance Credit 14 

Approved courses: Hours 

Mathematics 2 — Solid Geometry 3 

Mathematics 3 or 9 — College Algebra 4 or 5 

Mathematics 4 or 10 — Plane Trigonometry 2 or 3 

Mathematics 5 — Analytic Geometry 4 

Mathematics 107 or 207 — Differential and Integral Cal- 
culus 3 or 4 

Mathematics 108 or 208 — Differential and Integral Cal- 
culus 3 or 4 

Mathematics 128 — Mathematical Theory of Investment 3 

Teachers of Music 
(See page 198.) 

Teachers of physical Education 

First or Second Teaching Subject 
(See page 203.) 

Part-Time Teachers of Physical Education 

Third Teaching Subject 

(See page 204.) 

Teachers of Practical Arts 
(See page 178.) 



The College of Education 157 

Teachers of Social Studies 

Hours 

Minimum requirements in social studies 1 44 

Hours 

History 20 

Political Science 6 

Sociology 6 

Economics 6 

Geography 6 

Approved courses in history: 

History 4 or 104 — Modern Europe 3 

History 5 or 105 — Modern Europe 3 

History 52— History of the United States 3 

History 53— History of the United States 3 

History 101 — Ancient History 3 

History 106 — Medieval Europe 3 

History 150 — History of West Virginia - 3 

History 151 — American Colonial History 3 

History 259 — Recent American History 3 

Approved courses in political science: 

Political Science 4 — The European States System 3 

Political Science 5 — The American Federal System 3 

Political Science 106 — American State and Local Gov- 
ernment 3 

or 

Political Science 107 — American City Government 3 

Approved courses in sociology: 

Sociology 1 or 101 — Introduction to Sociology 3 

Sociology 103 — Rural Sociology 3 

or 

Sociology 105 — Urban Sociology 3 

Sociology 210— The Family 3 

or 

Sociology 231 — Race Problems 3 

Approved courses in economics: 
Economics 1 and 2 or 101 and 102 — Principles of 

Economics 6 

or 

Economics 21 and 22 — Economic Development 6 

Approved courses in geography: 

Geology 1 — Physiography 4 

or 

Geology 102 — General Geology 3 or 4 

Geology 9 — Geologic and Geographic Influences 2 

Geology 11 or 111 — Economic Geology 3 or 4 

or 

Geology 108 — Geology of West Virginia 2 or 3 

Geology 116 — Geography of North America 2 



x This requirement may be reduced by 4 hours, subject to the approval of 
the adviser, provided the student has had 4 units of social studies in high school. 



158 Curricular Requirements 

Teachers of Spanish 

Hours 
Minimum requirements 20 

Approved courses: Hours 

Spanish 5 — Contemporary Fiction 3 

and 

Spanish 6 — Drama of the Nineteenth Century 3 

or 

Spanish 7 or 107 — Advanced Readings 3 

and 

Spanish 8 or 108 — Advanced Readings 3 

Spanish 9 or 109 — Grammar and Conversation 3 

Spanish 10 or 110 — Advanced Conversation 3 

Spanish 115 — Lyric Poetry 3 

Spanish 116 — Civilization and Culture 3 

Spanish 221 — Literature of the Golden Age 3 

Spanish 222 — The Golden Age after Lope de Vega 3 

Spanish 223 — Spanish American Literature 2 

Spanish 224 — Spanish American Literature 2 

A total of 20 hours in Spanish is required for recommendation 
for a certificate. For students not having had two years of high 
school Spanish, additional college Spanish will be required. 



The College of Engineering and School of Mines 159 

THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MECHANIC 

ARTS 

THE SCHOOL OF MINES 



ORGANIZATION 

The College of Engineering and Mechanic Arts: 

For the purpose of administration and instruction, the College of 
Engineering and Mechanic Arts is organized into the following depart- 
ments or groups of departments: 

The Department of Chemical Engineering (Ch. E.) 
The Department of Civil Engineering (C. E.) 
The Department of Electrical Engineering (E. E.) 
The Department of Industrial Education* (I. E.) 
The mechanical engineering group (M. E.), comprising the follow- 
ing: 

Department of Drawing, Machine Design and Construction and 
Industrial Engineering 

Department of Power Engineering 
The Department of Mechanics (M.) 

A few courses of instruction, not included in the work of any par- 
ticular department, are designated as General (G.) 

The descriptive material appearing on the pages which follow out- 
lines the requirements for the various degrees in engineering. A state- 
ment setting forth the organization and purposes of the College of Engi- 
neering and Mechanic Arts, including the work of the Engineering 
Experiment Station, appears on pages 47 to 49. 

The School of Mines: 

All the mining and industrial work of the University is organized 
under the School of Mines. For the purpose of administration, the 
school is divided into the following divisions: 

The Department of Mining Engineering (E. M.) 
The Department of Mining and Industrial Extension 

The descriptive material appearing on pages 160 to 161 and 171 to 
177, outlines the requirements for the four-year course leading to the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Engineering of Mines, as well as the 
five-year combined course leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science 
at the end of the fourth year, and Bachelor of Science in Engineering of 
Mines at the end of the fifth year. 

The Department of Mining and Industrial Extension of the School of 
Mines conducts courses of instruction in practical subjects pertaining to 
the every-day work of various groups and industries in centers where a 
sufficient number requests the courses. Conferences on water-purification, 
fire-prevention, meter-reading, and other subjects are sponsored by the 



160 Curricular Requirements 

Department at stated intervals. A more comprehensive description of the 
work of the Department of Mining and Industrial Extension, including 
the Short Course in Coal Mining and vocational courses offered during 
the summer session and in extension, appears on pages 54 to 56. 

BACCALAUREATE DEGREES 

The attention of students is directed to the general requirements of 
the University concerning entrance, admission with advanced standing, 
special students, requirements as to residence, classification of students, 
examinations, and grades, as set forth in the General Information section 
(Part II) of this Catalogue. 

To receive any of the baccalaureate degrees conferred in the College 
of Engineering or the School of Mines the student must have satisfied 
all the entrance requirements and, except in the. case of Industrial 
Education and the five-year curricula, must have received credit for 
150 hours. 1 In chemical engineering, electrical engineering, and 
mechanical engineering, a summer term equivalent to 5 hours, three 
of which shall be in residence and two in outside practice, are in- 
cluded in the 150 hours. For civil engineering students and mining 
enginering students a five weeks' residence course in surveying, for 
which 5 hours of credit are given, is required in the summer follow- 
ing the second year as a part of the total requirement for the 150 
hours. 

SUBSTITUTIONS 

The following substitutions are regularly allowed in addition to 
special substitutions listed elsewhere: M. E. 24 for C. E. 10; Chemistry 
5, 6, or 15 (2 to 5 hours) for Chemistry 10; Chemistry 10 or 15 f@r 
2 hours of Chemistry 5 or 6; Economics 1 and 2 or Is and 2s for 
Economics 103; Economics 111 or Ills for Economics 110. 

CREDIT FOR WORK DONE OUT OF RESIDENCE 

To register for G. 105s, G. 106s, or G. 107s the student should 
secure a summer practice registration card from the office of the Dean 
of the College of Engineering or from the office of the Director of the 
School of Mines and consult with his adviser before selecting the job. 
He should keep a detailed record of his work and observations along 
engineering and industrial lines and secure from his employer a letter 
stating the length of time employed. To receive credit he shall write 
a complete and satisfactory report on his summer's work and submit 
it to his adviser. See page 285. 

Students entering the College of Engineering or the School of 
Mines with considerable outside experience may apply for advanced 
standing for not more than a total of six hours for practical work in 



1 Students matriculating with 58 or more hours of credit may graduate with 
148 hours, since physical education is not required of such students. 



The College of Engineering and School of Mines 161 

the following subjects done in the field, shops or drafting room: 
M. E. 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 10, 13s, 20, 24, 105; C. E. 1, 2, 3, 10, and E. E. 1. 

THESIS 

Any candidate for a baccalaureate degree in engineering may with 
the consent of his major professor prepare a thesis on some subject 
relating to a special branch of engineering or other department of 
applied science. It will be presented for approval first to the in- 
structor under whose guidance it has been prepared, then to the head 
of the department in which the degree is to be conferred. A type- 
written copy of the thesis prepared in accordance with official specifi- 
cations and signed by both the instructor in charge and the head of the 
department, must be placed in the University library before graduation. 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING CURRICULA 

1. A four-year curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Chemical Engineering, with options in metallurgy and 
ceramics. 

2. A four-year curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Civil Engineering, with option in sanitary engineering. 

3. A four-year curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Electrical Engineering. 

4. A four-year curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Industrial Education. 

5. A four-year curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Mechanical Engineering. 

6. Combined science and engineering curricula extending over five 
or more years leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science, and 
Bachelor of Science in Engineering. 

FRESHMAN SCHEDULE 

In order to permit all students in the College of Engineering and 
the School of Mines to have a year in which to find out definitely what 
courses they wish to pursue, the first year of all engineering curricula 
is made uniform. To assist the student in making an intelligent choice, 
a series of weekly lectures are given throughout the first semester 
explaining the work of the several branches of engineering. 

First Year 
(Identical for all Engineering Courses) 
First Semester Hrs. Second Semester Hrs. 

Eng. 1— Comp. and Rhet 3 Eng. 2— Comp. and Rhet 3 

Math. 3 — College Algebra 4 Math. 5 — Analytic Geom 4 

Math. 4 — Plane Trig 2 Chem. 4 — Inorganic Chem 4 

Chem. 3 — Inorganic Chem 4 Mil. 2 — Militarv Science 1 

Mil. 1— Military Science 1 P. E. 2 — Ser. Prog. (Men) 1 

P. E. 1— Ser. Prog. (Men) 1 C. E. 1— Surveying 2 

M. E. 20— Mechanical Draw 3 M. E. 26 — Descriptive Geom 3 

G. 1 — Engineering Lectures 

18 18 



162 Curricular Requirements 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

The object of the four-year course in chemical engineering is to 
qualify young men to design, build, and manage manufacturing plants 
in which the products of manufacture are based on chemical processes 
and to fit men for professional employment as industrial chemists and 
chemical engineers. 

The curriculum outlined on the following page includes fundamental 
courses in inorganic, analytical, organic and physical chemistry; in 
shop practice, mechanical drawing and chemical plant design; in physics, 
theoretical and applied mechanics, mechanical and electrical engineer- 
ing; in mineralogy, metallurgy; and in industrial chemistry and 
chemical engineering. This curriculum is designed to give the student 
a thorough knowledge of the basic principles of those subjects which 
experience has shown are essential to one entering the chemical en- 
engineering profession. 

Students taking Chemistry 10 (2 Hrs.) in the summer session may 
take Chemistry 6 (5 Hrs.), or Chemistry 6 (3 Hrs.) and Ch. E. 102 (2 
Hrs.) in the second semester of their second year; all other chemical 
engineering students will take Chemistry 6 (5 Hrs.). By taking Chemis- 
try 10 or 15 (2 Hrs.) in the summer session a student may complete 
the 150-hour requirement with an option of 6 instead of 8 hours in his 
fourth year. These options are in four groups; chemical, ceramic, 
metallurgical, and commercial engineering. Thesis subjects will usually 
be selected from problems related to the development of the natural 
resources of West Virginia as foundations for chemical industries. 

Students preparing to take the course in chemical engineering 
should present German for entrance. A student may secure a broader 
training in language, economics, history, science, applied chemistry, and 
engineering by taking the combined Bachelor of Science and En- 
gineering course. By a careful selection of electives both degrees may 
be secured in five years. 

Metallurgy Option. Students electing the metallurgy option in 
chemical engineering should take the following courses as their fourth 
year electives: Ch. E. 211 (3 Hrs.), Ch. E. 232 (2 Hrs.), Ch. E. 222 (2 
Hrs.), and Ch. E. 223 (2 Hrs.). Ch. E. 124 (2-5 Hrs.) may be offered in 
place of one of the above courses by students who have shown marked 
ability along metallurgical lines. 

Ceramic Option. Students electing the ceramic option in chemical 
engineering should substitute Ch. E. 211 (3 Hrs.) for C. E. 115 (3 Hrs.) 
and Ch. E. 230 (3 Hrs.) for Ch. E. 201 (3 Hrs.). In addition, they 
should take Ch. E. 231 (2 Hrs.), Ch. E. 232 (2 Hrs.), and Ch. E. 233 (2 
Hrs.) as their senior electives, but students showing marked ability in 
ceramics may offer Ch. E. 124 (2-5 Hrs.) in place of either of these 
three courses. Students electing the ceramic option will be required to 
do their G. 105s in some approved ceramic industry. 



The College of Engineering and School of Mines 



163 



CURRICULUM IX CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering 

Summer Session* Following First Year 

Hrs. 

M. E. 10— Pipe Fitting 1 

M. E. 11— Machine Work 2 

Chem. 10 — Quan. Analysis — Optional 2 

Second Year 



First Semester Hrs. 

Physics 105— G. Physics 4 

Phvsics 107— G. Physics Lab... 1 

Math. 107— Calculus 4 

Chem. 5 — Qual. Analysis 4 

Mil. 3 — Military Science 1 

M. E. 5— Foundry 2 

M. E. 24 — Empirical Design.... 2 



18 



Second Semester Hrs. 

Physics 106— G. Physics 4 

Physics 108— G. Physics Lab. 1 

Math. 108— Calculus 4 

Chem. 6 — Quant. Analysis 3 or 5 
Ch. E. 102 — Blow-pipe and 

Assay 2 or 

Mil. 4 — Military Science 1 

M. 101— Statics 3 

E. M. 106— Mineralogy 1 

19 



G. 105s — Summer Practice — Out of Residence 2 



Third Year 



Chem. 233— Organic Chem 5 

Chem. 260— Physical Chem 3 

E. M. 202— Coal Lab 1 

M. 102— Mech. of Materials.... 4 

M. 103— Materials Test Lab 1 

M. E. 221— Thermodynamics.... 3 

G. 101— Eng'g Society y 2 

17 y 2 



Chem. 261— Physical Chem 3 

C. E. 115— Hydraulics 3 

M. E. 29— Mechanism 4 

M. E. 122— Mechanical Lab 2 

M. 104— Kinetics 3 

Ch. E. 201— Benzene Deriv 3 

G. 102— Eng'g Society y 2 

18y 2 



Fourth Year 



Econ. 103 — Prin. of Economics 3 

E. E. 110— Elements of E. E. 5 
Ch. E. 205— Chem. Eng'g and 

Manufactures 3 

Ch. E. 206— Ind. Chem. Lab... 2 

Ch. E. 220— Metallurgy 2 

Ch. E. 221— Metallurgy Lab... 1 

G. 103— Eng'g Society y 2 

Electives — (see below).... 2 

18 % 



Eng. 186— English 1 

M. E. Ill — Machine Design 2 

Ch. E. 207— Chem. Eng'g and 

Manufactures 2 

Ch. E. 208— Chem. Eng'g Lab. 2 
Ch. E. 209— Chemical Plants.. 2 

Ch. E. 210— Electro-Ch. Ind 3 

G. 104— Eng'g Society y 2 

Inspection Trip 

Electives — (see below) 3 or 5 

17% 



Electives 

Ch. E. 101, 102, 124, 202, 211, M. E. 222— Heat Engines 3 

212, 222, 223, 230, 231, 232, M. E. 223— Power Pl't Design 3 

233 2 to 5 G. 110— Business Law 3 

E. E. 214— Ind. App. of Elec. 3 Geol. 105— General Geology 3 

M. E. 112— Machine Drawing 2 Econ. 110— Money, Cr. and Bk. 2 

M. E. 207— Industrial Eng'g.... 3 Chem. 107, 238, 252, 262....2 to 5 



164 Curricular Requirements 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

The course in civil engineering has been planned to give a broad 
education in those general and scientific subjects which form the 
foundation of all engineering, and a special training in the field of 
civil engineering. 

Civil engineering includes plane, topographic, and geodetic survey- 
ing, which has to do with measurements of land surfaces; highway and 
railway engineering, which have to do with the building and mainten- 
ance of highways and railways, respectively, as well as the construction 
of tunnels, subways, and other special engineering projects; sanitary 
and municipal engineering, comprising the construction and operation 
of sewers, sewerage purification works, water supply systems, water 
purification plants, and garbage disposal systems; structural engineer- 
ing, comprising the construction of bridges, buildings, foundations, 
docks, walls, piers, and other fixed structures; and hydraulic engineer- 
ing, comprising the development of water power, the building of 
harbors, river improvements, and irrigation works. 

During the first two years emphasis is placed on those subjects 
underlying all engineering, such as English, mathematics, chemistry, 
physics, drawing, and surveying. These subjects are taught not as an 
end in themselves, but rather as a tool for the solution of engineering 
problems. The teaching is done by means of recitations, drawing room 
work, laboratory work, and field work. During these first two years 
instruction is also given in military training and in physical education, 
in order to keep the student physically fit. 

In the third and fourth years the application of these basic 
sciences are made to the solution of engineering problems. Breadth 
of training is furnished by courses in mechanics, economics, bacteriology, 
geology, electricity, and heat engineering. Depth of training is fur- 
nished by professional work in highway, railway, sanitary, structural, 
and hydraulic engineering. 

The professional field is so wide that the whole cannot be covered 
in a four year course. For this reason, during the latter part of the 
course certain options are offered. In addition to the sanitary option, 
which is outlined below, the student is offered a choice of one of two 
options in the second semester of the fourth year, one of which devotes 
more time to the subject of highway engineering, and the other to the 
subject of hydraulic engineering. 

OPTIONAL COURSES IN SANITARY ENGINEERING 

Students in civil engineering who desire to specialize in sanitary 
engineering are required to make the following substitutions: 

Fourth year— first semester, C. E. 202, (3 Hrs.) for C. E. 102, (3 
Hrs.); second semester, C. E. 203, (3 Hrs.) for C. E. 204, (3 Hrs.), 
C. E. 117, (2 Hrs.) and Ch. E. 202, (2 Hrs.) for 4 hours of elective 
subjects. 



The College of Engineering and School of Mines 



165 



CURRICULUM IX CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering 

Second Year 



First Semester Hrs. 

Physics 105— G. Physics 4 

Physics 107— G. Physics Lab. 1 

Math. 107— Calculus 4 

Chem. 10 — Quan. Analysis 2 

Mil. 3 — Military Science 1 

C. E. 2— Surveying 4 

C. E. 10— Struc. Drafting 2 

18 



Second Semester Hrs. 

Physics 106 — G. Physics 4 

Physics 108— G. Physics Lab. 1 

Math. 108— Calculus 4 

Geol. 102— General Geology 4 

Mil. 4 — Military Science 1 

C. E. 3— Railroad Curves 2 

M. 101— Statics 3 

19 



C. E. 4s — Summer Surveying (five weeks) 5 



Third Year 



Econ. 103 — Prin. of Economics 3 

Bot. 141 — Bacteriology 3 

M. 102 — Mech. of Materials.... 4 

M. 103— Materials Test. Lab 1 

E. E. 101— Applied Electricity 4 
M. E. 221— Thermodynamics.... 3 
G. 101— Eng'g Society V 2 

is y 2 



Econ. 110— Money, Cr. and Bk. 2 

M. 104— Kinetics 3 

M. E. 122— Mechanical Lab 2 

C. E. 101— Roads and Pave.... 3 

C. E. 115— Hydraulics 3 

C. E. 121— Roofs and Bridges 4 

G. 102— Eng'g Society Va 

17M* 



Fourth Year 



C. E. 102— Railway Eng'g 3 

C. E. 103 — Highway Design.... 3 
C. E. 116— Water Sup. Eng'g. 4 
C. E. 120— Materials of Const.* 2 

C. E. 123— Bridge Design 3 

C. E. 207— Foundations 3 

G. 103— Eng'g Society y 2 

18 y 2 



Eng. 186— English 1 

G. 110 — Business Law 3 

C. E. 118— Sanitary Eng'g 3 

C. E. 204— Adv. Structures 3 

C. E. 20G — Concrete Const 3 

G. 104— Eng'g Society Y 2 

Inspection Trip 

Electives (by groups) 4 

17% 



Electives 



C. E. 200— Water Pow. Eng'g 2 

Ch. E. 202— Water Ex 2 

C. E. 208— Trans. Econ 2 



C. E. 209— Highway Lab 2 

C. E. 124— Thesis 2 or 4 



166 Curricular Requirements 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

The course in electrical engineering is intended to give the student 
that theoretical and practical instruction which will enable him to obtain 
a basic knowledge of the application of electricity. 

The work of the first two years is largely preparatory to the techni- 
cal training of the last two years, and parallels closely that of the 
mechanical engineering course. This gives the requisite foundation in 
English, mathematics, physics, chemistry, drafting, and the elements of 
shop practice. Electrical construction is taken up at an early part of 
the course so that the student may profit by it when seeeking summer 
employment. Some of the fundamental principles of electricity and 
magnetism are studied in the course in physics. 

The purely electrical engineering courses begin with the third year. 
In the first semester of this year the elements of electrical engineering 
are taken up. The theory is studied in the classroom and then experi- 
mentally proved or verified in the laboratory. In the second semester 
this study is continued to include the design, construction, and operation 
of direct current machinery as well as the theory of alternating currents. 
In addition to the electrical studies the following supplementary subjects 
are covered during the year: hydraulics, thermodynamics, and heat 
engines; mechanics, mechanical laboratory practice; economics; and 
money, credit, and banking. 

The fourth year is largely devoted to a study of the commercial 
applications of electricity either directly or indirectly. The design,, 
construction, and operation of alternating current apparatus are studied 
in the class and laboratory. The generation of electrical energy, its 
distribution and utilization, together with the economic factors to be 
considered, are covered by the course in electrical generation and dis- 
tribution, which is continued into the second semester as a design 
course. An introductory course in illumination and signalling is in- 
tended to acquaint the student with the fundamentals of illuminating 
engineering. The course in advanced laboratory is included to give the 
student an opportunity for original work. 

In his fourth year the student has a choice of 5 hours of elective 
courses, from which he may select those courses of particular value or 
interest to him. These electives are listed on the opposite page below 
the schedule of courses. 



The College of Engineering and School of Mines 



167 



CURRICULUM IX ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 

Summer Session Following First Year 

Hrs. 

M. E. 13s— Machine Work 3 

Second Year 



First Semester Hrs. 

Physics 105 — G. Physics 4 

Physics 107— G. Physics Lab. 1 

Math. 107— Calculus 4 

Chem. 10 — Quan. Analysis 2 

Mil. 3 — Military Science 1 

M. E. 1— Pattern Making 1 

M. E. 7 — Forging 1 

M. E. 24 — Empirical Design.... 2 

E. E. 1— Electrical Const 2 

18 



Second Semester Hrs. 

Physics 106 — G. Physics 4 

Physics 108— G. Physics Lab... 1 

Math. 108— Calculus 4 

Mil. 4 — Military Science 1 

M. 101— Statics ~ 

M. E. 5— Foundry 2 

M. E. 29— Mechanism 4 



19 



G. 105s — Summer Practice — Out of Residence 2 

Third Year 

Econ. 103 — Prin. of Economics 3 Eng. 186 — English 1 

M. 102— Mech. of Materials.... 4 M. 104— Kinetics 3 

M. 103— Materials Test Lab... 1 C. E. 115— Hydraulics 3 

M. E. 122— Mechanical Lab 2 M. E. 222— Heat Engines 3 

M. E. 221— Thermodynamics .. 3 E. E. 200— D. C. Machinery.... 4 

E. E. 100— Elements of E. E. 4 E. E. 201— A. C. Theory and 

G. 101— Eng'g Society V 2 Meas 4 

G. 102— Eng'g Society % 

17 y 2 is y 2 



Fourth Year 



G. 110 — Business Law 3 

M. E. 223— Steam Pow. Plants 3 
E. E. 202— A. C. Machinery.... 3 
E. E. 204— E. Des. and Calc... 3 

E. E. 205— Electrical Lab 2 

E. E. 207— E. Transmission.... 3 
G. 103— Eng'g Society 



% 



17 y 2 



Econ. 110— Money, Cr. and Bk. 2 

M. E. 228— Eng'g Lab 2 

E. E. 104— Illumination 2 

E. E. 203— A. C. Machinery.... 3 

E. E. 206— Advanced E. Lab... 2 

E. E. 208— E. Design 2 

G. 104— Eng'g Society M> 

Electives — (see below) 5 

18 M> 



E. E. 105— Thesis 2 to 

E. E. 209— Electric Traction.... 
E. E. 210— Rate Making.. ..2 or 
E. E. 211— Electric Problems.. 
E. E. 212— Transients, Surges 

and Electric Waves 

E. E. 213— E. Pow. Trans, and 

Dist 



Electives 

5 E. E. 214— Ind. Appl. of Elec. 3 

2 E. E. 216— Telephone Eng'g.... 3 

3 M. E. Ill— Machine Design 2 

2 M. E. 112— Machine Drawing.. 2 
Ch. E. 210— Electro Chemical 

3 Industries 2 or 3 

Math. 240— Differential Equa- 

3 tions 3 



168 Curricular Requirements 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

The aim of the course in mechanical engineering is to give the 
student such mental equipment as will enable him to deal most effec- 
tively both technically and commercially with general engineering 
problems. All possible practice is given in the work that an engineer 
is ordinarily called on to do, but greater stress is laid on a thorough 
knowledge of those underlying principles and methods which are the 
foundation of all engineering professions. To this is added a study of 
those economic subjects which are essential to a thorough understanding 
of sound business methods. Options are provided in the fourth year 
which enable the student to specialize in accordance with his natural 
inclination. Students selecting the power option or the industrial option 
in the first semester are required to take at least 3 hours in the same 
group during the second semester. 

The work in pure mathematics is terminated at the end of the 
second year, and applications follow in the recitation room courses in 
mechanism, statics, mechanics and materials, dynamics, and machine de- 
sign. Power engineering begins with the course in thermodynamics in 
the third year and is continued by the courses in heat engines and 
power plant design with options in the design of steam turbines and 
gas engines. A sufficient amount of electrical engineering is given in 
the third and fourth years to enable the student to handle engineering 
operations involving the simpler electrical problems, and additional 
courses available in the electrical option. 

The shop work, commencing in the second year, is planned to ac- 
quaint students with the fundamental tools and mechanical operations, 
to enable them to acquire a reasonable amount of manual dexterity, 
and to furnish them continuously with practical examples of the prin- 
ciples studied in the class rooms. With those selecting the industrial 
option a study is made of the methods used in manufacturing plants 
and engineering establishments, and of the principles of industrial 
management. 

Drafting room work is given throughout the four years, starting 
with elementary mechanical drawing and descriptive geometry in the 
first year. The courses in mechanism, machine design, and power plant 
design are accompanied by drawing room work, giving practical appli- 
cations of the principles studied in the class room and constant practice 
in the execution of drawings. 

The engineering laboratories provide the students with practice 
in testing, handling, and caring for a large variety of machinery, in- 
cluding steam, air, gas, hydraulic, material-testing, and power-trans- 
mission machinery. One half-day a week is devoted to this work 
during the last two years. 



The College of Engineering and School of Mines 



169 



CURRICULUM IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 
Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 

Summer Session Following First Year 
M. E. 13s— Machine Work 



Hrs. 



Second Year 



First Semester Hrs. 

Physics 105— G. Physics 4 

Physics 107— G. Physics Lab. 1 

Math. 107— Calculus 4 

Chem. 10 — Quant. Analysis 2 

Mil. 3 — Military Science 1 

M. E. 1— Pattern Making 1 

M. E. 5— Foundry 2 

M. E. 7 — Forging 1 

M. E. 24— Empirical Design.... 2 

18 



Second Semester Hrs. 

Physics 106— G. Physics 4 

Physics 108— G. Physics Lab... 1 

Math. 108— Calculus 4 

Mil. 4 — Military Science 1 

M. 101— Statics 3 

M. E. 4— Pattern Making 2 

M. E. 29 — Mechanism 4 



19 



G. 105s — Summer Practice — Out of Residence 2 

Third Year 

Econ. 103— Prin. of Economics 3 Econ. 110— Money, Cr. and Bk. 2 

M. 102— Mech. of Materials.... 4 M. 104— Kinetics 3 

M. 103— Materials Test. Lab... 1 E. E. 103— Elements of E. E. 4 

E. E. 102— Elements of E. E. 4 M. E. Ill— Machine Design.... 2 

M. E. 105 — Machine Const 2 M. E. 112 — Machine Drawing.. 2 

M. E. 221— Thermodynamics.... 3 M. E. 122— Mechanical Lab 2 

G. 101— Eng'g Society V 2 M. E. 222— Heat Engines 3 

G. 102— Eng'g Society V 2 

17% 18 y 2 



Fourth Year 



C. E. 115— Hydraulics 3 

C. E. 122— Structural Eng'g or 

Ch. E. 220— Metallurgy 2 

Ch. E. 221— Metallurgy Lab... 1 

M. E. 123— Eng'g Lab 2 

M. E. 201— Machine Design.... 2 
M. E. 202— Machine Drawing.. 2 
M. E. 223— Steam Pow. Plants 3 

G. 103— Eng'g Society V 2 

Electives — (see below) 3 

18 % 



Eng. 186— English 1 

G. 110 — Business Law 3 

E. E. 214— Ind. App. of Elec. 3 
M. E. 227— Pr. Plant Designs 2 

M. E. 228— Eng'g Lab 2 

G. 104— Eng'g Society Vz 

Inspection Trip 

Electives — (see below) 6 



17% 



Electives 



M. E. 106— Shop Methods. .2 or 3 

M. E. 124— Thesis 2 to 4 

M. E. 205— Industrial Eng'g.... 3 

M. E. 206— Industrial Eng'g.... 3 

M. E. 207— Industrial Eng'g.... 3 



M. E. 224— Steam Turbines.... 3 

M. E. 225— Gas Eng'g 3 

M. E. 226— Heat and Vent...2 or 3 
E. E. 204— E. Desn. and Calc. 3 
E. E. 210— Rate Making.. .2 or 3 



170 Curricular Requirements 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

The object of this course is to prepare men and women to teach 
vocational industrial subjects in high schools, vocational schools, night 
schools, part-time schools, and schools in industrial plants and to super- 
vise work in connection with the administration of the State and Federal 
vocational education acts. It is intended to give students a broad, 
flexible, practical education upon which they can build a life of useful- 
ness and service and which will enable them to pursue graduate work 
with assurance and confidence. 

In addition to the shop courses taken in the University, not less 
than 18 weeks of work must be done under commercial and trade 
conditions. This work should be approved by the instructor before the 
student enters upon it. It will carry 5 hours of credit in G. 106s and 
107s. A monthly report^ will be required on the work done. 

Electives may be made from the following grouping. Whenever 
a new subject is started, at least 8 hours must be taken in that sub- 
ject and all prerequisites must be met. Electives in subjects other 
than those listed may be allowed when approved by the adviser, the 
faculty, and the Committee on Scholarship. A total of 133 hours are 
required for graduation in this course. 

Those who have a satisfactory trade experience of two years be- 
yond the period of apprenticeship in accordance with the state plan 
for vocational education and who take this course will be eligible to 
teach their trade as well. 

The course of any candidate for a degree will include: 

Subject Hrs. Subject Hrs. 

English 12 Economics 6 

Physics 10 Public Speaking 6 

Chemistry 10 Education (8 Hrs. in I. E.) 15 

Drawing and Descriptive Geom. 8 Outside Shop Work 5 

Shop Work 30 Military (when required) 4 

Mathematics 6 Physical Education 2 

Electives will be chosen from the following groups except as noted 
above: 

Subject Hrs. Subject Hrs. 

English 6 Shops 5 

Physics 10 Mathematics 11 

Chemistry 20 Education 5 

Drawing 9 Social or Political Science 9 

Physical Education 1 23 Natural Science 9 

History 9 

Not less than 8 hours may be chosen from any branch of engineering 
in which the student is prepared to meet the requirements of the course. 



^Including Physical Education 75, 78. 152, 276, and 277, and 8 hours made 
up of selected work from courses 11, 12, 13, 14, 43, 44, 45, 46, 111, 112, 113, 114, 
143, and 144. 



The College of Engineering and School of Mines 171 



At least 8 hours in industrial education including I. E. 124 and 
164 are required. The rest of the work in education will be taken in 
the College of Education. 

CURRICULUM IN INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Industrial Education 

First Year 

First Semester Hrs. Second Semester Hrs* 

Eng. 1— Comp. and Rhet 3 Eng. 2 — Comp. and Rhet 3 

Eng. 3— Evol. of Eng. Lit 3 Eng. 4— Evol. of Eng. Lit 3 

Math. 3— College Algebra 4 Math. 4— PI. Trig 2 

Chem. 3 — Inorganic Chem 4 Chem. 4 — Inorganic Chem 4 

Mil. 1 — Military Science 1 Mil. 2 — Military Science 1 

P. E. 1— Ser. Prog. (Men) 1 P. E. 2— Ser. Prog. (Men) 1 

M. E. 20— Drawing 3 M. E. 1— Pattern Making 1 

G. 1 — Eng'g Lectures M. E. 5 — Foundry 2 

19 M. E. 7— Forging 1 

18 

Second Year 

Physics 105— G. Physics 4 Physics 106— G. Physics 4 

Physics 107— G. Physics Lab 1 Physics 108— G. Physics Lab 1 

Econ. 1 — Prin. of Economics.... 3 Econ. 2 — Prin. of Economics.... 3 

Pub. Spkg. 3— Begin. Interpret. 3 Pub. Spkg. 11— Effec. Spkg 3 

Mil. 3 — Military Science 1 Mil. 4 — Military Science 1 

M. E. 2— Woodworking 2 M. E. 12— Machine Work 1 

M. E. 11— Machine Work 2 M. E. 24 — Empirical Design 2 

M. E. 103— Foundry Work 3 

16 18 

Third and fourth years to be arranged. See preceding page for 
requirements. 

FIVE-YEAR CURRICULA 1 

For a description of curricula leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science and degrees in engineering, see page 

SCHOOL OF MINES CURRICULA 1 

1. A four-year curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Engineering of Mines, with options in coal mining and oil 
and gas engineering. 

2. Combined science and engineering curricula extending over five 
or more years leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science, and 
Bachelor of Science in Mining Engineering in the School of Mines. 



a The freshman year of these curricula is common with the freshman vear 
in the College of Engineering. This provision permits a student to postpone a 
choice of his course of study in any branch of engineering until after a year of 
college work. 



172 Curricular Requirements 



MIXING ENGINEERING 

Mining engineering deals with the processes and appliances used 
in the extraction of minerals from within the earth. Not only must 
the mining engineer be thoroughly trained in mining and geology, but 
also in the application of the fundamental principles of civil, electrical, 
and mechanical engineering to mining conditions. 

The first two years of the course in mining engineering are de- 
voted to a thorough training in the underlying principles of mathe- 
matics, physics, and chemistry. Supplementing these are courses in 
surveying, including mine surveying, English, and drawing. For the 
last two years of the course two options are provided, one in coal mining 
and one in geological, oil, and gas engineering. The student is permitted 
to state his choice of option at the beginning of the second year. 

COAL MINING 

In the Coal Mining Option the study of coal mining is taken up in 
the third year. This study includes the geology and classification of 
coals; explosives and blasting; prospecting; shaft sinking and tunnel- 
ing; methods of working; haulage, hoisting and pumping; and the 
preparation of coal for the market. A course in the projection of mine 
workings and the design of mining plants is offered throughout the 
fourth year. A thorough course in mine gases and the ventilation of 
mines is given in the first half of the fourth year, supplemented by 
work in the mining laboratory. The course in fuels is designed to give 
the student a knowledge of the various fuels that are utilized in 
engineering practice, while the courses in metallurgy acquaint him 
with the minerals and processes used in manufacture of iron and steel. 
The course in mine management presents the economic, social, and 
financial considerations to be met in the successful management of a 
mining enterprise. 

The study of steam engineering begins with the course in thermody- 
namics. Practice in the handling and care of instruments and machinery 
and in the solution of practical engineering problems is offered in the 
mechanical laboratory. These courses are followed by courses in elec- 
trical engineering and structural engineering. 

A training in the science of geology is offered by the courses in 
mineralogy and general geology. These courses may be supplemented 
by the study of the economic geology of the non-metallic ' minerals in 
the fourth year, special attention being paid to the geology of coal, 
oil and gas. Should the student desire further work in geology a course 
in field geology is offered as an elective subject. 

The courses in economics, business law, and industrial engineering 
furnish the fundamental business training so essential for the engineer. 



The College of Engineering and School of Mines 



173 



CURRICULUM IX MIXING ENGINEERING 

(Coal Mining Option) 
Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Engineering of Mines 

First Year 



First Semester Hrs. 

Eng. 1— Comp. and Rhet 3 

Math. 3 — College Algebra 4 

Math. 4— PI. Trig 2 

Chem. 3 — Inorganic Chem 4 

Mil. 1 — Military Science 1 

P. E. 1— Ser. Prog. (Men) 1 

M. E. 20 — Mechanical Drawing 3 
G. 1 — Eng'g Lectures 

18 



Second Semester Hrs. 

Eng. 2— Comp. and Rhet 3 

Math. 5 — Analytic Geom 4 

Chem. 4 — Inorganic Chem 4 

Mil. 2 — Military Science 1 

P. E. 2— Ser. Prog. (Men) 1 

C. E. 1 — Surveying 2 

M. E. 26 — Descriptive Geom 3 



18 



Second Year 



Physics 105 — G. Physics 4 

Physics 107— G. Physics Lab... 1 

Math. 107— Calculus 4 

Mil. 3 — Military Science 1 

C. E. 2— Surveying 4 

M. E. 23— Drawing 2 

E. M. 106— Mineralogy 2 

18 



Phvsics 106— G. Physics 4 

Physics 108— G. Physics Lab... 1 

Math. 108— Calculus 4 

Chem. 6 — Quant. Analysis 4 

Mil. 4 — Military Science 1 

M. 101— Statics 3 

E. M. 101 — Mine Surveying.... 2 

19 



E. M. 102s — Summer Mine Surveying (five weeks) 5 



Third Year 



Econ. 103 — Prin. of Economics 3 

Geol. 102— General Geology.... 4 

M. 102— Mech. of Materials.... 4 

M. 103— Materials Test Lab 1 

M. E. 221— Thermodynamics.... 3 

E. M. Ill— Mining 2 

G. 101— Eng'g Society % 

17% 



Econ. 110— Money, Cr. and Bk. 2 

M. 104— Kinetics 3 

M. E. 122— Mechanical Lab 2 

C. E. 115— Hydraulics 3 

E. M. 107— Mining Methods.... 4 

E. M. 112— Coal Mining 4 

G. 102— Eng'g Society V 2 

18% 



Fourth Year 



G. 110— Business Law 3 

Ch. E. 220— Metallurgy 2 

E. E. 102— Elements of E. E. 4 
C. E. 122— Structural Eng'g.... 3 
E. M. 113— Mine Ventilation.... 3 

E. M. 115 — Mine Design 2 

E. M. 202— Coal Lab 1 

G. 103— Eng'g Society Y 2 

18% 



Eng. 186— English 1 

E. E. 103— Elements of E. E. 4 
E. M. 114 — Mine Management 1 

E. M. 116— Mine Design 3 

E. M. 118 — Mining Lab 3 

G. 104— Eng'g Society Yz 

Inspection Trip 

Electives (see below) 5 

17 y 2 



Electives 



E. M. 120— Thesis 2 to 4 

E. M. 203— Geol. Survey 2 

Ch. E. 102— Blow Pipe & Assy 2 

Ch. E. 211— Fuels 3 

Ch. E. 221— Met. Lab 1 

Ch. E. 222— Non. Fer. Met 2 



Ch. E. 232— Refractories 2 

C. E. 206— Concrete Const 3 

M. E. 207— Industrial Eng'g.... 3 

Geol. 11 — Economic Geol 4 

Geol. 162— Field Geol 3 

Geol. 211— Mineral Fuels.. 3 or 4 



174 Curricular Requirements 



GEOLOGICAL AND OIL AXD GAS ENGINEERING 

This option is planned to meet the needs of the engineer who is 
more interested in the geological aspect of mining than in the actual 
operation of a mining property. There is a growing demand for the 
so-called mining geologist who, while he has had a thorough training in 
the fundamentals of engineering in general and of mining engineering 
in particular, yet is specially qualified to work out the detailed geological 
features of mining properties and to make reports on them. This 
is particularly true in the case of oil and gas companies, where accurate 
.geological knowledge in advance of actual drilling operations is of the 
greatest importance in the economical development of the field. Besides 
the opportunities offered by mining companies, many of our railroads 
maintain a corps of geologists while the several states and the Federal 
government are continually carrying on geological investigation. This 
course also offers an excellent preparation for those who propose to 
carry on graduate work. 

In the third year the course differs from the coal mining option in 
that organic chemistry and geological courses are substituted for the 
courses in coal mining. A course in field geology in which the student 
prepares a geological map and a complete report on an assigned area 
enables him to apply the geological knowledge received in his second 
year. The fundamentals of mining and metallurgy are studied in the 
third year as well. The study of oil and gas geology treats of the 
origin, properties, distribution, and mode of accumulation of oil and 
gas, and familiarizes the students with all the available sources of in- 
formation on this subject. The courses in oil and gas production and 
oil refining take up the subjects of the chemical and physical properties 
of petroleum and natural gas, their extraction and subsequent treat- 
ment, the valuation of oil and gas properties, reports on them, and the 
actual testing in the laboratory of various oils, oil shales, and natural 
gas. 

A thorough grounding in the fundamentals of business is afforded 
by the courses in economics, money, credit, and banking, business law 
and industrial engineering. 



The College of Engineering and School of Mines 



175 



CURRICULUM IN MINING ENGINEERING 
(Oil and Gas Option) 

r 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Engineering of Mines 



First Semester 



First 

Hrs. 



Year 



Eng. 1 — Comp. and Rhet 3 

Math. 3 — College Algebra 4 

Math. 4— PI. Trig 2 

Chem. 3 — Inorganic Chem 4 

Mil. 1 — Military Science 1 

P. E. 1— Ser. Prog. (Men) 1 

M. E. 20 — Mechanical Drawing 3 
G. 1 — Eng'g Lectures 

18 



Second Semester 



Hrs. 



Eng. 2— Comp. and Rhet 3 

Math. 5 — Analytic Geom 4 

Chem. 4 — Inorganic Chem 4 

Mil. 2 — Military Science 1 

P. E. 2— Ser. Prog. (Men) 1 

C. E. 1— Surveying 2 

M. E. 26— Descriptive Geom 3 



18 



Second Year 



Phvsics 105 — G. Physics 4 

Phvsics 107— G. Physics Lab. 1 

Math. 107— Calculus 4 

Geol. 102 — General Geology.... 4 

Mil. 3 — Militarv Science 1 

M. E. 23— Drawing 2 

E. M. 106 — Mineralogy 2 

18 



Physics 106 — G. Physics 4 

Physics 108— G. Physics Lab. 1 

Math. 108— Calculus 4 

Geol. 103 — Historical Geology 4 

Chem. 6 — Quant. Analysis 5 

Mil. 4 — Military Science 1 



19 



Third Year 



Econ. 103 — Prin. of Economics 3 

Chem. 233 — Organic Chem 5 

M. 101— Statics 3 

C. E. 2 — Surveying 4 

Ch. E. 101— Oil Lab 1 

E. M. Ill— Mining 2 

G. 101— Eng'g Society % 

is y 2 



Econ. 110— Money, Cr. and Bk. 2 

Geol. 162— Field Geology 3 

Geol. 205— Structural Geol 3 

Geol. 211— Mineral Fuels 3 

M. 102— Mech. of Materials.... 4 
M. 103— Materials Test. Lab... 1 
E. M. 101— Mine Surveying.... 2 

G. 102— Eng'g Society V 2 

18 % 



E. M. 102s — Summer Mine Surveying (five weeks) 5 

Fourth Year 



M. 104— Kinetics 3 

M. E. 221— Thermodynamics.... 3 
Ch. E. 212— Oil Refining Lab. 2 

Ch. E. 220— Metallurgy 2 

G. 110 — Business Law 3 

C. E. 115— Hydraulics 3 

E. M. 201— Oil and Gas Prod. 2 

G. 103— Eng'g Society.... V 2 

18 % 



Eng. 186 — English 1 

E. E. 101— Applied Elect 4 

Ch. E. 211— Fuels 3 

E. M. 203— Geol. Surveying.... 2 

G. 104— Eng'g Society V 2 

M. E. 122— Mechanical Lab 2 

Inspection Trip 

Electives (see below) 4 

16 V 2 



Electives 



E. M. 112— Coal Mining 4 

E. M. 120— Thesis 2 to 4 

Ch. E. 102— Blow Pipe & Assy. 2 
Ch. E. 201— Benzene Deriv 3 



Ch. E. 222— Non-Fer. Met 2 

C. E. 206— Concrete Const 3 

M. E. 207— Industrial Eng'g.... 3 

Geol. 11, 204 4 

Chem. 107, 238, 260 3 to 5 



176 Curricular Requirements 

FIVE-YEAR CURRICULA 

For a description of curricula in the School of Mines leading to the 
degrees of Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Science in Engineering 
of Mines, see below. 

FIVE YEAR CURRICULA 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science and Degrees in 
Engineering and Mining Engineering 

These curricula are designed to meet the needs of students who 
wish a broader training in liberal arts subjects than is provided in a 
four-year curriculum. The work outlined for the first four years may 
also be taken by students who desire a general scientific course with 
engineering as a major as a preparation for the study of law, business, 
business administration,, or some branch of science, or for teaching 
mathematics and science. 

(A) Requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science, to be con- 
ferred at the end of the fourth year. 

Subject Hours 

The requirements in the first three years of any 
four-year engineering curriculum, except summer 

practice 1 112 2 

Additional Economics (to meet group requirements) 1 

One foreign language 12 

Elective from one of the following groups: 6 

(1) English, Journalism, Public Speaking 

(2) Foreign language 

(3) History 

(4) Political Science 

(5) Philosophy and Sociology 

(6) Business Administration 



Total 131 s 

(B) Requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering 
or Engineering of Mines to be conferred upon completion of the 
fifth year. 

Summer Practice 105s 2* 

The work outlined for the fourth year in the depart- 
ment in which the first degree was taken 36 

Total for Five Years 169 



Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering 
may postpone 3 hours of third year work until the fifth year to take the place 
of economics required for the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

2 For civil and mining engineering students — 114 hours. 

3 For civil and mining engineering students — 133 hours. 

*For all curricula except civil and mining engineering. 

In special cases students may, with the approval of the adviser and Com- 
mittee on Scholarship, be permitted to substitute a limited amount of fourth-year 
work in the same curriculum for third-year subjects. 



The College of Engineering and School of Mines 177 

SPECIAL CURRICULA 

1. Elective Groups for Students in Other Colleges. Candidates for 
degrees other than engineering degrees and special students in any de- 
partment of the University are permitted to elect subjects in the College 
of Engineering and School of Mines, provided, in each case they have had 
the subjects specified as prerequisites. Students who wish to take a 
general classical or scientific course of study before taking the engineer- 
ing curriculum are advised to carry their mathematics as far as called 
for by the engineering curriculum, and to take some of their elective work 
in the College of Engineering. The engineering instructors will advise 
them what is the best to elect. For a list of engineering and mining 
courses accredited in the College of Arts and Sciences see footnote at the 
bottom of page 121. 

2. Partial Curriculum. Students who have not the time or are 
otherwise unable to take full curriculum will be allowed to take a special 
or partial curriculum, consisting of such studies as they are prepared to 
take, provided that such curriculum shall have been approved by the 
adviser. For further information see statement of requirements for ad- 
mission as special students. 

PROFESSIONAL DEGREES 

The University confers the following professional degrees: Chemical 
Engineer (Ch. E.), Civil Engineer (C. E.), Electrical Engineer (E. E.), 
Mechanical Engineer (M. E.), and Engineer of Mines (E. M.), upon 
graduates of the College of Engineering and the School of Mines of 
West Virginia University on the basis of practical experience and study 
in absentia, the presentation of a thesis and oral final examination. 

To be eligible a candidate for a professional degree must have been 
in active practice of his profession for at least five years since receiving 
his first degree, must have been in responsible charge of important 
work for at least two years. 

Application for registration as a candidate for a degree should be 
made not later than October 1 in the year in which the degree is ex- 
pected. Detailed regulations and registration blanks may be obtained 
from the Dean of the College of Engineering, or the Director of the 
School of Mines. 

RECOMMENDATION FOR CERTIFICATION OF TEACHERS 

Students who wish to obtain a high school certificate to teach the 
practical arts must meet the requirements of the State Board of Educa- 
tion, the College of Education, and the Department of Industrial Educa- 
tion of the College of Engineering and Mechanic Arts. Recommendation 



178 Curricular Requirements 

for certification is made by the Department of Industrial Education to 
the Dean of the College of Education. A statement of the State require- 
ments appears below: 

REQUIREMENTS FOR TEACHERS OF THE PRACTICAL ARTS 

Minimum requirements: Hours 

Industrial Arts 36 

Summer Practice 5 

Approved courses: Hours 

Woodworking 6 

M. E. 2 — Woodworking 2 

M. E. 3 — Woodworking 2 

M. E. 101— Woodworking 2 

Pattern Making 3 

M. E. 1— Pattern Making 1 

M. E. 4— Pattern Making 2 

Foundry 2 

M. E. 5— Foundry Work 2 

M. E. 103— Foundry W T ork 2 

Forge Work 1 

M. E. 7 — Forging 1 

M. E. 104— Forging 2 

Electric Wiring 2 

E. E. 1 — Electrical Construction 2 

Pipe Fitting 1 

M. E. 10— Pipe Fitting 1 

Wood Finishing 2 

M. E. 8s— Wood Finishing 2 

Machine Shop 8 

M. E. 11— Machine Work 2 

M. E. 12— Machine Work 1 

M. E. 105 — Machine Construction 2 

M. E. 106— Shop Methods 2 or 3 

M. E. 107 — Machine Construction 2 to 5 

Drawing 6 

M. E. 20 — Mechanical Drawing 2 

M. E. 22 — Mechanical Drawing 2 

M. E. 24 — Empirical Design 2 

M. E. 26 — Descriptive Geometry 3 

M. E. 29— Mechanism 4 

C. E. 10— Structural Drafting 2 

Approved Electives: 

Sheet Metal 2 

M. E. 6s— Sheet Metal Work 2 

Surveying 8 

C. E. 1 2 

C. E. 2 4 

C. E. 3 2 



The Graduate School 179 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

ORGANIZATION 

By order of the Board of Governors of West Virginia University, a 
University Graduate School is established, whose roots are implanted in 
all University undergraduate work, irrespective of departments or 
schools. The Graduate School is empowered (1) to direct research and 
investigation with particular reference to the problems of the State, and 
(2) to train and recommend to the Board of Governors candidates for 
the degrees of Master of Science, Master of Arts, and Doctor of 
Philosophy. 

Graduate study and teaching at West Virginia University is the 
most advanced work in education undertaken by the State. Its chief aim 
is the development of independent investigation and the stimulation or 
promotion of the spirit of research. To the end of economy in the use of 
University facilities, personnel, and equipment for graduate work, the 
Graduate School is organized on the basis of divisions rather than on 
the basis of departments. These divisions are as follows: 

(a) Industrial Sciences, embracing the various engineering 
branches, the Engineering Experiment Station, including the Bureau of 
Mines Research, chemistry, geology, mathematics, physics, and such 
kindred subjects as shall be determined by the Dean of the Graduate 
School in consultation with the Graduate Council; 

(b) Biology and Agriculture, embracing the various branches of 
agriculture, the Agricultural Experiment Station, the medical sciences, 
bacteriology, botany, genetics, plant pathology, zoology, and such kindred 
subjects as shall be determined by the Dean of the Graduate School in 
consultation with the Graduate Council; 

(c) Social Sciences, embracing the Bureau of Government Research, 
the social sciences and public law, languages and literatures, philosophy, 
psychology, and such kindred subjects as shall be determined by the Dean 
of the Graduate School in consultation with the Graduate Council; 

(d) Education, embracing the Bureau of Educational Research, all 
branches of professional education, and such kindred subjects as shall be 
determined by the Dean of the Graduate School in consultation with the 
Graduate Council. 

Each of the four divisions is headed by a chairman. The four group 
chairmen and the Dean constitute the Graduate Council, hereafter re- 
ferred to as the Council; and either one of their number or the Dean 
serves as Chairman of the Council. 

All regulations governing the Graduate School, such as the determi- 
nation of curricula, projects, majors, minors, standards, thesis require- 
ments, and like and similar matters shall be formulated by the Council 
and presented to the Faculty for its consideration and action. 



180 Curricular Requirements 

FACULTY 

The Faculty of the Graduate School consists of the Dean of the 
Graduate School, the deans of the colleges, members of the Council, and 
professors in charge of work open to graduate students only. 

STUDENT BODY 

The student body of the Graduate School consists of all students en- 
rolled in graduate courses who have previously received the bachelor's 
degree or who have completed undergraduate work equivalent thereto, 
except candidates for professional degrees. 

Seniors in the colleges of West Virginia University who are within 
10 semester hours of graduation may, with the aproval of the Graduate 
Council, enroll for courses in the Graduate School, for which they may 
receive graduate credit after having obtained their bachelors' degrees. 
Such graduate courses must not have been offered for undergraduate 
credit. 

ADVISER 

When a student is admitted to the Graduate School, the Chairman 
of the Graduate Council will appoint an adviser to have general direction 
of his program. 1 The adviser will arrange a specific course of study to 
be approved by the Council and, in the case of candidates for advanced 
degrees, will preside at the candidate's qualifying and final examinations. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATE DEGREES 

(For a list of graduate degrees offered, see pages 80 and 81.) 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 

1. Candidacy: 

Admission to candidacy for any graduate degree is conditioned upon 
the fulfillment of the requirements for admission to the Graduate School, 1 
and also the particular requirements of undergraduate preparation for 
the field of study in which the student wishes to specialize. 

2. Scholarship : 

No credits are acceptable toward an advanced degree which are re- 
ported with a grade lower than C. 2 

Reasonable standards of oral and written English must be con- 
sistently attained. 

3. Curriculum: 

Credit toward a graduate degree may only be obtained for courses 
listed in this Catalogue and numbered 200-399. Other advanced courses 
and special research courses not so listed may, with the approval of the 
Graduate Council, carry graduate credit. 



1 For a complete statement of the requirements for admission to the Graduate 
School, see page 70. 

^or a description of the marking system in use in the University, see 
page S2. 



The Graduate School 181 



4. Residence : 

Residence credit for special field assignments and for work taken off 
the University Campus shall be allowed only with the prior approval of 
the Graduate Council. 

5. Thesis: 

All theses shall be presented in the form prescribed by the Graduate 
Council at least one month previous to the Commencement Day on which 
the degree is expected. If the thesis is accepted, typewritten and bound 
copies shall be submitted to the Secretary of the Graduate Council at 
least one week before the degree is to be conferred. In case of the 
masters' theses three 1 copies are required, while in the case of doctors' 
theses five 1 copies are required. In addition a synopsis for purposes of 
publication must also be submitted with masters' and doctors' theses. 

6. Final Examination: 

(a) The administration of all final examinations for graduate de- 
grees shall be under the jurisdiction of the Graduate Council, which may 
call to its aid examiners who are not members of the University faculty. 

(b) The candidate's adviser, or his representative, shall preside at 
the final examination for a graduate degree. The Chairman of the 
Graduate Council shall, with the approval of the Graduate Council, 
appoint an examining committee of not less than three for the master's, 
and not less than five for the doctor's examination. 

(c) The candidate shall not be eligible for the final examination 
until his thesis has been approved by the examining committee. 

7. Commencement : 

(a) At the time of registration for the semester or session in which 
the candidate expects to receive a graduate degree, he shall submit a 
formal request to the Chairman of the Graduate "Council for the con- 
ferring of such degree. 

(b) The candidate must have completed all requirements for the 
degree which he wishes to receive at least one week before Commence- 
ment Day. 

THE DEGREES OF MASTER OF ARTS AND MASTER OF SCIENCE 
Requirements for Candidacy 

Satisfactory fulfillment of General Regulation No. 1 for graduate 
degrees (stated above) will admit an applicant to candidacy. 

Requirements for Completion 

Curriculum: The completion of not less than 30 hours of graduate 
work approved by the Faculty of the division in which the candidate is 
enrolled and also by the Council. At least 10 hours, exclusive of thesis, 
shall be in the candidate's major field, and all remaining hours shall be 
in subjects cognate thereto. 



Candidates for degrees in the Division of Education are required to submit 
four copies of masters' theses and six copies of doctors' theses. 



182 Curricular Requirements 

Residence: A minimum of 36 weeks of residence in full-time 
graduate study at West Virginia University is required. 

Thesis: ,A thesis granting not more than 6 hours of credit may be 
required at the option of the Faculty of the division in which the candi- 
date's major interest lies. 

Final Examination: An examination, oral or written or both at the 
option of the candidate's examining committee, shall be required, covering 
the candidate's thesis and studies in his major and minor fields and his 
ability to apply facts and principles intelligently to such situations and 
problems as he may be reasonably expected to meet in his subsequent 
work. 

Special Requirements: In addition to the foregoing requirements,, 
the special requirements of the division in which the candidate elects to 
pursue his major, must be met. 

THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Admission to the Graduate School and enrollment in graduate courses 
does not of itself imply acceptance of the applicant for a doctor's degree. 
Ordinarily, preparation for matriculation or admission to candidacy will 
be the major concern of the student for the greater part of two graduate 
years. 

When an applicant has successfully passed his qualifying examina- 
tion he will be formally promoted to candidacy for a doctor's degree. 

Admission to candidacy must precede the final examination for a 
doctor's degree by at least one academic year. 

Graduate courses pursued in fulfillment of the requirements for the 
master's degree, if of suitable character and quality, may be credited 
toward the doctorate. 

Requirements for Candidacy 

In addition to fulfilling the general requirements for graduate de- 
grees (previously stated) the applicant must be able to read French and 
German to the satisfaction of the Faculty of the division in which the 
student is a major. 1 

After a period of residence the applicant will be admitted to a com- 
prehensive preliminary or qualifying examination (either oral or written 
or both) in which he must demonstrate (a) a grasp of the important 
phases and problems of the field of study in which he proposes to major 
and an appreciation of their relation to other fields of human knowledge 
and accomplishment, and (b) the ability to employ rationally the instru- 
ments of research that have been developed in his major field. 



2 Th!s requirement must be met before the qualifying- examination is taken. 
With the approval of the Council, one other language may be substituted for 
French or German. 



The Graduate School 183 



Requirements for Completion 

(a) Curriculum: The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is not 
awarded for the mere accumulation of course credits nor for the com- 
pletion of a definite residence requirement. The candidate's program of 
studies must be so ordered and coordinated as to equip him in a special 
field upon a broad background of general knowledge. The exact amount 
and nature of course work to be undertaken by a candidate will be de- 
termined in the light of his previous preparation and the demands of his 
chosen field of application. The aggregate of correlated courses of 
graduate instruction should, however, be not less than 60 semester hours, 
ordered and distributed so as to promote a broad and systematic knowl- 
edge and the ability to pursue pioneer constructive w r ork. 

(b) Residence: In general, the requirements for the Doctor of 
Philosophy degree contemplate at least three years of full-time graduate 
work beyond the bachelor's degree. A minimum of 36 weeks in residence 
in full-time graduate study at West Virginia University is required. 
This requirement must be satisfied during regular academic semesters. 

(c) Thesis: The candidate must submit a thesis on some problem 
in the field of his major interest. The thesis must present the results of 
the candidate's individual investigations and must embody a definite con- 
tribution to the existing knowledge of the chosen field. 

(d) Final Examination: If the candidate's thesis is approved and 
he has fulfilled all other requirements stated above, he will be admitted 
to final oral examination on his thesis before his examining committee. 
At the option of this committee, a written examination may be required. 

(e) Special Requirements: In addition to the foregoing, the candi- 
date must satisfy any special requirements which, with the approval of 
the Council, may be imposed by the Faculty of the division in which his 
major lies. 



The College of Law 185 



THE COLLEGE OF LAW 

The purpose of the instruction given in the College of Law is to 
train the student thoroughly in the principles and procedure of the 
common law with particular reference to their application or modifica- 
tion by decision and statute in West Virginia. 

METHOD OF INSTRUCTION 

The work of the student is based chiefly upon the study and dis- 
cussion of decided cases, with collateral reading of statutes, approved 
text-books and periodicals, elucidated by free discussion in the class. 

Practice and Procedure. Instruction in practice and procedure is 
preparatory and supplementary to the work of the practice court, and is 
conducted by text-book, lectures and special study of the statutes and 
decisions governing West Virginia practice and procedure. Attention is 
given to the jurisdiction and functions of the Supreme Court of Appeals, 
the circuit, county and inferior courts, and the powers, duties, and 
liabilities of attorneys at law as officers of the court. The statutes and 
decisions governing the purpose and use of special legal and equitable 
remedies, such as attachment, garnishment, statutory motions, injunc- 
tions, etc., receive careful attention. Attention is also given to the pro- 
cedural phases of the extraordinary legal remedies, mandamus, habeas 
corpus, certiorari, quo warranto, and prohibition. 

Practice Court. The practice court exercises original jurisdiction 
in law, equity and probate cases, and appellate jurisdiction in appeals 
from inferior tribunals. 

Statements of facts are furnished, such as would be related to a 
lawyer in active practice by his client. Each student must determine 
whether or not upon such facts the particular case in hand is one of 
common law, equity, or probate cognizance. He must then frame his 
pleadings, serve his summons or notice and answer his adversary's plead- 
ings until issue is joined in legal manner; after which the case is brought 
on for hearing in strict accordance with settled legal procedure, witnesses 
are examined and cross-examined, and the case is conducted through all 
the various stages of trial or hearing down to and including the judg- 
ment, decree or sentence; after which, should the case be appealed, it 
must be carried through the Supreme Court, involving the preparation of 
the record on appeal, briefs of counsel, etc. 

The clerk and his assistants are chosen from the student body, from 
whose ranks are also drawn a sheriff, jurors, and other officers, thus 
giving to the students the benefit of practice in administrative judiciary 
machinery. The sessions are presided over by that member of the law 



186 Curricular Requirements 

faculty who has charge of practice courses and by circuit judges 
especially chosen for the work. The judges also lecture upon various 
subjects of interest to the students, and especially upon legal ethics. 

Drafting of Legal Instruments. Students are instructed in this 
course in the actual preparation of deeds, mortgages, wills, abstracts and 
opinions of title, assignments, contracts, partnership agreements, and 
other legal instruments which a lawyer is called upon to prepare. State- 
ments of facts are furnished to the class by the instructor in charge and 
each student is required to prepare the various forms of instruments. 
These are corrected by the instructor and are discussed and criticised 
in class. Careful consideration is given to special forms of execution 
and acknowledgment when one of the parties is a corporation, a partner- 
ship, a married woman, or the like. 

Law Quarterly Notes. The editors of the Student Note and Recent 
Case Department of the West Virginia Law Quarterly are members of 
the second and third year classes, who are chosen each year from those 
students who made the highest grades in the preceding year. This de- 
partment affords to ambitious students an opportunity to do research 
work of a practical nature. 

Club Courts, established for the argument of law points arising out 
of statements of facts submitted by the members of the faculty and 
others, are maintained in the College of Law. Membership in these 
clubs is required as to first-year students, and an opportunity to join one 
of them is also open to upperclass students in the College of Law. The 
arguments are presided over by representatives of the West Virginia 
judiciary, members of the bar in active practice, and senior law students. 
Conduct of the law club work is in charge of the Moot Court Board, 
membership of which is drawn from the roll of honor students in the 
second and third year classes. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 

The attention of students is directed to the general requirements of 
the University concerning entrance, admission with advanced standing, 
requirements as to residence, classification of students, examinations, 
grades, and honor points, as set forth in the General Information section 
(Part II) of this Catalogue. 

THE COMBINED COURSE 

Students may secure the degree of Bachelor of Arts for three years 
of academic work 1 and one year of law under conditions stated on page 
125. 



L No work included in the three years (96 hours) of academic work and 
counted toward the A. B. degree may be counted toward the LL. B. degree. 
On completion of two additional years of work in the College of Law, the degree 
of LL. B. will be conferred. 



The College of Law 187 



BACHELOR OF LAWS 

Credits Required 

Students who have satisfied the preparatory and college require- 
ments for entrance to the College of Law as candidates for the degree 
of Bachelor of Laws, and who have satisfactorily completed courses 
aggregating 84 hours, with 50 honor points, 1 distributed over three years' 
residence, and who have otherwise satisfied the requirements of the Uni- 
versity and the College of Law, will be granted the degree of Bachelor 
of Laws. 

Required and Elective Work 

The work of the first year is prescribed. All of the studies of the 
second year are elective except Common Law Pleading, Evidence, Real 
Property II, and Equity Jurisdiction I, and all of the third year courses 
are elective except Practice and Procedure and Practice Court. Second 
year courses may be elected by third year students, but third year courses 
will not in general be open to second year students. All required courses 
are marked by an asterisk. 9 

It is expected that each student will carry 14 or 15 hours of class 
room work per week during the first and second years and 15 during the 
third. 

On petition, the Committee on Scholarship in its discretion may per- 
mit a student to take for law credit either History 223 or Public Speak- 
ing 213. 

ADMISSION TO BAR 

Under the provisions of chapter 30, article 2, section 1, of the 
Official (Revised) Code of West Virginia, 1931, those who receive the 
degree of Bachelor of Laws from West Virginia University may be ad- 
mitted to the bar without further examination. 

STUDENTS IN OTHER COLLEGES 

Students of at least senior standing in other colleges of the Uni- 
versity may be permitted to take work in the College of Law subject 
to the regulations of the colleges where they are registered and of the 
College of Law, but conditioned in each case upon the consent of the 
instructor giving the courses which such students desire to take. 



1 For a description of the honor point system, see pages 78 and 82. 

2 In exceptional cases the Committee on Scholarship may permit a student 
to substitute for a required course a number of hours of other work deemed 
equivalent thereto. 



188 



Curricular Requirements 



THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

The attention of students is directed to the general requirements of 
the University concerning entrance, admission with advanced standing, 
requirements as to residence, classification of students, examinations, 
and grades, as set forth in the General Information section (Part II) of 
this Catalogue. 

INSTRUCTION IN MEDICINE 

REQUIREMENTS FOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

The West Virginia University School of Medicine has its own dean 
and faculty but confers no degrees in medicine. However, it cooperates 
with the College of Arts and Sciences in granting the Bachelor of Science 
(B. S.) degree for the following courses of study: 

1. Science and Medicine, for two years (66 hours) of academic work 
and two years (76 hours) of medicine, a total of 142 hours. 1 

2. Science, Pharmacy, and Medicine, for three years (110 hours) of 
academic and pharmacy work and two years (76 hours) of medicine, a 
total of 186 hours. 2 

The School of Medicine is not affiliated with any other college or 
school of medicine. Its students may go where they like to complete 
their medical studies and receive the degree of M. D. 

The work in physical diagnosis and introductory surgery is in charge 
of practicing physicians, members of the local medical profession. 

CURRICULUM 



COURSES 



Hrs. a 
Week 


Hours a 

Semester 




V 

0) 




5 

o 



PERIODS 



Biochemistry 101. 



Histology 104. 



Anatomy 101. 



First Year — First Semester 



3 | 10 | 54 



2 | 8 | 36 



4 | 11 | 72 | 195 | 267 



180 1234 A. Lab.. M.. Th. 8-12, S. 8-10 
B. Lab., T., F. 8-12, S. 11-1 
Lect. W. 9 and 11, S. 10 

144 | 180 A. Lab., T., F. 8-12 
B. Lab., M., Th., 8-12 

Lect., W. 8 and F. 12 

M., T., W., Th., F. 2-5 



1 See page 128 for statement of academic requirements; pages 188 and 189, 
for statement of requirements in medicine. 

2 See page 129 for statement of academic and pharmacy requirements; 
pages 188 and 189 for statement of requirements in medicine. 



The School of Medicine 



189 



First Year — Second Semester 



Bacteriology 105. 



Embryology 105. 
First half 
of semester 

Neurology 103 

Second half 
of semester 

Anatomy 102 

Physiology 102.... 



2 


8 


36 


144 


180 


4 


8 


36 


72 


108! 


4 


8 


36 


72 


108 


3 

1 


6 
3 

3 


54 
18 


108 
54 

54 


162 

72 



M. 

T. 



T., Th., 10-12, W. 



Pharmacology 101. 



Pathology 101 1 3j 8 | 54 



A. Lab., 
11-1 

B. Lab., 
Lect. M. 

A. Lab. 

B. Lab., 
11-1 

Lect. M. 

A. Lab. 

B. Lab. 
11-1 

Lect. M. 9, T., Th. 2, F 
M., F. 2-5, W. 3-6 

A. Lab. T. 3-6 

B. Lab. Th. 3-6 

Lect. W. 2 

A. Lab. S. 8-10, B. Lab. S 
Lect. S. 10 



W., Th., F. 8-10 

8, F. 11 5 

T., W., Th., F. 8-lOj 
M., T., Th., 10-12, \V. 

9, T., Th. 2, F. 10 I 3 

T., W., Th. F. 8-10 
M., T., Th. 10-12, W. 1 



10 



11-1 



Physiology 103. 



Pharmacology 102 i 3 

Hygiene 106 2 

Obstetrics 107 | 2 



Second Year — First Semester 

198 jA. Lab. M., W. 2-5, F. 2-4 

B. Lab. T., Th. 2-5, F. 10-121 

Lect. M.. T., Th. 10 6 

198 Lect. M., T., W., T., F. 9 
A. Lab. T., Th. 2-5 

IB. Lab. M., W. 2-5 f 7 

54 Lect. Rec, M., W., F. 8 1 3 

36 Lect. M., W. 11 ! 2 

36|Lect. T., Th. 11 | 2 



90 



144 



108 



Second Year — Second Semester 



Pathology 102. 



Pharmacology 103.... 

Pharmacology 104.... 

Intro. Surgery 101 j 

Anatomy 106 

Phys. Diagnosis 101.. 



Theoretical 
Medicine 102 



Physiology 104 

Clinical Path. 103 | 2 



18 1 90 



90 



36 



108 



36 



A. Lab. M. 2-5, T. 3-5 

B. Lab. W. 2-5, Th. 3-5 
Lect. M. 9 

90 IA. Lab. M. 2 

B. Lab. W. 2 

I Rec. A. & B., Th. 9-11... 
54|Lect. M., T., W. 9 



54 
36 
72 



36 



Lect. T., W., Th. 11. 
Lect. T., Th. 9 



A. Lab. F. 8-10 

B. Lab. F. 8-10 

C. Lab. F. 8-10 
Lect. M., F. 11.. 



A. Sec. M. 2-4 

|B. Sec. Th. 2-4 2 

18 Lect. T. 10 

108 Lect. W. 8, F. 10 1 

Lab., Sec. A. F. 1-3, S. 8-10 

|Lab., Sec. B. F. 3-5, S. 10-12....| 3 

Note : Medical students must take work in sequence as shown in the schedule. 
Third and fourth years to be taken in approved medical school. 



72 



190 Curricular Requirements 



INSTRUCTION IN PHARMACY 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

IN PHARMACY 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy (B. S. Phar.) is con- 
ferred upon any student who complies with the general regulations of the 
University concerning degrees, satisfies all entrance, school, and depart- 
mental requirements, and completes the basic two-year course below, 
together with one of the folowing curricula providing for specialized 
training during the third and fourth years : 

A. Retail Pharmacy (143 hours) 

B. Industrial Pharmacy (145 hours) 

The curriculum for the first two years is the same for all students. 
At the beginning of the third year the student is expected to select a field 
of specialization and pursue for the remaining two years the courses 
outlined in that group. 

A student who desires to substitute another course in place of any 
course prescribed in his curriculum must obtain permission for such 
substitution from the Committee on Scholarship. 

BASIC COURSES REQUIRED OF ALL STUDENTS 1 

First Year 
First Semester Hours 

English 1 8:00 T., Th., S 3 

Botany 1 8:00-10:00 M., W., F 4 

Pharmacy 1 9:00 T., Th. 2:00 to 5:00 W 3 

Pharmacy 2 10:00 M., F., 1:00 W 3 

Chemistry 3 11:00 M., W., F., 2:00-4:00 T., Th 4 

Physical Education 1 10:00 T., Th 1 

Military 1:00 T., Th., F 1 19 

Second Semester Hours 

English 2 8:00 T., Th., S 3 

Botany 2 8:00-10:00 M., W., F 4 

Pharmacy 3 9:00 T., Th 2 

Pharmacy 10 10:00 M., 2:00-5:00 M., F 3 

Chemistry 4 11:00 M., W., F., 2:00-4:00 T., Th 4 

Phvsical Education 2 10:00 T., Th 1 

Military 1:00 T., Th., F 1 18 

Second Year 
First Semester Hours 

German 1 8:00 T., Th., S 3 

Pharmacy 9 9:00 T., Th 2 

Pharmacy 4 10:00 T., Th 2 

Pharmacy 11 11:00 M., W., F 3 

Pharmacy 5 2:00-5:00 T., Th., 9:00-12:00 S 3 

Chemistry 5 2:00-5:00 M., W., F 4 

Military 1:00 M., W., F 1 18 



1 Upon entering, those who plan to follow the Pharmacy-Medical Course 
should elect zoology instead of botany during the first year. 



The School of Medicine 191 

Second Semester 

Hours 

German 2 8:00 T., Th., S 3 

Pharmacy 6 10:00 M., T., Th., F 4 

Pharmacy 12 11:00 M., W., F 3 

Pharmacy 8 11:00 T 1 

Pharmacy 7 2:00-5:00 T., Th 2 

Chemistry 6 2:00-5:00 M., W., F., 9:00-12:00 S 4 

Military 1:00 M., W., F 1 18 

A. RETAIL PHARMACY 

Third Year 

First Semester 

Hours 

Physics 1 8:00 M., W., F 3 

Economics 103 8:00 T., Th., S 3 

Physics 3 10 :00-12 :00 S 1 

Pharmacy 103 .' 10:00 M., F 2 

Pharmacy 106 10:00 T., Th 2 

Chemistry 233 11:00 M., W., F., 2:00-4:00 T., Th 5 

Pharmacy 101 2:00-5:00 M 1 

Pharmacy 102 2:00-5:00 F 1 18 

Second Semester 

Hours 

Physics 2 8:00 M., W. F 3 

Economics 110 8:00 T., Th 2 

Pharmacy 107 9:00 T., Th 2 

Physics 4 10:00-12:00 S 1 

Physiology 101 10:00 M., F., 1:00 W., 2:00-5:00 W 4 

Chemistry 238 11:00 T., Th., 2:00-5:00 M., F 4 

Pharmacy 114 9:00 M., F 2 18 

Fourth Year 

First Semester 

Hours 

00 T., Th., 1:00 W 3 

00 M., W., F 3 

00 T., Th., S 3 

00 M., W., F 3 

00-12:00 M., T., W., Th. F 5 

00-5:00 W 1 18 



Pharmacy 108 8 

Bus. Administration 121... 8 

Pharmacy 201 9 

Bus. Aministration 121 9 

Bacteriology 105 10 

Pharmacy 109 2 



Second Semester 

Hours 

Chemistry 277 : 8:00 W., F 2 

Pharmacy 110 9:00 W., 2:00-5:00 T., Th 3 

Pharmacy 113 9:00 M., T., Th., F 4 

Bus. Administration 125...10:00 T., Th., S 3 

Pharmacy 118 11:00 W 1 

Pharmacy 202 11:00 M., F 2 

Elective 1 17 



192 Curricular Requirements 



B. INDUSTRIAL PHARMACY 

Third Year 

First Semester 

Hours 

Physics 1 8:10 M., W., F 3 

Physics 3 8:00-10:00 S 1 

Pharmacy 103 10:00 M., F 2 

Pharmacy 106 10:00 T., Th 2 

Chemistry 233...„ 11:00 M., W., F., 2:00-4:00 T., Th 5 

Chemistry 163 11:00 T., Th., 2:00-4:00 F 3 

Elective 2 18 

Second Semester 

Hours 

Physics 2 8:00 M., W., F 3 

Physics 4 8:00-10:00 S 1 

Pharmacy 107 - 9:00 T., Th 2 

Chemical Engineering 201.. 9:00 M., 2:00-5:00 T., Th 3 

Physiology 101 10:00 M., F., 1:00 W., 2:00-5:00 W 4. 

Chemistry 238 11:00 T., Th., 2:00-5:00 M., F 4 17 

Fourth Year 

First Semester 

Hours 

Pharmacy 105 8:00 W., 2:00-5:00 M., F 3 

Pharmacy 108 8:00 T., Th., 1:00 W 3 

Pharmacy 201 9:00 T., Th., S 3 

Chemistry 251 9:00 M., W., F 3 

Bacteriology 105 10:00-12:00 M., T., W., Th., F 5 

Pharmacy 109 2:00-5:00 W 1 

Pharmacy 104 2:00-5:00 T., Th 2 20 

Second Semester 

Hours 

Chemistry 277 8:00 W., F 2 

Pharmacy 110 9:00 W., 2:00-5:00 T., Th 3 

Pharmacy 113 .. 9:00 M., T., Th. F 4 

Pharmacy 118 -11:00 W 1 

Pharmacy 202 11:00 M., F 2 

Botany 214 2:00-5:00 W., 9:00-12:00 S 2 

Chemical Engineering 202.. 2:00-5:00 M., F 2 

Elective 1 17 



The School of Medicine 193 



SUGGESTED ELECTIVE COURSES 1 

First Semester 
Subject Hours 

Biochemistry 101 6 

Business Admin. 121 Marketing Methods 3 

Business Admin. 126 Retail Store Management 3 

Business Managem't 131. ...Business Management 3 

Business Admin. 141 Business Law 3 

Chemistry 211 .Synthetic Inorganic Chemistry 3 

Chemistry 214 Organic Qualitative Analysis 3 

Chemistry 339 Dyes and Dye Intermediates 4 

Chemistry 251 Industrial Inorganic Chemistry 3 

Chemistry 63 or 163 Physical Chemistry 3 

Chemistry 247 Stereochemistry 2 

Economics 111 Money, Credit and Banking 3 

French 1 (When not offered for entrance credit).... 3 

German 1 (When not offered for entrance credit).... 3 

German 121 Scientific German 3 

Mineralogy 2 Minerals and Rocks 4 

Pharmacy 203 Food Analysis 2 to 3 

Pharmacy 115 Microscopy 21 to 3 

Pharmacy 116 Pharmaceutical Investigations 2 to 3 

Pharmacy 117 Dispensing 1 to 2 

Zoology 1 Animal Biology 4 

Second Semester 
Subject Hours 

Business Admin. 112 Income Tax Procedure 3 

Business Admin. 122 Marketing Methods 3 

Business Admin. 125 Advertising 3 

Business Admin. 148 Sales Management 3 

Botany 214 Microtechnique and Plant Histology 2 

Chemistry 238 Organic Chemistry 4 or 5 

Chemistry 340 Dyes and Dye Intermediates 4 

Chemistry 252 Industrial Organic Chemistry 3 

Chemistry 262 Colloidal Chemistry 4 

Chemistry 274 History of Chemistry 2 

Chem. Eng'g. 201 Benzene Derivatives 2 to 3 

Chem. Eng'g. 202 Water Exam, and Purification 2 

French 2 (When not offered for entrance credit) 3 

German 2 (When not offered for entrance credit) 3 

German 122 Scientific German 3 

Journalism 113 Newspaper Advertising 3 

Mineralogy 2 Minerals and Rocks 4 

Pharmacy 204 Food Analysis 3 to 5 

Pharmacy 115 Microscopy 2 to 3 

Pharmacy 116 Pharmaceutical Investigations 2; to 3 

Pharmacy 117 Dispensing 1 to 2 

Physics 116 Photography 2 

Zoology 2 Vertebrate Zoology 4 

Psychology 1 Introduction to Psychology 3 

Psychology 10 Applied Psychology 3 

Psychology 12 or 112 Experimental Psychology 3 

1 A11 electives must be approved by the adviser before election. 



194 Curricular Requirements 



THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

The attention of students is directed to the general requirements of 
the University concerning entrance, admission with advanced standing, 
requirements as to residence, classification of students, examinations, 
grades, and honor points, as set forth in the General Information section 
(Part II) of this Catalogue. 

The descriptive material on the following pages outlines the 
curricular requirements for the "degrees in music and for certification of 
teachers. A more extended general description of the organization and 
work of the School of Music appears on pages 52 and 53. For state- 
ment concerning fees, see pages 74 and 76. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 

The degrees of Bachelor of Music and Bachelor of Science in Music 
Education are regularly conferred in the School of Music. 

The Bachelor of Music degree (B. Mus.) is conferred upon any 
student who complies with the general regulations of the University con- 
cerning degrees, satisfies all entrance and departmental requirements, 
and completes one of the following curricula in applied music (136 
hours) with an average of one honor point per credit-hour: 

A. Piano, Violin, or Pipe Organ 1 

B. Voice 2 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Music Education (B. S. Mus. 
Ed.) is conferred upon any student who complies with the general regu- 
lations of the University concerning degrees, satisfies all entrance and 
departmental requirements, and completes the curriculum in public school 
music (130 hours) for teachers of music with a second teaching subject 8 
with an average of one honor point per credit-hour. 



1 See page 195. 
2 See page 196. 
3 See page 197. 



The School of Music 



195 



CURRICULA IN APPLIED MUSIC 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Music 

PIANO, VIOLIX. OR PIPE ORGAN 

First Tear 



First Semester Hrs. 

Piano, Violin, or Pipe Organ .... 2 

English 1 — Comp. and Rhet 3 

French, German, or Italian 3 

Theory 1 — Intro. Harmony 2 

Pub. Sch. Mus. 75— Ear Train- 
ing 3 

Piano 132— Sight Playing 1 

Physical Ed. or Mil. Science .... 1 
Elective 2 



Second Semester Hrs. 

Piano, Violin, or Pipe Organ .... 2 

English 2— Comp. and Rhet 3 

French, German, or Italian 3 

Theory 2 — Intermediate 

Harmony 2 

Pub. Sch. Mus. 76— Ear Train- 



ing 



Piano 133 — Sight Playing 1 

Physical Ed. or Mil. Science .... 1 
Elective 2 



17 
Second Year 



17 



First Semester Hrs. 
Piano, Violin, or Pipe Organ .... 2 
Pub. Sch. Mus. 73— Sight Sing- 
ing 3 

French, German, or Italian 3 

Theory 103 — Adv. Harmony .... 3 

Public Speaking 3 

Theory 105— History of Music 2 
Physical Ed. or Mil. Science .... 1 

17 
Third 
First Semester Hrs. 

Piano, Violin, or Pipe Organ .... 2 
Pub. Sch. Mus. 179 — Music 

Appreciation 3 

Theory 107 — History of Music. 2 

French, German, or Italian 2 

Theory 109 — Intro. Counter- 
point 2 

Theory 111 — Harmonic Analysis 2, 

Education 3 

Elective 1 



Second Semester Hrs. 
Piano, Violin, or Pipe Organ .... 2 
Pub. Sch. Mus. 74— Sight Sing- 
ing 3 

French, German, or Italian 3 

Theory 104 — Adv. Harmony .... 3 

Public Speaking 3 

Theory 106 — History of Music. 2 

Physical Ed. or Mil. Science .... 1 

17 
Year 

Second Semester Hrs. 
Piano, Violin, or Pipe Organ .... 2 
Pub. Sch. Mus. 180— Music 

Appreciation 3 

Theory 108— History of Music. 2 

French, German, or Italian 2 

Theory 110 — Counterpoint 2 

Theory 112 — Analysis and Form 2 
Science 4 



17 



First Semester 

Piano, Violin, or Pipe Organ .... 2 
Theory 113 — Introductory 

Composition 1 

Theory 115 — Orchestration 1 

French, German, or Italian 2 

Ensemble 1 

Elective 10 



17 
Fourth Year 
Hrs. 



Second Semester Hrs. 
Piano, Violin, or Pipe Organ .... 2 

Theory 114 — Composition 1 

Theory 116 — Orchestration 1 

French, German, or Italian 2 

Ensemble 1 

Graduation Recital 2 

Elective 8 



17 



17 



196 



Curricular Requirements 



VOICE 
First Year 



First Semester Hrs. 

Voice 2 

Piano 2 

English 1 — Comp. and Rhet 3 

Pub. Sch. Mus. 73— Sight Sing- 
ing 3 

Pub. Sch. Mus. 75— Ear Train- 
ing 3 

Italian 1 3 

Physical Ed. or Mil. Science .... 1 



17 



Second Semester Hrs. 

Voice 2 

Piano 2 

English 2 — Comp. and Rhet 3 

Pub. Sch. Mus. 74— Sight Sing- 
ing 3 

Pub. Sch. Mus. 76— Ear Train- 
ing 3 

Italian 2 3 

Physical Ed. or Mil. Science .... 1 



17 



Second Year 



First Semester Hrs. 

Voice 2 

Piano 2 

Theory 1 — Intro. Harmony 2 

English 3 — English Literature.. 3 

Public Speaking : 3 

Physics 4 

Physical Ed. or Mil. Science .... 1 



17 



Second Semester Hrs. 

Voice 2 

Piano 2 

Theory 2 — Intermediate 

Harmony 2 

English 4 — English Literature.. 3 

Public Speaking 3 

Physical Ed. or Mil. Science .... 1 

Elective 4 



17 



Third Year 



First Semester Hrs. 

Voice 2 

Theory 103— Adv. Harmony .... 3 
Theory 105 — History of Music. 2 
Theory 107 — History of Music. 2 
Pub. Sch. Mus. 179 — Music 

Appreciation 3 

German or French 3 

Choir 1 

Elective 1 



17 



Second Semester Hrs. 

Voice 2 

Theory 104 — Adv. Harmony .... 3 
Theory 106 — History of Music. 2 
Theory 108 — History of Music. 2 
Pub. Sch. Mus. 180— Music 

Appreciation 3 

German or French 3 

Choir 1 

Elective 1 



17 



Fourth Year 



First Semester Hrs. 

Voice 2 

Theory 113 — Introductory 

Composition 1 

Theory 109 — Elementary 

Counterpoint 2 

Theory 111 — Analysis and 

Form 2 

Education 3 

German or French 6 

Choir 1 



17 



Second Semester Hrs. 

Voice 2 

Theory 114 — Composition 1 

Theory 110 — Adv. Counterpoint 2 
Theory 112 — Analysis and 

Form 2 

Graduation Recital 2 

German or French 6 

Choir 1 

Elective 1 



17 



The School of Music 



197 



CURRICULUM FOR TEACHERS OF MUSIC WITH A SECOND 
TEACHING SUBJECT 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Music Education 



First Year 



First Semester Hrs. 

Voice and Piano 2 

Pub. Sch. Mus. 73 or 74— Sight 

Singing 3 

English 1 3 

Science 4 

Physical Education 1 1 

Second Teaching Field 3 



16 



Second Semester Hrs. 

Voice or Piano 2 

Pub. Sch. Mus. 75 or 76— Ear 

Training 3 

English 2 3 

Science 2 

Physical Education 2 1 

Second Teaching Field 3 

Pub. Sch. Mus. 92— Orchestra.. 1 
Pub. Sch. Mus. 93— Orchestra.. 1 



First Semester 



16 



Second Year 



Hrs. 



Voice or Piano 2 

Theory 1 — Harmony 2 

Theory — History of Music 2 

Political Science 3 

English or Pub. Speaking 3 

Physical Education 3 1 

Second Teaching Field 4 



17 



Second Semester 



Hrs. 

Voice or Piano 2 

Theory 2 — Harmony 2 

Theory — History of Music 2 

Economics 3 

English or Pub. Speaking 3 

Physical Education 4 1 

Second Teaching Field 4 



17 



Third 

First Semester Hrs. 

Voice or Piano 2 

Pub. Sch. Mus. 179— Music 

Appreciation 3 

Pub. Sch. Mus. 188— High Sch. 

Music 2 

Educational Psychology 106 .... 3 
Educational Administration 109 3 
Second Teaching Field 3 

16 



Year 

Second Semester Hrs. 

Voice or Piano 2 

Pub. Sch. Mus. 180— Music 

Appreciation 3 

Education 120 3 

Educational Psychology 112 .... 2 

Physical Education 180 2 

Second Teaching Field and 

Electives 4 

16 



Fourth Year 



First Semester Hrs. 

Music Education 169 2 

Music Education 224 3 

Educational Psychology 214 .... 2 

History 3 

Second Teaching Field and 
Electives 6 



Second Semester Hrs. 
Pub. Sch. Mus. 194 — Orchestra 1 

Education (Elective) 2 

Sociology 3 

History 3 

Second Teaching Field and 
Electives 7 



16 



16 



198 Curricular Requirements 

An entering student who cannot qualify for Piano 24 wil be con- 
sidered a preparatory student until this deficiency has been overcome, 
unless he can meet an equal standard in some other field of applied 
music which he intends to pursue in place of piano. Where a student 
excels in some field other than piano or voice, exceptions may be made in 
the amount of piano or voice required, at the discretion of the head of 
the department. 

CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS 

The following are the requirements for certification of high-school 
teachers : 

General Academic Requirements: Hours 

English and Public Speaking 12 

History 6 

Political Science, Economics and Sociology 9 

Science 6 

Health 2 

Physical Education 4 

— 39 
Professional Requirements : 

Educational Psychology 106 3 

Educational Administration 109 3 

Educational Psychology 112 : 2 

Educational Psychology 214 2 

Educational Materials and Methods 120 3 

Public School Music 169 — Music Education 2 

Public School Music 224 — Music Education 3 

Electives 2 

— 20 
Music Requirements: 

Public School Music 73 or 74 — Sight Singing 3 

Public School Music 75 or 76 — Ear Training 3 

Theory of Music 1 and 2 — Harmony 4 

Theory of Music 105, 106, 107, or 108— History of 

Music 4 

Public School Music 179 and 180 — Music Apprecia- 
tion 6 

Public School Music 92, 93, and 194— Band and 

Orchestra Instruments 3 

Public School Music 188— High School Music 2 

Piano 6 

Voice 6 

— 37 
Second Field and Electives 34 

Total Required Hours 130- 



The Division of Physical Education 199 



THE DIVISION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

For purposes of administration and instruction the Division of 
Physical Education is organized into the following departments: (1) 
service program for men, (2) service program for women, (3) intra- 
mural athletics, (4) health service, and (5) teacher training. 

The Division of Physical Education has been organized for the 
purpose (1) of providing for the entire student body a regular program 
of wholesome physical activity, and of safeguarding the health conditions 
of the students while at the University; and (2) of preparing teachers 
of physical education for the high schools of the State. 

The descriptive material on the pages which follow outlines the 
curricular requirements for the four-year teacher-training course leading 
to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Physical Education. A more 
comprehensive statement of the organization and purposes of the Division 
of Physical Education, including the service programs for both men and 
women, intramural athletics, and health service, appears on pages 60 to 
62 and 89 to 93. 

The attention of students is directed to the general requirements of 
the University concerning entrance, admission with advanced standing, 
requirements as to residence, classification of students, examinations, 
grades, and honor points, as set forth in the General Information section 
(Part II) of this Catalogue. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREE 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Physical Education may be 
conferred upon any student who satisfies the entrance requirements and 
offers 128 hours 1 with grades of D or above, and an average grade of C. 

REQUIRED AND ELECTIVE COURSES 

Of the 128 hours which are required for the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Physical Education, at least 41 hours are required in the 
Division of Physical Education. The remaining hours must be selected 
from such courses as may be approved by the adviser. A candidate for 
a degree is expected to make a selection of one of the teaching combi- 
nations on page 203, and to complete the number of semester hours 
required in each teaching group. 

The courses are arranged to meet the University requirements 
for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Physical Education as well as 
the State requirements for certification. The curriculum for the four 
year course has been so arranged that consideration is given to the 



1 Students may decrease the number of hours required for graduation by 
doing work of superior quality. For each eight honor points in excess of one 
honor point per credit hour, the number of credit hours required for graduation 
may be diminished by one. This does not, however, excuse students from 
courses required for their degree. For explanation of the honor-point system, 
see pages 78 and 82. 



200 Curricular Requirements 

various activities which should constitute a well rounded program of 
physical education for boys and girls of high school age. These courses 
are arranged in eight groups as follows: 

A. Required courses in physical education, which include the theory 
and practice of physical education courses for men and women, 
are Physical Education 11, 12, 13, 14, 43, 44, 45, 46, 111, 112, 
113, 114, 143, 144 for men, and Physical Education 27, 28, 59, 
60, 127, 128, 159, and 160 for women. These courses are known 
as the physical education block. 

B. Required courses in physical education which include courses 
in theory, and listed as Physical Education 75, 76, 77, 78, 150, 
224, 152, 166, 167, 175, 179, 276, and 277. 

C. Required courses in English and public speaking. 

D. Required courses in science which furnish a background for 
physical education in practice. 

E. Required courses in education which consider the principles of 
,. . general education. 

F. Required courses in social studies. 

G. Required courses in military science for men of the University. 
H. Elective courses which are taken at the pleasure of the student. 

It is understood that a sound and vigorous body is essential to all 
students who elect this curriculum. Each student must, therefore, pass 
a thorough physical examination before he will be allowed to enroll in 
this program. Special emphasis is placed upon the personal and 
professional qualifications of the student as well as on a high standard 
of scholarship. 

Student teaching of high school classes in physical education, as well 
as practice coaching of high school athletic teams, is available in the Uni- 
versity Demonstration High School and in the Morgantown High School. 
Student teaching of college classes in physical education is provided in 
connection with the service programs for both men and women. 

FOUR YEAR CURRICULA IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Physical Education 
General Minimum Curriculum 

1. Physical Education For Men 33 

2. Physical Education For Women 35 

3. English and Public Speaking 15 

4. Social Studies 15 

5. Science — Anatomy, Zoology, Chemistry, Physiology .... 20 

6. Education 20 

7. Health Education 5 

8. Military Science (men) 4 

9. Home Economics (women) 3 

10. Elective (women) 15 

11. Elective (men) 16 



The Division of Physical Education 



201 



CURRICULUM IX PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR MEN 
First YEAB 



First Semester Hrs. 

Eng. 1 3 

Chem. 1 4 

Phys. Ed. 11 1 

Phys. Ed. 12 1 

Phys. Ed. 75 3 

Mil. Sci. 1 1 

History 3 



18 



Second Semester Hrs. 

Eng-. 2 3 

Chem. 2 4 

Phys. Ed. 13 1 

Phys. Ed. 14 1 

Phys. Ed. 76 2 

Mil. Sci. 2 l 

History 3 



15 



Second year 



First Semester Hrs. 

Eng. 3. 3 

'Zoology 4 5 

Phys. Ed. 43 1 

Phys. Ed. 44 1 

Phys. Ed. 77 2 

Mil. Sci. 3 1 

Elective 3 



Second Semester 



Hrs. 

Eng. 4 3 

Anatomv 4 

Pub. Spk. 7 3 

Phys. Ed. 45 1 

Phys. Ed. 46 1 

Phvs. Ed. 78 3 

Mil. Sci. 4 1 



16 



16 



Thihd Year 



First Semester Hrs. 

tEd. Psy. 106 3 

tEd. Ad. 109 3 

Phys. Ed. Ill 1 

Phys. Ed. 112 1 

^Phys. Ed. 175 3 

Sociology 101 3 

Elective 2 



Second Semester Hrs. 

fEd. M & M 120 3 

tEd. Psy. 112 2 

-Phvs. Ed. 179 3 

Phys. Ed. 113 1 

Phvs. Ed. 114 „ 1 

Phys. Ed. 150 3 

Social Studies 3 



16 



16 



First Semester 



Fourth Tear 

Hrs. 



tEd. Psv. 214 2 

tEd. M & M 160-170 2 

Phys. Ed. 143 2 

Phys. Ed. 276 3 

Social Studies 3 

Elective 5 



Second Semester 



Hrs. 



Phys. Ed. 144 2 

Phys. Ed. 277 3 

Phvs. Ed. 152 2 

Phys. Ed. 224 3 

Social Studies 3 

Elective 3 



17 



16 



*It is desirable that the above science courses be taken in the sequence 
indicated. 

tit is desirable that the above courses in education be taken in the sequence 
indicated. 



202 



Curricular Requirements 



CURRICULUM IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR WOMEN 
First Year 



First Semester 



Hrs. 



English 1 3 

^Chemistry 1 4 

Phys. Ed. 27 2 

Phys. Ed. 75 3 

Elective 1 

History 3 



16 



Second Semester 



Hrs. 



English 2 3 

*Chemistry 2 4 

Phys. Ed. 28 2 

Phys. Ed. 76 2 

History 3 

Elective 2 



16 



Second year 



First Semester Hrs. 

*Zoology 4 5 

English 3 3 

Phys. Ed. 59 2 

Phys. Ed. 77 2 

Public Speaking 7 or 11 3 

Elective 2 



Second Semester Hrs. 

*Anatomy 1 4 

English 4 3 

Home Econ. 14 — Nutrition 3 

Phys. Ed. 60 2 

Phys. Ed. 78 3 



17 



15 



Third Year 



First Semester Hrs. 

fEd. Psy. 106 3 

fEd. Ad. 109 3 

Phys. Ed. 127 2 

*Phys. Ed. 175 3 

Phys. Ed. 167 2 

Sociology 101 3 



16 



Second Semester Hrs. 

*Phys. Ed. 179 3 

fEd. Psy. 112 2 

Phys. Ed. 128 2 

Phys. Ed. 166 3 

Social Studies 3 

fEd. M. and M. 120 3 

16 



Fourth Year 



First Semester Hrs. 

Phys. Ed. 159 2 

Phys. Ed. 276 3 

fEd. M. and M. 160-170 2 

fEd. Psy. 214 2 

Social Studies 3 

Elective 3 



Second Semester Hrs. 

Phys. Ed. 160 2 

Phys. Ed. 277 3 

Phys. Ed. 224 3 

Phys. Ed. 152 2 

Elective 7 



15 



17 



*It is desirable that the above science courses be taken in the sequence 
indicated. 

fit is desirable that the above courses in education be taken in the sequence 
indicated. 



The Division of Physical Education 203 

CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS 

For a statement of the conditions governing the preparation of high 
school teachers and their recommendation to the State Board for certi- 
fication, see page 150. 

SUGGESTED TEACHING COMBINATIONS FOR FIRST CLASS 
HIGH SCHOOL CERTIFICATES 

1. Physical education and biology. 

2. Physical education and Spanish or French or German or Latin. 

3. Physical education and mathematics. 

4. Physical Education and Social Science. 

5. Physical Education and English. 

6. Physical education may be taken as a second or third 1 teaching 
subject with any recommended combinations. 

DIRECTORS OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

(First or second Teaching Subject) 
Courses Howrs 

Required Courses for Men: 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13, 14, 43, 44, 45, 46, 111, 112, 
113, 114, 143, and 144 — Theory and Practice of Physi- 
cal Education for freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and 

seniors 16 

Physical Education 150 — Individual Gymnastics 3 

Physical Education 224 — Directed Teaching 3 

Physical Education 152 — Materials and Methods in 
Physical Education 2 

24 
Required Courses for Women : 

Physical Education 27, 28, 59, 60, 127, 128, 159, and 160 
— Theory and Practice of Physical Education — for 

freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors 16 

Physical Education 166 — Individual Gymnastics 3 

Physical Education 167 — Rythmic Analysis 2 

Physical Education 224 — Directed Teaching 3 

Physical Education 152 — Materials and Methods of 
Teaching Physical Education 2 

26 
Required Courses for Men and Women: 

Physical Education 75 — Introduction to Physical Edu- 
cation 3 

Physical Education 76 — Hygiene 2 

Physical Education 77 — History of Physical Education 2 
Physical Education 78 — Playground and Community 

Recreation 3 

Physical Education 175 — Kinesiology 3 

Physical Education 179 — Physiology 3 

Physical Education 276 — Health Education 3 

Physical Education 277 — Organization and Administra- 
tion of Physical Education 3 



22 



l See page 204. 



204 Curricular Requirements 



PART TIME TEACHERS OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

(Third Teaching Subject) 

Teachers who have completed at least fifteen hours in physical edu- 
cation and two hours in health education and are qualified for the first- 
class high school certificate, may be certified on this certificate as part- 
time teachers of physical education, provided the following courses are 
included in the seventeen hours of health and physical education. 

Courses Hours 

Professional Courses for Men and Women : 

Physical Education 75 — Introduction to Physical Edu- 
cation 3 

Physical Education 78 — Community Play and Recrea- 
tion 3 

Physical Education 277 — Organization and Administra- 
tion of Physical Education 3 

Physical Education 180— Public School Health 2 . 

Theory and Practice for Men: 

Courses selected from the following: 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13, 14, 43, 44, 45, 46, 111, 
112, 113, 114 6 

Theory and Practice for Women : 
Courses selected from the following : 

Physical Education 27, 28, 59, 60, 127, 128 6 

GENERAL PHYSICAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENT FOR 
CERTIFI CATION 

All students who plan to be certificated to teach must meet the State 
requirement of a minimum of six (6) hours of Health and Physical Edu- 
cation. 

The specific courses offered to meet this requirement are as follows.' 

For Men Hrs. For Women Hrs. 

Physical Education 1* 1 Physical Education 1* 1 

Physical Education 2* 1 Physical Education 2* 1 

Physical Education 178 2 Physical Education 3* 1 

Phvsical Education 180 2 Physical Education 4* 1 

Phvsical Education 180 2 



6 



6 



*This requirement should be met by the men in their first year of residence, 
and by women during their first two years of residence. 

Physical Education 178 and 180 are open only to juniors and seniors. 



Part IV 
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ARRANGEMENT OF COURSES 

The courses of instruction for all colleges, schools, and divisions of the University- 
are assembled in this part of the Catalogue alphabetically by major groups, and 
alphabetically by departments under each group. The major groups appear in the 
following order : Agriculture, Arts and Sciences, Education, Engineering, Law, Medi- 
cine, Mining, Music, Pharmacy, and Physical Education. The home economics courses 
appear under Agriculture. 

SUMMER SESSION COURSES 

The summer session courses listed in this section are those given during 1933. 
The courses offered in subsequent years will not be identical, although a considerable 
number of them will be the same. During summer sessions the endeavor is made to 
rotate the important and fundamental courses offered during the regular academic 
year, so that they may be available to students whose attendance is limited to summer 
sessions. As a result the summer student is given the fullest opportunity of pursuing 
a complete and well-balanced program of study. 

ABBREVIATION S 

The following abbreviations are used in the announcements of courses : 
I — a course given during the first semester 
II — a course given during the second semester 
I, II — a semester course given each semester 
Yr. — a- course continuing through two semesters 

S — a course continuing through both terms of the summer session 
SI — a course given during the first term of the summer session 
S2 — a course given during the second term of the summer session 
Hrs. — number of credit-hours per course 
t — courses omitted during academic year 1933-34. 

Where a course carries credit during the regular year which varies from that of 
the summer session, the number of credit-hours offered during the regular year will 
appear in the course announcements immediately after the symbol I or II ; and the 
number of credit-hours offered during the summer session will appear after the symbol 
SI or S2. Advisers in preparing study lists or in reporting credit for such courses 
or for courses offered exclusively during the summer session will append to the 
number of the course a small letter s to signify the variation in credit offered or the 
fact that the course is offered exclusively during the summer session. 

Wherever reference is made to education or engineering courses in the course 
announcements, curricula, or textual matter, the department will be indicated as 
follows : 

General Education — Gen. Ed. Educational Psychology — Ed. Psy. 

Agricultural Education — Ag. Ed. Educational Supervision — Ed. Sup. 

Educational Chemical Engineering — Ch. E. 

Administration — Ed. Ad. Civil Engineering — C. E. 

Higher Education — Hi. Ed. Electrical Engineering — E. E. 

Home Economics Mechanical Engineering — M. E. 

Education — H. E. Ed. Mechanics — M. 

Industrial Education — I. E. Mining Engineering — E. M. 

Educational Materials General — G. 

and Methods —Ed. M. and M. 

SCHEDULE 

A complete statement showing the name, number and description of each course, 
number of credit-hours, days on which class meets, name of instructor, room number, 
and building, appears in a semester schedule published at the beginning of each 
semester. 

PLAN FOR NUMBERING COURSES 

For convenience it is customary to designate the course of study by the name of 
the department and the number of the particular course. The plan for numbering 
is as follows : 

Courses 1 to 99 — courses open to freshmen and sophomores 
Courses 100 to 199 — courses open to juniors and seniors 
Courses 200 to 299 — courses open to juniors, seniors, and graduates 
Courses 300 to 399 — courses open to graduates only 

(206) 



AGRICULTURE 

(For explanation of abbreviations, see page 206.) 

AGRICULTURE 

Dean From me and Agricultural College Staff. 
Undergraduate Division 

1. Introduction to Agriculture. I. 1 Hr. 

A survey of the history and practice of the general field of agri- 
culture with special reference to opportunities and problems in 
West Virginia. Two lectures. 

Mr. Wilson and Agricultural College Staff. 

2. Introduction to Agriculture. II. 1 Hr. 

Continuation of Agriculture 1. 

Mr. Wilson and Agricultural College Staff. 

5. Farm Practice. 2 Hrs. 

A minimum of 12 weeks on an approved farm will be required 
of each candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Agriculture who has not had the equivalent of at least one year's 
farm experience after reaching the age of 14 years. This work 
must be done under direction of the Dean and the Committee on 
Farm Operations. Open only to students deficient in farm 
practice. 

AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY 

Professor Dustman. 
Undergraduate Division 1 
(See pages 224 to 227.) 

Graduate Division 

380, 382. Research. I. 1 to 5 Hrs. 

Graduate research in the general field of agricultural chemistry. 
Available only by permission of instructor. Mr. Dustman. 

381, 383. Research. II. 1 to 5 Hrs. 

Same as Agricultural Chemistry 380. Mr. Dustman. 



a Chemistry courses for agricultural and home economics students of under- 
graduate rank are offered in the College of Arts and Sciences. 

(207) 



208 Courses of Instruction 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 1 

Professor Allen; Associate Professors Olney and Parsons; and 
Instructor Cline. 

Undergraduate Division 

101. Problems of Rural Education. II. 2 Hrs. 

An introductory course to assist students in choosing a voca< 
tion in the various fields of rural educational service. Two 
lectures. Mr. Allen. 

117. Surveys of Occupations. II. 2 Hrs. 

Material and method of occupational analysis to train teachers 
in vocational guidance. Offered in alternate years. Two lectures. 

Mr. Allen. 

120. Principles of Vocational Teaching. II. 3 Hrs. 

The development of principles underlying instruction in agricul- 
tural occupations. Should accompany Agricultural Education 224. 
Three lectures. Mr. Olney. 

tl34. Methods of Agricultural Extension. II. 2 Hrs. 

A study of the activities of the county extension agents and the 
agricultural extension program of West Virginia. Two lectures. 
Offered in alternate years. Mr. Parsons. 

138. Directed Practice in Agricultural Extension. II, S. 2 to 4 Hrs. 
Participation as a responsible assistant under guidance in the 
work of the county agricultural or home demonstration agent. 

Mr. Allen and Staff. 

160. Materials and Methods of Teaching Vocational Agriculture. I, II. 

3 Hrs. 

First semester: for seniors only. Two lectures and one labora- 
tory. Second semester: for juniors only. Two lectures and one 
laboratory. Prerequisite: all required basic agricultural courses. 

Mr. Olney. 

166. Materials and Methods of Teaching Elementary Science. I, SI. 
2 Hrs. 

Selection and evaluation of materials to be included in elementary 
science, together with suggestions for their effective presentation. 
Two lectures. Mr. Allen. 

fl68. Materials and Methods of Visual Instruction. I. 2 Hrs. 

Practice in the preparation and use of illustrative materials and 
devices employed in teaching vocational agriculture and related 
science. Offered in alternate years. Two laboratories. Mr. Allen. 

180. Special Problems. I. 1 to 3 Hrs. Mr. Allen and Staff. 

181. Special Problems. II. 1 to 3 Hrs. Mr. Allen and Staff. 



fOmitted during- the academic year 1933-34. 

iAgricultural Education 160, 120. 224, and 101 or 233 are required of all 
candidates for positions teaching vocational agriculture in West Virginia high 
schools. Agricultural Education 120, 224, 233, 138, and 180 may be taken in 
extension. 



Agriculture 209 



224. Student Teaching. I, II. 3 to 5 Hrs. 

Participation under guidance in representative activities of the 
teacher of vocational agriculture. Two lectures and one labora- 
tory. Prerequisite: Agricultural Education 160 and attainment 
of an average of 1 X A honor points for each credit hour in courses 
in agriculture. Mr. Olney. 

225s. Directed Field Practice in Supervising Vocational Agriculture. 
SI. 2 Hrs. 

Conferences, demonstrations, and directed participation in the 
activities incidental to directing the supervised farm practice of 
pupils in vocational agriculture. Program-planning, home farm 
visits, directed learning, interviewing parents and farmers, com- 
munity service, etc. Mr. Allen and Mr. Cline. 

233. Rural Organization. I. 3 Hrs. 

The educative function of vocational teachers and leaders in 
rural community organization; directed observation and partici- 
pation in programs, requiring several afternoon and out-of-town 
trips. Two lectures and a third period to be arranged. 

Mr. Olney. 

248. Graphic Methods in Teaching. I. 2 Hrs. 

Practice in the use of graphic devices for presenting facts; inter- 
preting and analyzing data; and studying achievement. Offered 
in alternate years. Two lectures. Mr. Allen. 

257. Vocational Education in Secondary Schools. I, SI. 2 Hrs. 

The administration of vocational education as the problem of 
superintendents and principals. Two lectures. Mr. Allen. 

260s. Advanced Course in Materials and Methods of Teaching Voca- 
tional Agriculture. SI. 2 Hrs. 

This course will be offered in three sections, each section to take 
full time work for successive periods of two weeks, and each to be 
devoted to distinct units of content. Mr. Olney. 

Graduate Division 

360. Problems in Agricultural Education. I, SI. 1 to 5 His. 
Critical studies of selected phases of the organization or technique 
of instruction in agriculture. Individual assignments on specific 
problems. Prerequisite: Agricultural Education 120, 160, and 
134 or 233. Mr. Allen and Staff. 

361. Problems in Agricultural Education. II. 1 to 5 Hrs. 

Same as Agricultural Education 360. Mr. Allen and Staff. 

380, 382. Research. I. 1 to 5 Hrs. 

Original investigations through surveys or controlled experimenta- 
tion in the materials, methods, and organization of instruction in 
agriculture. These studies may constitute or be continued into a 
thesis. Prerequisite: Agricultural Education 138 or 224, and 
360 or 361. Mr. Allen and Staff. 

381, 383. Research. II. 1 to 5 Hrs. 

Same as Agricultural Education 380. Mr. Allen and Staff. 



210 Courses of Instruction 

AGRICULTURAL JOURNALISM 

Mr. Jenny. 

Undergraduate Division 
105. Agricultural Journalism. II. 3 Hrs. 

Primarily a course in farm news writing. Three lectures and 
recitations. Prerequisite: Journalism 1. Mr. Jenny. 

AGRONOMY AND GENETICS 

Professor Garber; Associate Professors Pierre and Hoover; and 
Assistant Professor Pohlman. 

AGRONOMY 
Undergraduate Division 

1. Farm Crops. I. 5 Hrs. 

A study of cereal, forage, and pasture crops. Three lectures and 
two laboratories. Mr. Pohlman. 

2. Soils. II. 3 Hrs. 

A study of the properties of soils. Two lectures and one labora- 
tory. Mr. Pohlman. 

180. Special Problems. I. 1 to 3 Hrs. 

Advanced work in soils or crop production. 

Mr. Garber and Staff. 

181. Special Problems. II. 1 to 3 Hrs. Mr. Garber and Staff. 

200. Advanced Crops. II. 3 Hrs. 

A study of the production, classification, and market grading of 
cereal and forage crops. Two lectures and one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite: Agronomy 1. Mr. Hoover. 

210. Fertilizers and Soil Fertility. II. 2 or 3 Hrs. 

Soil fertility and the theories and practices in the use of fertilizer. 
Two lectures with one laboratory optional. Prerequisite: 
Agronomy 2. Mr. Pierre. 

Graduate Division 

314. Soil Microbiology. II. 3 Hrs. 

Two lectures and one laboratory period. Occurrence of micro- 
organisms in soils and their relationship to the decomposition of 
organic matter, availability of plant nutrients, and soil acidity. 
Technique of isolation and study. Mr. Pohlman. 

316. Soil Chemistry. II. 3 Hrs. Mr. PlERRE. 

f330. Plant Breeding and Field Technic. II. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Genetics 221. Offered in alternate years. 

Mr. Garber and Staff. 
350. Seminar. I. 1 Hr. 

A study of the recent literature pertaining to soils and crop pro- 
duction. Mr. Garber and Staff. 

tOmitted during the academic year 1933-34. 



Agriculture 211 



351. Seminar. II. 1 Hr. 

Same as Agronomy 350. Mr. Garber and Staff. 

380, 382. Research. I, SI. 1 to 5 Hrs. 

Mr. Garber and Staff. 

381, 383. Research. II, S2. 1 to 5 Hrs. 

Same as Agronomy 380. Mr. Garber and Staff. 

GENETICS 
Undergraduate Division 

111. Elementary Genetics. I, II. 2 or 3 Hrs. 

An elementary study of the principles of heredity. Two lectures 
with one laboratory optional. Mr. Hoover. 

180. Special Problems. I. 1 to 3 Hrs. Mr. Garber and Staff. 

181. Special Problems. II. 1 to 3 Hrs. Mr. Garber and Staff. 

221. Genetics. I. 3 Hrs. 

Fundamental principles of inheritance. Two lectures and one 
laboratory. Mr. Garber and Staff. 

Graduate Division 

322. Advanced Genetics. II. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Genetics 221. Mr. Garber. 

f332. Biometry. II. 3 Hrs. 

Statistical analysis of biological data. Offered in alternate years. 

Mr. Garber. 

380, 382. Research. I. 1 to 5 Hrs. 

Adapted to the needs of graduate students wishing to do research 
or directed reading in the field of plant or animal genetics. May 
or may not include a thesis. Mr. Garber and Staff. 

381, 383. Research. II. 1 to 5 Hrs. 

Same as Genetics 380. Mr. Garber and Staff. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

Professor Livesay; Associate Professor Rietz; and Assistant Professors 
Wilson and Longwell. 

Undergraduate Division 
1. Animal Nutrition. 1 II. 3 Hrs. 

A study of digestion and metabolism of food nutrients, nutrient 
requirements of farm animals, and nutritive values of feeds and 
rations. Three lectures. Mr. Longwell. 

102. Livestock Production and Management. 1 I. 5 Hrs. 

A study of market types, breeds, production, and management 
of beef cattle, hogs, and horses. Three lectures and two labo- 
ratories. Prerequisite: Animal Husbandry 1. 

Mr. Livesay and Mr. Longwell. 



Animal Husbandry 1 and 102 are prerequisite to all courses in the depart- 
ment, including veterinary science courses. 

fOmitted during the academic year 1933-34. 



212 Courses of Instruction 

138. Livestock Grading and Selection. II. 2 Hrs. 

Two laboratories. Mr. Livesay and Staff. 

162. Mutton and Wool Production. II. 3 Hrs. 

Two lectures and one laboratory. Mr. Wilson. 

166. Meats. II. 2 Hrs. 

Lectures and demonstrations on the identification, selection, and 
nutritive value of meat cuts. Primarily for home economics 
students. Two lectures. Mr. Longwell. 

167. Meats. I. 3 Hrs. 

Farm butchering, curing, and care of meats. Visit to one of 
the large packing houses of Pittsburgh required of all students 
taking this course. Two lectures and two laboratories combined. 

Mr. Longwell. 

169. Meat Judging. I. 1 Hr. Mr. Longwell. 

180. Special Problems. I. 1 to 3 Hrs. Mr. Livesay and Staff. 

181. Special Problems. II. 1 to 3 Hrs. Mr. Livesay and Staff. 

203. Advanced Animal Nutrition. I, SI. 3 Hrs. 

A detailed study of the chemistry of feeding stuffs and of the 
animal body, as well as of the digestion and metabolism of food 
nutrients. Three lectures. Mr. Longwell. 

222. Breeding Farm Animals. II. 3 Hrs. 

Three lectures. Mr. Livesay, 

235. Animal Husbandry Seminar. I. 1 Hr. Mr. Livesay and Staff. 

236. Animal Husbandry Seminar. II. 1 Hr. Mr. Livesay and Staff. 

243. Advanced Livestock Judging. I. 2 Hrs. 

Students taking this course will be required to participate in a 
tour of inspection of representative flocks, herds, and studs. 
Two laboratories. Mr. Livesay and Staff. 

Graduate Division 

380, 382. Research. I, SI. 1 to 5 Hrs. 

Library and experimental work along the lines of breeding, nutri- 
tion, and parasites. Mr. Livesay and Staff. 

381, 383. Research. II, S2. 1 to 5 Hrs. 

Same as Animal Husbandry 380. Mr. Livesay and Staff. 



Agriculture 213 



VETERINARY SCIENCE 
Undergraduate Division 

102. Animal Pathology. I. 3 Hrs. 

Three lectures. Mr. Rietz. 

f206. Parasites and Pathology. II. 3 Hrs. 

Three lectures. Offered in alternate years. Mr. Rietz. 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Professor Henderson; Associate Professor Thurston; and 
Assistant Professor Bowling. 

Undergraduate Division 

101. Principles of Dairying. 1. 5 Hrs. 

Prerequisite to all other courses in the department except Dairy 
Husbandry 107. Three lectures and two laboratories. 

Mr. Henderson and Mr. Thurston. 

fl02. Dairy Manufactures. II. 4 Hrs. 

A study of the manufacture of ice cream, condensed milk, and dry 
milk. Offered in alternate years. Three lectures and one 
laboratory. Mr. Thurston. 

103. Dairy Manufactures. II. 4 Hrs. 

A study of market milk and manufacture of butter and cheese. 
Offered in alternate years. Three lectures and one laboratory. 

Mr. Thurston. 
107. Milk and Public Health. I. 2 or 3 Hrs. 

Two lectures and one laboratory. Mr. Henderson. 

123. Dairy Judging. II. 1 or 2 Hrs. 

Two laboratories. Mr. Bowling and Mr. Thurston. 

180. Special Problems. I, SI, S2. 1 to 3 Hrs. 

Mr. Henderson and Staff. 

181. Special Problems. II. 1 to 3 Hrs. Mr. Henderson and Staff. 

204. Dairy Technology. II. 3 Hrs. 

Chemical and bacteriological methods used in the technical con- 
trol of milk and milk products. One lecture and two laboratories. 
Prerequisite: Dairy Husbandry 101 and 102 or 103. 

Mr. Thurston. 
t218. Dairy Chemistry. I. 3 Hrs. 

One lecture and two laboratories. Offered in alternate years. 
Prerequisite for graduate students: Chemistry 106 or equivalent, 
Chemistry 31 or 233, and Dairy Husbandry 101. 

Mr. Dustman. 



fOmitted during the academic year 1933-34. 



214 Courses of Instruction 

221. Purebred Dairy Cattle. I. 3 Hrs. 

Two lectures and one laboratory. Offered in alternate years. 

Mr. Bowling. 

222. Milk Production. II. 4 Hrs. 

Three lectures and one laboratory. Mr. Henderson. 

Graduate Division 

380, 382. Research. I, SI. 1 to 5 Hrs. 

Special assigned dairy problems consisting either of library 
references or of work in the laboratory. Mr. Henderson and Staff. 

381, 383. Research. II, S2. 1 to 5 Hrs. 

Same as Dairy Husbandry 380. Mr. Henderson and Staff 

ENTOMOLOGY 

Professor Peairs. 

Undergraduate Division 
2. Entomology. II, S2. 4 Hrs. 

Prerequisite to all other courses offered in the department. 
Biological, morphological, taxonomic, and economic phases of 
the study of insects. Three lectures and one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite: Invertebrate zoology. Mr. Peairs. 

103. Economic Entomology. I. 3 Hrs. 

Standard practices in insect control; methods for the study of in- 
jurious insects. Professional requirements in entomology. Three 
lectures. Mr. Peairs. 

104. Systematic Entomology. II, 3 Hrs; S2 (104s), 2 Hrs. 
Taxonomy of genera and species of West Virginia insects. Classi- 
fication of restricted groups for qualified students. Three 
laboratories. Mr. Peairs. 

111. Summer Field Work. S. 2 Hrs. 

Systematic collecting and field studies of insects, to be followed 
for credit by Entomology 104. Students taking this course will 
be required to provide their own equipment for collecting and 
mounting insects. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

Mr. Peairs. 

180. Special Problems. I. 1 to 3 Hrs. 

Work adapted to the individual needs of students who desire 
special training in the field of entomology. Mr. Peairs. 

181. Special Problems. II. 1 to 3 Hrs. Mr. Peairs. 

201. Survey of Applied Entomology. I. 3 to 5 Hrs. 

Three lecture or conference periods and two optional laboratory 
periods each week. The principles underlying the control of in- 
sects; cultural, biological, and chemical. A critical study of 
experimental work which has led to the adoption of standard 
practices in selected cases, and a survey of present conditions 
which shall serve as a point of departure for research work 
and should precede or accompany all graduate work in entomology. 
Practice in biological and control investigations. Mr. Peairs. 



Agriculture 215 



Graduate Division 

380, 382. Research. I, SI. 1 to 5 Hrs. 

Problems adapted to the needs and training of the student. These 
may be biological, taxonomic, or economic in their nature and 
must be based upon a thorough knowledge of what has been done 
by other investigators in the same line of work. Mr. Peairs. 

381, 383. Research. II, S2. 1 to 5 Hrs. 

Same as Entomology 380. Mr. Peairs, 

FARM ECONOMICS 

Professor Dadisman; Associate Professor Armentrout; and 
Assistant Professor Cornell. 

Undergraduate Division 

2. Farm Economics. II. 3 Hrs. 

Principles of economics as applied to agriculture. Three lectures. 

Mr. Dadisman. 
104. Farm Management. II. 3 Hrs. 

Choosing, equipping, and operating a farm. Three lectures. 

Mr. Dadisman. 
107. Farm Records and Accounts. I. 2 Hrs. 

One lecture and laboratory combined. Mr. Dadisman. 

131. Marketing Agricultural Products. I. 3 Hrs. 

A study of principles and practices of marketing agricultural 
products. One day will be spent in Pittsburgh studying fruit, 
vegetables, and livestock markets. Three lectures. 

Mr. Armentrout. 

133s. Cooperative Marketing of Agricultural Products. SI. 2 Hrs. 

This course will be offered for special students, full time, for two 
consecutive weeks. Advanced registration required. 

Mr. Armentrout. 

171s. Geography of Agriculture. S2. 2 Hrs. 

A world picture of present-day agriculture. Mr. Dadisman. 

Mr. Dadisman and Staff. 

Mr. Dadisman and Staff, 

216. Agricultural Land Problems. II. 2 Hrs. 

A study of land systems and policies of the leading agricultural 
countries. Two lectures. Mr. Dadisman, 

218. Agricultural Statistics. II. 2 Hrs. 

Statistical analysis and presentation of agricultural data. One 
lecture and one laboratory. Mr. Dadisman and Mr. Cornell. 

233. Cooperative Marketing of Agricultural Products. I. 3 or 4 Hrs. 

Organization, management, and financing of farmers' cooperative 
organizations. Three lectures. One laboratory in accounting of 
cooperative marketing associations optional. Prerequisite: Farm 
Economics 131. Mr. Armentrout. 



180. 


Special Problems. 


I. 


1 to 3 Hrs. 


181. 


Special Problems. 


II. 


1 to 3 Hrs 



216 Courses of Instruction 

Graduate Division 

380, 382. Research. I. 1 to 5 Hrs. 

A study of specific problems related to the field of farm economics; 
or the preparation of a thesis. Mr. Dadisman and Staff. 

381, 383. Research. II. 1 to 5 Hrs. 

Same as Farm Economics 380. Mr. Dadisman and Staff. 

FARM MECHANICS 
Undergraduate Division 

152. Farm Shop Work. II, SI. 2 Hrs. 

Practical instruction in woodworking, cold metal, concrete, solder- 
ing, etc., as applied to construction and repair work on the farm. 
One lecture and laboratory combined. Mr. Cornell. 

153. Farm Mechanics. II. 3 Hrs. 

Principles underlying farm mechanics, with special reference to 
farm machinery and farm power. Two lectures and one labora- 
tory. Mr. Cornell. 

159. Farm Buildings and Sanitation. II. 3 Hrs. 

Design and construction of farm buildings, together with problems 
involving sanitation. Two lectures and one laboratory. 

Mr. Cornell. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Professor Colwell; Assistant Professors Nesbitt, Noer, Palmer, and 

Richmond; Instructors Braden, Dietrich, Strickland, and 

Waddell; and Assistants Hagy and Shirey. 

(1) Students in the College of Arts and Sciences who major in home 
economics must meet the requirements in that college and also the depart- 
mental requirements as outlined on page 140. 

(2) Students who wish to obtain the high school certificate to teach home 
economics must meet the requirements of the State Board of Education, the 
College of Education, and the Department of Home Economics. This can be 
done only through work in the College of Agriculture leading to the B. S. H. E. 
degree. 

(3) Students from other colleges who wish to elect home economics courses 
without meeting the science requirements may take Home Economics 2, 14, 
15, 17, 122, 31, 133, and 134 or 135. 

Undergraduate Division 
Foods and Nutrition 

2. Food Selection. II. 2 Hrs. 

Not open to majors. Planned for students in lower division 
of College of Arts and Sciences who wish to have such knowl- 
edge of elementary nutrition as will enable them to establish 
good food habits. Two lectures. Miss Colwell. 

3. Food Preparation. I, II. 4 Hrs. 

Two lectures and two laboratories. Prerequisite: Chemistry 1 
or its equivalent. Miss Braden. 



Agriculture 217 



4. Food Study. II. 4 Hrs. 

Two lectures and two laboratories. Prerequisite: Home Eco- 
nomics 3 or its equivalent; Chemistry 1 and 2. Miss Braden. 

14. Nutrition. II. 3 Hrs. 

Primarily for physical education majors. Two lectures and one 
laboratory. Miss Braden. 

105. Food Preservation. I. 2 Hrs. 

One lecture and one laboratory period combined. Prerequisite: 
Home Economics 4 or its equivalent. Miss Nesbitt. 

107. Dietetics. I. 4 Hrs. 

Two lectures and two laboratories. Prerequisite: Home Eco- 
nomics 3 and 4, and biological science 8 hours. Miss Braden. 

108. Group Feeding. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

One laboratory. Prerequisite: Home Economics 3 and 4. 

Miss Colwell and Miss Waddell. 

212. Human Nutrition. II. 4 Hrs. 

Two lectures and two laboratories. Prerequisite: Chemistry 31, 
Home Economics 3, 4, and 107. Miss Nesbitt. 

215. Nutrition Work with Children. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

One lecture and one laboratory. Prerequisite: Home Economics 
3, 4, and 107. Miss Nesbitt. 

216. Community Nutrition Problems. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Lecture and field work. Prerequisite: Home Economics 3, 4, 107, 
215, or consent of instructor. Miss Colwell and Miss Braden. 

Textiles and Clothing 

15. Clothing Selection. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Two lectures. Miss Noer. 

17. Textiles and Clothing. I, II. 4 Hrs. 

Two lectures and two laboratories. Miss Dietrich and Miss Hagy. 

122. Selection and Construction of Clothing. I, II. 4 Hrs. 

Three laboratories. Prerequisite: Home Economics 17, 31, or 
permission of instructor. Miss Dietrich, 

125. Advanced Clothing. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Three laboratories. Prerequisite: Home Economics 17 and 122. 

Miss Dietrich. 

226. Advanced Textiles. II. 2 Hrs. 

Two laboratories. Prerequisite: Home Economics 17, Chemistry 
1 and 2. Miss Dietrich. 

Applied Arts 

31. Applied Design. I, II. 4 Hrs. 

Two lectures and two laboratories. Miss Palmer. 

134. House Decoration. II. 3 Hrs. 

One lecture and two laboratories. Miss Palmer. 



218 Courses of Instruction 



135. Home Planning and Furnishing. I, II. 4 Hrs. 
Suggested prerequisite: Home Economics 17 and 31. 

Miss Palmer. 

136. Advanced Home Planning and Furnishing. I, II. 2 Hrs. 
Two laboratories. Prerequisite: Home Economics 135. 

Miss Palmer, 
Health and Child Care 

240. Child Development. II, SI. 2 Hrs. 

Two lectures. Prerequisite: Home Economics 4 and 107; 
suggested prerequisite, Psychology 1. Miss Colwell. 

Home Management 

251. Mechanics of the House. I, II, SI. 2 Hrs. 

Two lectures. Prerequisite: 30 hours of home economics. 

Miss Nesbitt. 

252. Home Management Laboratory. I, II. 3 Hrs.; SI (252s), 2 Hrs. 
To be preceded or accompanied by Home Economics 251 and 254. 

Miss Colwell and Miss Hagy. 
254. Home Management. I, II. 3 Hrs. 

Three lectures. Prerequisite: Home Economics 3 and 4, 107, 31, 
135, 15, 17, 122. Miss Nesbitt. 

Home Economics Education 

163. Materials and Methods of Teaching Home Economics in High 
Schools. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Two lectures. Prerequiste: minimum home economics required 

courses, 25 hours; preferably 32 hours. Education required 

courses, 9 hours; preferably 12 hours. Miss Richmond. 

182s. Methods in Home Economics Extension. SI. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Field work. This course 
aims to familiarize the student with the state and county ex- 
tension program. It includes organization, plans of work, reports, 
methods, demonstrations, project work, exhibits, etc. 

Miss Humphreys. 

224. Student Teaching. I, II. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite or parallel: Educational Materials and Methods 120 
and 163. Miss Richmond and Miss Strickland. 

262. Vocational Home Economics in Secondary Schools. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

The placement of home economics content in junior and senior 
high school. Layouts and equipment. Two lectures. Pre- 
requisite: Educational Materials and Methods 163 or consent of 
instructor. Miss Richmond. 

264. Problems in Home Economics Education. II, SI. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 262 or consent of instructor. 

Miss Colwell and Staff. 

General courses 

1. Home Economics Survey. I, II. 1 Hr. 

A brief survey of the scope and field of home economics educa- 
tion. One lecture. Miss Colwell and Staff. 

180. Problems in Home Economics. I. 1 to 3 Hrs. 

Miss Colwell and Staff. 



Agriculture 219 



181. Problems in Home Economics. II. 1 to 3 Hrs. 

Miss Colwell and Staff. 

270. History of Home Economics. I, II. 1 Hr. 

One lecture. Miss Colwell and Staff. 

Graduate Division 

380, 382. Research. I. 1 to 5 Hrs. 

Courses are planned to meet the needs of qualified graduate stu- 
dents. Mainly, original research in the fields of nutrition, textiles, 
home management, and applied art. Miss Colwell and Staff. 

381, 383. Research. II. 1 to 5 Hrs. 

Same as Home Economics 380. Miss Colwell and Staff. 

HORTICULTURE 

Professor Knowlton; Assistant Professor Westover; and Instructors 
Childs, Dye, and McCubbin. 

Undergraduate Division 

101. Principles of Horticulture. I. 4 Hrs. 

Fruit production with some attention to seasonal activities in 
vegetable growing. Prerequisite to all courses in pomology. 
Three lectures and one laboratory. Mr. Knowlton and Staff. 

102. Principles of Horticulture. II. 4 Hrs. 

Vegetable production with some attention to seasonal activities 
in fruit growing. Prerequisite to all courses in olericulture. 
Three lectures and one laboratory. Mr. Westover and Staff. 

115. Fruit Judging. I. 1 Hr. 

Two laboratory periods first half of semester. Mr. Childs. 

139. Landscape Gardening. I. 2 Hrs. 

Theory and practice of landscape design with special application 
to home grounds. One lecture and one laboratory. Mr. Dye. 

140. Plant Materials. II. 2 Hrs. 

A study of the important woody and herbaceous plants used in 
landscape gardening. One lecture and one laboratory. Mr. Dye. 

Mr. Knowlton and Staff. 

Mr. Knowlton and Staff. 

206. Small Fruits Production. II. 3 Hrs. 

A practical and scientific study of standard cultural practices 
in the small fruit plantation. Offered in alternate years. Two 
lectures and one laboratory. Mr. Childs. 

209. Systematic Pomology. I. 3 Hrs. 

A study of the history, botany, and classification of fruits. Two 
lectures and one laboratory. Mr. Knowlton and Staff. 



180. Special Problems. 


I. 


1 to 3 Hrs. 


181. Special Problems. 


II. 


1 to 3 Hrs 



220 Courses of Instruction 



212. Commercial Fruit Production. II. 3 Hrs. 

The latest methods in pruning, spraying, soil culture, and other 
production practices for fruit trees from the practical and 
scientific standpoint. Two lectures and one laboratory. 

Mr. Knowlton and Staff, 

213. Harvesting, Packing, and Storage of Fruits. I. 3 Hrs. 
Instruction in maturity standards for harvesting, grading accord- 
ing to national and state standards, and planning and manage- 
ment of packing houses and storages. Two lectures and one 
laboratory. Mr. Knowlton and Staff. 

232. Commercial Vegetable Production. II. 3 Hrs. 

Current methods of commercial vegetable crop production in- 
cluding equipment, soil and climatic adaptation, plant raising, 
soil culture, harvesting, grading, and packing. Two lectures and 
one laboratory. Mr. Westover and Staff. 

233. Systematic Olericulture. I. 3 His. 

A study of the history, botany, and classification of vegetable 
crops. Two lectures and one laboratory. 

Mr. Westover and Staff. 

Graduate Division 

380, 382. Research. I. 1 to 5 Hrs. 

Original investigation on an assigned problem dealing with horti- 
cultural crops. Mr. Knowlton and Staff. 

381, 383. Research. II. 1 to 5 Hrs. 

Same as Horticulture 380. Mr. Knowlton and Staff. 

PLANT PATHOLOGY 1 

Professor Orton and Associate Professor Leonian. 
Undergraduate Division 

103. Economic Plant Pathology. I. 3 Hrs. 

The important diseases of field, garden, and orchard crops; meth- 
ods of control. One lecture and two laboratories. 

Mr. Orton and Staff. 

103s. Economic Plant Pathology. SI. 2 Hrs. 

This course will be offered for special students, full time for two 
consecutive weeks. Advanced registration required. 

Mr. Orton and Staff. 

107. Market Pathology. II. 2 Hrs. 

A study of the losses occurring during the storage and marketing 
of perishable produce. Two laboratories. Mr. Orton and Staff. 

180. Special Problems. I. 1 to 3 Hrs. Mr. Orton and Mr. Leonian. 

181. Special Problems. II. 1 to 3 Hrs. Mr. Orton and Mr. Leonian. 

202. General Plant Pathology. II. 5 Hrs. 

A fundamental course on the nature of disease in plants, with 
practice in laboratory methods. Two lectures and three labora- 
tories. Mr. Orton and Staff. 



1 Botany 1, 2, and 141 are prerequisite to all courses in the department. 



Agriculture 221 



Graduate Division 

f301, 302. Morphology and Pathology. I, II. 5 Hrs. 

Comparative morphology of the bacteria and fungi; descriptive 
pathology; methods and identifications. Two lectures and three 
laboratories throughout the year. Offered in alternate years. 

Mr. Orton and Mr. Leonian. 
313, 314. Parasitism. I, II. 4 Hrs. 

Physiology of the bacteria and fungi and their mode of parasitism. 
Two lectures and two laboratories throughout the year. Pre- 
requisite: Plant Pathology 301 and 302. Offered in alternate 
years. Mr. Orton and Mr. Leonian. 

350, 351. Seminar. I, II. 1 Hr. 

A critical study or literature review of some specialized subject. 
Required of all majors. Mr. Orton and Staff. 

380, 382. Research. I, SI. 1 to 5 Hrs. 

A detailed study of some special disease or disease group, employ- 
ing advanced methods of investigation. Prerequisite: Plant 
Pathology 202. Mr. Orton and Staff. 

381, 383. Research. II, S2. 1 to 5 Hrs. 

Same as Plant Pathology 380. Mr. Orton and Staff. 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

Associate Professor Andrews and Instructor Wightman. 

Undergraduate Division 

1. Poultry Husbandry. II. 4 Hrs. 

Prerequisite to all other courses in the department. Three 
lectures and one laboratory. Mr. Andrews and Staff. 

103. Advanced Poultry Husbandry. I. 2 Hrs. 

Continuation of Poultry Husbandry 1, including a general survey 
of scientific investigations in poultry husbandry. Two lectures. 

Mr. Andrews. 

105. Poultry Judging. I. 2 to 3 Hrs. 

This course covers both standard and utility judging. A prepara- 
tion for intercollegiate judging contests. One lecture and labora- 
tory combined. Mr. Wightman. 

180. Special Problems. I. 1 to 3 Hrs. Mr. Andrews and Staff. 

181. Special Problems. II. 1 to 3 Hrs. Mr. Andrews and Staff, 

Graduate Division 

380, 382. Research. I. 1 to 5 Hrs. 

Original research on a poultry problem to be selected. 

Mr. Andrews and Staff. 

381, 383. Research. II. 1 to 5 Hrs. 

Same as Poultry Husbandry 380. Mr. Andrews and Staff. 



fOmitted during the academic year 1933-34. 



222 Courses of Instruction 



ARTS AND SCIENCES 

(For explanation of abbreviations see page 206.) 

AGRICULTURE 1 

(See page 207.) 

AGRONOMY 1 

(See pages 210 and 211.) 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 1 

(See pages 211 to 213.) 

BIOLOGY 2 
Lower Division 3 

1. General Biology. I. 4 Hrs. Mr. Reese and Mr. Strausbaugh. 

2. General Biology. II. 4 Hrs. Mr. Reese and Mr. Strausbaugh. 

Graduate Division 

350. Biological Science Seminar. I. 1 Hr. 

Mr. Orton, Mr. Garber, Mr. Reese, and Mr. Strausbaugh. 

351. Biological Science Seminar. II. 1 Hr. 

Mr. Orton, Mr. Garber, Mr. Reese, and Mr. Strausbaugh. 

BOTANY 4 

Professors Strausbaugh and Spangler; and 
Instructors Ammons and Core. 

Lower Division 

1. General Botany. I. 4 Hrs. 

A course dealing with the structure, function and environmental 
relations of the seed plant. 

Mr. Strausbaugh, Miss Ammons, and Mr. Core. 



^he following courses are regular electives in the College of Arts and 
Sciences: Farm Economics 131, Dairy Husbandry 218, and all courses in 
entomology, genetics, and plant pathology. In addition to these courses, fifteen 
hours, selected from the following courses offered in the College of Agriculture, 
may be credited toward the A. B. degree in the College of Arts and Sciences : 
Agricultural Education 101, 168, 134, and 233 ; Agronomy 1 and 2 ; Animal 
Husbandry 1, 102, and 222; Dairy Husbandry 101; Farm Economics 2; Horti- 
culture 101 and 102 ; and Poultry Husbandry 1. 

2 The courses in biology are given by the cooperation of the Departments of 
Botany and Zoology. 

3 These courses are designed especially to meet the science requirements in 
the lower division for students who do not intend to take further work in the 
biological sciences. 



Arts and Sciences 223 



2. General Botany. II. 4 Hrs. 

Continuation of Botany 1, dealing with the lower groups of plants 
and a brief survey of the classification of seed plants. 

Mr. Strausbaugh, Miss Ammons, and Mr. Core. 

4. Systematic Botany. II, 4 Hrs.; SI (4s), 2 Hrs. 

The identification of seed plants and a study of their classification. 

Mr. Core. 

7s. General Botany. SI. 2 Hrs. 

For students who have had no work in college botany. A study of 
algae, liverworts, and mosses. Mr. Core. 

8s. General Botany. S2. 2 Hrs. 

A study of pteridopytes and seed plants giving special attention 
to life histories, with practice in identification of these plants. 

Mr. Spangler. 
31. Plant Ecology. I. 4 Hrs. 

A study of the environmental relationships of plants. 

Mr. Strausbaugh. 

Upper Division 

141. Bacteriology. I, II, 3 Hrs.; S2 (141s), 2 Hrs. Mr. Spangler. 

211. Morphology and Phylogeny. I. 4 Hrs. 

A thorough survey of structure, life histories, and phylogenetic re- 
lationships of representative forms in all groups of the plant 
kingdom. Prerequisite: Botany 1 and 2. Mr. Spangler. 

212. Morphology and Phylogeny. II. 4 Hrs. 

Continuation of Botany 211. Mr. Spangler. 

214. Microtechnique and Plant Histology. II. 4 Hrs. 

Study of the tissues and organs of plants with training in the 
preparation of material for microscopic study. Prerequisite: 
Botany 1 and 2. Mr. Strausbaugh. 

221. Plant Physiology. I. 4 Hrs. 

A study of the functions of plants. Prerequisite: Botany 1 and 2, 
and a general course in chemistry. Mr. Strausbaugh. 

222. Advanced Plant Physiology. II. 4 Hrs. 

Qualitative and quantitative studies of the substances of plant 
tissues and the roles these play in the metabolism of the plant. 
Prerequisite: Botany 221; also courses in general physics and 
organic chemistry. Mr. Strausbaugh. 

232. Forest Ecology. II. 4 Hrs. 

A study of the various forest types, their development and their 
environmental relations. Prerequisite: Botany 1, 2, and 31. 

Mr. Strausbaugh. 

234. Experimental Ecology. II. 4 Hrs. 

The measurement of ecological factors. Prerequisite: Botany 1, 
2, and 31. Mr. Strausbaugh. 



224 Courses of Instruction 

235s. Field Studies in Botany. 1 SI. 6 Hrs. 

This is essentially a course in physiographic ecology, planed for 
botany majors and to meet the needs of those who intend to teach, 
or are teaching botany. The studies will be conducted in various 
interesting regions of the State and the entire time will be spent 
in the field. Mr. Strausbaugh. 

251. History of Botany. II. 2 Hrs. 

For majors and advanced students of botany only. 

Mr. Strausbaugh. 

253. Botany Seminar. I. 1 Hr. 

For seniors who are majoring in botany. 

Mr. Strausbaugh and Staff. 

254. Botany Seminar. II. 1 Hr. 

For seniors who are majoring in botany. 

Mr. Strausbaugh and Staff. 

Graduate Division 

351s. Taxonomic Studies. SI. 1 to 6 Hrs. 

For graduate students who are capable of working independently. 

Mr. Cork. 

365, 366, 367, 368. Morphology, Plant Anatomy, and Taxonomy. I, 

II, S2 (365). 1 to 5 Hrs. Mr. Strausbaugh and Mr. Spangler. 

371, 372, 373, 381, 382. Plant Physiology, Plant Microchemistry, and 
Plant Ecology. I, II. 1 to 5 Hrs. 

Mr. Strausbaugh and Mr. Spangler. 

391, 392. Research. I, II, 1 to 5 Hrs.; SI, S2 (391s), 1 to 6 Hrs. 

Open only to students who are capable of working more or less 
independently in the investigation of some botanical problem. 

Staff. 

CHEMISTRY 2 

Professors Clark, Jacobson, Samuel Morris, Hubert Hill, Dustman, 

Burke, and Davtes; Associate Professors Deatrick, Collett, 

and Garland; and Assistant Professors Lazzell, 

Gibson, and Pray. 

Lower Division 

1. General Chemistry. 3 I, II, SI. 4 Hrs. 

Recommended for students in the College of Arts and Sciences and 
the College of Education. Primarily for freshmen. Three recita- 
tions and two two-hour laboratory periods. Staff. 



1 See page 62. 

2 Chemistry 1, 2, and 9, or Chemistry 3 and 4 are prerequisite to all other 
courses in chemistry. Three-year and four-year pre-medical students are re- 
ferred to pages 124, 126, and 129 for outine of required courses. For courses in 
physiological and pharmaceutical chemistry see pages 290 and 303. A deposit 
is required of all students who take laboratory courses. 

3 Students desiring to take Chemistry 1 in the second semester may sub- 
stitute Chemistry 3 if Chemistry 1 is not offered. 



Arts and Sciences 225 



2. General Chemistry. I, II, S2. 4 Hrs. 

Recommended for students in the College of Arts and Sciences 
and the College of Education. Primarily for freshmen. Three 
recitations and two two-hour laboratory periods. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 1, or equivalent. Staff. 

3. Inorganic Chemistry. 1 I, II, SI. 4 Hrs. 

Required of students in the College of Agriculture, including home 
economics, the College of Engineering, pre-medical students, and 
pharmacy students. Students in the College of Arts and Sciences 
who have decided to take more than one year of chemistry are 
eligible. Primarily for freshmen. Three recitations and two two- 
hour laboratory periods. Staff. 

4. Inorganic Chemistry. 1 I, II, S2. 4 Hrs. 

Required of students of the College of Agriculture, College of 
Engineering, pre-medical students, and pharmacy students. Pri- 
marily for freshmen. Students in the College of Arts and 
Sciences who have decided to take more than one year of chemis- 
try are eligible. Prerequisite: Chemistry 3. Staff. 

5 or 105. Qualitative Analysis. I, SI. 4 Hrs. 

Chemistry 9 may either precede or accompany this course. Re- 
quired of students whose major is chemistry, students in chemical 
engineering, candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
public health, and pharmacy students. Three three-hour labora- 
tory periods, including recitations and special assignments. Pre- 
requisite: Chemistry 1, 2, and 9; or Chemistry 3 and 4. 

Mr. Hill and Mr. Lazzell. 

6 or 106. Quantitative Analysis. II, 3 to 5 Hrs.; S2 (6s or 106s) 

4 Hrs. 

Chemistry 5 should precede this course wherever possible. Re- 
quired of students whose major is chemistry, and of students in 
chemical engineering and mining engineering. Three or five three- 
hour laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Chemistry 1, 2, and 9, or 
3 and 4. Mr. Hill and Mr. Lazzell. 

9. Inorganic Chemistry. I, SI. 2 Hrs. 

Required of students who have taken Chemistry 1 and 2, and who 
desire further work in chemistry. May precede or accompany sueh 
work. Mr. Morris. 

10. Quantitative Analysis. I. 2 Hrs. 

Primarily for engineering students. Two three-hour laboratory 
periods. Prerequisite: Chemistry 3 and 4. Mr. Gibson. 

15 or 115. Quantitative Analysis. I, II, 3 Hrs.; SI (15s or 115s) 
2 or 3 Hrs. 

For pre-medical students. Chemistry 9 may accompany this 
course. Three three-hour laboratory periods. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 3 and 4, or 1, 2, and 9. Mr. Hill and Mr. Lazzell. 

31 or 131. Organic Chemistry. I. 4 Hrs. 

For students in agriculture and home economics. Chemistry 9 
may accompany this course. Prerequisite: Chemistry 4, or 2 
and 9. Mr. Dustman. 



1 Students entering with the idea of majoring in chemistry may take 
Chemistry 3 and 4 insead of Chemistry 1, 2, and 9. 



226 Courses of Instruction 

36 or 136. Organic Chemistry. II, S2. 6 Hrs. 

Required of pre-medical and pharmacy students. Prerequisite for 

pre-medical students: Chemistry 15 and 63. Prerequisite for 

pharmacy students : Chemistry 6. Mr. Garland. 

63 or 163. Physical Chemistry. I, SI. 3 Hrs. 

Required of pre-medical students and candidates for the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in public health. Chemistry 9 may accompany 
this course. Two recitation periods and one three-hour laboratory 
period. Prerequisite: Chemistry 4, or Chemistry 2 and 9. 

Mr. Davies. 
Upper Division 

107. Quantitative Analysis. I, II, S2. 2 Hrs. 
Continuation of Chemistry 15 and 115. 

Mr. Hill and Mr. Lazzell. 

141. Assigned Topics. I. 1 to 5 Hrs. 

Open by special permission to undergraduates who have already 
completed 36 hours of chemistry. An introduction to research. 

Staff. 

142. Assigned Topics. II. 1 to 5 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 141. Staff. 

208. Advanced Quantitative Analysis. I. 4 Hrs. 

Four three-hour laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Chemistry 6, 
Physics 3 and 4, and Mathematics 5. Mr. Jacobson. 

211. Synthetic Inorganic Chemistry. I. 3 Hrs. 

Seniors by permission. One lecture and two three-hour laboratory 
periods. Mr. Morris. 

214. Organic Qualitative Analysis. I. 3 Hrs. 

Three three-hour laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Chemistry 
238. Mr. Jacobson. 

217. Organic Quantitative Analysis. II. 3 Hrs. 

Three three-hour laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Chemistry 
238. Mr. Jacobson. 

f218. Dairy Chemistry. I. 3 Hrs. 

For students in the College of Agriculture. Prerequisite: for un- 
dergraduates, Chemistry 31 ; for graduates, Chemistry 6 or 15, or 
Chemistry 31 or 233. Mr. Dustman. 

222. Food Analysis. II. 3 Hrs. 

Primarily for agriculture and home economics students. One 
lecture and two three-hour laboratory periods. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 6 or 15, and Chemistry 31 or equivalent. Mr. Jacobson. 

233. Oranic Chemistry. I, 5 Hrs.; SI (233s), 4 Hrs. 

Required of students who major in chemistry, of students in 
chemical and mining engineering, and of candidates for the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in public health. Three lectures and two 
three-hour laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Chemistry 6. 

Mr. Clark and Mr. Garland. 



tOmitted during the academic year 1933-34. 



Arts and Sciences 227 



238. Organic Chemistry. II. 4 or 5 Hrs. 

Two lectures and three three-hour laboratory periods. Prerequi- 
site: Chemistry 233. Mr. Clark and Mr. Garland. 

247. Stereochemistry. I. 2 Hrs. 

Open to seniors. Prerequisite: Chemistry 238. Mrs. Deatrick. 

251. Industrial Inorganic Chemistry. 1 I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Clark. 

252. Industrial Organic Chemistry. 1 II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Clark. 

253s. Industrial Chemistry. SI. 2 Hrs. 

Attention of high school teachers is directed to this course. 
Emphasis will be placed upon West Virginia industries, including 
frequent visits to plants. Mr. Clark. 

254s. Industrial Chemistry. SI. 2 Hrs. 

Students of Chemistry 253s may elect this course, others by per- 
mission. Daily library work and frequent visits to industrial 
plants, including preparation of reports. Mr. Clark. 

260. Physical Chemistry. I. 3 to 5 Hrs. 

Required of chemistry majors and chemical engineering students, 
the latter for 3 hours' credit. Two recitations and one or two 
three-hour laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Chemistry 233, 
Physics 4, and Mathematics 5. Mr. Collett. 

261. Physical Chemistry. II. 3 or 4 Hrs. 

Required of chemical engineering students and chemistry majors. 
Two recitation and one or two three-hour laboratory periods. Pre- 
requisite: Chemistry 260. Mr. Collett. 

262. The Chemistry of Colloids. II, 4 Hrs.; SI (262s), 2 Hrs. 
Required of four-year pre-medical students. Two lectures and two 
three-hour laboratory periods. Mr. Davies. 

265s. The Chemistry of Colloids. SI. 2 Hrs. 

A laboratory course to accompany Chemistry 262s. Mr. Davies, 

274. History of Chemistry. II, S2. 2 Hrs. 

Open to seniors. Prerequisite: Chemistry 6. 

Mr. Hill and Mrs. Deatrick. 

277. Synthetic Drugs. 1 I or II, S2. 2 Hrs. Mr. Lazzell. 

299s. Chemistry of Organic Nitrogen Compounds. SI. 2 Hrs. 

For students who have already completed one year of organic 

chemistry. Mr. Clark. 
Graduate Division 

339. Dyes and Dye Intermediates. I. 4 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: Chem. 343, unless by special permission. 

Mr. Clark. 

340. Dyes and Dye Intermediates. II. 4 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Chem. 339. Mr. Clark. 



*For senior pharmacy students; other seniors only by consent. 



228 Courses of Instruction 

343. Advanced Organic Chemistry. I. 4 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Chem. 238 or equivalent. Mr. Garland. 

345. Theories of Organic Chemistry. II. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Chem. 343. Mr. Garland. 

346. Chemical Microscopy and Chemical Crystallography. I. 2 Hrs. 

Mr. Jacobson. 
367. Advanced Physical Chemistry. I or II. 4 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Chem. 261. Mr. Davies. 

369. Kinetics of Chemical Reactions. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Burke, 

370. Kinetics of Chemical Reactions. II. 3 Hrs. 

A continuation of course 369. Mr. Burke, 

380. Electrochemistry. I, II. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Chem. 258 and 261. Mr. Collett. 

383. Advanced Quantitative Analysis. II. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Chem. 5, 238, 261. Mr. Hill. 

388s. Current Trends in the Technology and Economics of Fuel. SI. 
2 Hrs. 

A general survey of the economics and technology of all the major 
forms of energy employed by society today, with special con- 
sideration of the influences affecting West Virginia's natural re- 
sources and industry. Mr. Burke. 

391. Journal Meeting and Seminar. I. 1 Hr. 

Required of graduate students working for graduate degrees with 
major in chemistry. Recommended as a minor for students from 
other departments. Staff. 

392. Journal Meeting and Seminar. II. 1 Hr. 

See Chemistry 391. Staff. 

393. Valence and Atomic Structure. I or II. 2 Hrs. Mr. Gibson. 

394. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. I or II. 2 Hrs. Mr. Pray. 

395. Special Topics. I. 1 to 3 Hrs. 

Chemistry of the carbohydrates, organic nitrogen compounds, 
actino chemistry, chemical kinetics, the phase rule, and study of 
chemical literature as preparation for research are suggested 
topics. Staff. 

396. Special Topics. II. 1 to 3 Hrs. 

See Chemistry 395. Staff. 

397. Research. I, SI. 1 to 6 Hrs. Staff. 

398. Research. II, S2. 1 to 6 Hrs. Staff. 



Arts and Sciences 229 



CLASSICS 

Professor Trotter and Associate Professor Brouzas. 

LATIN 

Lower Division 

1. Elementary Latin. I. 3 Hrs. 

An intensive course in the elements of the Latin language, con- 
sisting of the completion of a standard beginner's book and of a 
simple elementary reader. Mr. Trotter. 

2. Elementary Latin. II. 3 Hrs. 

A continuation of Latin 1, consisting of the study of a standard 
second year book. Mr. Trotter. 

3. Caesar. I. 3 Hrs. 

Selections from the Gallic Wars. Prerequisite: Latin 1 and 2, 
or equivalent. Mr. Trotter. 

4. Cicero's Orations. I, 3 Hrs.; SI (4s), 2 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: Latin 3, or 2 units of high school Latin. 

Mr. Trotter, 

5. Latin for Law Students: Selections from Legal Latin and the 
Institutes of Justinian. II. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Latin 3, or 2 units of high school Latin. 

Mr. Brouzas. 

6. Vergil's Aeneid. II, 3 Hrs.; SI (6s), 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Latin 3 and 4, or 3 units of high school Latin. 

Mr. Trotter. 

8. Cicero's De Senectute, and De Amicitia. II. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite : Latin 4 and 6, or 4 units of high school Latin. 

Mr. Trotter. 

14. Roman Comedy. I. 3 Hrs. 

Plautus, Captivi or Menaechmi; Terence, Adelphce or Andria. Pre- 
requisite. Latin 4 and 6, or 4 units of high school Latin. 

Mr. Brouzas. 

21. Roman Prose Literature. II. 3 Hrs. 

Selections from the Letters of Cicero, Pliny, Marcus Aurelius, and 
Fronto. Prerequisite: Latin 4 and 6, or 4 units of high school 
Latin. Mr. Brouzas. 

f22. The Elegy and the Epigram. I, 3 Hrs.; SI (22s), 2 Hrs. 

Selections from the elegiac poets and from Martial's epigrams. 
Prerequisite: Latin 14 and 21, or equivalent. Mr. Brouzas. 

f23. Livy. II. 3 Hrs. 

Selections from books 21 and 22. Prerequisite: Latin 14 and 21, 
or equivalent. Mr. Trotter. 

24. The Lyric Poets. II. 3 Hrs. 

Selections from Horace's Odes and Epodes and from Catullus and 
other poets. Prerequisite: Latin 14 and 22, or equivalent. 

Mr. Brouzas. 



tOmitted during the academic year 1933-34. 



230 Courses of Instruction 

f25. Latin Composition. II. 3 Hrs. 

A review of the principles and syntax of the Latin language, and 
practice in writing simple Latin. Prerequisite : Latin 14 and 21, 
or equivalent. Mr. Brouzas. 

Upper Division 

f227. Vulgar Latin. I. 3 Hrs. 

Selections from old Latin prose, from Petronius, Apuleius, and 
from late and mediaeval Latin writers. Lectures by the instructor 
on the history of the Latin language and the formation of the 
Romance languages, especially French. Prerequisite : Latin 14, 21, 
and 24, or equivalent. Mr. Brouzas. 

f231. Satire. II. 3 Hrs. 

Horace, Satires and Epistles; selections from Juvenal and Persius. 
Prerequisite: Latin 14, 21, and 22, or equivalent. Mr. Brouzas. 

f234. History. I, 3 Hrs.; SI (234s), 2 Hrs. 

Tacitus, Agricola, or Annals; Suetonius, Life of Julius or 

Augustus, Sallust, Catiline. Prerequisite: Latin 21 and 24, or 

equivalent. Mr. Brouzas. 

235. Epic. I. 3 Hrs. 

Vergil's Aeneid and the later Epic. Prerequisite: Latin 22 and 
24, or equivalent. Mr. Brouzas. 

236. Philosophy. II. 3 Hrs. 

Cicero's Tusculan Disputations or De Officiis; Seneca's Dialogues 
and Epistles. Prerequisite: Latin 21, 22, and 24, or equivalent. 

Mr. Brouzas. 

CLASSICAL CIVILIZATION 1 
Upper Division 

237. Greek and Roman Religion and Mythology. I. 2 Hrs. 

A study of the Greek and Roman religious ideas and myths with 
particular emphasis on their influence upon the art and literature 
of the ancient and the modern world. Mr. Brouzas. 

238. Greek and Roman Archaeology and Art. II. 2 Hrs. 

A study of the Greek and Roman masterpieces with especial 
emphasis on their influence upon mediaeval and modern art. 

Mr. Brouzas. 
f239. Greek Life and Thought. I, SI. 2 Hrs. 

A survey of Greek culture and thought as reflected in Greek litera- 
ture. Mr. Brouzas. 

t240. Roman Life and Thought. II. 2 Hrs. 

Continuation of Greek 239, with attention devoted to the Roman 
writers and periods. Mr. Brouzas. 



tOmitted during- the academic year 1933-34. 

^hese courses are offered as being- of cultural value to all students. They 
present a picture of a cross-section of Greek and Roman society, life, manners, 
thought, literature, art, science, and law. The study of the influence of classical 
antiquity upon the subsequent periods prepares one for a better appreciation of 
modern civilization. Each course may be taken separately, if so desired. No 
prerequisites are required. 



Arts and Sciences 



231 



GREEK 
Lower Division 

1. Elementary Greek. I. 3 Hrs. 

A course in the elements of the Greek language. 

2. Xenophon or New Testament. II. 3 Hrs. 



Graduate Division 



f381. Seminar. I. 3 Hrs. 
Research course. 

f382. Seminar. II. 3 Hrs. 
Research course. 



Mr. Brouzas. 
Mr. Brouzas. 



Mr. Brouzas. 
Mr. Brouzas. 



DAIRY HUSBANDRY 1 

(See pages 213 and 214.) 

ECONOMICS, BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, AND SOCIOLOGY 

Professors Harris, Vickers, Rufener, Bell, 2 and Helms; 2 Assistant 

Professors Saposnekow and Johnson; and Instructors 

Gauger, Hutchinson, and Simpson.* 

ECONOMICS 3 

Lower Division 

1. Principles of Economics. I, II, 3 Hrs.; SI (Is), 4 Hrs. 

For sophomores. Designed to be followed by Economics 2. Staff. 



2. Principles of Economics. I, II, 3 Hrs.; S2 (2s), 2 Hrs. 
Continuation of Economics 1. 



Staff. 



21. Economic Development. I. 3 Hrs. 

With special reference to the United States. Mr. Gauger. 

22. Economic Development. II. 3 Hrs. 

With special reference to Europe. Mr. Gauger. 

Upper Division 

101. Principles of Economics. I, 3 Hrs.; SI (101s), 4 Hrs. Staff. 

102. Principles of Economics. II, 3 Hrs.; S2 (102s), 2 Hrs. Staff. 



103. Principles of Economics. I. 3 Hrs. 

For students in the College of Engineering. 



Mr. Rufener. 



fOmitted during- the academic year 1933-34. 

VDairy Husbandry 218 is a regular elective in the College of Arts and 
Sciences. Dairy Husbandry 101 is included in the 15 hours of agriculture which 
may be elected by students in the College of Arts and Sciences. 

2 Visiting instructor during the summer session 1933. 

3 Economics 1 and 2 are prerequisites for all upper division courses in 
economics except Economics 103 and 110. Students from the College of Agri- 
culture may substitute Farm Economics 2 for Economics 2. 



232 Courses of Instruction 

110. Money, Credit, and Banking. II. 2 Hrs. 

For students in the College of Engineering. Prerequisite: Eco- 
nomics 103. Mr. Rufener. 

111. Money, Credit, and Banking. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Vickers. 

112. Public Finance. II. 4 Hrs. Mr. Vickers. 

113. Business Organization. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Rufener. 

114. Business Finance. II. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Economics 111 and 113. Mr. Rufener. 

131. Statistics. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Johnson. 

132. Statistics. II. 3 Hrs. 

Continuation of Economics 131. Mr. Johnson. 

fl33. Principles of Life Insurance. I. 3 Hrs. 

fl34. Principles of Property Insurance. II. 3 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: Economics 133. 

140. Labor Problems. II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Vickers. 

141. Railroad Transportation. I or II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Rufener. 

fl44. Economics of Public Utilities. II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Rufener. 

211s. Money, Credit, and Banking. SI. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: 6 hours of Economics. Mr. Rufener. 

214s. Business Finance. SI. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Economics 111. A study of the means and methods 
of financing business enterprise. Types of securities, sources of 
capital, distribution of funds, underwriting, budgets, receivership, 
reorganization, etc., are some of the problems considered. 

Mr. Bell. 

215. Investment and Speculation. I. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Economics 114. Mr. Rufener. 

240s. Labor Problems. S2. 2 Hrs. 

A general course dealing with the outstanding questions in the 
field of labor, including such problems as women in industry, child 
labor, hours, wages, industrial accidents, industrial unrest, labor 
organizations, and methods for settling industrial disputes. 

Mr. Helms. 

244s. Principles of Public Utilities. S2. 2 Hrs. 

A study of the general features of the field: history of public 
utilities; regulation; valuation; rates; customer and employee 
ownership; public relations; and service requirements. Mr. Helms. 

251. History of Economic Doctrines. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Vickers. 

256s. A Critical Study of Modern Economic Theory. SI. 2 Hrs. 

A critical study of the more important theories of value and distri- 
bution. The course is designed to give the student a cross section 
of recent economic theory and to afford training in the critical 
analysis of economic theories. Mr. Bell. 



Omitted during the academic year 1933-34. 



Arts and Sciences 233 



258. Distribution of Wealth. II. 2 Hrs. 

f263. Tax Systems, National and State. I. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: at least three advanced courses in economics, in- 
cluding Economics 112. 

f265. Central Banking Systems and Related Problems. I. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: at least three advanced courses in economics, in- 
cluding Economics 111. Mr. Vickers. 

|266. Central Banking Systems and Related Problems. II. 3 Hrs. 

Continuation of Economics 265. Mr. Vickers. 

300s. Economic Problems. SI. 2 to 4 Hrs. 

The course aims to develop scientifically the method and process 
of research in topics selected by the student from the general field 
of economics. Private conferences will be arranged for aiding 
the student individually. Mr. Bell. 

Graduate Division 

381. Research in Topics Connected with Money and Banking. I. 3 Hrs. 

Mr. Vickers. 

382. Research in Topics Connected with Money and Banking. II. 3 Hrs. 

Mr. Vickers. 

383. Research in Topics Connected with Government Regulation. I. 

3 Hrs. Mr. Rufener. 

384. Research in Topics Connected with Government Regulation. II. 
3 Hrs. Mr. Rufener. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Upper Division 

101. Principles of Accounting. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Johnson. 

102. Principles of Accounting. II. 3 Hrs. 

Continuation of Business 101. Mr. Johnson. 

103. Industrial Accounting. I. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Business 102, or equivalent. Mr. Johnson. 

105. Advanced Accounting. I. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Business 102, or equivalent. Mr. Johnson. 

106. Advanced Accounting. II. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite:. Business 102, or equivalent. Mr. Johnson. 

107. Auditing. II. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Business 102, or equivalent. Mr. Johnson. 

112. Income Tax Procedure. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Johnson. 



tOmitted during the academic year 1933-34. 



Courses of Instruction 



121. Marketing. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Hutchinson. 

122. Marketing. II. 3 Hrs. 

Continuation of Business 121. Mr. Hutchinson. 

125. Advertising. II. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Business 121. Mr. Hutchinson. 

126. Retail Store Management. I. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Business 121. Mr. Hutchinson. 

fl27. Foreign Trade Methods. II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Hutchinson. 

Prerequisite: Business 121. 

131. Business Management. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Hutchinson. 

134. Bank Management. II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Hutchinson. 

141. Business Law. I. 3 Hrs. 

Not open to students preparing for a law degree. 

Mr. Hutchinson. 
148. Sales Management. II. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Business 121. Mr. Hutchinson. 

SOCIOLOGY 1 

Lower Division 

1. Introduction to Sociology. I, II, 3 Hrs.; SI (Is), 2 Hrs. 

For sophomores. Mr. Harris and Mr. Saposnekow. 

Upper Division 

101. Introduction to Sociology. I, II, 3 Hrs.; SI (101s), 2 Hrs. 

Mr. Harris and Mr. Saposnekow. 

103. Rural Sociology. II, 3 Hrs.; S2 (103s), 2 Hrs. Mr. Harris. 

105. Urban Sociology. I, II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Saposnekow. 

tl08. Problems of Child Welfare. II. 2 Hrs. Mr. Harris. 

151s. Applied Sociology. SI. 2 Hrs. Mr. Simpson. 

210. The Family. II, 3 Hrs.; S2 (210s), 2 Hrs. Mr. Harris. 

231. Race Problems. I, 3 Hrs.; SI (131s), 2 Hrs. 

Mr. Harris and Mr. Simpson. 

232. Immigration. II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Saposnekow. 



tOmitted during" the academic year 1933-34. 

Sociology 1 or 101 is a prerequisite for all other courses in sociology. 



Arts and Sciences 235 



233. Problems of Crime and Delinquency. I, 3 Hrs.; SI (233s), 2 Hrs. 

Mr. Saposnekow. 

234. Problems of Dependents and Defectives. II. 3 Hrs. 

Mr. Saposnekow. 

240. Social Control. II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Harris. 

241. Community Organization. I, 3 Hrs.; S2 (241s), 2 Hrs. 

Mr. Harris. 

242. Introduction to Social Work. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Harris. 

243. Social Origins. I, 3 Hrs.; SI (143s), 2 Hrs. 

Mr. Saposnekow and Mr. Simpson. 

246. History of Social Thought. II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Sapsonekow. 

Graduate Division 

347. Seminar in the Current Literature of Sociology. I. 2 to 4 Hrs. 

Mr. Saposnekow. 

348. Seminar in Principles and Methods of Research in Sociology. 
II. 2 to 4 Hrs. Mr. Harris. 

351, 352. Special Problems in Sociological Research. I or II. 2 to 4 
Hrs. Mr. Harris and Mr. Saposnekow. 

EDUCATION 1 

(See pages 267 to 273.) 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 2 

(See pages 278 to 280.) 

ENGINEERING AND MECHANICS ARTS 3 

(See pages 273 to 285.) 

ENGINEERING OF MINES 2 

(See pages 294 and 295.) 



x Electives amounting to not more than 20 hours, selected from courses 
offered in the College of Education, may be offered toward the A. B. degree in 
the College of Arts and Sciences. 

2 Electives amounting to not more than 15 hours, selected from the following 
courses offered in the College of Engineering and School of Mines, may be 
offered for credit toward the A. B. degree in the College of Arts and Sciences; 
Chemical Engineering 205, 206, 220, and 221 ; Civil Engineering 1, 2, 3 10 and 
115; Electrical Engineering 100, 101, 102, 103, 200, 201, 202, 203, 205, and 206; 
Industrial Education 101, 103, and 105 ; Mechanical Engineering 20, 23, 24, 
26, 29, 207, 221, 222, and 226 ; Mechanics- 101, 102, 103, and 1047 and Mining 
Engineering 106 and 203. In addition to the above, the student may elect with 
the consent of his adviser when his major is physics, Mechanical Engineering 
1 to 13s and 101 to 107 (10 Hrs.). 



236 Courses of Instruction 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Professors Johnson, Armstrong, Cox, Draper, and Goode; 1 Associate 

Professors Chappell and Smith; Assistant Professor Crocker; 

and Instructors Lytle, Reed, Sayre, Pettigrew, Page, 

Howard, Bishop, and Hetherington. 

Lower Division 

1C. English Composition. I, II. 3 Hrs. 

Required of all students who are inadequately prepared for 
English 1. Mr. Johnson and Staff. 

1. Composition and Rhetoric. 2 I, II, 3 Hrs.; SI, S2, (Is), 2 Hrs. 
Primarily for freshmen. English 1 and 2 are required of all candi- 
dates for the bachelor's degree in all colleges. 

Mr. Johnson and Staff. 

2. Composition and Rhetoric. 2 I, II, 3 Hrs.; SI, S2 (2s), 2 Hrs. 
Continuation of English 1. Mr. Johnson and Staff. 

3. English Literature. I, II, 3 Hrs.; SI, S2 (3s), 2 Hrs. 
Primarily for sophomores. Mr. Smith and Staff. 

4. English Literature. I, II, 3 Hrs.; SI, S2 (4s), 2 Hrs. 
Continuation of English 3. Mr. Smith and Staff. 

13. Expository Writing. I, II, SI. 2 Hrs. Mr. Johnson and Staff. 

14. Descriptive and Narrative Writing. I, II, S2. 2 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: either English 13, or a mark of at least B in 
English 2. Mrs. Reed and Mrs. Pettigrew. 

f29. The English Language. II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Johnson. 

65. American Literature. I, II. 3 Hrs. 

Mr. Smith and Mr. Hetherington. 

Upper Division 8 

113. Advanced Composition: Types and Problems of Logical Composi- 
tion. I, II, S2. 2 Hrs. Mr. Johnson and Mr. Bishop. 

115. Advanced Composition: Creative Writing. II, 3 Hrs.; SI (115s), 
2 Hrs. Mrs. Reed and Miss Lytle. 

142. Shakespeare. I, II, 3 Hrs.; SI (142s), 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: English 3 or 4. Mr. Armstrong and Mr. Smith. 



tOmitted during the academic year 1933-34. 

Visiting instructor during the summer session 1933. 

Engineering and agricultural students will be assigned as far as possible to 
separate sections. 

8 Credit for at least 9 hours of lower division English is prerequisite to ad- 
mission to any of the upper division courses except English 186. Credit for 
English 1, 2, and 3, and for at least 3 hours of upper division English, is pre- 
requisite for admission to English 230 to 279, inclusive, except where other- 
wise indicated in the course announcement. 



Arts and Sciences 237 



153. The Poetry of Robert Browning. II. 3 Hrs. Mr. ARMSTRONG. 

160. Contemporary Literature: Poetry. I, SI. 2 Hrs. Mr. Smith. 

161. Contemporary Literature: Prose. II. 2 Hrs. Mr. Smith. 
165s. American Literature. SI. 2 Hrs. Mr. SMITH. 

166. American Fiction. II. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: a general course in American literature or consent 
of the instructor. Mr. Armstrong. 

167. Rise of American Romanticism. I, S2. 2 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: as for English 166. Mr. Hetherington. 

175. The Short Story. I, S2. 2 Hrs. Mr. Armstrong and Mr. Bishop. 

181. Bible Literature: The English Old Testament. I. 3 Hrs. 

Mr. Armstrong. 

182. Bible Literature: 'The English New Testament. II, SI. 2 Hrs. 

Mr. Armstrong. 

185. Masterpieces of World Literature. I. 2 Hrs. Mr. CROCKER. 

186. English for Engineers. II. 1 Hr. Mr. Johnson. 

230. The English Language. I, II, 3 Hrs.; S2 (230s), 2 Hrs. 

Mr. Cox and Mr. Chappell. 

231. Old English. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Chappell. 

232. Beowulf. II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Chappell. 

234. Chaucer. II, 3 Hrs.; SI (234s), 2 Hrs. Mr. Cox. 

235. Shakespeare. I, II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Draper and Mr. Cox. 
f237. Mediaeval Metrical Romances. II, S2. 2 Hrs. Mr. Chappell. 

239. Early English Drama. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Crocker. 

240. English Drama From 1600 to 1642. II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Crocker. 

241. Literature of the Sixteenth Century. I, 3 Hrs.; SI (241s), 2 
Hrs. Mr. Chappell and Mr. Draper. 

f242. Tudor Prose: The English Humanists. II. 2 Hrs. 

Mr. Crocker. 

f243. Restoration and Eighteenth Century Drama. I. 3 Hrs. 

Mr. Crocker. 

245. Literature of the Seventeenth Century: Jacobean and Caroline 
Literature. I, 3 Hrs.; SI (245s), 2 Hrs. Mr. Draper. 



tOmitted during the academic year 1933-34. 



238 Courses of Instruction 

246. Literature of the Seventeenth Century: The Restoration Period. 
II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Draper. 

f247. Literature of the Eighteenth Century. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Draper. 

f248. Literature of the Eighteenth Century. II. 3 Hrs. Mr. DRAPER. 

f249. The Romantic Movement. I. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: English 1, 2, 3, and 4. Mr. Armstrong. 

t250. The Romantic Movement. II. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: English 1, 2, 3, and 4. Mr. Armstrong. 

251. Victorian Literature. I. 2 Hrs. Mr. Armstrong. 

255. Tennyson. I, SI. 2 Hrs. Mr. Cox. 

258. Rudyard Kipling. II. 2 Hrs. Mr. Cox. 

259. English Literature, 1890-1918. II, SI. 2 Hrs. 

Mr. Crocker and Mr. Goode. 

261. Aspects of the Drama. I. 2 Hrs. Mr. CROCKER. 

f262. Modern Drama. II. 3 Hrs. Mr. CROCKER. 

263. Study of One Author. II, SI. 2 Hrs. 

The entire production or the most important work of some selected 
author is studied to gain a complete view. The author chosen for 
1933-34 is Wordsworth. Mr. Armstrong, 

267. American Drama. I. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: English 65 or equivalent. Mr. Smith. 

f269. Emerson and Thoreau. H, SI. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: English 65 or equivalent. Mr. Smith. 

270. Poe and Whitman. II. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: English 65 or equivalent. Mr. Smith. 

271s. Howells and the Latin American Realists. S2. 2 Hrs. 

Mr. Hetherington. 

272. Popular Literature. I, 3 Hrs.; SI (272s), 2 Hrs. 

A study of the ballad and other forms of popular literature found 
in West Virginia. Students should consult the instructor before 
registering for this course. Mr. Cox. 

273. Poetry. II. 2 Hrs. Mr. Crocker. 



fOmitted during: the academic year 1933-34. 



Arts and Sciences 239 



f274. Types of Poetry: Narrative. II, S2. 2 Hrs. 

Mr. Draper and Mr. Johnson. 

275. Types of Poetry: Lyric. I. 2 Hrs. Mr. Draper. 

276. The English Novel. I, 3 Hrs.; SI (276s), 2 Hrs. 

Mr. Johnson and Mr. Goode. 

f277. The Essay. II, 3 Hrs.; S2 (277s), 2 Hrs. Mr. JOHNSON. 

279. English Satire and Humor. II. 3 Hrs. Mr. JOHNSON. 

Graduate Division 

301s. Conferences on Graduate Programs, Theses, and Examinations. 
SI, S2. No credit. 
For English majors only. Mr. Johnson. 

321. Studies in Advanced Rhetoric. II. 2 Hrs. Mr. Johnson. 

324. Literary Criticism. I, 3 Hrs.; SI (324s), 2 Hrs. Mr. Johnson. 

350s. The Romantic Movement : Byron, Shelley, and Keats. SI. 2 Hrs. 

Mr. Goode. 

391. Introduction to Literary Research. I, 2 or 3 Hrs.; SI, S2 (391s), 
2 Hrs. Mr. Draper. 

393. Seminar. II. 2 or 3 Hrs. 

The subject will vary according to the needs of the group taking 
the seminar. Prerequisite : an adequate training in English litera- 
ture and especially in the field in which the seminar is given. 

Mr. Draper. 

395. Thesis. I, II. 2 to 4 Hrs. in all. 

ENTOMOLOGY 1 

(See page 214.) 

FARM ECONOMICS 2 

(See pages 215 and 216.) 

GENETICS 1 

(See page 211.) 



tOmitted during the academic year 1933-34. 

Regular elective for Arts and Science students. 

Tarm Economics 2 may be included by Arts and Science students in the 
15 hours of agricultural electives. Farm Economics 131 is a regular elective in 
the College of Arts and Sciences. 



240 Courses of Instruction 

GEOLOGY, MINERALOGY, AND GEOGRAPHY 1 

Professor Galpin; Assistant Professors Martens and Fridley; 
Instructors Price and Wells. 

Lower Division 

1. Physiography. I, II, 4 Hrs.; SI (Is), 2 Hrs. 

An introduction to the surface features of the earth. Three recita- 
tions, and one three-hour laboratory period. Mr. Fridley. 

2. Minerals and Rocks. I, II. 4 Hrs. 

Three recitations, and one two-hour laboratory period. 

Mr. Martens. 

3. Historical Geology. I, II. 3 or 4 Hrs. 

Three recitations, and one two-hour laboratory period. Pre- 
requisite: Geology 1. Mr. Wells. 

4. Geology for Students in Agriculture. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Fridley. 

5 or 105. Geology for Students in Engineering. I, II. 3 Hrs. 

Mr. Galpin or Mr. Martens. 

9. Geologic and Geographic Influences. I, II, SI. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Geology 1. Mr. Fridley. 

11 or 111. Economic Geology. I, II. 3 or 4 Hrs. 

An introduction to our useful minerals and rocks. Three recita- 
tions and one three-hour laboratory period. Prerequisite: 
Geology 1 or Geology 2. Mr. Galpin. 

Upper Division 

102. General Geology. I, II. 3 or 4 Hrs. 

A study of the causes, processes and results of change on and in 
the earth. Three recitations, and one three-hour laboratory period. 
Prerequisite: one year of chemistry. Staff. 

103. Historical Geology. I, II. 4 Hrs. 

Similar to Geology 3 but more advanced. Three recitations, and 
one three-hour laboratory period. Prerequisite: Geology 1 or 
Geology 102. Mr. Wells. 

108. Geology of West Virginia. II. 2 or 3 Hrs. 

Two recitations, with or without one three-hour laboratory period. 
Prerequisite: Geology 1. Mr. Price. 

116. Geography of North America. I, SI. 2 Hrs. 

Primarily for students in education. Prerequisite : Geology 9. 

Mr. Fridley. 

161. Field Geology. I. 3 Hrs. 

One recitation and two laboratory or field periods. Prerequisite: 
Geology 103, or equivalent. Mr. Price. 

162. Field Geology. II. 3 Hrs. 

Continuation of Geology 161. Mr. Price. 



*For a suggested sequence of courses in this field, see pages 138 and 139. 



Arts and Sciences 241 



163s. Field Geology. S. I. 3 Hrs. 

Summer field work away from the University. Prerequisite: 
Geology 103. 

204. Paleontology. II. 4 Hrs. 

Invertebrate fossils, and their use in correlating strata. One 

recitation, and three two-hour laboratory periods. Prerequisite: 

Geology 3 or 103. Mr. Wells. 

205. Structural Geology. II. 3 or 4 Hrs. 

A study of shapes and positions of rock masses in the earth, and 
origin of these features and their bearing upon recovery of oil 
and other mineral products. Three recitations, and one three-hour 
laboratory period. Prerequisite: Geology 103. Mr. Price. 

206. Sedimentation. I. 4 Hrs. 

Studies in the origin of sedimentary rocks. Three recitations and 
one three-hour laboratory period. Prerequisite: Geology 3 or 103. 

Mr. Price. 
208. Advanced Physiography. II. 3 Hrs. 

Includes a study of the surface features of the United States. One 
recitation and two three-hour laboratory periods. Prerequisite: 
Geology 103. Mr. Fridley. 

211. Economic Geology: Coal, Oil, and Gas. II. 3 or 4 Hrs. 

Three recitations and one laboratory period. Prerequisite : Geology 
103 and Chemistry 106. Mr. Galpin. 

266s. Field Geology. S. 5 Hrs. 

Continuation of Geology 163s. 

273. Geological Survey. SI, S2. 1 to 4 Hrs. 

Field work in connection with State Geological Survey. Mr. Price. 

284. Mineralogy. I. 4 Hrs. 

Three recitations and one two-hour laboratory period. Pre- 
requisite: Chemistry 6 and Physics 4. Mr. Martens. 

285. Microscopic Mineralogy. II. 4 Hrs. 

An introduction to the use of the polarizing microscope. Two 
recitations and two two-hour laboratory periods. Prerequisite: 
Geology 284. Mr. Martens. 

289. Geologic Problems. I, II. 2 to 4 Hrs. 

Consult instructor before registering. Staff. 

290. Geologic Problems. I, II. 2 to 4 Hrs. 

Similar to Geology 289. Staff. 

291. 292. Seminar. I, II. 1 Hr. 

Prerequisite: Geology 204. Mr. Price. 

Graduate Division 

351, 352, 353, 354, 355, 356. Problems and Research. I, II. 6 Hrs. 

Each student selects or is given a problem upon which he works 
independently. Credit is based upon progress, method and results. 
Consult department head before registering. Staff. 



242 Courses of Instruction 

GERMANIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 1 

Professor Porterfield; Assistant Professor Wadepuhl; 
and Instructor Roesch. 

Lower Division 

1. Elementary German. I, II, 3 Hrs.; SI (Is), 2 Hrs. 
Pronunciation, syntax, reading, composition. 

Mr. Porterfield and Miss Roesch. 

2. Elementary German. I, II, 3 Hrs.; S2 (2s), 2 Hrs. 

Mr. Porterfield, Mr. Wadepuhl, and Miss Roesch. 

3. Intermediate German. I. 3 Hrs. 

Rapid reading of prose by modern authors, memorizing of poems, 
dictation, composition. Mr. Porterfield and Mr. Wadepuhl, 

4 or 104. Intermediate German. II. 3 Hrs. 

Continuation of German 3. Mr. Porterfield and Mr. Wadepuhl. 

13s. Intermediate German. SI. 2 Hrs. 

Arranged for students who began German in second semester of 
the regular college year, and for those who have had a similar 
amount of instruction elsewhere. Translation, conversation, re- 
view of grammar. Mr. Porterfield. 

14s. Intermediate German. S2. 2 Hrs. 

Continuation of German 13s, with main emphasis on reading, pro- 
nunciation, and literary form. Miss Roesch. 

Upper Division 

107. Nineteenth Century Drama. I. 3 Hrs. 

Critical study of selected dramas by Kleist, Grillparzer, Hebbel, 
Ludwig. Mr. Porterfield. 

108. Nineteenth Century Drama. II. 3 Hrs. 

Continuation of German 107. Mr. Porterfield. 

111. Spoken German. I, 3 Hrs.; S2 (Ills), 2 Hrs. 

Practice in the speaking and writing of German. Miss Roesch. 

112. Spoken German. II. 3 Hrs. 

Continuation of German 111. Miss Roesch. 

121. Scientific German. I, 3 Hrs.; SI (121s), 2 Hrs. 

Intended primarily for students in science courses. Prerequisite: 
one year of college German, or two years of high school German. 

Mr. Wadepuhl. 

122. Scientific German. II. 3 Hrs. 

Continuation of German 121. Mr. Wadepuhl. 



German 1, 2, 3. and 4 each is prerequisite to the next following, and the 
four combined are prerequisite to all other courses with the exception of 
German 111, 112, 121, and 122, for which German 1 and 2 are prerequisite. 



Arts and Sciences 243 



t221. Gothic. I. 2 Hrs. 

Streitberg's Gotisches Elementarbuch (1920) and Wright's 
Grammar of the Gothic Language (1930), phonology, declensions, 
conjugations, and syntax will be studied as if Gothic were a living 
language. Prerequisite: 18 hours of German from the lower 
division, German 251, 252, and English 231 and 232. 

Mr. PORTERFIELD. 

f222. Gothic. II. 2 Hrs. 

Philological study of texts, relation of Gothic vowel and consonant 
system to Primitive Germanic, Icelandic, Old High German, and 
Anglo-Saxon, comparison of Skeireins with Wulfila's translations, 
deciphering of Codex Argenteus (photograph), origin of Gothic 
alphabet. Prerequisite: same as for German 221, and including 
German 221. Mr. Porterfield. 

f241. Faust, Part I. I. 3 Hrs. 

Open to qualified undergraduates. Mr. Porterfield. 

t242. Faust, Part II. II. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: German 241. Mr. Porterfield. 

f245. History of German Literature, 1769-1870. I. 3 Hrs. 

Mr. Porterfield. 
f246. History of German Literature, 1870-1914. II. 3 Hrs. 

Continuation of German 245. Mr. Porterfield. 

251. History of German Language. I. 2 Hrs. 

Open to qualified undergraduates. Required of all majors who are 
planning to teach German. Mr. Porterfield. 

252. History of German Language. II. 2 Hrs. 

Continuation of German 251. Mr. Porterfield. 

HISTORY 

Professors Ambler, Callahan, Chitwood, Shortrh>ge, and Ramsdell; 1 
Associate Professor Barnhart; and Instructors Dixon and Ennis. 

Lower Division 2 

4. Modern Europe. I, II, 3 Hrs.; SI (4s), 2 Hrs. 
For freshmen. First semester ends at 1815. 

Mr. Ennis and Mr. Roth. 

5. Modern Europe. II, 3 Hrs.; S2 (5s), 2 Hrs. 

Continuation of History 4. Mr. Ennis and Mr. Roth. 



fOmitted during the academic year 1933-34. 

Visiting instructor during the summer session 1933. 

2 A11 first and second year courses are offered as lower division "year 
courses." These courses run through the year, but in no ease is the first half 
year a prerequisite for the second half. For example, History 4 is not a pre- 
requisite for History 5. History 4 and 5 make up the introductory first year in 
history, but freshmen who have high school credit for European history may, and 
those who expect to major in English or to enter the law school should, take 
English history, History 27 and 28. Students majoring in history and the social 
sciences should take History 52 and 53 in their sophomore year. A freshman 
should not take more than one "year course" at a time, and a sophomore may 
take two "year courses" only by permission of the adviser and the Department 
of History. 



244 Courses of Instruction 

27. History of England. I, II, 3 Hrs.; SI (27s), 2 Hrs. 
For freshmen and sophomores. 

Miss Dixon, Mr. Ennis, and Mr. Summers. 

28. History of England. II, 3 Hrs.; S2 (28s), 2 Hrs. 
Continuation of History 27. Miss Dixon and Mr. Summers. 

52. History of the United States. I, II, 3 Hrs.; SI (52s), 2 Hrs. 
For sophomores. First semester ends at 1840. 

Mr. Chitwood and Mr. Barnhart. 

53. History of the United States. II, 3 Hrs.; S2 (53s), 2 Hrs. 
Continuation of History 52. 

Mr. Ambler, Mr. Chitwood, and Mr. Barnhart. 

Upper Division 1 
101. Ancient History. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Ennis. 

104. Modern Europe. I, II. 3 Hrs. 

For those who have not had History 4 and 5, or equivalent, and 
who do not major in history. Mr. Ennis. 

105. Modern Europe. I, II. 3 Hrs. 

Continuation of History 104. Mr. Ennis. 

106. Medieval Europe. I. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: one college course in European history. Mr. Ennis. 

107. The French Revolution. I. 3 Hrs. 

108. The Napoleonic Era. II. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: one college course in European history. 

114. The Renaissance and the Reformation. II. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: History 4 and 5, or equivalent. Mr. Ennis. 

131. The British Empire. I, 3 Hrs.; S2 (131s), 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: a general course in history. Miss Dixon. 

133. English Constitutional Development. I. 3 Hrs. 

For those who have had History 27 and 28, or equivalent. 

Mr. Shortridg:e. 

134. English Constitutional Development. II. 3 Hrs. 
Continuation of History 133. Mr. Shortridge. 

135. British Reform Movements. II. 3 Hrs. Miss Dixon. 
149. Western Virginia to 1860. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Ambler. 



x Courses for juniors and seniors are in the upper division. In this division 
juniors should take only courses numbered between 100 and 199. These courses 
should be selected with reference to major subjects. The following, in the order 
named, are suggested; first semester, History 149, 151, 131, 133. 106, 107, 154, 
and 101 ; second semester, History 150, 151, 134, 108, 135, and 175. All courses 
should be selected after consultation with advisers and the Department of 
History. 



Arts and Sciences 245 



150. History of West Virginia. II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Ambler. 

151. American Colonial History. I, II, 3 Hrs.; SI (151s), 2 Hrs. 

Mr. Chitwood. 
154. Development of the West. I. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: courses in American history. Mr. Barnhart. 

161. History of Latin-America. 3 Hrs. 

164. Problems of the Pacific. II, 3 Hrs.; SI (164s), 2 Hrs. 

Mr. Ennis. 

175. History of American Political Parties. I, 3 Hrs.; SI (175s), 2 
Hrs. 
Prerequisite: History 52 and 53, or equivalent. Mr. Barnhart. 

218. Causes of the World War. II, 3 Hrs.; SI (218s), 2 Hrs. 

Mr. Chitwood. 

232. History of Canada. II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Shortridge. 

253s. American Expansion. S2. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Advanced courses in American history. 

Mr. Callahan. 

255. American Constitutional Development. I, II, 3 Hrs.; S2 (255s), 
2 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: History 52 and 53, or equivalent. Mr. Callahan. 

257. The Slavery Controversy in the United States. I, II, 3 Hrs.; SI 

(257s), 2 Hrs. 
Primarily for history and social science majors. 

Mr. Ambler and Mr. Ramsdell. 

258. Reconstruction and National Development, 1865-1898. I, II. 3 
Hrs. 

Primarily for history and social scienee majors, but open to others 
with basic courses in American history. Mr. Ambler. 

259. Recent American History. II, 3 Hrs.; S2 (259s), 2 Hrs. 

For history and social science majors, but open to others with basic 
courses in American history. Mr. Ambler. 

260. American Foreign Policy and Diplomacy, 1776-1861. I. 3 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: History 52 and 53, or equivalent. Mr. Callahan. 

261. American Foreign Policy and Diplomacy, 1861-1931. II. 3 Hrs. 
Prerequisite : Same as for History 260. Mr. Callahan. 

262s. The Civil War. SI. 2 Hrs. 

Emphasis on the political, economic, and constitutional phases, 
with military movements sketched in rather lightly. 

. Mr. Ramsdell. 



246 Courses of Instruction 

263. Anglo-American Diplomatic Relations. I, 3 Hrs.; S2 (363s), 
2 Hrs. Mr. Callahan. 

264. American Policy in Latin-American Relations. II. 3 Hrs. 

Mr. Callahan. 
266. The New South. II, 3 Hrs.; SI (266s), 2 Hrs. 

Primarily for history and social science majors. Mr. Barnhart. 

271. Problems in Recent European History. II. 3 Hrs. 

Mr. Chitwood. 

276. Introduction to Historical Method and Bibliography. I, II. 3 Hrs. 

This course is prescribed in the fourth year for all history majors. 

Mr. Ambler and Mr. Barnhart. 

283. Colonial Institutions. I, 3 Hrs.; SI (283s), 2 Hrs. 

Mr. Chitwood. 

Tutorial Courses 1 

184. Tutorial Instruction: English History. I. 3 Hrs. Miss Dixon. 

185. Tutorial Instruction: English History. II. 3 Hrs. Miss Dixon. 

188. Tutorial Instruction: Revolutionary Europe, 1763-1815. I. 3 Hrs. 

189. Tutorial Instruction: Revolutionary Europe, 1763-1815. II. 3 Hrs. 

280. Tutorial Instruction: American History. I. 3 Hrs. 

Mr. Barnhart. 

281. Tutorial Instruction: American History. II. 3 Hrs. 

Mr. Barnhart. 

287s. Seminar: American History. 2 S2. 2 to 6 Hrs. 

At Library of Congress, Washington, D. C. Mr. Chitwood. 

288s. Seminar: European History. 2 S2. 2 to 6 Hrs. 

At Library of Congress, Washington, D. C. Mr. Chitwood. 

Graduate Division 

349. Selected Problems in Local and Regional History. I, 3 Hrs.; SI 

(349s), 2 Hrs. Mr. Ambler. 

350. Selected Problems in Local and Regional History. II, 3 Hrs.; 
S2 (350s), 2 Hrs. Mr. Ambler. 

370. Seminar: Research in American History. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Mr. Callahan. 



1 These courses are designed for history and social science majors. The work 
is conducted by individual conferences between student and instructor, based 
upon thorough reading and investigation in selected topics within his field of 
interest as well as in related subjects that the student has been unable to cover 
in his course work. 

2 See page 62. 



Arts and Sciences 247 



HORTICULTURE 1 

(See page 219.) 

INTERNATIONAL LAW 

(See Political Science) 

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 

(See History and Political Science) 

JOURNALISM 

Professor Reed and Instructor Rinehart. 

Lower Division 

1. Newspaper Reporting. 2 I, II. 3 Hrs. 

Two lectures and three laboratory hours. Students are required 
to know how to use a typewriter, or to acquire such knowledge 
during the first half of the semester. Prerequisite: English 1 
and 2, with a final mark of B or higher in each. 

Mr. Reed and Mr. Rinehart. 

2. Newspaper Reporting. I, II. 3 Hrs. 

Two lectures and three laboratory hours. Continuation of Jour- 
nalism 1, which is prerequisite. Mr. Reed and Mr. Rinehart. 

Upper Division 

103. Copy Editing. I. 3 Hrs. 

Three three-hour laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Journalism 
1 and 2, or consent of instructor. Mr. Rinehart. 

104. Copy Editing. II. 3 Hrs. 

Three three-hour laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Journalism 
103, or consent of instructor. Mr. Rinehart. 

fl08. The Community Newspaper. II. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite : Journalism 1 and 2, or consent of instructor. 

Mr. Rinehart. 

113. Newspaper Advertising. II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Rinehart. 

115. Teaching Journalistic Writing. II, SI. 2 Hrs. Mr. Reed. 

125. Newspaper Management. II. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Journalism 1, 2, 103, and 104, or consent of in- 
structor. Mr. Rinehart. 

fl27. History of American Journalism. II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Reed. 



tOmitted during the academic year 1933-34. 

horticulture 101 and 102 may be included by Arts and Science students in 
the 15 hours of agricultural electives. 

2 Students receiving a mark below B in Journalism 1 are advised not to 
continue work in this department. 



248 Courses of Instruction 

128. Advanced Reporting and Law of the Press. I. 3 Hrs. 

For seniors in journalism. Mr. Rinehart. 

220. Feature Writing. I, 3 Hrs.; SI (220s), 2 Hrs. 

For seniors and graduates. Mr. Reed. 

221. Journalistic Critical Writing. II. 2 Hrs. 

For seniors and graduates. Mr. Reed. 

230. Editorial Writing. I, 3 Hrs.; SI (230s), 2 Hrs. 

For seniors and graduates. Mr. Reed 

231. Journalism Ethics. II. 3 Hrs. 

For seniors and graduates. Mr. Reed. 

LIBRARY TRAINING 

Librarian Arnett, Mrs. Hite, and Miss Peters. 1 
Lower Division 

1. Library Methods. I. 2 Hrs. 

An introductory course for the purpose of acquainting students 
with the University Library and the practice of library methods; 
instruction in the use of catalogues, indexes, and general ref- 
erence books, and in the selection and purchase of books. 

Mr. Arnett and Mrs. Hite. 

2. Library Methods. II. 2 Hrs. 

Theory and practice of library methods, including elementary 
cataloguing, classification, binding, and repair of books, loan desk, 
etc. Mr. Arnett and Mrs. Hite. 

3. Advanced Study and Practice in Library Methods. I. 2 Hrs. 
Intended for those specializing in library work. Hours to be 
arranged. Mr. Arnett and Mrs. Hite. 

Upper Division 

101s. Library Methods. SI. 2 Hrs. 

Instruction and practice in classifying, indexing, and cataloguing. 

Mr. Arnett and Mrs. Hite. 

102s. Reference Work for School Libraries. SI. 2 Hrs. 

Reference books required in a well-balanced school library, 
practice in the use of these books, and methods of teaching their 
uses to pupils. Miss Peters. 

103s. Book Selection for School Libraries. SI. 2 Hrs. 

Principles and methods of selecting books for junior and senior 
high school libraries. Miss Peters. 

104s. School Library Administration. SI. 2 Hrs. 

The administration of different types of school libraries, with 
special reference to junior and senior high school libraries. The 
various steps in establishing and managing the library. 

Miss Peters. 



Visiting instructor during the summer session 1933. 



Arts and Sciences 249 



LAW 

(See pages 125 and 286 to 288.) 
MATHEMATICS 

Professors Eiesland, Reynolds, and Turner; Assistant Professors 
Davis and Vehse; and Instructors Stewart and Vest. 

Lower Division 

2. Solid Geometry. I, II, 3 Hrs.; SI (2s), 2 Hrs. 

If offered to remove entrance condition, % unit. Prerequisite: 
plane geometry. Staff. 

3. College Algebra. I, II, SI. 4 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: IY2 units of algebra, and 1 unit of plane geometry. 

Staff. 

4. Plane Trigonometry. I, ll, SI. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: IY2 units of algebra, and 1 unit of plane geometry. 

Staff. 

5. Analytic Geometry. I, II, S2. 4 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: college algebra and plane trigonometry. Staff. 

6s. Spherical Trigonometry with Topics in Advanced Algebra. S2. 
2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: college algebra and plane trigonometry. This 
course includes topics in plane trigonometry and ten lessons in 
spherical trigonometry with application to the astronomical 
triangle. Mr. Vehse. 

7. Solid Geometry. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

For students in the College of Engineering. Prerequisite: plane 
geometry. Staff. 

9. College Algebra. I. 5 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: 1 unit of algebra and 1 unit of plane geometry. 

Mr. Stewart. 
10. Plane Trigonometry. II. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: 1 unit of algebra and 1 unit of plane geometry. 

Mr. Vest, 
Upper Division 

107. Differential and Integral Calculus. I, II. 4 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 2, 3, 4, 5; or 2, 9, 10, 5. 

Mr. Eiesland and Staff. 

108. Differential and Integral Calculus. I, II. 4 Hrs. 
Continuation of Mathematics 107. Mr. Eiesland and Staff. 

128. Mathematical Theory of Investment. II. 3 Hrs. 

Primary for students in economics and sociology. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 3 or 9. Mr. Reynolds. 

207. Differential and Integral Calculus. 1 I, 3 Hrs.; SI (207s), 4 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 5. Mr. Vehse, 



x Not open to undergraduate engineering students. Will carry graduate 
•redit only for graduate students majoring in education. 



250 Courses of Instruction 

208. Differential and Integral Calculus. 1 II, 3 Hrs.; S2 (208s), 4 Hrs. 
Continuation of Mathematics 207. Mr. Vehse. 

239s. Ordinary Differential Equations. SI. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 108 or 208. Mr. Eiesland. 

240. Differential Equations. I, 3 Hrs.; S2 (240s), 2 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 108 or 208. 

Mr. Eiesland and Miss Turner. 

241. Theory of Determinants and Analytic Geometry of Space. I, 3 

Hrs.; SI (241s), 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 108 or 208. 

Miss Turner and Mr. Davis. 

242. Advanced Calculus. II. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 108 or 208. Mr. Eiesland. 

243. Projective Geometry. II. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 241. Miss Turner. 

244. Theory of Equations. II. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 108 or 208. Mr. Reynolds. 

250s. Advanced Topics in Mathematics. SI. 2 Hrs. Mr. Reynolds. 

290. Vector Analysis. II. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 240. Mr. Vehse. 

Graduate Division 

301. Differential Geometry and Theory of Surfaces. I. 3 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 240, 241, 242, and 243. Mr. Davis, 

302. Differential Geometry and Theory of Surfaces. II. 3 Hrs. 
Continuation of Mathematics 301. Mr. Davis. 

303. Higher Algebra. I. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 242 and 243. Mr. Reynolds. 

304. Higher Algebra. II. 2 Hrs. 

Continuation of Mathematics 303. Mr. Reynolds. 

305. Introduction to the Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable. 

I. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 240, 242, and 243. Mr. Reynolds. 

306. Introduction to the Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable. 

II. 3 Hrs. 

Continuation of Mathematics 305. Mr. Reynolds. 

307. Higher Plane Curves. I. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 243. Miss Turner. 



*Not open to undergraduate engineering' students. Will carry graduate 
credit only for graduate students majoring in education. 



Arts and Sciences 251 



308. Higher Plane Curves. II. 3 Hrs. 

Continuation of Mathematics 307. Miss Turner. 

309. Linear and Quadratic Complexes. I. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 301 and 302. Mr. Eiesland. 

310. Linear and Quadratic Complexes. IT. 3 Hrs. 

Continuation of Mathematics 309. Mr. Eiesland. 

311. Algebraic Surfaces. I. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 307 and 308. Miss Turner. 

312. Algebraic Surfaces. II. 3 Hrs. 

Continuation of Mathematics 311. Miss Turner. 

313. Algebraic Geometry and Theory of Abelian Integrals. I. 3 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 305 and 306. Mr. Eiesland. 

314. Algebraic Geometry and Theory of Abelian Integrals. II. 3 Hrs. 
Continuation of Mathematics 313. Mr. Eiesland. 

324. Differential Equations of Physics. I. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 240 and Physics 232. Mr. Eiesland. 

325. Differential Equations of Physics. II. 3 Hrs. 

Continuation of Mathematics 324. Mr. Eiesland. 

330. Special Topics in Mathematics. I. Credit to be arranged. 

Mr. Eiesland and Staff. 

331. Special Topics in Mathematics. II. Credit to be arranged. 

Mr. Eiesland and Staff. 

MEDICINE 1 

(See pages 289 to 293.) 

MINING ENGINEERING 

(See pages 121 and 294 and 295.) 

MUSIC 2 

(See pages 296 to 301.) 

Students who have completed 66 hours in the College of Arts and Sciences, 
as outlined on pages 124 and 12S, or 110 hours in the College of Arts and 
Sciences and Department of Pharmacy, as outlined on page 129, may com- 
plete the requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree by taking the courses 
prescribed by the School of Medicine in the curriculum on pages 188 and 189. 
Students who have completed 100 hours in the College of Arts and Sciences, as 
outlined on pages 124 and 126, may complete the requirements for the Bachelor 
of Arts degree by taking the first 35 hours listed by the School of Medicine 
in the curriculum on pages 188 and 189. 

2 Electives amounting to not more than 15 hours, selected from the follow- 
ing courses offered in the School of Music, may be offered for credit toward 
the Bachelor of Arts degree in the College of Arts and Sciences : Theory of 
Music 1, 2, and 103 to 114 ; Public School Music 73, 74, 75, 76, 179, and 
180; Voice 109, 110, 111, and 112; Ensemble 153 and 154; and Piano, Voice, 
Violin, or Organ (16 hours each). 



252 Courses of Instruction 

PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY 1 

Professors Winter and Stalnaker; Assistant Professor Cresswell. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Lower Division 

4. Introduction to Philosophy. I, II, 3 Hrs.; SI (4s), 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 1. Mr. Cresswell. 

11 or 111. Ethics. I. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 1. . Mr. Cresswell, 

Upper Division 

104. Introduction to Philosophy. I, II, 3 Hrs.; SI (104s), 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 1. Mr. Cresswell. 

106. Logic. I. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 1, Philosophy 4. Mr. Cresswell. 

107. Aesthetics. II, 3 Hrs.; SI (107s), 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 1, Philosophy 4. Mr. Cresswell. 

112. History of Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. I. 3 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 1, Philosophy 4. Mr. Cresswell. 

113. History of Modern Philosophy. II. 3 Hrs. 

Continuation of Philosophy 112, ending with German Idealism. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 1, and Philosophy 4. Mr. Cresswell. 

114. Contemporary Philosophy. II. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 1, Philosophy 4, and 3 hours in other 
philosophy courses. Mr. Cresswell. 

120. The Philosophy of Plato. I. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 1, Philosophy 4, and 3 hours in other 
philosophy courses, preferably Philosophy 112. Mr. Cresswell. 

208. Philosophy of Religion. II, 3 Hrs.; SI (208s), 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 1, Philosophy 4, and 3 hours in other 
philosophy courses. Mr. Cresswell. 

217. Seminar in Metaphysics. I. 2 Hrs. 

A critical study of a selected system of thought. Prerequisite: 
Psychology 1, Philosophy 4, 112, 113, and 106. Mr. Cresswell. 



Psychology 1 is prerequisite to all other courses in the department. In 
general, lower division courses precede upper division courses. In the upper 
division, the courses as listed below are arranged in the order best suited to a 
progressive development of the fields of philosophy and psychology respectively. 



Arts and Sciences 253 



PSYCHOLOGY 
Lower Division 

1. Introduction to Psychology. I, II, 3 Hrs.; SI (la), S2 (lb), 
2 Hrs. 

Not open to freshmen. This course is designed to familiarize the 
student with the principal phenomena of mental life, and is pre- 
requisite to all other courses in psychology and philosophy. 

Mr. Winter and Miss Stalnaker. 

10. Applied Psychology. II, 3 Hrs.; SI (10s), 2 Hrs. 

A study of the application of psychology to medicine and law. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 1. Mr. Winter. 

12 or 112. Experimental Psychology. I, II. 3 Hrs. 

This course may be taken simultaneously with Psychology 1. 

Miss Stalnaker. 

Upper Division 

101. Introduction to Psychology. I, II, 3 Hrs.; SI (101a), S2 (101b), 
2 Hrs. Mr. Winter and Miss Stalnaker. 

116. Social Psychology. I. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 1. Mr. Winter. 

122. Child Psychology. II. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 1. Miss Stalnaker. 

124. Mental Measurement. I, 3 Hrs.; S2 (124s), 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 1. Miss Stalnaker. 

126. Advanced Experimental Psychology. I. 2 Hrs. 

Students in this course will be given individual problems for ex- 
perimentation. Prerequisite: Psychology 1, 12, and 124. 

Mr. Winter. 

219. Clinical Psychology. II. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 1, 122, and 124. Miss Stalnaker. 

229. Abnormal Psychology. II, S2. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 1, 12, and 116. Miss Stalnaker. 

230. Advanced Psychology. II. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 1 and 12, and one course in philosophy. 

Mr. Winter. 

240. History of Psychology. II. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 1 and 12, and two courses in philosophy. 

Mr. Winter. 

245. Seminar. I, SI. 2 Hrs. 

A critical study of the current literature of psychology. Pre- 
requisite: Psychology 1, 12, and 116. Mr. Winter, 



254 Courses of Instruction 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 1 

(See pages 305 to 312.) 

PHYSICS 

Professors Colwell and Molby; Associate Professor Ford; Assistant 
Professor Holmes; and Instructors Myers and Thomas. 

Lower Division 

1. Introductory Physics. I, SI. 3 Hrs. 

Primarily for freshmen. Required of all students in the College of 
Agriculture and the School of Medicine. This course must be 
accompanied by the laboratory work of Physics 3. This course 
takes up mechanics, sound and heat. Prerequisite: plane geometry 
and algebra. Mr. Colwell and Mr. Thomas. 

2. Introductory Physics. II, S2. 3 Hrs. 

Primarily for freshmen. This course must be accompanied by the 
laboratory work of Physics 4. This course includes electricity, 
magnetism and light. Continuation of Physics 1 which is pre- 
requisite. Mr. Colwell and Mr. Thomas. 

3. Introductory Physical Laboratory. I, SI. 1 Hr. 

Primarily for freshmen. This course accompanies and is required 
of all students who take Physics 1. One laboratory period. 

Mr. Molby and Staff. 

4. Introductory Physical Laboratory. II, S2. 1 Hr. 

Primarily for freshmen. Continuation of Physics 3. 

Mr. Molby and Staff. 

9. A Problem in General Physics. I. 2 Hrs. 

Open to students who have taken, or are taking, Physics 1, 2, 3, 
and 4, or equivalent; not open to students who have taken Physics 
105, 106, 107 and 108. Mr. Thomas. 

10. Problems in General Physics. II. 2 Hrs. 

Continuation of Physics 9. Mr. Thomas. 

13. Introductory Radio-Telegraphy and Radio-Telephony. I. 3 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: Physics 1, 2, 3, and 4, or equivalent. Mr. Myers. 

14. Introductory Radio-Telegraphy and Radio-Telephony. II. 3 Hrs. 
Continuation of Physics 13 which is prerequisite. Mr. Myers. 

17. General Laboratory. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Primarily for sophomores and juniors. This course is designed to 
meet the needs of students who desire more laboratory work than 
that offered in Physics 3 and 4. Prerequisite : Physics 3 and 4. 

Mr. Molby. 



fifteen hours, selected from the following courses In the Division of 
Physical Education, may be credited towards the A. B. degTee in the College of 
Arts and Sciences: Physical Education 75, 76, 78, 150, 166, 167, 175, 276, and 
277. 



Arts and Sciences 255 



Upper Division 

105. General Physics. I, SI. 4 Hrs. 

Required of all candidates for engineering degrees and recom- 
mended for all students who major in mathematics. Not open to 
students who have credit for Physics 1. No student is permitted 
to take this course without its accompanying laboratory exercise 
which is Physics 107. The course comprises mechanics, sound and 
heat. Prerequisite: trigonometry and analytic geometry. 

Mr. Ford, Mr. Colwell, and Mr. Holmes. 

105A. General Physics. II. 4 Hrs. 

A repeat course for those who have failed in Physics 105. 

Mr. Thomas. 

106. General Physics. II, S2. 4 Hrs. 

Continuation of Physics 105. Not open to students who have 
credit in Physics 1 and 2. This course covers light, electricity and 
magnetism. No student is permitted to take this course without 
its accompanying laboratory exercise which is Physics 108. 

Mr. Ford and Mr. Holmes. 

107. General Physics Laboratory. I, SI. 1 Hr. 

This is a companion course for Physics 105. Mr. Molby and Staff. 

108. General Physics Laboratory. II, S2. 1 Hr. 

Continuation of Physics 107. Mr. Molby and Staff. 

116. Photography. II. 3 Hrs. 

For science majors. Two lectures and one laboratory exercise. 

Mr. Molby 

123. Electrical Measurements. I. 3 Hrs. 

Primarily for juniors. Prerequisite: Physics 1, 2, 3, 4, or 105, 
106, 107, and 108, and integral calculus. Mr. Myers. 

124. Radio-Telegraphy and Radio-Telephony. II. 3 Hrs. 

Open to seniors. Elective for seniors in electrical engineering. 
Prerequisite: Physics 1, 2, 3, and 4, or equivalent, and integral 
calculus. Mr. Myers. 

221. Light. I, S2. 3 Hrs. 

Lectures and laboratory work. This course is designed to meet the 
needs of students in general biology, chemistry, and medicine. 
Graduate credit will be allowed to those who are not majoring in 
Physics. Prerequisite: Physics 1, 2, 3, 4, and trigonometry, or 
Physics 105, 106, 107, and 108. Mr. Molby. 

225. Introduction to Modern Physics. I. 3 Hrs. 

Designed especially for students majoring in the natural sciences. 
Open to all seniors. Prerequisite: Physics 1, 2, 3, and 4, or 105, 

106, 107, and 108, and Mathematics 3 and 4, or equivalent. 

Mr. Ford. 

226. Introduction to Modern Physics. II. 3 Hrs. 

Continuation of Physics 225. Mr. Ford. 

231. Theoretical Mechanics. I. 3 Hrs. 

Open to seniors. Prerequisite: Physics 1, 2, 3, and 4, or 105, 106, 

107, and 108, and integral calculus. Mr. Colwell. 



256 Courses of Instruction 

232. Theoretical Mechanics. II. 3 Hrs. 

Continuation of Physics 231. Mr. Colwell. 

233. Introductory Electricity and Magnetism. I. 3 Hrs. 

Open to seniors. Prerequisite: Physics 105, 106, 107, and 108, 
and integral calculus. Mr. Holmes. 

234. Introductory Electricity and Magnetism. II. 3 Hrs. 
Continuation of Physics 233, which is prerequisite. Mr. Holmes. 

241, 243, 245, 247. Physics Seminar. I. 1 Hr. 

Open to seniors and graduates. A discussion of modern research 
in physics. Mr. Colwell. 

242, 244, 246, 248. Physics Seminar. II. 1 Hr. 

Similar to Physics 241. Mr. Colwell. 

249. Intermediate Laboratory. I, 2 to 4 Hrs.; SI (249s), 2 Hrs. 
Open to seniors who major in physics. Prerequisite: Physics 105, 
106, 107, and 108, and calculus. Mr. Ford. 

250. Intermediate Laboratory. II. 2 to 4 Hrs. 

Continuation of Physics 249. Mr. Ford. 

251s. General Survey of Modern Physics. SI. 3 Hrs. 

For minors in education only. Mr. Ford. 

252s. General Survey of Modern Physics. S2. 3 Hrs. 

A continuation of Physics 251s. Mr. Molby. 

Graduate Division 

381. Physical Optics. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Molby. 

382. Physical Optics. II. 3 Hrs. 

A continuation of Physics 381. Mr. Molby. 

383. The Kinetic Theory of Gases and Molecular Physics. I. 3 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: Physics 1, 2, 3, and 4, or Physics 105, 106, 107, and 
108, and integral calculus. Mr. Holmes. 

384. The Kinetic Theory of Gases and Molecular Physics. II. 3 Hrs. 
A continuation of Physics 383. Mr. Holmes. 

391. Advanced Electricity and Magnetism. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Colwell. 

392. Advanced Electricity and Magnetism. II. 3 Hrs. 

A continuation of Physics 391. Mr. Colwell. 

393. Experimental Research. I, 4 to 6 Hrs.; SI (393s), 4 Hrs. 

Mr. Colwell and Staff. 

394. Experimental Research. II. 4 to 6 Hrs. 

Mr. Colwell and Staff. 



Arts and Sciences 257 



PLANT PATHOLOGY 1 

(See pages 220 and 221.) 
POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professors Sly and Fairman; 2 and Assistant Professors 
Frasure and Shipman. 

Lower Division 

4. The Principles and Practices of Government: The European 
States System. I, 3 Hrs.; S2 (4s), 2 Hrs. 

Primarily for sophomores. 

Mr. Sly, Mr. Frasure, and Mr. Shipman. 

5. The Principles and Practices of Government: The American 
Federal System. II, 3 Hrs.; SI (5s), 2 Hrs. 

Primarily for sophomores. 

Mr. Sly, Mr. Frasure, and Mr. Shipman. 

Upper Division 

106. American State and Local Government. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Sly. 

107. American City Government. II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Sly. 

f208. Problems of the Modern State: The Administrative Process. I. 
3 Hrs. Mr. Sly. 

f209. Problems of the Modern State: The Legislative Process. II. 3 
Hrs. Mr. Sly. 

210. British Government and Practical Politics. II. 3 Hrs. 

Mr. Frasure. 
f211. New Constitutions of Europe. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Frasure. 

216. Comparative Political Institutions. II, 3 Hrs.; SI (216s), 2 Hrs. 

Mr. Frasure and Mr. Fairman. 

219. History of Political Thought: Plato to Machiavelli. I. 3 Hrs. 
Required of majors. Mr. Sly. 

220. History of Political Thought: Machiavelli to the Present. II 

3 Hrs. 

Required of majors. Mr. Sly. 

223. International Law. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Shipman. 

241s. American Constitutional System. SI. 2 Hrs. Mr. Shipman. 

242. American Constitutional Law: The American Federal System. 
I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Shipman. 



fOmitted during the academic year 1933-34. 
x Regular elective for Arts and Science students. 
-'Visiting instructor during the summer session 1933. 



258 



Courses of Instruction 



243. American Constitutional Law: 
nities. II. 3 Hrs. 



Fundamental Rights and Immu- 

Mr. Shipman. 



244s. Current Problems in American Government. 



SI. 2 Hrs. 

Mr. Fairman. 

Mr. Shipman. 

Mr. Shipman. 



245. Municipal Corporations. I. 3 Hrs. 
f246. Administrative Law. II. 3 Hrs. 

261. International Relations. I, 3 Hrs.; S2 (261s), 2 Hrs. 

Mr. Frasure. 

262. International Government. II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Frasure. 



Tutorial Courses 1 
294. Tutorial Instruction: International Relations. I. 



295. Tutorial Instruction: 

(295s), 2 Hrs. 

296. Tutorial Instruction: 

297. Tutorial Instruction: 



International Relations. II, 



Public Law. 
Public Law. 



I. 3 Hrs. 



3 Hrs. 

Mr. Frasure. 

3 Hrs.; S2 
Mr. Frasure. 

Mr. Shipman. 



II, 3 Hrs.; SI (297s), 2 Hrs. 
Mr. Shipman. 



298. Tutorial Instruction: State and Local Government. I. 



3 Hrs. 
Mr. Sly. 



299. 



301. 



302. 



Tutorial Instruction: 

SI (299s), 2 Hrs. 



State and Local Government. II, 3 Hrs.; 
Mr. Sly and Mr. Fairman. 



Graduate Division 
Methods of Research in Political Science. 



I. 2 to 4 Hrs. 

Mr. Sly. 



Methods of Research in Political Science. II, 2 to 4 Hrs.; SI 
(302s), 2 Hrs. Mr. Sly and Mr. Fairman. 

303. Selected Problems in International Relations. I. 2 to 4 Hrs. 

Mr. Frasure. 

304. Selected Problems in International Relations. II, 
S2 (304s), 2 Hrs. 

Selected Problems in Public Law. 



305. 



306. 



Selected Problems in Public Law. 

2 Hrs. 



2 to 4 Hrs.; 
Mr. Frasure. 

I. 2 to 4 Hrs. 

Mr. Shipman. 

II, 2 to 4 Hrs.; SI (306s), 

Mr. Shipman. 



fOmitted during the academic year 1933-34. 

'These courses are designed for political science majors. The work is con- 
ducted by individual conferences between student and instructor, based upon 
thorough reading and investigation in selected topics within his field of interest 
as well as in related subjects that the student has been unable to cover in his 
course work. 



Arts and Sciences 259 



310. Source Materials in Political Science. I. 2 Hrs. 

Mr. Sly and Staff. 

311. Source Materials in Political Science. II. 2 Hrs. 

Mr. Sly and Staff. 

POULTRY HUSBANDARY 1 

(See page 221.) 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 

Professor Kay, and Instructors Simonson, Fear, and Lowther. 

Lower Division 

3. Beginning Interpretation. I, II, 3 Hrs.; SI (3s), 2 Hrs. 

Drill exercises for the development of an expressive voice and 
body. Study and practice of the oral interpretation of varied 
types of literature. Gesture. Mrs. Fear and Miss Simonson. 

6. Beginning Acting. I, II, 3 Hrs.; S2 (6s), 2 Hrs. 

Training of the whole body to develop a sensitive realization of 
feeling, and ability to make an adequate artistic response. Over- 
coming of inhibitions and repressions caused by fears and false 
modesty. Coordination of body with mind in the communication of 
thought and feeling. Characterization and pantomine. 

Miss Simonson. 

7. General Course. I, II. 3 Hrs. 

A non-specialized course designed for students who will be able to 
take but one course in speech. Primarily for students of the 
schools of Agriculture, Engineering and Physical Education. Stu- 
dents of the College of Arts and Sciences are requested not to elect 
this course. Mr. Lowther. 

11. Effective Speaking. I, II, 3 Hrs.; SI, S2 (lis), 2 Hrs. 

An intensive study of the speech situation as conditioned by the 
speaker, the audience, the place, and the occasion. Problems of 
attention and interest; the impelling motives. Each speech is 
assigned to deal with a specific situation and secure a favorable 
response from the audience. Practice in writing and delivering 
short speeches. Parliamentary practice. 

Mr. Kay and Mr. Lowther. 

Upper Division 
Acting and Play Production 

132. Advanced Acting. II, 3 Hrs.; SI (132s), 2 Hrs. 

Preparation of short plays and scenes from long plays for the 
purpose of gaining skill in the art of acting period plays, type 
characters, and straight parts. Observation and criticism of 
modern acting. Students selected by the instructor may continue 
the work for additional credit. Prerequisite : course 6 and 129. 

Miss Simonson. 



Poultry Husbandry 1 may be included by Arts and Science students in the 
15 hours of agricultural electives. 



260 Courses of Instruction 

133. Play Production. II, 3 Hrs.; SI (133s), 2 Hrs. 

A practical course to prepare prospective teachers and play 
directors for schools and community theatres. The organization 
and duties of the producing staff, methods of production, scenery 
design and building, lighting, costuming, make-up; Theory of 
design, color and decoration. Collateral reading, discussions, and 
laboratory work. Miss Simonson. 

137. Play Directing. I, 3 Hrs.; S2 (137s), 2 Hrs. 

Study of the various schools of directing. Blocking out the play; 
casting; building the dramatic scenes; stage technique. The 
problem of design, grouping, balance, tempo, rhythm, atmosphere, 
and emphasis. Conducting the rehearsals; directing the per- 
formance. Reading and criticism of plays. Prerequisite: courses 
6 and 129. Miss Simonson and Mrs. Fear. 

139. The Theatre and Theatric Arts. I. 3 Hrs. 

The place of the theatre as an educational and social institution; 
its aims, methods, and achievements. History of the drama and 
the art of acting. The aim of this course is to give a cultural 
background for a better understanding and appreciation of the art 
of the theatre. Miss Simonson. 

Speech Composition and Delivery 

115. The Occasional Address. II, 3 Hrs.; SI (115s), 2 Hrs. 

A history of orators and oratory with emphasis on the American. 
Analysis of oratorical masterpieces to discover the source of 
oratorical power. An intensive study of the art of persuasion. 
Each student will write and deliver addresses of the formal type. 
Prerequisite: three hours in speech composition. Mr. Lowther 

117. Extempore Speaking. I, II, SI. 2 Hrs. 

A study of the more practical, non-oratorical types of speech. 
Some consideration to audience psychology as it affects the secur- 
ing of attention, interest and favorable response to the speaker. 
Enlargement of speech vocabulary; compiling a speakers source 
book. Practice in rapid organization and formulation of ideas in 
the presence of an audience. Mr. Kay. 

213. Argumentation and Debate. I, II. 3 Hrs. 

An intensive study of argumentative discourse. Analyzing and 
denning the proposition; brief drawing; evidence; argument; 
fallacies; refutation. Practice in actual debate. Course 11 or 117 
is recommended to precede this course. 

Mr. Kay and Mr. Lowther. 

220. Advanced Debating. I, II. 3 Hrs. 

Practice in the art of oral debate. Study of debate strategy. 
Inter-collegiate debate teams will be chosen from members of this 
class. With the consent of the instructor a student may repeat 
this course for credit. Prerequisite: course 213. 

Mr. Kay and Mr. Lowther. 



Arts and Sciences • 261 



Oral Interpretation 
121. Voice and Diction. I, II, 3 Hrs.; S2 (121s), 2 Hrs. 

The nature and functions of the organs of speech; voice placing; 
breath control; ear training. Drills for developing distinct 
enunciation; correct pronounciation, and a clear, resonant, power- 
ful voice. Mrs. Fear. 

125. Story Telling. I, II. 3 Hrs. 

Consideration of child psychology and the consequent nature of 
literature suited to children: practice in story telling in class and 
before groups of children in public schools, etc. Making of biblio- 
graphy and compilation of personal story books. Miss Simonson. 

129. General Interpretation. I, II, 3 Hrs.; S2 (129s), 2 Hrs. 

Detail study of the printed symbols as a means of communica- 
tion. Extensive study of various types of literature, especially 
poetry, drama and oratory which are written primarily for oral 
interpretation. Much practice in reading aloud. Mr. Kay. 

222. Oral Interpretation of Poetry. I, 3 Hrs.; S2 (222s), 2 Hrs. 
The object of this course is to develop a better understanding and 
a more sincere appreciation, both intellectual and emotional, of 
poetic values, and to enable the reader to share them with others 
through adequate communication. Prerequisite: course 129. 

Mr. Kay. 

223. Oral Interpretation of the Drama. II. 3 Hrs. 

Oral study of one or more classic or modern plays. Prerequisite: 
course 129. Mr. Kay. 

227. Professional Reading. I. 2 Hrs. 

An advanced course for senior majors who have shown exceptional 
proficiency in interpretation. Mr. Kay. 

228. Professional Reading. II. 2 Hrs. 

Continuation of course 227. Mr. Kay. 

Special 

140, 141, 142. Extra-Curricular Activities. I, II. 1 to 3 Hrs. 

The head of the department may grant from one to three hours' 
credit to members of a debate team, or the cast of a major play, 
and to others who participate in speech activities which are 
assigned and directed by a member of the speech faculty. 

236. Teaching of Speech. II. 2 Hrs. 

A seminar for seniors and graduate students with a major or 
minor in speech who expect to teach speech in a secondary school 
or college. Staff. 

240. Speech Correction. II. 3 Hrs. 

A practical course designed to provide qualified students and 
prospective teachers with a working knowledge of the nature and 
causes of the various types of speech defects and the indicated 
treatment and method of correction. Students registered in this 
course will be required to aid in the work of the speech clinic. 

Mr. Lowther. 



262 . Courses of Instruction 

Speech Clinic. 

Students registered in speech courses who are discovered to be 
possessed of some speech defect will be assigned to the clinic for 
diagnosis and treatment. In so far as time will allow, the services 
of the clinic will also be open to any student of the University 
without extra charge. Mr. Lowther. 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 1 

Professors Stathers, Darby, and Spiker; Associate Professor Mitrani; 
and Instructors Ashburn, Maynard, Manning, James, and MacBride. 

FRENCH 
Lower Division 

1. Elementary French. I, II, 3 Hrs.; SI (Is), 2 Hrs. 

Mr. Spiker and Staff. 

2. Intermediate French. I, II, 3 Hrs.; S2 (2s), 2 Hrs. 
Continuation of French 1. Mr. Spiker and Staff. 

5. Fiction of the Nineteenth Century. I, 3 Hrs.; SI (5s), 2 Hrs. 

Mr. Darby and Staff. 

6. Drama of the Nineteenth Century. II, 3 Hrs.; S2 (6s), 2 Hrs. 

Mr. Darby and Staff. 

7 or 107. Advanced Readings. I, 3 Hrs.; SI (7s or 107s), 2 Hrs. 

Mr. Mitrani and Staff. 

8 or 108. Advanced Readings. II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Mitrani and Staff. 

9 or 109. Grammar and Pronunciation. I, 3 Hrs.; SI (9s or 109s), 

2 Hrs. 

For sophomores or juniors. Prerequisite: 12 hours of French, 

or equivalent. Mr. Mitrani and Staff. 

10 or 110. Advanced Conversation. II, 3 Hrs.; S2 (10s or 110s), 
2 Hrs. 

For sophomores or juniors. Prerequisite: French 9 or 109, 

or equivalent. Mr. Mitrani and Staff. 

Upper Division 

115. The Classical School. I, 3 Hrs.; SI (115s), 2 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: 12 hours of French, or equivalent. 

Mr. Darby, Mr. Spiker, and Mr. Manning. 

116. The Classical School After Moliere. II, 3 Hrs.; S2 (116s), 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: French 115. 

Mr. Darby, Mr. Spiker, and Mr. Manning. 



bourses 1 and 2, or two years of high school credit, will be required for 
entrance to courses 5, 6, 7, and 8. Usually, students who have had two years' 
study of the language in high school should take courses 5 and 6. Students who 
have done three years of work in high school should take courses 7 and 8. 
No student who has not completed French 9, 10, 115, 116, and 231, or Spanish 
9, 10, 116, 221, and 222, will be recommended as a teacher of these subjects. 



Arts and Sciences 



263 



221. The Romantic Movement. I. 3 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: French 115 and 116. 

222. French Literature Since 1850. II. 3 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: French 221. 

223. The Problem Play. I. 2 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: French 115 and 116. 



Mr. Stathers. 



Mr. Stathers. 



Mr. Darby. 



224. Historical Novel in the Nineteenth Century. II. 2 Hrs. 



Prerequisite: French 115 and 116. 

226. Literary Criticism in the Nineteenth Century. II. 

Prerequisite: French 221 and 222. 



229. Literature of the Sixteenth Century. 

Prerequisite: French 115 and 116. 



I. 2 Hrs. 



230. The Sixteenth Century After 1550. II. 2 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: French 115 and 116. 



Mr. Darby. 

2 Hrs. 
Mr. Spiker. 



Mr. Spiker. 



Mr. Spiker. 



231. 



237. 



Phonetics and Pronunciation. I, SI. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: 18 hours of French, or equivalent. Mr. Stathers. 



Moliere. I, SI. 2 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: French 115 and 116. 



243. Etude du vocabulaire. I, SI. 2 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: French 109 and 110. 

244. Explication de textes. II. 2 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: French 109 and 110. 



Mr. Spiker. 



Mr. Stathers. 



Mr. Stathers. 



257s. The Contemporary Drama. SI. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: eighteen semester hours of French or equivalent. 

Mr. Mitrani. 



267s. The Theater of the Eighteenth Century 

Prerequisites: French 115 and 116. 

273s. Corneille. S2. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisites: French 115 and 116. 



S2. 2 Hrs. 



Mr. Darby. 



Mr. Darby. 



391. Seminar. I. 2 to 5 Hrs. 

The origin of French comedy relative to native and foreign ele- 
ments in its composition. Mr. Spiker. 

392. Seminar. II. 2 to 5 Hrs. 

The development of the theory of tragedy previous to the seven- 
teenth century. Mr. Spiker. 

395. Seminar. I. 2 to 5 Hrs. 

Individual study of some subject chosen from the literature of the 
first half of the nineteenth century. Mr. Stathers. 



264 



Courses of Instruction 



3%. 



Seminar. II. 2 to 5 Hrs. 

A critical study of some phase of literature of the second half of 

the nineteenth century. Mr. Stathers. 

SPANISH 

Lower Division 
Elementary Spanish. I, II. 3 Hrs. 



Intermediate Spanish. II. 3 Hrs. 
Continuation of Spanish 1. 

Contemporary Fiction. I. 3 Hrs. 



Mr. Ashburn and Staff. 

Mr. Ashburn and Staff. 

Mr. Maynard and Staff. 



Drama of the Nineteenth Century. II. 3 Hrs. 

Mr. Maynard and Staff. 



or 107. Advanced Readings, 
or 108. Advanced Readings. 



I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Maynard and Staff. 

II. 3 Hrs. 



9 
10 

115. 
116. 
221. 
222. 
223. 
224. 

395. 
396. 



Mr. Maynard and Staff. 

I. 3 Hrs. 

Mr Ashburn and Staff. 



or 109. Grammar and Conversation. 

For sophomores or juniors. 

or 110. Advanced Conversation. II. 3 Hrs. 
For sophomores or juniors. Prerequisite: Spanish 9 or 109, or 
equivalent. Mr. Ashburn and Staff. 

Upper Division 

Lyric Poetry. I. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: 12 hours of Spanish, or equivalent. Mr. Maynard- 

Civilization and Culture. II. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: 12 hours of Spanish, or equivalent. Mr. Maynard^ 

Literature of the Golden Age. I. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: 18 hours of Spanish, or equivalent. Mr. Mitrani. 

The Golden Age after Lope de Vega. II. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 221. Mr. Mitrani. 

Spanish American Literature. I. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: 18 hours of Spanish, or equivalent. Mr. Mitrani. 

Spanish American Literature. II. 2 Hrs. 

Continuation of Spanish 223. Prerequisite: 18 hours of Spanish, 

or equivalent. 

Graduate Division 



Mr. Mitrani. 



Literature of the Sixteenth Century. I. 3 Hrs. 

Leading literary productions of the Renaissance. Mr. Stathers. 

Old Spanish, n. 3 Hrs. Mr. Stathers. 



Education 265 



ITALIAN 
Lower Division 

1. Elementary Italian. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Darby. 

2. Intermediate Italian. II. 3 Hrs. 

Continuation of Italian 1. Mr. Darby. 

5 or 105. Modern Fiction. I. 3 Hrs. Mr. Darby. 

6 or 106. Modern Drama. II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Darby. 

ZOOLOGY 1 

Professors Reese and Chidester; Associate Professor Taylor; 
Assistant Professor Eaton; 2 and Instructor Gribble. 

Lower Division 

1. Invertebrate Zoology. I, II, SI. 4 Hrs. 

A study chiefly of invertebrate animals, with an introduction to 
the vertebrates. Mr. Reese, Mr. Taylor, and Staff. 

2. Vertebrate Zoology. II, S2. 4 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Zoology 1, or equivalent. Mr. Reese and Staff. 

4. Elementary Zoology. I. 5 Hrs. 

For students in physical education. Mr. Chidester. 

16. Economic Zoology. II. 2 Hrs. Mr. Reese. 

51. Physiology and Hygiene. I, II. 3 or 4 Hrs. 

Not open to pre-medical students. An elementary course in 
physiology and hygiene. Mr. Chidester. 

Upper Division 

118. Methods of Zoology. II. 3 Hrs. 

A practical course in the methods of collecting, preserving, inject- 
ing, making microscopic preparations, etc. Prerequisite: Zoology 
1 and 2, or equivalent. For zoology majors only. Open to others 
only if space permits. Mr. Taylor. 

125. Limnology. I. 2 Hrs. 

For sophomores in public health. Combination course offered by 
departments of botany and zoology. Mr. Taylor and others. 

126s. Advanced Limnology. S. 1 Hr. 

Continuation of Zoology 125. The course consists mainly of field 
work. Hours to be arranged. Mr. Taylor and others. 

207. Vertebrate Embryology. I. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Zoology 1 and 2. Mr. Reese. 



Zoology 1, 2, 118, and 210 are of special interest to teachers. Zoology 1 
and 2 are required of students preparing to enter the study of medicine. 
Zoology 4 is required of students in physical education. 

Visiting instructor during the summer session 1933. 



266 Courses of Instruction 

210. Principles of Biology. II. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Zoology 1. Mr. Chidester. 

231, 232, 233. Comparative Anatomy. I. 1 to 4 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Zoology 1 and 2. Mr. Chidester. 

234. Animal Histology. I. 2 Hrs. 

Not open to pre-medical students. Prerequisite: Zoology 1 and 2. 

Mr. Taylor. 
235s. Comparative Embryology. S. 6 Hrs. 

To be taken at the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, 
Mass.; six weeks; summer. Prerequisite: Zoology 1, 2, and 207. 

Marine Biological Staff. 
240. Current Literature. I, II. 1 Hr. 

For seniors and graduates. Mr. Taylor. 

252. Physiology of Development. II. 3 Hrs. 

Open to seniors and graduates. Lectures and conferences on 

nutrition and the endocrines. Prerequisite: Zoology 2, and 231 

or 51. Mr. Chidester. 

253s. Physiology of Development. S. 6 to 12 Hrs. 

Continuation of Zoology 252. Experimental studies on nutrition 
and the endocrines. To be taken at the Marine Biological Labora- 
tory, Woods Hole, Mass. Six to 12 weeks, summer. Mr. Chidester. 

261s. Field Zoology. SI. 6 Hrs. 

Primarily for zoology majors and for those who teach or intend 
to teach zoology, this course aims to familiarize the student with 
the animal life of the state in its natural surroundings, and in- 
cludes the collection, the identification and classification, and the 
study of habits of the various forms found in this region. The 
class travels, in company with a similar class in field botany, about 
the State as a part of the West Virginia University Biological 
Expedition. Further details may be found in the Announcement 
of the Summer Session. Prerequisite: Zoology 1 and 2, or 
equivalent. Mr. Taylor. 

Graduate Division 

381, 382, 383, 384, 385. Comparative Anatomy, Histology, and Em- 
bryology. I, II, SI or S2. 1 to 5 Hrs. 

Mr. Reese, Mr. Chddester, and Mr. Taylor. 

390, 391, 392, 393, 394, 395. Research Work. I, II, SI or S2. 1 to 5 
Hrs. 

Original research on an assigned problem in the field of zoology. 
Mr. Reese, Mr. Chddester, and Mr. Taylor. 



Education 267 



EDUCATION 

(For explanation of abbreviations, see page 206.) 

Professors Baldwin, Bohan, Deahl, L. B. Hill, Hudelson, Pollock, 
and Stemple; Assistant Professors Clark, Colebank, and Rich- 
mond; Instructors Coplin, Soupart, and Wilt; Teachers 
Boggess, Bowlby, Coffroth, Cook, Dorsey, Federer, 
Meredith, Zimmerman, and Breck; 2 and 
Lecturers Eurich/ Smith, 2 and Warner. 2 

Courses in Education are open only to students of junior, senior, 
and graduate standing. The following courses are required of high 
school teachers for recommendation for certification: Ed. Psy. 106 and 
214; Ed. Ad. 109; Ed. Sup. 224; and Ed. M. and M. 120 and at least one 
of the Ed. M. and M. courses 152 to 170, inclusive. Enough additional 
courses must be chosen from the following to meet the minimum require- 
ment of 20 hours in Education: Gen. Ed. 231, 233, 281, and 282; Ed. 
Ad. 236, 284, and 285; Ed. Psy. 112; and an additional course selected 
from Ed. Sup. 224 and Ed. M. and M. 152 to 170, inclusive. No other 
electives will be accepted without the consent of the Scholarship Com- 
mittee of the College of Education. The required Education courses are 
to be taken in the order stipulated in the descriptions of those courses. 

GENERAL EDUCATION 
Undergraduate Division 

231. Philosophy of Education. I, 3 Hrs.; SI (231s), 2 Hrs. 

A study of the principles of education and of the conditions that 
help and hinder; life activities which the school should reflect 
and promulgate through its organization, its program of studies, 
and its methods. Mr. Deahl. 

233. Educational Sociology. II. 3 Hrs. 

Factors and forces that build society; their relative values in 
education; individual and social control; democracy and guidance 
in building programs of study; environment and heredity in the 
evaluation of the school; the agencies that educate for democracy.' 

Mr. Deahl. 

272. Statistical Methods in Education. I, 3 Hrs.; SI. S2 (272s), 2 Hrs. 
Measures of central tendency, variability, and simple correlation; 
reliability of measures and differences; appropriate treatment 
and effective presentation of data. Required of all candidates 
for graduate degrees in Education. Prerequisite: Ed. Psy. 106 
and Ed. Ad. 109. Mr. Bohan and Mr. Eurich. 

281. History of Education. I. 2 Hrs. 

Development of American education, elementary, secondary, and 
higher; local, state, and national influences; factors of progress 
and decline; effects of economic, political, religious, scientific, and 
social control; opportunities and responsibilities of American 
education. Mr. Deahl. 



2 Visiting instructor during the summer session 1933. 



268 Courses of Instruction 

282. History of Education. II. 2 Hrs. 

The development of European and Oriental civilization as re- 
flected in education; growth of ideas and ideals in human prog- 
ress; struggle of church, state, and school for educational prog- 
ress; present problems in national and international education, 
with their historical antecedents. Mr. Deahl. 

Graduate Division 

300. Techniques of Educational Research. I, SI, S2. 2 Hrs. 

A laboratory course for the development of methods of educational 
research and the reporting of such with special reference to theses. 
Required of all candidates for advanced degrees in Education. 
Prerequisite or parallel: Gen. Ed. 272. 

Mr. Bohan and Mr. Eurich. 

395, 396, 397, 398. Seminar. Yr., SI, S2. No credit. 

Two semesters, a semester and a summer term, or four summer 
terms are required of all candidates for graduate degrees in Edu- 
cation. Official enrollment required. Staff. 

EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION 

Professors Baldwin and Stemple, Advisers. 
Undergraduate Division 

109. Secondary Education. I, II, 3 Hrs.; SI (109s), 2 Hrs. 

High school problems outside the field of instructional methods. 
Required for the bachelor's degree in Education and for the 
high school teaching certificate. This course, being prerequisite 
to several later required courses in Education, should be taken 
during the junior year. Mr. Stemple and Mr. Colebank. 

236. The Secondary- School Curriculum. II, 3 Hrs.; S2 (236s), 2 Hrs. 
The principles of curriculum construction and the materials used 
in high school courses of study. Prerequisite: Ed. Psy. 106, 
Ed. Ad. 109, and Ed. M. and M. 120. Mr. Stemple. 

239. Public School Organization and Administration. I, 3 Hrs.; SI 
(239s), 2 Hrs. 

An orientation course for prospective school administrators. Unit 
school types; local, state, and national organization; school laws; 
functions of boards of education; selection, promotion, and tenure 
of teachers in service; pupil accounting; the school plant; finances; 
curriculum; etc. Required of all educational administration 
majors. Prerequisite: Ed. Psy. 106 and Ed. M. and M. 120, or 
equivalent, and teaching experience. Mr. Baldwin. 

241. School Buildings and Equipment. I, S2. 2 Hrs. 

Building programs; school plans; utilization of buildings; oper- 
ation of school plant; seating; heating and ventilating; scoring 
of buildings; etc. Prerequisite: Ed. Psy. 106 and 112, Ed. 
Ad. 109, or equivalent, and teaching experience. Mr. Baldwin. 



Education 269 



242. School Records and Reports. I. 2 His. 

School population accounting; school census and attendance; 
permanent, cumulative pupil records; official record forms; staff 
personnel record forms; etc. Prerequisite: Ed. Psy. 106 and 
112, or equivalent, and teaching experience. Ed. Ad. 239 should 
either precede or accompany this course. Mr. Baldwin. 

284. Pupil Personnel Administration. I, 3 Hrs.; S2 (284s), 2 Hrs. 
The administration of educational guidance and extra-curricular 
activities. Prerequisite: Ed. Psy. 106 and 112 and Ed. Ad. 109. 

Mr. Stemple. 

285. The Junior High School. I, SI. 2 Hrs. 

The administrative, curricular, and extra-curricular problems 
peculiar to this type of school. For junior high school principals, 
supervisors, and teachers. Prerequisite: Ed. Psy. 106 and Ed. 
Ad. 109. Mr. Stemple. 

Graduate Division 

338. High School Organization. II. 2 Hrs. 

An intensive study of the literature on various phases of 
secondary-school organization. Prerequisite: 20 hours of Educa- 
tion, and high school teaching experience. Mr. Stemple. 

340. Public School Finance. II, 3 Hrs.; SI (340s), 2 Hrs. 

School cost accounting; budgetary procedure; bonds; publicity; 
revenue; taxation; state and county apportionment and equaliza- 
tion; etc. Required of all majors in general educational ad- 
ministration. Prerequisite: 20 hours of Education and teaching 
experience. Administrative experience and courses in taxation 
and the principles of accounting are also desirable antecedents 
and may be required. Mr. Baldwin. 

343. School Surveys. II, 3 Hrs.; S2 (343s), 2 Hrs. 

The development of the educational survey as an instrument for 
effecting progressive educational procedure. Prerequisite: (Jen. 
Ed. 272 and Ed. Ad. 239. Mr. Baldwin. 

344. Staff Personnel Administration. II. 2 Hrs. 

Selection, introduction, direction, evaluation, improvement, and 
promotion of members of the supervisory, instructional, research, 
clerical, and maintenance staffs. Administrative experience is 
also a desirable antecedent and may be required. Mr. Baldwin. 

353. High School Administration. II, 3 Hrs.; SI (353s), 2 Hrs. 

Advanced course for secondary-school principals. Required of all 
graduate majors in High School Administration, and for recom- 
mendation for high school principal's certificate. Prerequisite: 
Ed. Psy. 106 and 112, Ed. Ad. 109 and 239, and Ed. M. and M. 
120, or equivalent, and high school teaching experience. 

Mr. Stemple. 

360, 361. Problems in Educational Administration (General and Sec- 
ondary). I, II, credit to be arranged, not to exceed 2 Hrs. per 
semester; SI, S2, 1 or 2 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

Mr. Baldwin and Mr. Stemple. 



270 Courses of Instruction 

HIGHER EDUCATION 
Graduate Division 

360, 361. Problems of Higher Education. II, SI, S2. 2 Hrs. 

Readings on and consideration of the aims and functions of higher 
education and the problems of college and university organization, 
administration, finance, curricula, instruction, social control, 
faculty and student personnel, induction of students, student 
accounting, and the preparation, training, and advancement of 
college teachers. An orientation course for graduate students who 
are engaged in or who contemplate college teaching. 

Mr. Hudblson. 

EDUCATIONAL MATERIALS AND METHODS 

Professor Pollock, Adviser. 
Undergraduate Division 
120. Principles of Teaching in Secondary Schools. I, II, 3 Hrs.; SI 
(120s), 2 Hrs. 

The fundamental principles of the teaching process; observation 
and study of instructional activities in the University Demonstra- 
tion High School; evaluation of teaching units; practice in lesson- 
planning. Required of all who are preparing to do student- 
teaching. Prerequisite: Ed. Psy. 106 and 112 and Ed. Ad. 
109, or equivalent, and consent of instructor. 

Mr. Deahl and Miss Pollock. 

152-170. Materials and Methods of High School Teaching. 1 

Special methods in the various teaching fields. Selection and 
arrangement of subject matter; activity analysis applied to the 
various subjects; analysis of courses of study based on surveys 
of pupil needs. Prerequisite: Ed. M. and M. 120. 

These courses are offered by the supervisors of student 
teaching in the various fields and are to be taken as correlates 
with student teaching. As a rule only one course in special 
methods is required, but a course in the second teaching field is 
desirable. The various sections of this course, with their in- 
structors, are as follows: 

152. Physical Education (for men and women). I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Mr. Schott and Miss Griffin. 

160. Agriculture. I, II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Parsons. 

161. English. I, II, S. 2 Hrs. Miss Soupart. 

162. Foreign Languages. I. 2 Hrs. Staff. 

163. Home Economics. I, II, S. 2 Hrs. 

Miss Richmond and Miss Breck. 

164. Industrial Education. I, S. 2 Hrs. Mr. Maclin. 

165. Mathematics. I, S. 2 Hrs. Miss Wilt. 

166. Biology. I, II, S. 2 Hrs. Mr. Clark. 

166. Physical Sciences. I, II, S. 2 Hrs. Mr. Federer. 

167. Social Studies. I, II, S. 2 Hrs. Miss Coplin. 

169. Music. I, H, S. 2 Hrs. Miss Hinkel. 

170. Commerce. I, II. 2 Hrs. Mr. Zimmerman. 



'Summer courses extend through first nine weeks of summer session. 



Education 271 



220. Teaching in the Secondary Schools. I or II. 3 Hrs. 

A critical analysis of current practices. Members will be selected 
by the instructor. Prerequisite: Ed. Psy. 106 and 112 and Ed. 
Ad. 109. Miss Pollock. 

298s. Adolescent Literature. S2. 2 Hrs. 

Study of the social and psychological backgrounds of adolescent 
interests in reading, with critical survey of appropriate materials 
for individual guidance in recreational reading in junior and 
senior high schools. Miss Smith. 

Graduate Division 

350, 351. The Science of Teaching. I, SI. 2 Hrs. 

An analysis and synthesis of the experimental evidence that con- 
stitutes the foundation of secondary-school instruction; critical 
evaluation of experimental techniques; interpretation of experi- 
mental results; implications of the cumulative evidence in the light 
of aims and content. This course must be preceded or accompanied 
by Gen. Ed. 272 and Ed. Psy. 365. Optional with Ed. M. and M. 
390 for teachers and supervisors of Ejiglish. Mr. Hudelson. 

360, 361. Problems in the Materials and Methods of High School Teach- 
ing. I, II, credit to be arranged, not to exceed 2 Hrs. per 
semester; SI, S2, 1 or 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Ed. M. and M. 350 or 390, and consent of in- 
structor. Miss Pollock, Mr. Hudelson, and Miss Smith. 

390. Advanced Course in the Materials and Methods of High School 
English. I, S2. 2 Hrs. 

Optional with Ed. M. and M. 350 for teachers and supervisors of 
English. Prerequisite: Ed. M. and M. 161 and Ed. Sup. 224. 

Miss Pollock and Miss Smith. 

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 

Professor Bohan, Adviser. 
Undergraduate Division 

106. Introductory Education Psychology. I, II, 3 Hrs.; SI, S2 (106s), 
2 Hrs. 

The psychological basis of learning, with particular reference to 
secondary-school pupils. Required for a bachelor's degree in 
Education and for the State high school teaching certificate. 
This course, being prerequisite to practically every other required 
Education course, should be taken early in the junior year. 

Mr. Bohan, Miss Pollock, and Mr. Warner. 

112. Educational Tests and Measures. I, II, S2. 2 Hrs. 

Uses of group intelligence and achievement tests for secondary- 
school pupils; interpretation of results. A laboratory course of 
two double periods per week. Required for the bachelor's degree 
in Education. Prerequisite: Ed. Psy. 106. This course, being 
prerequisite to several other required Education courses, should be 
taken in the junior year. Mr. Bohan and Mr. Warner. 



272 Courses of Instruction 

214. Advanced Educational Psychology. I, II, SI, S2. 2 Hrs. 

Each student will be expected to make a special study of the 
psychological problems in his teaching field. Required for a 
bachelor's degree in Education and for the State high school 
teaching certificate. Prerequisite: Ed. Psy. 106. Graduate 
credit will be allowed only when previous work in psychology 
and educational psychology totals at least six semester hours. 
Mr. Bohan, Mr. Deahl, and Mr. Warner. 

Graduate Division 

358. Systematic Educational Psychology. II. 2 Hrs. 

Advanced study of the general field of psychology with reference 
to education. Emphasis on the development, present-day litera- 
ture, and problems in the field. Recommended as preparation for 
the qualifying examination for the doctorate. Prerequisite: Ed. 
Psy. 106 and 214, or equivalent. Mr. Bohan. 

360, 361. Problems in Educational Psychology. I, II, credit to be 
arranged, not to exceed 2 Hrs. per semester; SI, S2, 1 or 2 Hrs. 
For students who are ready to undertake independent research. 
Prerequisite : consent of instructor. Mr. Bohan and Mr. Eurich. 

365. Construction and Use of Standard Tests. II. 2 Hrs. 

Scientific techniques of constructing objective tests and scales; 
selection of items; criteria of reliability and validity; and norms. 
Actual development, or participation in the development, of a 
scientific test or scale is a requirement of this course. Pre- 
requisite: Ed. Psy. 106 and 112, Ed. Ad. 109, and Gen. Ed. 272, 
or equivalent. Mr. Bohan. 

EDUCATIONAL SUPERVISION 

Professor L. B. Hill, Adviser. 
Undergraduate Division 

224. Student Teaching. I, II, S (9 weeks), 3 Hrs. 

Required for certification. Must be accompanied by Ed. M. and 
M. 152-170. Each student will arrange for two consecutive hours 
daily for observation and practice. Prerequisite: Ed. Psy. 106 
and 112, Ed. Ad. 109, Ed. M. and M. 120, and the completion 
of at least fifty percent, of the certification requirements with 
an honor-point average of at least 1.0 in each teaching field and 
in Education. 

Application for registration should be made to Mr. Robert 
Clark early in the preceding semester. Facilities for student 
teaching are available in agriculture, commerce, English, foreign 
languages, home economics, industrial education, mathematics, 
music, physical education, the sciences, and the social studies. 

Mr. Clark, Mr. Colebank, and Staff. 

240. Supervision of Elementary-School Instruction. I, S2. 2 Hrs. 

For superintendents, supervisors, and principals of elementary 
schools. General and specific objectives, content, and procedure 
of typical elementary-school subjects. Mr. Hill. 



Engineering and Mechanic Arts 273 

246. Supervision of Junior and Senior High School Instruction. I, S2. 
2 Hrs. 

A basic course dealing with the general principles of super- 
vision; also with the sifted content of each subject-matter field. 
An attempt will be made to find the unique contribution which 
each subject makes to the learner. Attention will be given to 
teaching procedures, techniques, and devices most conducive to 
that contribution. Mr. Clark or Mr. Hill. 

250. Teacher Cooperation in the Supervision of Instruction. II. 3 
Hrs. 

An elective course for those who have had student teaching and 
who desire to become supervisors of teachers. Aims: (1) to 
cultivate opportunities and means by which classroom teachers 
may attain and promote higher teaching levels in the school 
system by cooperating with their associates; (2) to evolve appro- 
priate techniques for intra-teacher cooperation in supervision. 

Mr. Hill. 

256. Supervision of Rural Schools. II. 2 Hrs. 

For county and district superintendents and rural school principals 
and teachers. Mr. Clark. 

Graduate Division 

327. Practice in the Supervision of Instruction. I, IT, 3 Hrs.; SI 
(327s), 2 Hrs. 

Required of graduate majors in Educational Supervision, and for 
the high school principal's certificate. Prerequisite: Ed. Sup. 
224 for all, and Ed. Sup. 246 for graduate majors in Educational 
Supervision. Application should be made early in the preceding 
semester. Mr. Hill. 

360, 361. Problems in Educational Supervision. I, II, credit to be ar- 
ranged, not to exceed 2 Hrs. per semester; SI, S2, 1 or 2 Hrs. 
Guidance in selecting, planning, and pursuing individual research 
projects. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Mr. Hill. 

ENGINEERING AND MECHANIC ARTS 1 

CHEMICAL, METALLURGICAL, AND CERAMIC ENGINEERING 

Professors Hodge and Koehler; Lecturer Parry; and Instructors 
Jenni and H. M. Cather. 

Undergraduate Division 

101. Oil Laboratory. I. 1 Hr. 

Primarily for students taking the Oil and Gas Option. Pre- 
requisite: Chemistry 6 or 10. Mr. Koehler. 

102. Blow-Pipe Analysis and Assaying. II. 2 Hrs. 
Laboratory and recitations. Prerequisite: Chemistry 6 or 10. 

Mr. Jenni. 



x The following courses are regularly scheduled for the summer session and 
should be taken at that time by all regular engineering students entering in 
1933-34 or later: C. E. 4s and M. E. 10, 11, and 13s. Students entering prior to 
1933-34 will take C. E. 5s and 107s (instead of 4s) and M. E. 10, 11, and 13s. 



274 Courses of Instruction 

110s. Practical Pottery. SI. 2 Hrs. 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the funda- 
mentals of clay working. The laboratory work involves the prep- 
aration of pottery bodies, the shaping of the wares by the various 
methods in use, bisque firing, and decorating. The lectures will 
cover some of the theories involved with discussion of industrial 
practice. The clay shop work will be given by a practical potter 
of wide industrial experience. Mr. Koehler and Assistant. 

124. Thesis. I, II. 2 to 5 Hrs. 

Some problem in chemical engineering or industrial chemistry is 
selected for investigation. A carefully prepared report is required. 
Credit is given in proportion to time put in and results obtained. 

Mr. Hodge or Mr. Koehler. 

201. Benzene Derivatives. II. 2 or 3 Hrs. 

Manufacture of commercial products from coal tar; benzene and 
related compounds; intermediates, dyes, drugs, and explosives. 
Recitations and laboratory. Prerequisite: Chemistry 233. 

Mr. Hodge and Mr. Jenni. 

202. Water Examination and Purification. II, S2. 2 Hrs. 
Recitations and laboratory. Prerequisite: Chemistry 6 or 10. 

Mr. Hodge. 
205.* Chemical Engineering and Manufactures. I. 3 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 260 and M. 103. 

Mr. Hodge and Mr. Cather. 

206.* Industrial Chemistry Laboratory. I. 2 Hrs. 

To accompany Ch. E. 205. Mr. Hodge and Mr. Jenni. 

207. Chemical Engineering and Manufactures. II. 2 Hrs. 
Continuation of Ch. E. 205. Mr. Hodge. 

208. Chemical Engineering Laboratory. II. 2 Hrs. 
Continuation of Ch. E. 206. To accompany Ch. E. 207. 

Mr. Hodge and Mr. Jenni. 

209. Chemical Plants. II. 2 Hrs. 

The principles applied in the layout, design and operation of 
plants devoted to the production of industrial chemicals. Pre- 
requisite: M. E. 29 and Ch. E. 205. Mr. Hodge and Mr. Cather. 

210. Electrochemical Industries. I, II. 2 or 3 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: E. E. 110 or its equivalent, and Chemistry 6 or 10. 

Mr. Koehler and Mr. Steely. 

211. Fuels. II. 2 or 3 Hrs. 

Recitations and laboratory. Prerequisite: Chemistry 6 or 10, and 
M. E. 122. Mr. Parry. 

212. Oil Refining Laboratory. I. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 233 and M. 103. Mr. Koehler. 

213. Principles of Gas and Fuel Engineering. I. 3 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: Ch. E. 211. Mr. Parry. 



*May be taken as undergraduate work by students in colleges other than 
the College of Engineering and Mechanic Arts. 



Engineering and Mechanic Arts 275 

214. Principles of Gas and Fuel Engineering. II. 3 Hrs. 

Continuation of Ch. E. 213. Mr. Parry. 

220.* Metallurgy of Iron and Steel. I. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 6 or 10. Mr. Hodge. 

221.* Metallurgy Laboratory. I. 1 Hr. 

Preparation and microscopical examination of 25 specimens of 
iron and steel; analytical determinations. To accompany Ch. E. 
220. Mr. Hodge and Mr. Jenni. 

222. Metallurgy Non-Ferrous. II. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 6 and M. 103. Mr. Hodge and Mr. Jenni. 

223. Metallography Laboratory. II. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Ch. E. 220, 221, and 222, and Chemistry 260. 

Mr. Hodge and Mr. Jenni. 

230. Ceramics. II, 3 Hrs.; Si (230s), 2 Hrs. 

A review of the ceramic industries. Chemical and engineering 
principles applied in the manufacture of ceramic materials. Work- 
ing and testing of clays. Recitation and laboratory. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 260. Mr. Koehler. 

231. Advanced Ceramics Laboratory. I, 2 Hrs.; SI (231s), 1 Hr. 
Preparation of bodies, glazes, enamels and glass. Biscuit and glost 
firing. Coloring agents. Factory control tests. Prerequisite: 
Ch. E. 230. Mr. Koehler. 

232. Refractories. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Manufacture, properties, and use of refractory materials. Stan- 
dard tests. Study of phase diagram of refractory materials. Pre- 
requisite: Chemistry 6 or 10. Mr. Koehler. 

233. Glass. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Physical and chemical properties of glass. Methods of analysis of 
glass and of raw materials. Theory and practice of manufacture. 
Prerequisite: Ch. E. 230. Mr. KOEHLER. 

Graduate Division 

300. Thesis. I, II. Credit to be arranged. 

A suitable problem in chemical engineering, metallurgy, or 
ceramics is selected for investigation. Prerequisite: Ch. E. 207. 

Mr. Hodge and Staff. 

301. Coal Tar and By-Products. II, S2. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Ch. E. 201, 206, and 211. Mr. Hodge. 

302. Biochemical Industries. I. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Ch. E. 201 and 207. Mr. Hodge. 

303. Transformations in Silicates. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Ch. E. 230. Mr. Koehler. 



♦May be taken as undergraduate work by students in colleges other than 
the College of Engineering and Mechanic Arts. 



276 



Courses of Instruction 



304. Utilization of Coal. I. 3 Hrs. 

Admission by consent of the instructor. Mr. Parry. 

310. Research Problems. I, II, 3 to 10 Hrs.; SI, S2, 3 to 6 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: Ch. E. 207. Mr. Hodge and Staff. 

311. Research Problems. I, II. 3 to 10 Hrs. 

A continuation of Ch. E. 310. Mr. Hodge and Staff. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Professors Carpenter and Davis; Assistant Professors 
Downs and Nelson. 



Undergraduate Division 

1.* Surveying. II. 2 Hrs. 

Primarily for freshmen. Prerequisite: 

2.* Surveying. I. 4 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Math. 4. 

3.* Railroad Curves. II. 2 Hrs. 
Continuation of C. E. 2. 

(5 Weeks.) 



Math. 4. Mr. Nelson. 



Mr. Nelson. 



Mr. Nelson. 



5 Hrs. 



4s. Summer Surveying. 1 SI. 

Prerequisite: C. E. 3. Mr. Nelson. 

5s. Surveying. 2 June 1 to June 12. 1 Hr. 

Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 4. Surveying practice supple- 
menting Civil Engineering 2, 3, and 4. Daily 8:00-5:00 and 7:00- 
9:00 P. M. Mr. Nelson. 



10.* Structural Drafting. I. 2 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: M. E. 20. 

101. Roads and Pavements. II. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: C. E. 4s. 

102. Railway Engineering. I. 3 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: C. E. 4s. 

103. Highway Design. I. 3 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: C. E. 102. 



Mr. Carpenter. 



Mr. Downs. 



Mr. Downs. 



Mr. Downs. 



107s. Railroad Surveys. 2 August 30 to September 11. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 101. Surveying practice supple- 
menting Civil Engineering 101. Daily 8:00-5:00 and 7:00-9:00 
P. M. Mr. Nelson. 

115.* Hydraulics. I, II, SI. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: M. 102 or 104 (or registration in M. 102 or 104). 

Mr. Davis and Mr. Carpenter. 



♦May be taken as undergraduate work in colleges other than the College 
of Engineering and Mechanic Arts. 

x This course is to be taken by students entering in 1933-34 or later. 
2 This course is to be taken by students entering prior to 1933-34. 



Engineering and Mechanic Arts 



277 



116. Water Supply Engineering. I. 4 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: C. E. 115. 

117. Municipal Engineering. I, II. 2 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: C. E. 115. 

118. Sanitary Engineering. II. 3 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: C. E. 115. 

120. Materials of Construction. I. 2 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: M. 102. 



Mr. Carpenter. 
Mr. Carpenter. 
Mr. Carpenter. 
Mr. Carpenter. 



121. Roofs and Bridges. II, SI. 4 Hrs. 



Prerequisite: M. 102. 



Mr. Davis and Mr. Carpenter. 



122. Structural Engineering. I, SI. 2 or 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: M. 102. Mr. Davis and Mr. Carpenter. 



123. Bridge Design. I. 3 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: C. E. 121. 



Mr. Davis. 



124. Thesis. I, II. 2 or 4 Hrs. 

Special design, investigation, or original research of some assigned 
topic relating to civil engineering. Staff. 

200. Water Power Engineering. II. 2 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: C. E. 115. 

201. Hydraulic Measurements. I, II. 1 Hr. 
Prerequisite: C. E. 115. 

202. Water Purification and Design. I. 3 or 4 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: registration in C. E. 116. 

203. Sewage Disposal. II. 3 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: C. E. 115. 



204. Advanced Structures. II. 

Prerequisite: C. E. 121. 



3 Hrs. 



205. Steel Building Design. I, II. 3 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: C. E. 121. 

206. Concrete Construction. II. 3 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: C. E. 121. 

207. Foundations. I. 3 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: C. E. 121. 



Mr. Davis. 
Mr. Carpenter. 
Mr. Carpenter, 
Mr. Carpenter. 

Mr. Davis. 

Mr. Davis, 

Mr. Davis. 



208. Transportation Economics. 
Prerequisite: C E. 102. 



II. 2 Hrs. 



209. Highway Laboratory. II. 2 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: M. 103. 



Mr. Davis, 



Mr. Downs. 



Mr. Nelson. 



278 Courses of Instruction 

Graduate Division 

300. Thesis. I, II, credit to be arranged; SI, 2 to 6 Hrs. 

Mr. Davis and Mr. Carpenter. 

301. Advanced Water Supply Engineering. I, II. Credit to be ar- 
ranged. Prerequisite: C. E. 116. Mr. Carpenter. 

302. Sewerage and Sewage Disposal. I, II. Credit to be arranged. 
Prerequisite: C. E. 118. Mr. Carpenter. 

303. Advanced Design Problems. I, II. Credit to be arranged. 

Mr. Davis and Mr. Carpenter. 

304. Advanced Water Power Engineering. I, II. Credit to be ar- 
ranged. Prerequisite: C. E. 200. Mr. Davis. 

305. Statically Indeterminate Structures. I, II. Credit to be arranged. 
Prerequisite: C. E. 204. Mr. Davis. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Professors Forman and Hall; Instructors Jones and Lienau. 
Undergraduate Division 

1. Electrical Construction. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Special construction work and assignment to engineering litera- 
ture. Mr. Hall and Staff. 

100.* Elements of Electrical Engineering. I. 4 Hrs. 

Primarily for juniors in electrical engineering. One laboratory 
period. Prerequisite: Physics 106. Mr. Forman and Mr. Jones. 

101.* Applied Electricity. I, II. 4 Hrs. 

Primarily for juniors in civil engineering. One laboratory period. 
Prerequisite: Physics 106. Mr. Jones. 

102.* Elements of Electrical Engineering. I. 4 Hrs. 

For students in mechanical and mining engineering. Accompanied 
by electrical laboratory. Mr. Hall and Staff. 

103.* Elements of Electrical Engineering. II. 4 Hrs. 

Continuation of E. E. 102. Mr. Hall and Staff. 

104. Illumination. II. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Physics 106. Mr. Forman. 

105. Thesis. I, II. 2 to 5 Hrs. 

Special investigation or original research on some topic relating 
to electrical engineering. Mr. Forman and Mr. Hall. 



*May be taken as undergraduate work in colleges other than the College 
of Engineering and Mechanic Arts. 



Engineering and Mechanic Arts 279 

110. Elements of Electrical Engineering;. I. 5 Hrs. 

For students in chemical engineering. Accompanied by electrical 
laboratory. Mr. Hall and Staff. 

200.* Direct Current Machinery. II. 4 Hrs. 

To follow E. E. 100. Mr. Hall and Staff. 

201.* Alternating Current Theory and Measurements. II. 4 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: E. E. 100. Mr. Forman and Mr. Jones. 

202.* Alternating Current Machinery. I. 3 Hrs. 

To follow E. E. 201. Accompanied by E. E. 205. Mr. Forman. 

203.* Alternating Current Machinery. II. 3 Hrs. 

Continuation of E. E. 202. Mr. Forman. 

204. Electrical Design and Calculations. I. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: E. E. 102 or 200. Mr. Hall and Mr. Jones. 

205.* Electrical Engineering Laboratory. I. 2 Hrs. 

To accompany E. E. 202. Mr. Forman and Mr. Jones 

206.* Advanced Electrical Laboratory. II. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: E. E. 202 and 205. Mr. Forman and Mr. Jones. 

207. Electrical Transmission. I. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: E. E. 201. Mr. Hall. 

208. Electric Design. II. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: E. E. 207. Mr. Hall and Mr. Jones. 

209. Electric Traction. II. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: E. E. 202. Mr. Hall. 

210. Rate Making Contracts and Metering. II. 2 or 3 Hrs. 

A study of factors involved in the metering, buying and selling of 
electrical energy. Mr. Hall. 

211. Electrical Problems. I, II. Credit to be arranged. Mr. Forman. 

212. Transients, Surges, and Electric Waves. II. 3 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: E. E. 201. Mr. Forman. 

213. Electric Power Transmission and Distribution. II. 3 Hrs. 
Advanced theory and calculations of transmission lines and net- 
works. Prerequisite: E. E. 207. Mr. Hall. 

214. Industrial Applications of Electricity. II. 3 Hrs. 
Prerequisite: E. E. 103 or 202. Mr. Hall. 



♦May be taken as undergraduate work in colleges other than the College 
of Engineering and Mechanic Arts. 



280 Courses of Instruction 

215. High Tension Dielectric Phenomena. II. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: E. E. 201. Mr. Forman. 

2] 6. Telephone Engineering. II. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: E. E. 201. Mr. Forman. 

Graduate Division 

300. Thesis. I, II. Credit to be arranged. 

Advanced research or special investigations on some topic related 
to electrical engineering. Mr. Forman or Mr. Hill. 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

Professor Maglin. 
Undergraduate Division 

101.* Vocational Education. II, Si. 2 Hrs. 

This course is offered primarily for superintendents, principals, 
and vocational teachers. It is designed to acquaint them with the 
influences which tend to broaden educational activities, to apprise 
them of the nature of federal and state aid, to familiarize them 
with the types of work suitable for different communities and to 
inform them regarding the qualifications of teachers. 

Mr. Maclin. 

102. Methods of Foreman Training. II. 2 Hrs. 

An analysis of the job of foreman, organization of foreman train- 
ing classes in industrial plants, the foreman as a teacher. 

Mr. Maclin. 

103.* Part-Time Education. II. 2 or 3 Hrs. Mr. Maclin. 

104. Occupational and Case Analysis in Vocational Guidance. II. 2 Hrs. 
Methods of making occupational analysis; the directing of students 
in securing vocational information; ways of giving guidance to 
pupils. Mr. Maclin. 

105.* Vocational and Educational Guidance. II, SI. 2 Hrs. 

Mr. Maclin. 

106s. Organization and Administration of Manual Training. SI. 2 Hrs. 
The study of the historical and educational basis for manual 
training, relation to other school subjects, relation to industry, 
social value, place in rural schools and methods of organizing and 
handling classes, cost keeping, courses of study, lists of equipment, 
standard of achievements to be obtained, method of teaching. 
Open only to those who are taking or who have credit for Mechani- 
cal Engineering 2 and 21, or their equivalent. 

124. Methods of Teaching. II. 2 Hrs. 

Some practice teaching. Prerequisite: I. E. 164. Mr. Maclin. 

164. Materials, Organization, and Administration. I. 2 Hrs. 

The organization of vocational schools, classes, and subject matter 
for the purpose of teaching. Mr. Maclin. 



♦May be taken as undergraduate work in colleges other than the College 
of Engineering and Mechanic Arts. 



Engineering and Mechanic Arts 281 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

DRAWIXG. MACHINE DESIGX. MACHINE CONSTRUCTION. AND 
INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

Professors Hayes and Gill; Assistant Professors Grow and White; and 
Instructors West, Seaman, H. M. Cather, Carl, and Gnagey. 

POWER ENGINEERING 

Professor Grumbein, and Instructors Amidon and H. M. Cather. 

Undergraduate Division 

1.* Pattern Making. I, II, SI. 1 Hr. 

Two three-hour periods or three two-hour periods, one-half 
semester only. Mr. Seaman and Mr. Stillman. 

2.* Woodworking. I, SI. 2 Hrs. Mr. Seaman. 

3.* Woodworking. I, II, SI. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: M. E. 2. Mr. Seaman and Mr. Stillman. 

4.* Pattern Making. I, II, SI. 2 Hrs. 

Two three-hour periods. Prerequisite: M. E. 1 and 5. 

Mr. Seaman and Mr. Stillman. 
5.* Foundry. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Two three-hour periods. Mr. Seaman and Mr. Carl. 

6s. Sheet Metal Work. SI. 2 Hrs. 

A course planned to be of special help to those who are introducing 
the work. Practice will be given in soldering, brazing, wiring, 
and hemming, laying out work and cutting, and the making of 
objects for home and school use. Course of study and equipment. 

Mr. West. 

7.* Forging. I» II, SI. 1 Hr. 

Two three-hour periods or three two-hour periods, one-half 
semester only. Mr. West. 

8s. Woodfinishing. SI. 2 Hrs. 

The proper selection of colors for different kinds of wood, the 
mixing of fillers, stains and paints, the application of varnish, 
shellac, and oil finishes. Mr. Seaman. 

10.* Pipefitting. I, II, SI. 1 Hr. 

One three-hour period. Mr. West. 

11.* Machine Work. I, II, SI. 2 Hrs. 

Two three-hour periods. Mr. Gill and Mr. Gnagey. 

12.* Machine Work. 1, II, SI. 1 Hr. 

One three-hour period. Continuation of M. E. 11, which is a pre- 
requisite. Mr. Gill and Mr. Gnagey. 



♦May be taken as undergraduate work in colleges other than the College 
of Engineering and Mechanic Arts. 



282 Courses of Instruction 

13s.* Machine Work. SI. 3 Hrs. 

Equivalent to M. E. 11 and 12. Summer session, four hours per 
day for six weeks. Mr. Gill and Mr. Gnagey. 

20.* Mechanical Drawing. I, II, 3 Hrs.; SI (20s), 2 Hrs. 

Three three-hour periods. Mr. Grow and Staff. 

21s. Mechanical Drawing. SI. 2 Hrs. 

The use and care of drawing instruments, freehand sketching and 
lettering. Elementary problems in working drawings, teaching 
projections, common drafting room conventions and their use in 
the making of simple working drawings, tracing, and blue-print- 
ing. This course is intended for those who are teaching manual 
training in public schools. Mr. Hayes. 

22s. Mechanical Drawing. SI. 2 Hrs. 

Continuation of Mechanical Engineering 20s; tracing, engineering 
sketches and workings from models, and drawing machine parts 
from proportions obtained from empirical formulae. Mr. Hayes. 

23. Mechanical Drawing. I. 2 Hrs. 

Continuation of M. E. 20. For mining engineering students only. 

Mr. Cather. 

24.* Empirical Design. I, II, SI. 2 Hrs. 

Two three-hour periods or three two-hour periods. Prerequisite: 
M. E. 11 or 13s, and M. E. 20. Mr. Grow and Staff. 

26.* Descriptive Geometry. I, II, SI. 3 Hrs. 

Three three-hour periods. Prerequisite: M. E. 20 and solid 
geometry. Mr. Hayes and Staff. 

29.* Mechanism. 1, II. 4 Hrs. 

Lectures, recitations and drawing problems. Two one-hour and 
two three-hour periods. Prerequisite: M. E. 20 and 26. 

Mr. Hayes and Staff. 
101.* Woodworking. I, II, SI. 2 Hrs. 

Continuation of M. E. 3. Mr. Seaman and Mr. Stillman. 

103.* Foundry Work. Semester and credit to be arranged; SI (103s), 

2 Hrs. 

Advanced work for special students. Continuation of M. E. 5. 

Mr. Seaman and Mr. Carl. 
104.* Forging. 

Semester and credit to be arranged. Advanced work for special 

students. Continuation of M. E. 7. Mr. West. 

105.* Machine Construction. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Continuation of M. E. 13s. Two three-hour periods. 

Mr. Gill and Mr. Gnagey. 
106.* Shop Methods. II. 2 or 3 Hrs. 

Continuation of M. E. 105. Two three-hour periods. Mr. Gill. 



•May be taken as undergraduate work in colleges other than the College 
of Engineering and Mechanic Arts. 



Engineering and Mechanic Arts 283 

107.* Machine Construction. 

Semester and credit to be arranged. Advanced work for special 
students. Continuation of M. E. 105 and 106. Mr. Gill. 

111. Machine Design. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

To accompany M. E. 112. Two periods. Prerequisite: M. 102 
and M. E. 29. Mr. Hayes. 

112. Machine Drawing. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

To accompany M. E. 111. Two three-hour periods. 

Mr. Hayes and Staff. 

122. Mechanical Laboratory. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Physics 106 and M. 101, and accompanying M. E. 
221. Mr. Grumbein, Mr. Amidon, and Mr. Cather. 

123. Engineering Laboratory. I. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: M. E. 122. Mr. Grumbein and Mr. Amidon. 

124. Thesis. I, II. 2 to 4 Hrs. 

Investigation or original research on some special topic relating to 
Mechanical Engineering. Mr. Grumbein and Mr. Hayes. 

201. Advanced Machine Design. I. 2 Hrs. 

Continuation of M. E. 111. To accompany M. E. 202. Lectures and 
recitations. Two periods. Mr. Hayes. 

202. Designing and Drawing. I. 2 Hrs. 

To accompany M. E. 201. Two three-hour periods. 

Mr. Hayes and Staff. 

205. Industrial Engineering. I. 3 Hrs. 

Three periods. Mr. Hayes. 

206. Industrial Engineering. II. 3 Hrs. 

Three periods. Prerequisite: M. E. 205. Mr. Hayes. 

207.* Industrial Engineering. II. 3 Hrs. 

Three periods. Mr. Hayes. 

221.* Thermodynamics of Engineering. I. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Physics 105 and 107, and Math. 108. 

Mr. Grumbein. 
222.* Heat Engines. II. 3 Hrs. 

Continuation of M. E. 221. Mr. Grumbein. 

223.* Steam Power Plants. I. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: M. E. 221. Mr. Grumbein and Mr. Cather. 

224. Steam Turbines. I. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: M. E. 222. Mr. Grumbein and Mr. Amidon. 

225. Gas Engines and Gas Engineering. II. 3 Hrs. 

Fuel gases, gas production and transmission, gas engines, etc. 
Prerequisite: M. E. 222. Mr. Grumbein and Mr. Amidon. 



♦May be taken as undergraduate work in colleges other than the College 
of Engineering and Mechanic Arts. 



284 Courses of Instruction 

226.* Heating and Ventilating. II. 2 or 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: M. E. 221. Mr. Grumbein. 

227. Steam Power Plant Design. II. 2 Hrs. 
Continuation of M. E. 223. Two three-hour periods. 

Mr. Grumbein and Mr. Cather. 

228. Engineering Laboratory. II. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: M. E. 123. Mr. Grumbein and Mr. Amidon. 

Graduate Division 

300. Thesis. I, II. Credit to be arranged. 

Investigation or original research on some special topic relating to 
mechanical engineering. Mr. Grumbein or Mr. Hayes. 

301. Engineering Laboratory. I, II. Credit will be given on the basis 
of the time spent in laboratory and the progress of the student. 
Commercial tests and research work. Mr. Grumbein. 

MECHANICS 

Professor Boomsliter; and Assistant Professor Cather. 
Undergraduate Division 

101.* Statics. I, II, SI. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Math. 108 (or registration in Math. 108), and 
Physics 105 and 107. Mr. Boomsliter and Mr. Cather. 

102.* Mechanics of Materials. I, II. 4 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: M. 101. Mr. Boomsliter and Mr. Cather. 

103.* Materials Testing Laboratory. I, II. 1 Hr. 

Prerequisite: Registration in M. 102. 

Mr. Boomsliter and Mr. Cather. 
104.* Kinetics. I, II, SI. 3 Hrs. 

Continuation of M. 101. Prerequisite: M. 101. 

Mr. Boomsliter and Mr. Cather. 

200. Advanced Mechanics of Materials. I or II. 2 to 4 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: M. 102. Mr. Boomsliter. 

202. Materials Research. I or II. 2 to 4 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: M. 102. Mr. Boomsliter. 

Graduate Division 

301. Advanced Kinetics. II. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: M. 101 and 104. Mr. Boomsliter. 



♦May be taken as undergraduate work in colleges other than the College 
of Engineering and Mechanic Arts. 



Engineering and Mechanic Arts 285 

GENERAL 

Undergraduate Division 

1. Engineering Lectures. I. (No credit). 

Required of all freshmen in engineering. A series of lectures de- 
signed to acquaint the engineering student at the beginning of his 
course with the profession he has chosen. Factors determining 
choice of engineering as a profession; the various kinds of engi- 
neering and the ability, training, opportunity, and responsibilities 
involved in each; problems and difficulties of the engineering stu- 
dent; the engineering point of view as applied to the student's 
daily environment and college life. Mr. Boomsliter. 

101. Engineering Society. I, II. Y2 Hr. 

Primarily for juniors. Required of all candidates for degrees in 
engineering. Membership, attendance, and active participation in 
the Engineering Society. Mr. Grumbein and Committee. 

102. Engineering Society. I, II. Y2 Hr. 

Continuation of G. 101. For juniors. 

Mr. Grumbein and Committee. 

103. Engineering Society. I, II. Y2 Hr. 

For seniors. Required of all candidates for degrees in engineer- 
ing. Continuation of G. 101 and 102. 

Mr. Grumbein and Committee. 

104. Engineering Society. I, II. Y2 Hr. 

Continuation of G. 103. For seniors. 

Mr. Grumbein and Committee. 
105s. Summer Practice. S. 2 Hrs. 

Required of all candidates for degrees in chemical, electrical and 
mechanical engineering. At least six weeks of practical ex- 
perience in some branch of engineering activity, preferably of a 
character that will articulate with the student's major subject. 
Students are recommended to spend all vacation periods in practi- 
cal work but under exceptional circumstances the Faculty of the 
College of Engineering may permit the substitution of an approved 
practical course taken in residence. Application for summer credit 
should be made before beginning the work; and the work done 
should be certified and reported in accordance with the special 
rules for Summer Practice, on or before October 1, after the work 
has been done. Work may be done during any vacation period. 

106s. Shopwork. S. 3 Hrs. 

Summer shop practice out of residence required for the degree of 
B. S. in Industrial Education. This work is to be along the line 
of the major or minor group. 

107s. Shopwork. S. 2 Hrs. 

Continuation of G. 106s. For students in industrial education. 

110. Business Law. I, II. 3 Hrs. 

General principles of business law. The law of contracts. Standard 
contract forms. Prerequisite: Economics 103, or 1 and 2, and 
M. 102. Mr. C. R. Jones. 



286 Courses of Instruction 

INDUSTRIAL SCIENCES 

Professor Burke. 

210. Research Administration. II. 2 Hrs. 

A study of the functions, organization, costs, management, and 
operation of industrial research departments. Mr. Burke. 

211. Research Administration. I. 2 Hrs. 

A study of factors influencing the direction and policies of re- 
search organizations; patents, patent law, and the relation of the 
research to the patent department; market analyses and economic 
surveys for the formulation and guidance of research policy; the 
economic and financial structure of the chemical industry. 

Mr. Burkb, 

LAW 1 

Professors Hardman, Carlin, Dickinson, and Williams; Associate 

Professors Fordham and Billig; Assistant Professor 

Horack; and Lecturer Donley. 

FIRST YEAR 

* Agency (Including Workmen's Compensation). II. 4 Hrs. 

Four hours a week in the second semester. Wambaugh, Cases on 
Agency (2d ed.). Mr. Horack. 

♦Contracts. Yr. 6 Hrs. 

Three hours a week throughout the year. Huffcutt & Woodruff, 
Cases on Contracts (4th ed.). Mr. Billig. 

♦Criminal Law and Procedure. I. 4 Hrs. 

Four hours a week in the first semester. Sayre, Criminal Law and 
Criminal Procedure. Mr. Horack. 

♦Introduction to Procedure. I. 2 Hrs. 

Two hours a week in the first semester. Sunderland, Cases on 
Common Law Pleading (2d ed.) and Morgan, Introduction to the 
Study of Law. Mr. Williams. 

♦Personal Property. I. 2 Hrs. 

Two hours a week in the first semester. Bigelow, Cases on Prop- 
erty, Vol. 1 (2d ed.). Mr. Carlin. 

♦Real Property (I). II. 4 Hrs. 

Four hours a week in the second semester. Bigelow, Introduction 
to the Law of Real Property and Aigler, Cases on Titles (2d ed.). 

Mr. Williams. 
♦Torts. Yr. 6 Hrs. 

Three hours a week throughout the year. Wilson's Cases on Torts. 

Mr. Dickinson. 
Use of Law Books. II. 1 Hr. 

One hour a week in the second semester. Law Books and Their 
Use (3d ed.). Mr. Donlet. 

♦Required courses. 

ir The programme of courses as here given is subject to change. 



Law 287 

SECOND YEAR 
♦Common Law Pleading (Including Drafting of Pleadings). II. 4 Hrs. 
Four hours a week in the second semester. Sunderland, Cases on 
Common Law Pleading (2d ed.). Mr. Carlin. 

♦Equity Jurisdiction (I). I. 4 Hrs. 

Four hours a week in the first semester. Cook's Cases on Equity 
(single volume, 2d ed.). Mr. Fordham. 

♦Evidence. I. 4 Hrs. 

Four hours a week in the first semester. Thayer, Cases on Evi- 
dence (2d ed.). Mr. Hardman. 

Legal Ethics. I. 1 Hr. 

One hour a week in the first semester. Hicks, Organization and 
Ethics of Bench and Bar. Mr. Donley. 

Negotiable Instruments. II. 3 Hrs. 

Three hours a week in the second semester. Smith & Moore, 
Cases on Bills and Notes (2d ed.). Mr. Dickinson. 

♦Real Property (II). I. 2 Hrs. 

Two hours a week in the first semester. Bigelow, Cases on Rights 
in Land (part). Mr. Williams. 

Real Property (III). II. 4 Hrs. 

Four hours a week in the second semester. Bigelow, Cases on 
Rights in Land (part) and Powell, Cases on Future Interests. 

Mr. Williams. 
Sales of Personal Property. I. 3 Hrs. 

Three hours a week in the first semester. Woodward, Cases on 
Sales (2d ed.). Mr. Billig. 

Trusts. II. 4 Hrs. 

Four hours a week in the second semester. Scott, Cases on Trusts 
(2d ed.). Mr. Fordham. 

Wills and Administration. II. 2 Hrs. 

Two hours a week in the second semester. Case-book to be 
announced. Given in 1933-34 and alternate years thereafter. 

Mr. Horack. 

Quasi-Contracts. II. 2 Hrs. 

Two hours a week in the second semester. Thurston, Cases on 
Quasi-Contracts. Mr. Horack. 

THIRD YEAR 

Administration of Insolvent Estates. II. 3 Hrs. 

Three hours a week in the second semester. Billig and Carey, Cases 
on the Administration of Insolvent Estates. Mr. Billig. 

fAdmniistrative Law. II. 2 Hrs. 

Two hours a week in the second semester. Case-book to be 
announced. Mr. Horack. 



♦Required courses. 

tOmitted during the academic year 1933-34 and alternate years thereafter. 



288 Courses of Instruction 

Conflict of Laws. I. 4 Hrs. 

Four hours a week in the first semester. Beale, Cases on Conflict 
of Laws. Mr. Dickinson. 

Constitutional Law. I. 4 Hrs. 

Four hours a week in the first semester. McGovney, Cases on 
Constitutional Law. Mr. Horack. 

•{•Corporation Finance. II. 2 Hrs. 

Two hours a week in the second semester. Douglas and Shanks, 
Cases and Materials on Business Units, Finance. Mr. Fordham. 

Drafting Legal Instruments. II. 1 Hr. 

One hour a week in the second semester. See page 15 for informa- 
tion as to the work in this course. Mr. Carlin. 

Equity Jurisidiction (II). II. 2 Hrs. 

Two hours a week in the second semester. Chafee, Equitable Re- 
lief Against Torts. Given in 1933-34 and alternate years there- 
after. Mr. Fordham. 

Equity Pleading and Practice. I. 2 Hrs. 

Two hours a week in the first semester. Clephane on Equity 
Pleading and Practice and selected cases and statutes. 

Mr. Carlin. 

Municipal Corporations. I. 2 Hrs. 

Two hours a week in the first semester. Macy, Cases on Municipal 
Corporations. Mr. Fordham. 

♦Practice and Procedure. I. 4 Hrs. 

Four hours a week in the first semester. Munson, Elementary 
Practice, selected cases, statutes, and lectures. See page 185 for 
information as to work in this course. Mr. Fordham. 

♦Practice Court. II. 3 Hrs. 

Court sessions and lecture periods in the second semester as 
specified by the faculty. See page 185 for information as to work 
of the practice court. Mr. Carlin and Judges. 

Private Corporations. I. 4 Hrs. 

Four hours a week in the first semester. Warren, Cases on 
Private Corporations (2d ed.) with Dodd's Supplement (2d ed.). 

Mr. Williams. 

Public Utilities. II. 4 Hrs. 

Four hours a week in the second semester. Smith and Dowling, 
Cases on Public Utilities. Mr. Hardman. 



*Required courses. 

tOmitted during the academic year 1933-34 and alternate years thereafter. 



Medicine 289 



MEDICINE 1 

ANATOMY 

Professors S. J. Morris and Dodds; Instructor Taylor; and 
Assistants Talbott and Patterson. 

GROSS ANATOMY AND NEUROLOGY 
Undergraduate Division 

1. Anatomy. II. 4 Hrs. 

For physical education students only. . Dr. Morris. 

101. Gross Anatomy. I. 7 Hrs. 

Required of all first-year students. Lectures and recitations, 72 
hours; laboratory, 195 hours. Prerequisite: Zoology 1 and 2, 
comparative anatomy desirable. Dr. Morris and Staff. 

102. Gross Anatomy. II. 3 Hrs. 

Required of all first year medical students. Continuation of 
Anatomy 101. Lectures, 54 hours; laboratory, 108 hours. Pre- 
requisite: Anatomy 101. Dr. Morris and Staff. 

103. Neurology. II. 3 Hrs. 

Required of all first-year medical students. Lectures, 36 hours; 
laboratory, 72 hours. Second half of semester. Prerequisite: 
Histology 104, Anatomy 101, psychology desirable. 

Dr. Morris and Staff. 
106. Applied Anatomy. II. 2 Hrs. 

Required of all second-year medical students. Lectures, 36 hours. 
Prerequisite: Anatomy 101 and 102, Neurology 103, Embryology 
105. Dr. Morris. 

209. Advanced Anatomy. Credit to be arranged. 

Open to properly qualified students. Dr. MORRIS. 

210. Anatomy of Eye, Ear, and Nose. Credit to be arranged. 

Open to properly qualified students. Dr. Morris. 

HISTOLOGY AND EMBRYOLOGY 
Undergraduate Division 

104. Histology. I. 5 Hrs. 

Required of all first-year medical students. Lectures, 36 hours; 
laboratory, 144 hours. Prerequisite: Zoology 1 and 2, Anatomy 
101, or to be taken at the same time. Mr. Dodds and Staff. 

105. Embryology. II. 3 Hrs. 

Required of all first-year medical students. Lectures, 36 hours; 
laboratory, 72 hours. Prerequisite: Histology 104, and Anatomy 
101. Mr. Dodds and Staff. 



x For explanation of abbreviations, see page 206. Staff members whose 
names are preceded by the abbreviation "Dr." have been admitted to the 
practice of medicine. 



290 Courses of Instruction 

207. Advanced Histology. I or II. Credit to be arranged. 

Open to properly qualified students. Laboratory work and study 
of current literature. Mr. Dodds. 

208. Advanced Embryology. I or II. Credit to be arranged. 

Open to properly qualified students. Mr. Dodds. 

BIOCHEMISTRY 

Assistant Professor Rafferty; and Assistants Powell and Rothey. 

101. Biochemistry. I. 6 Hrs. 

Lectures, 54 hours; laboratory, 180 hours. Prerequisite: in- 
organic and organic chemistry quant, analysis, and zoology. 

Mr. Rafferty and Staff. 

202. Chemistry of the Carbohydrates, Fats, and Proteins. I. 5 Hrs. 
Lectures, two per week; laboratory, 6 hours per week. Pre- 
requisite: inorganic chemistry, qualitative analysis, and organic 
chemistry. Mr. Rafferty. 

203. Chemistry of Digestion, Metabolism, and Excretion. II. 5 Hrs. 
Lectures, two per week; laboratory, 6 hours per week. 

Mr. Rafferty. 

204. Quantitative Methods of Urine and Blood Analysis. II. 5 Hrs. 
Lectures, two per week; laboratory, 6 hours per week. 

Mr. Rafferty. 

206. Biochemical Preparations. I or II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Rafferty. 

207. Biochemical Preparations. I or II. 3 Hrs. Mr. Rafferty. 

PATHOLOGY AND BACTERIOLOGY 

Professors Fenton and Spray; Instructor Moody; and Assistants 
Lighthiser and DeAngelis. 

Undergraduate Division 

101. General Pathology. I. 6 Hrs. 

Required of second-year medical students. Lectures, demonstra- 
tions, and laboratory work. Prerequisite: physiological chemistry, 
histology, physiology, anatomy, and bacteriology. 

Dr. Fenton and Staff. 

102. Pathology of Infectious Granulomas and Tumors. II. 3 Hrs. 
Required of second-year medical students. Lectures, recitations, 
and laboratory work. Prerequisite: Pathology 101. 

Dr. Fenton and Staff. 

103. Clinical Pathology. II. 3 Hrs. 

Required of second-year medical students. A laboratory course in 
blood, gastric contents, etc., and their pathological and clinical 
significance. Prerequisite: Bacteriology 105, physiology 102, and 
Biochemistry 101 and Pathology 101. Dr. Fenton and Staff. 



Medicine 291 



105. Medical Bacteriology. II. 5 Hrs. 

Required of first-year medical students. Prerequisite: Bio- 
chemistry 101. Mr. Spray and Staff. 

106. Hygiene. I. 2 Hrs. 

Required of second-year medical students. Prerequisite: Bacteri- 
ology 105. Mr. Spray. 

207. Pathology (Special). I or II. 3 Hrs. 

Microscopic and gross specimens from selected autopsies. Pre- 
requisite: Pathology 101 and 102. Dr. Fenton. 

208. Advanced Bacteriology. I. Credit to be arranged. 

Open to graduates and advanced students. Mr. Spray. 

Graduate Division 

308. Advanced Bacteriology. I or II. Credit to be arranged. 
Prerequisite: Bacteriology 105 or equivalent. Mr. Spray. 

309. Experimental Pathology. I or II. Credit to be arranged. 

Dr. Fenton. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

Professor Van Liere; Associate Professor Crisler; and 
Assistant Robinson. 

Undergraduate Division 

101. Physiology. II. 4 Hrs. 

Elementary course for pharmacy students. 

Dr. Crisler and Staff. 

102. Physiology. II. 2 Hrs. 

Physiology of muscle, nerve, and blood. Prerequisite: Biochemis- 
try 101 and Histology 104. Dr. Van Liere and Staff. 

103. Physiology. I. 7 Hrs. 

Physiology of circulation, respiration, digestion, metabolism, secre- 
tion, central nervous system, and special senses. Prerequisite: 
Physiology 102, Anatomy 101 and 102 and Neurology 103. 

Dr. Van Liere and Staff. 

104. Physiology. II. 1 Hr. 

Physiology of internal secretion. Prerequisite: Physiology 103. 

Dr. Crisler. 
205. Seminar in Physiology. Yr. No credit. 

Graduate Division 

306. Physiology. I or II. Credit to be arranged. 

Research in physiology, leading to the Master of Science degree. 

Dr. Van Liere and Dr. Crisler. 



292 Courses of Instruction 

# 

PHARMACOLOGY 

Assistant Professors David and Rafferty; and 
Assistants Powell and Rothey. 

Undergraduate Division 

101. Chemical Pharmacology. II. 1 Hr. 

3 hours per week; 54 hours. Prerequisite: inorganic and organic 
chemistry and zoology. Mr. Rafferty and Staff. 

102. Systematic Pharmacology. I. 3 Hrs. 

For second-year medical students. Three hours per week; 54 
hours. Prerequisite: Pharmacology 101, Physiology 102 and 
Biochemistry 101. Dr. David. 

103. Pharmacodynamics. II. 2 Hrs. 

For second-year medical students. Five hours per week; 90 
hours. Conferences and demonstrations. Prerequisite: Pharma- 
cology 102. Dr. David and Staff. 

104. Systematic Pharmacology. II. 3 Hrs. 

Continuation of course 103. Three hours per week; 54 hours. 
Prerequisite: Pharmacology 102. Dr. Davdd and Staff. 

211. Bio- Assay. I, II. Credit according to work done. 

Open to properly qualified students. Special pharmacodynamics. 
Hours to be arranged. Dr. David and Staff. 

212. Toxicology. I. 2 Hrs. 

A special course devoted to the study of the methods — chemical 
and biological — of detecting poisons of medico-legal interest; 
total, 72 hours. Prerequisite: Pharmacology 101 and 102. 

Mr. Rafferty. 

213. Pharmacology Research. II. Credit to be arranged. 
Problems open to specially interested students with proper quali- 
fications. Hours to be arranged. Dr. David. 

MEDICINE 
PHYSICAL DIAGNOSIS 

Professor Simpson; and Instructors Bray, Maxwell, and Whittlesey. 

Undergraduate Division 

101. Physical Diagnosis. II. 2 Hrs. 

Required of second-year medical students. An introductory course 
in the study of the taking of medical histories and the examination 
of patients. Lectures, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Prerequisite: 
Anatomy 101 and 102, Physiology 103. 

Sec. A, Dr. Bray; Sec. B, Dr. Maxwell; 
Sec. C, Dr. Whittlesey. 



Military Science and Tactics 293 

THEORETICAL, MEDICINE 

Professor Simpson. 

Undergraduate Division 

102. Theoretical Medicine. II. 2 Hrs. 

Recitations upon the more common diseases with the application of 
the principles taught in Physical Diagnosis 101. Prerequisite: 
Anatomy 101 and 102, Physiology 103. Dr. Simpson. 

OBSTETRICS 

Professor Van Liere. 
Undergraduate Division 

107. Obstetrics. I. 2 Hrs. 

Introductory course in obstetrics. Lectures, 36 hours. Pre- 
requisite: Anatomy 101 and 102. Dr. Van Liere. 

INTRODUCTORY SURGERY 

Instructor Pride. 

Undergraduate Division 

101. Surgery and Operative Technique. II. 3 Hrs. 

Required of second-year medical students. Prerequisite: Anatomy 
101 and 102, Applied Anatomy 106 to be taken at same time. 

Dr. Pride. 

MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

Professor Baldwin; Assistant Professors Smith, Whipple, Nesbit, 
and Lincoln ; and Assistants Schultz, Dearborn, and Young. 

Undergraduate Division 
Basic — Fikst Year 

1. Military Science. 1 Hr. 

Infantry: National Defense Act, military courtesy and discipline, 
drill and command, and rifle marksmanship. 

Engineers: National Defense Act, military courtesy and dis- 
cipline, drill and command, rifle marksmanship, and military 
bridges. 

2. Military Science. 1 Hr. 

Infantry and Engineers : Military hygiene and first aid, drill and 
command, and scouting and patrolling. 

Basic — Second year 

3. Military Science. 1 Hr. 

Infantry : Drill and command, musketry, automatic rifle, scouting 
and patrolling, and combat principles. 

Engineers: Drill and command, musketry, automatic rifle, and 
scouting and patrolling. 

4. Military Science. 1 Hr. 

Infantry and Engineers: Drill and command, scoutjng and 
patrolling, and combat principles. 



294 Courses of Instruction 

Advanced — First Year 

105. Military Science. 1 Hr. 

Infantry: Map reading and military sketching, drill and com- 
mand, machine guns and 37 m.m. guns, and 3 inch trench mortars. 
Engineers: Drill and command, military explosives and demoli- 
tions, fortifications, military bridges, and map reading and mili- 
tary sketching. 

106. Military Science. 1 Hr. 

Infantry: Drill and command, 37 m.m. guns and 3 inch mortars, 
and combat principles. 

Engineers: Drill and command, combat principles, military 
bridges, and map making and reproduction. 

Advanced — Second year 

107. Military Science. 1 Hr. 

Infantry : Military law and 0. R. C. regulations, military history 

and policy of the United States, drill and command, and combat 

principles. 

Engineers: Military law and 0. R. C. regulations, military 

history and policy of the United States, drill and command, 

combat principles, and engineer organization and duties. 

108. Military Science. 1 Hr. 

Infantry: Military history and policy of the United States, unit 

administration, field engineering, drill and command, and combat 

principles. 

Engineers : Military history and policy of the United States, unit 

administration, drill and command, military bridges, and engineer 

organization and duties. 

MINING 

Professor Law all; and Assistant Professor Staab. 
Undergraduate Division 
101. Mine Surveying. II. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: C. E. 2. Mr. Staab. 

102s. Mine Surveying. 1 SI. 3 Hrs. 

This course is a continuation of and gives practice supplementing 
E. M. 101. It must be taken during the summer term immediately 
following the semester in which E. M. 101 is taken. 

Mr. Law all and Mr. Staab. 

106.* Elementary Mineralogy. I, II. 1 or 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 4. Mr. Staab. 

107. Mining Methods. II. 4 Hrs. 

A study of the coal fields and mining methods of West Virginia 
and of the United States, supplemented by field work in the vicinity 
of Morgantown. Inspection trips, with written reports, are re- 
quired. Prerequisite: E. M. 111. Mr. Staab. 



♦May be taken by undergraduates in other colleges. 

students entering in 1933-34 or later will take this course for 5 hours of 
credit. 



Mining Engineering 296 



111. Mining. I. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 6 and Physics 106. Mr. Staab. 

112. Coal Mining. II. 4 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: E. M. 111. Mr. Lawall. 

113. Mine Ventilation. I. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: E. M. 112 and 107. Mr. Law all. 

114. Mine Management. II. 1 Hr. 

Prerequisite: E. M. 112. Mr. Law all. 

115. Mine Design. I. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: E. M. 112 and registration in C. E. 122. 

Mr. Law all and Mr. Staab. 

116. Mine Design. II. 3 Hrs. 

Continuation of E. M. 115, which is prerequisite. 

Mr. Law all and Mr. Staab. 
118. Mining Laboratory. II. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: E. M. 112 and 202. Mr. Law all. 

120. Thesis. I, II. 2 to 4 Hrs. 

An individual problem on some phase of mining. None but excep- 
tional students having high scholastic standing will be permitted 
to elect this course. Mr. Law all and Mr. Staab. 

201. Oil and Gas Production. I. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: Geology 211. Mr. Law all and Mr. Staab. 

202. Coal Laboratory. I. 1 Hr. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 6. Mr. Law all. 

203.* Geological Surveying. II. 2 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: E. M. 101 and Geology 162. Mr. Staab. 

Graduate Division 

300. Thesis. I, II. Credit to be arranged. 

An individual problem in some phase of mining. A carefully pre- 
pared report is required. Mr. Law all and Mr. Staab. 

301. Mining Investigations. I. 3 to 10 Hrs. 

Prerequisite: E. M. Ill, 112, and 113. Mr. Law all. 

302. Mining Investigations. II. 3 to 10 Hrs. 

A continuation of E. M. 301. Mr. Lawall. 

303s. Coal Mining. SI. 3 Hrs. 

Prerequisites: chemistry 10 hours, physics 8 hours, and accom- 
panied or preceded by general geology. This course is designed 
especially for students who are planning to teach mining subjects 
in high school, and is not open to students taking E. M. 102, 111, 
and 112. Hours to be arranged. Mr. Lawall and Staff. 

304, 305. Mining Topics. I, II. 3 Hrs. 

Special advanced topics designed to meet the needs, as they arise, 
of graduate students specializing in the field of mining engineer- 
ing. Mr. Lawall. 



*May be taken by undergraduates in other colleges. 



296 Courses of Instruction 

MUSIC 1 

ENSEMBLE 

Assistant Professor Wood. 

153. Accompanying. Yr. 2 Hrs. 

The course furnishes opportunity to advanced students to acquire 
the art of accompanying songs and violin and cello solos. 

155. Chamber Music. Yr. 2 Hrs. 

The study of sonatas, trios and string quartettes by Haydn, 
Mozart, Beethoven, Bach, Handel, Mendelssohn, Gade, Grieg, etc. 
Open to violinists, cellists, pianists, and viola players. 

PIANO 2 

Assistant Professor Shepard; and Instructors Moore and Snee. 

24. Intermediate Courses. 3 I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Heeller, op. 47, Czerny, op. 299, Books 1 and 2, Bach easier com- 
positions (little preludes and fuges, easier two-part inventions). 
Sonatinas, rondos, etc., by Clementi, Kuklak, Dussek, Hummel, 
Reinecke, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven. Pieces selected to meet the 
requirements of the student. Mr. Shepard and Staff. 

25. Intermediate Course. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Continued study of the sonatinas, rondo and dance forms prepara- 
tory to the study of the standard sonatas. Mr. Shepard and Staff. 

26. Intermediate Course. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Czerny, op. 299, Books 3 and 4; Heller, op. 16, 45 and 46; Krause 
Trill Studies ; Berens left hand studies ; Bach two-part inventions ; 
easier Cramer studies. Sonatas and variations by Haydn, Mozart, 
easier sonatas by Beethoven. Appropriate selections from classic 
and modern composers. Prerequisite: Piano 25. 

Mr. Shepard and Staff. 

27. Intermediate Course. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

A continuation of the study of the classics, stressing the works of 
Mozart, Bach, Haydn and the earlier compositions of Beethoven. 

Mr. Shepard and Staff. 



x A11 courses in music are either undergraduate courses or undergraduate 
courses open to graduates. For explanation of abbreviations, see page 206. 
Special students in applied music, not working for credit, take private half- 
hour lessons. Stulents registered for credit attend one-hour recitations in classes 
of two students each. 

2 After the first six weeks of the first hemester, students taking work in 
the piano department will be given an examination to determine whether they 
are sufficiently advanced to apply for college credit. All piano students will 
be examined at least twice a year, in January and May, to determine the 
progress made. It is impossible to give a list of studies and pieces to be 
strictly adhered to, as the needs of the individual student must be considered. 
The material outlined, however, will give an idea of the work covered in the 
different courses. 

3 In cases in which students are not able to meet the requirements of Piano 
24, they will be obliged to take piano work without credit until such a time 
as they can satisfactorily demonstrate their ability to meet the standard set 
in Piano 24. 



Music 297 



128. Intermediate Course. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Cramer studies, continued. Bach three-part inventions. Sonatas 
by Beethoven. Selections from Schubert, Mendelssohn, Schumann, 
Chopin and MacDowell. An introduction to some of the more 
modern composers. Prerequisite: Piano 27. 

Mr. Shepard and Staff. 

129. Intermediate Course. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Some of the easier preludes and fuges of Bach, selections from the 
Romantic period and some modern compositions by Debussy, Ranel 
Griffes and others. Mr. Shepard and Staff. 

130. Advanced Course. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Harberbier, op. 53; Bach preludes and fuges; Moscheles, op. 70 or 
95, Chopin Etudes, op. 10 and 25, compositions of Brahms, Liszt, 
Chopin, Grieg and others. More difficult works of the modern and 
ultra-modern composers. Prerequisite: Piano 129. Mr. Shepard. 

131. Advanced Course. II. 2 Hrs. 

Continuation of study of the standard concertos and modern works 
by Whithorne, Scriabine, Dohnanyi and others. Graduation re- 
cital. Mr. Shepard. 

132. Sight Playing. I, II. 1 Hr. 

The work is arranged for classes of four or six, one hour per week, 
and consists of rhythmic scale work, transposition of simple hymn 
forms, study of the classics, such as overtures, quartettes and 
symphonies and the study of modern compositions. Miss MOORE. 

133. Sight Playing. I, II. 1 Hr. 

Continuation of course 132. Miss Moore. 

PIPE ORGAN 

Instructor Snee. 

61. First Year Course. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Stainer's organ book; Rink's organ school; Schneider's pedal 
studies. Mrs. Snee. 

62. First Year Course. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Technique; hymn playing and easy organ compositions. 

IVtrs Snee. 

63. Second Year Course. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Grade II. Buck's studies in pedal phrasing; Bach short preludes 
and fuges; easier sonatas of Guilmant; organ pieces by Hollins. 

Mrs Snee 

64. Second Year Course. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Technique; easier sonatas of Mendelssohn; organ pieces by 
Lemarc and Rhineberger. Mrs. Snee. 

165. Third Year Course. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Larger works by Bach, more difficult sonatas of Guilmant; pieces 
by Budois and Salome. Mrs. Snee. 

166. Third Year Course. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Sonatas by Mendelssohn and Rhineberger; pieces by Lemmens, 
Grison, etc. Continuation of Bach larger works. Mrs. Snee. 



298 Courses of Instruction 

167. Fourth Year Course. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Handel concerto; wider symphonies; Bach, Toccato and Fugue. 
■ Mrs. Snee. 

16$. Fourth Year Course. II. 2 Hrs. 

Graduation recital program. Mrs. Snee. 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC 

Assistant Professor Hinkhl; Professor Black; and Assistant 
Professor Wood. 

MUSIC 

73. Sight Singing. I, II, 3 Hrs.; SI (73s), 2 Hrs. 

The reading of music involving difficult intervals, complicated 
rhythms, chromatic melody, modulations, etc., two-part singing. 

Mr. Black. 

74. Sight Singing. II, 3 Hrs.; SI (74s), 2 Hrs. 

Three and four-part singing, Canons, Polphony, etc. Mr. Black. 

75. Ear Training. I, n. 3 Hrs. 

Rhythmic and melodic dictation. Tonal relationships of the major 
and minor scales, introducing chromatic intervals, and simple time 
problems. .\ Mr. Black. 

76. Ear Training. II. 3 Hrs. 

More difficult rhythms and intervals. Song analysis. Mr. Black. 

92. Orchestra Class. 1 I, II. 1 Hr. 

Study of the cornet and trombone in classes. Tone production, 
simple exercises and scales, easy pieces, fingering of cornet, posi- 
tions of the slide trombone and their relationship. Literature of 
brass instruments. Mitchell's Class Method will be the text used. 

Mr. Wood. 

93. Orchestra Class. 1 I, II. 1 Hr. 

Study of the clarinet and flute. Boehm and Albert systems. Tone 
production, simple scales and exercises. Mitchell's Class Method 
will be the text used. Mr. Wood. 

179. Music Appreciation. I, 3 Hrs.; SI 179s), 2 Hrs. 

The structure, development, and aesthetic content of the art of 
music. Analytical study of the smaller forms of musical composi- 
tion from the standpoint of the listener to develop a taste for and 
an understanding of the best music. Illustrations from the works 
of the masters. Required of all music students. Prerequisite: 
Public School Music 75 and 76. Miss Hinkel. 

180. Music Appreciation. II. 3 Hrs. 

Analytical study of masterpieces in the large forms of musical 
composition. Illustrations from the masters. Required of all 
music students. Prerequisite: Public School Music 179. 

Miss Hinkel. 



1 Students owning instruments are required to bring them with them ; 
otherwise instruments will be rented for the class, and a small rental fee 
will be charged. 



Music 299 



188. High School Music. I. 2 Hrs. 

Open to seniors. The study of conducting. Chorus, orchestra, 
glee clubs, music appreciation, harmony, credit for outside music 
study. Miss Hinkel. 

194. Orchestra Class. 1 II. 1 Hr. 

Study of the violin, viola, and cello. Scales, simple pieces, 
exercises, positions, tuning, etc. Mr. Wood. 

197. University Orchestra. Yr. 2 Hrs. 

Playing in orchestra for the purpose of acquiring actual ex- 
perience. Higher orchestral forms studied. Open to non-music 
students as well as to music students. Mr. Wood. 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

169. Materials and Methods of Teaching High School Music. I, II, SI. 
2 Hrs. 

Required for certification of high school music teachers. Pre- 
requisite: Ed. M. and M. 120. Miss Hinkel. 

224. Student Teaching. I, II, 3 Hrs.; SI (224s), 2 Hrs. 

Required for certification of high school music teachers. Pre- 
requisite: Ed. M. and M. 120. Miss Hinkel. 

THEORY OF MUSIC 

Assistant Professors Shepard and Wood. 

1. Introductory Harmony. I, SI. 2 Hrs. 

Keyboard harmony. Intervals, scales. Triad formation, etc. 
Prerequisite : at least one semester in piano. 

2. Intermediate Harmony. II. 2 Hrs. 

Keyboard harmony. Chords of dominant seventh and ninth. Pre- 
requisite: Theory of Music. 

103. Advanced Harmony. I. 3 Hrs. 

Modulation in various forms. Prerequisite: Theory of Music 1 
and 2. 

104. Advanced Harmony. II. 3 Hrs. 

Altered and mixed chords. Elaboration of tone lines, etc. 

105. History of Music. I. 2 Hrs. 
The ancient period. 

106. History of Music. II. 2 Hrs. 
The classic period. 

107. History of Music. I. 2 Hrs. 
The romantic period. 



students owning instruments are required to bring them with them ; other- 
wise instruments will be rented for the class, and a small rental fee will be 
charged. 



300 Courses of Instruction 



108. History of Music. II. 2 Hrs. 
Modern and current music. 

109. Introductory Counterpoint. I. 2 Hrs. 

Single melodic line. Association of two, three, four tone lines. 

110. Counterpoint. II. 2 Hrs. 
Modulation. Rhythmic diversity, etc. 

111. Harmonic Analysis. I. 2 Hrs. 

Practice in accounting for chords and foreign tones which make 
up the harmonic structure. 

112. Analysis and Form. II. 2 Hrs. 

Continuation of Harmonic Analysis, and study of smaller forms. 

113. Introductory Composition. I. 1 Hr. 

Practice in writing original phrases, periods, and double periods. 

114. Composition. II. 1 Hr. 

Continuation of original writing, including the song forms. 

115. Orchestration. I. 1 Hr. 

Arrangements for string orchestra. Projects selected from choral 
and piano compositions. Elements of wood winds. Prerequisite: 
elementary harmony. 

116. Orchestration. II. 1 Hr. 

Arrangements for wood winds and brasses, in separate groups 
and ensemble. Prerequisite: Orchestration 115. 

VIOLIN 

Assistant Professor Wood. 

41. Elementary Course. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

This course is arranged for those who are not sufficiently advanced 
to take up the collegiate courses that follow. Studies by Laoureux, 
Sevcik and Sitt, for easier forms of left hand technique. Bowing 
studies by Stoeving and solos by Bohm, Seitz, Raff, etc. 

42. First Year Course. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Dont, op. 37, Schradieck technique violin school I, Sevcik, op. 3, 
solos by Bohm, Wieniawski, etc. Scales and arpeggios. 

43. First Year Course. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Continuation of Dont, op. 37 and Schradieck 1. Easier Kruetzer 
etudes. Scales and arpeggios, solos by Vieuxtemps and concertos 
by de Beriot and Viotti. 

44. Second Year Course. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Kruetzer studies continued, Schradieck technique violin school II, 
bowing studies of more advanced type, scales major and minor, 
Handel sonatas. 

45. Second Year Course. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Etudes and other technical work continued from Violin 44. Solos 
and concertos by Wieniawski, Viotti, etc. 



Music 301 



146. Third Year Course. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Fiorillo etudes, Sevcik, op. 1 book No. 4. Solos by Sarasate and 
Vieuxtemps. 

147. Third Year Course. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Fiorillo etudes continued and etudes selected from Rovelli, Sevcik, 
op. 1 book No. 4, concertos by Sophr or Viotti. 

148. Fourth Year Course. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Rode etudes and continuation of Sevcik, op. 1 book 4, sonatas for 
solo violin by Bach, concertos and solos by Mendelssohn, Saint- 
Saens and Wieniawski. 

149. Fourth Year Course. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Rode etudes continued and Schradieck, op. 1, advanced solos con- 
tinued for development of style and interpretation. Recital. 

150. Advanced Soloist Course. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

This course is arranged for those who desire work in repertoire. 

VOICE 

Professor Black and Assistant Professor Hinkel. 

1. First Year Course. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Technique; scales, arpeggios, etc., vocalises, Panofka and Concone. 
Simple songs in Italian. Mr. Black. 

2. First Year Course. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Technique; vocalises, Vaccai and Marchesi. Simple songs in 
Italian and English. Mr. Black. 

3. Second Year Course. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Technique; scales, Lutgen, Concone, etc. Songs in Italian and 
English. Mr. Black. 

4. Second Year Course. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Technique; scales, arpeggios, etc., Lamperti, Panofka, etc. 
Ensemble; duets, trios and quartets. Mr. Black. 

105. Third Year Course. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Technique; Bona, Lutgen, Concone, Bordogni, etc. Arias from 
standard grand operas. Mr. Black. 

106. Third Year Course. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Technique; Arias from standard oratorios. Ensemble. Mr. Black. 

107. Fourth Year Course. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Technique; Lamperti, Concone, Aprile, etc. Continuation of Arias, 
oratorios, etc. Mr. Black. 

108. Fourth Year Course. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

Graduation recital program. Mr. Black. 

109. 110. Choir. Yr. 2 Hrs. Mr. Black. 
Ill, 112. Glee Club. Yr. 2 Hrs. Miss Hinkel. 



302 Courses of Instruction 

PHARMACY 

Professor Bergy; Associate Professor Hayman; and Instructor Geiler. 

Undergraduate Division 

1. Theoretical Pharmacy. I. 3 Hrs. 

Descriptive and experimental lectures and recitations, and one 
laboratory period, embracing a study of the apparatus and 
technique necessary for the correct procedure in the manufacture 
of pharmaceutical preparations (90 hours). Mr. Geiler. 

2. Pharmaceutical Arithmetic and Stoichiometry. I, SI. 3 Hrs. 
Lectures and recitations (54 hours). Mr. Geiler. 

3. Advanced Pharmaceutical Arithmetic. II, SI. 2 Hrs. 
Continuation of Pharmacy 2. Lectures and recitations (36 hours). 

Mr. Geiler. 

4. Operative Pharmacy Lectures. I. 2 Hrs. 

A systematic consideration of the various official preparations for 
which the Pharmacopoeia and National Formulary give formulas 
and processes. Lectures and recitations (100 hours). Mr. Geiler. 

5. Operative Pharmacy Laboratory. I. 3 Hrs. 

This course is carried in conjunction with Pharmacy 4. The rep- 
resentative classes of preparations of the Pharmacopoeia and 
National Formulary are manufactured (154 hours). Mr. Geiler. 

6. The Art of Compounding. II. 4 Hrs. 

The more difficult pharmaceuticals and miscellaneous preparations 
are considered in connection with the modern methods of com- 
pounding. The latter part of the course is devoted to an intensive 
study of the methods of preparation and standardization of 
biologicals. Lectures and recitations (72 hours). Mr. Bergy. 

7. Art of Compounding Laboratory. II. 2 Hrs. 

A laboratory course conducted in conjunction with Pharmacy 6. 
Laboratory (100 hours). Prerequisite: Pharmacy 4 and 5. 

Mr. Bergy. 

8. Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence. II. 1 Hr. 

An intensive study of the Harrison Narcotic Law, the West Vir- 
ginia Pharmacy Law, and other state and national laws pertaining 
to pharmacy. Lectures and recitations (18 hours). Mr. Hayman. 

9. Pharmaceutical Latin. I. 2 Hrs. 

Emphasis is placed upon pronunciation, declension, English and 
Latin translation, comparison, abbreviations and vocabularies of 
medicine and pharmacy. Lectures and recitations (36 hours). 

Mr. Hayman. 

10. Vegetable Histology. II. 3 Hrs. 

A study of the microscopical characteristics of starches, powdered 
vegetable drugs and their adulterants. Lectures and recitations 
(18 hours), laboratory (100 hours). Mr. Hayman. 



303 



li. PfcansaeofMsy. I. 8 Hi 

An intensive study of vegetable and animal drugs, their collection, 
preparation, constituents, and applicability. Lectures and recita- 
tions (54 ho:: Mr. HAYMAN. 

12. Pharmacol no- >. II. 8 Hi 

A continuation of Pharmacy 11. Lectures -and recita - 
hours). Mr. Ha~: 

] Is. Pharmaceutical Chemistry. .Si. 3 Hrs. 

A course dealing specifically with inorganic chemistry as applied 
to pharmacy. Lectures and recita* 

101. Commercial l)(-\xn. I. 1 Hr. 

ractical course in water color lettering em; ■ arrange- 

ment and color harmony, for show cards ar. windows. 

Laboratory (50 hour- Mr. Hayman. 

102. Accounting. I. 1 Hr. 

Laboratory (60 hours). Mr. Hayman. 

L03. Hygiene. I. 2 Hrs. 

Lectures and recitat Mr. Bergy. 

104. Qualitative of the Alkaloid- and Synthetics. I. 2 Hr,. 

Laboratory (100 hour Mr. Ha' ; 

10.". ph> --iolozical ( hemi-try. I. 3 Hrs. 

Chemistry of the carbohydrates, and re- 

lated substances. L< : B hours), laboratory (100 hou? 

Mr. Bergy and STAFF. 

106. Pharmaceutical Chemistry. I. 2 Hrs. 

A course dealing specifically with inorganic chemistry as applied 
to pharmacy. Lectures and recita* Mr. Bergy. 

107. Pharmaceutical Chemistry. II. 2 Hrs. 

A continuation of Pharmacy 106. Special attention will be given 
to the chemistry and adaptability of germicides, fungicides, 
parasite Mr. Bhigy. 

Prescription- and Incompatibilities. I. 3 Hrs. 
The prescription is studied relative to the interpretat: 
chemical, pharmaceutical, and therapeutical incompatibilities, 
posology. art of dis: and Latin DomeDdatare. Lectures 

and recitations (54 hours). Mr. Ha\- 

109. Prescription Practice. I. 1 Hr. 

A labors arse accompanying Pharmacy 108. Laboratory 

Mr. Hayman. 

110. Assay and Pharmaceutical Testing. II. 3 Hrs. 

i critical study of U. S. P. <fc N. F. Lecture (13 

hours), laborat' hours). Mr. Geiler. 



304 Courses of Instruction 

113. U. S. P. and N. F. II. 4 Hrs. 

A comprehensive study of the United States Pharmacopoeia and 
the National Formulary, including review on related subjects. 
Recitations (72 hours). Mr. Hayman. 

114. Commercial Pharmacy. IT. 2 Hrs. 

The establishment, management and development of a modern 
pharmacy, with special emphasis on business economics, account- 
ing, correspondence, salesmanship, and advertising. Lectures and 
recitations (36 hours). Mr. Geiler. 

115. Microscopy. I or II. 2 to 3 Hrs. 

A laboratory course concerned with the microscopy of vegetable 
foods and technical products, microchemical reactions of inorganic 
chemicals, quantitative microscopic methods, and micrometry. Per- 
mission of instructor must be secured before electing. Laboratory 
(100 to 150 hours). Mr. Hayman. 

116. Pharmaceutical Investigation. I or II. 2 or 3 Hrs. 

Original investigation in pharmacy or pharmaceutical chemistry. 
Laboratory and collateral reading (100 to 150 hours). 

Mr. Bergy and Staff. 

117. Dispensing. I or II. 1 or 2 Hrs. 

A practical course in University Pharmacy under the supervision 
of a registered pharmacist in compounding, pricing, and filing 
prescriptions. Laboratory (50 or 100 hours). 

Mr. Bergy and Staff. 

118. New and Non-Official Remedies. II. 1 Hr. 

A critical study of the most recent pharmaceutical introductions 
as approved by the Council of Pharmacy of The American Medical 
Association. Lectures and recitations (18 hours). Mr. Bergy. 

120. Cosmetics. I. 1 or 2 Hrs. 

A laboratory course devoted to compounding a large number of 
preparations of this type, including perfumes (54 or 108 hours). 

Mr. Bergy. 

201. Pharmacology. I. 3 Hrs. 

A general survey of the pharmacological, antidotal, and thera- 
peutic action of the more potent drugs which the pharmacist is 
called upon to dispense. Lectures and recitations (54 hours). 

Mr. Bergy. 

202. Pharmacology. II. 2 Hrs. 

A continuation of Pharmacy 201. Lectures and recitations (36 
hours). Mr. Bergy. 

203. Food Analysis. I, II. 2 or 3 Hrs. 

Methods employed by the U. S. Government and other standard 
methods of analysis. Laboratory analysis of milk, butter, fats, 
oils, meats, vinegar, canned goods, baking powders, extracts, etc., 
their adulterants and impurities. Prerequisite: Chemistry 5, 6, 
and 233. Laboratory and collateral reading (100 to 150 hours). 

Mr. Bergy and Staff. 

204. Food Analysis. I, II. 3 to 5 Hrs. 

A continuation of Pharmacy 203. Laboratory and collateral read- 
ing (150 to 250 hours). Mr. Bergy and Staff. 



Physical Education 305 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 1 

SERVICE PROGRAM FOR MEN 3 

Assistant Professor Jones; 3 Assistant Professors Samuel, Neale, 

Rodgers, and Smith; Instructors Ratcliffe and Cubbon; 

and Assistants Tallman, Stadsvold, and Vachersse. 

1. Service Program for Men. 4 I, SI. 1 Hr. 

Required of all freshmen in the University. Students who pass 
the University physical achievement tests during the semester will 
be assigned to the elective group for an elective program of 
physical education under the direction of the Staff. Students who 
fail to pass the University physical achievement tests will be 
assigned to the regular group for the regular program of physical 
education under the direction of the Staff. These students will be 
organized into groups for organized competition in seasonable 
activities. Mr. Jones and Staff. 

2. Service Program for Men. 5 II. 1 Hr. 

Continuation of course 1. Required of all freshman men in the 
University. Mr. Jones and Staff. 

SERVICE PROGRAM FOR WOMEN 

Assistant Professor Griffin; Instructors Hurst, Thomas, and McCall. 

1. Service Program for Women. I. 1 Hr. 

Required of all freshman women. 

Fall Season — soccer, swimming, volleyball, archery, games, 

dancing. 
Winter Season — clogging, folk dancing, games, swimming, 

basketball. Miss Griffin and Staff. 

2. Service Program for Women. II, SI. 1 Hr. 

Required of all freshman women. 

Winter Season — swimming, folk dancing, games, basketball. 
Spring Season — playground baseball, archery, swimming, 
track and field activities, dancing, tumbling. 

Miss Griffin and Staff. 



x For explanation of abbreviations, see page 206. All courses offered in 
this subject are either undergraduate courses or undergraduate courses open 
to graduates. Staff members whose names are preceded by the abbreviation 
"Dr." have been admitted to the practice of medicine. 

2 Physical Education 1 and 2 will meet the University requirement of 2 
hours' credit in physical education as a prerequisite for graduation from all 
schools and colleges. During registration week, all freshmen will report at the 
Men's Field House for assignment of lockers and baskets, and for appoint- 
ments for physical examinations and physical achievement tests. These exami- 
nations and tests will be the guide in the selection of a program of physical 
education for the individual student. See Bulletin of the Department of Service 
Program for Men. 

3 On leave of absence. 1932-33. 

^Students who are found to be physically unable to engage in regular 
activity will be assigned to the restricted grovj) for a restricted program of 
physical education recommended by the University physician and under the 
direction of the Staff of the department. Students who are on the freshman 
or Varsity athletic teams will be assigned to the athletics for credit group 
under the direction of the coach of the sport. Freshman students enrolled 
in Physical Education 11 will receive credit in Physical Education 1. 

5 Freshman students enrolled in Physical Education 12 will receive credit 
in Physical Education 2. 

6 Physical Education 1, 2, 3, and 4 will meet the University requirement 
of 4 hours in physical education for women, to be taken during their freshman 
and sophomore years. 



306 Courses of Instruction 

3. Service Program for Women. I. 1 Hr. 

Continuation of Physical Education 2. Required of all sophomore 
women. Miss Griffin and Staff. 

4. Service Program for Women. II. 1 Hr. 

Continuation of Physical Education 3. Required of all sophomore 
women. Miss Griffin and Staff. 

- 101. Service Program for Women. I. 1 Hr. 

Elective for junior women. Required for graduation in the College 
of Education, the Department of Home Economics and the School 
of Music. Prerequisite: Physical Education 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Miss Griffin and Staff. 

102. Service Program for Women. II. 1 Hr. 

Continuation of Physical Education 101. Elective for junior women. 

Miss Griffin and Staff. 

103. Service Program for Women. I. 1 Hr. 

Elective for senior women. Prerequisite: Physical Education 1, 
2, 3, 4, 101, 102. 

104. Service Program for Women. II. 1 Hr. 

Elective for senior women. Miss Griffin and Staff. 

TEACHER TRAINING 

Professor Schott; Assistant Professors Griffin, Samuel, Jones, 1 Neale, 

and Rodgers; Instructors Hurst, Thomas, McCall, 

and Whittlesey; and Assistants Vacheresse, 

Myers, and Summers. 

THEORY AND PRACTICE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR MEN 2 

11. Theory and Practice of Physical Education. I. 1 Hr. 

This course includes theory and practice in the fundamentals of 
football. Mr. Neale. 

12. Theory and Practice of Physical Education. I. 1 Hr. 

This course covers theory and practice in an activity program 
suitable for junior and senior high school boys. Mr. Samuel. 

13. Theory and Practice of Physical Education. II. 1 Hr. 

This course covers theory and practice in an activity program 
suitable for junior and senior high school boys. This is a con- 
tinuation of course 12, which is prerequisite for admission to 
course 13. Mr. Samuel, 

14. Theory and Practice of Physical Education. II. 1 Hr. 

This course covers theory and practice in the fundamentals of 
baseball. Mr. Rodgers. 



iOn leave of absence, 1932-33. 

2 A11 courses indicated in the block of theory and practice of physical educa- 
tion for men are offered daily except Saturday from 8 :00 to 10 :00 a. m. 
Physical Education 11, 12, 13, and 14 are required of freshmen men; Physical 
Education 43, 44, 45, and 46 are required of sophomore men; Physical Educa- 
tion 111, 112, 113, and 114 are required of junior men; and Physical Education 
143 and 144 are required of senior men. 



Physical Education 307 



43. Theory and Practice of Physical Education. I. 1 Hr. 

This course covers the aims of the Boy Scout movement, its 
plan of organization and the curriculum. The Camping move- 
ment is also considered. Mr. Samuel. 

44. Theory and Practice of Physical Education. I. 1 Hr. 

This course covers theory and practice in the fundamentals of 
basketball. Mr. Stadsvold. 

45. Theory and Practice of Physical Education. II. 1 Hr. 

This course includes natural activities in tumbling and the 
fundamentals of work on the apparatus. Mr. Schott. 

46. Theory and Practice of Physical Education. II. 1 Hr. 

This course covers theory and practice in the fundamentals of 
track and field athletics. Mr. Smith. 

111. Theory and Practice of Physical Education. I. 1 Hr. 

This course includes lectures, demonstrations, and practice work 
in the training and conditioning of athletes. Mr. Smith. 

112. Theory and Practice of Physical Education. I. 1 Hr. 

This course includes a study of the standard and advanced first 
aid requirements, and the work given for the Teacher's Certificate 
in first aid as set up by the American Red Cross. Miss Hurst. 

113. Theory and Practice of Physical Education. II. 1 Hr. 

This course covers theory and practice in the fundamentals of 
wrestling. Mr. Myers. 

114. Theory and Practice of Physical Education. II. 1 Hr. 

This course covers theory and practice in the fundamentals of 
boxing. Mr. Vacheresse. 

123s. Organization, Selection and Presentation of Materials for the 
Physical Education Program. SI. 2 Hrs. 

This course is designed for part time teachers of physical educa- 
tion in elementary and secondary schools. Mr. Jones. 

141s. Scouting and Officiating. SI. 2 Hrs. 

This course considers the aims of the Boy Scout movement, its 
plan of organization and the curriculum; and a study of the 
technique of officiating in the major sports. Consideration is also 
given to officiating procedure and the ethics of officiating. 

Mr. Samuel and Mr. Schott. 

143. Theory and Practice of Physical Education. I. 2 Hrs. 

This course will include the theory of coaching football, basket- 
ball, and the conduct of programs in physical education in the 
public school, together with the theory and technique of ofnciat- 
in these activities. Mr. Neale, Mr. Stadsvold, and Mr. Schott. 

144. Theory and Practice of Physical Education. II. 2 Hrs. 

This course will include the theory of coaching track and field, 
baseball, and the conduct of programs in physical education in the 
public schools, together with the theory and technique of officiat- 
in these activities. Mr. Smith, Mr. Rodgers, and Mr. Schott. 



308 Courses of Instruction 

193s. Organization and Administration of Intramural Athletics. SI. 

2 Hrs. 

This course considers the intramural movement in its relation to 
the whole program of physical education. The organization of col- 
lege and university departments, together with the organization 
for junior and senior high schools will be considered. A term 
paper will be required. Mr. Samuel. 

THEORY AND PRACTICE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR WOMEN 1 

First Year 

27. Theory and Practice of Physical Education. I. 2 Hrs. 

This course includes fundamentals and practice in playing soccer, 
field ball, speedball and basketball; instruction in singing games 
and folk dances; elementary and advanced swimming strokes, 
standard dives and life saving. Staff, 

28. Theory and Practice of Physical Education. II. 2 Hrs. 
Continuation of basketball and swimming; with the addition of 
clogging, indoor baseball and the theory and practice of archery. 

Staff, 
31s. Swimming. SI. 2 Hrs. 

Advanced swimming and diving, technique of instruction, care of 
pools, and history of swimming. Miss Griffin and Staff. 

32s. Clogging. SI. 2 Hrs. 

This course includes learning the fundamental steps in clogging, 
and dance material. Miss Hurst. 

Second Year 

59. Theory, and Practice of Physical Education. I. 2 Hrs. 

This course includes the fundamentals of hockey, basketball 
technique; activities in all forms of gymnastics; and skill in 
natural dancing with some historical and philosophical back- 
ground. Staff. 

60. Theory and Practice of Physical Education. II. 2 Hrs. 

A continuation of the work in basketball, natural dancing, and 
gymnastics, with the addition of the fundamentals of playground 
baseball, development of skill in playing, and the theory of coach- 
ing the game. Staff. 

61s. Folk Dancing. SI. 2 Hrs. 

Folk dance material and a study of folk customs and folklore. 

Miss Hurst. 

62s. Games. SI. 2 Hrs. 

This course includes the theory and practice of games of low 
organization, which may be used for gymnasium, playground, or 
summer camp work. Miss Hurst. 



x A11 courses indicated in the block of theory and practice of physical 
education for women are offered on Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 
8:00 to 10:00, and on Tuesday and Thursday from 8:00 to 9:00 or from 
9 :00 to 10 :00, in Elizabeth Moore Hall. Physical Education 27 and 28 are 
required of freshman women. Physical Education 59 and 60 are required of 
sophomore women. Physical Education 127 and 128 are required of junior 
women. These courses are adapted to the needs of prospective teachers, play- 
ground instructors, and assistants in summer camp work. Physical Education 
159 and 160 are required of senior women. 



Physical Education 309 



Third Year 
123s. Organization, Selection and Presentation of Materials for the 
Physical Education Program. SI. 2 Hrs. 

This course is designed for part-time teachers of physical edu- 
cation in elementary and secondary schools. Miss Griffin. 

127. Theory and Practice of Physical Education. I. 2 Hrs. 

This course includes archery teaching; swimming technique, 
which covers the theory and practice of teaching swimming, a 
thorough study and analysis of the standard dives, and sanitation 
of the swimming pool; tumbling, stunts, including stunts suitable 
for various age groups, pyramid building, and advanced tumbling; 
organizations of adolescent girls, such as Girl Scouts, Camp Fire 
Girls, and Reserves. Staff. 

128. Theory and Practice of Physical Education. II. 2 Hrs. 
Practice in teaching swimming; track and field activities adapted 
to the use of women; skill in playing tennis and a knowledge of 
the rules; and games of low organization for elementary, junior 
and senior high schools, summer playgrounds and camps. 

Staff. 
131s. Tumbling and Stunts. SI. 2 Hrs. 

This course includes stunts, tumbling and pyramid building 
suitable to all ages and groups. Preparation and presentation of 
a problem will be required. Miss Thomas. 

Fourth Year 

159. Theory and Practice of Physical Education. I. 2 Hrs. 

This course includes the teaching of soccer, speedball, hockey, 
basketball, gymnastics, individual gymnastics. Staff. 

160. Theory and Practice of Physical Education. II. 2 Hrs. 

Philosophy of athletics, which includes a study of the fundamental 
principles relating to highly organized team games, and a con- 
tinuation of basketball teaching and gymnasium teaching, with 
the addition of teaching of folk dancing, baseball and track and 
field. Staff. 

193s. Intramural Activities for High School Girls. SI. 2 Hrs. 

Games suitable for competition in co-curricular or after school 
periods, including individual activities and those of high and low 
organization as well as methods of conducting such a program. 
Preparation and presentation of a problem will be required. 

Miss Thomas. 
Recreation Swimming. I. No credit. 

For women students who are able to swim. Staff. 

PROFESSIONAL COURSES EY PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
For Men 

150. Individual Gymnastics. II. 3 Hrs. 

This course will deal with the diagnosis of abnormal cases found 
in the classroom including overweight, underweight, post-oper- 
ative postural and flat-foot cases, with the prescription of 
activities for their correction. The course will cover the program 
of tests and measurements as employed in the school program. 
Prerequisite: anatomy, physiology, kinesiology. Mr. Jones. 



310 Courses of Instruction 

For Women 

166. Individual Gymnastics. II. 3 Hrs. 

This course will deal with the diagnosis of abnormal cases found 
in the classroom including overweight, underweight, post-oper- 
ative, postural and flat-foot cases, with the prescription of 
activities for their correction. The course will cover the program 
of tests and measurements as employed in the school program. 
Prerequisite: anatomy, physiology, kinesiology. Miss Thomas. 

167. Rhythmic Analysis. I. 2 Hrs. 

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of 
the nature and scope of rhythm in the physical education program. 
An opportunity will be had for practice in the analysis of rhythm 
in the music used in dancing, folk dancing, and singing games. 
Practice in the creation of rhythm step patterns will be offered. 

Miss McCall. 
For Men and Women 

75. Introduction to Physical Education. I. 3 Hrs. 

Required of all freshmen men and women in the Division of Phy- 
sical Education. This course is intended to acquaint the beginner 
with the purposes, scope, and possibilities of physical education in 
the schools of the United States. An orientation course, it will 
consider the aims and objectives of modern physical education. 
Lectures, discussions, and assigned readings. A note book and 
term paper will be required. Mr. Schott. 

76. Hygiene. II. 2 Hrs. 

This course deals with those phases of hygienic living which 
should be understood by all college students. Special emphasis 
will be placed on the personal aspects of hygiene. This course is 
open only to freshman students majoring in physical education 
and may not be elected as a substitute for Phys. Ed. 276 (Health 
Education). Mr. Samuel. 

77. History of Physical Education. I. 2 Hrs. 

This course will consider the development of physical education 
from early civilization to the present time, giving attention to 
the early Roman and Greek periods, the German, Swedish, and 
Danish systems, and the recent development in the American 
program. Miss Griffin. 

78. Playground and Community Recreation. II. 3 Hrs. 

This course is arranged to prepare the student in physical educa- 
tion for the direction of municipal departments of playgrounds 
and community recreation. It will include a study of the nature 
and function of play in the life of the child. Mr. Jones. 

133s. Playground and Community Recreation. SI. 2 Hrs. 

This course is arranged to prepare the student in physical educa- 
tion for the direction of municipal departments of playgrounds 
and community recreation. It will include a study of the nature 
and function of play in the life of the child as well as practical 
experience in manual, musical, dramatic, and play activities for 
playgrounds. Mr. Jones. 



Physical Education 311 



152. Materials and Methods of Teaching Physical Education. I, II. 
2 Hrs. Mr. Schott and Miss Griffin. 

175. Kinesiology. I. 3 Hrs. 

This course will consider the principles of bodily movements in 
relation to the anatomical structure. The general and special 
effects of exercise upon carriage, posture, and organic function 
will be studied. Miss Thomas, 

178. Principles of Physical Education. I, II. 2 Hrs. 

This is an orientation course designed for students who expect to 
teach in the public schools of the State and desire to meet the 
requirements of the State Board of Education, namely, that each 
applicant for certification present credit for four semester hours 
in physical education and two semester hours in health education. 
General principles and objectives underlying the modern program 
of physical education will be discussed. Practical problems, such 
as selection of materials, employment of staff, provision of proper 
facilities, and making of curricula will be considered. Mr. Schott. 

179. Physiology. II. 3 Hrs. 

This course will deal with the fundamentals of human physiology, 
taking up the various systems and studying their function with 
the object of learning how the human body works. 

Dr. Whittlesey. 

180. Public School Health. I, II, SI. 2 Hrs. 

This course is designed for all teachers, and considers the various 
topics concerned in the maintenance of the health of school chil- 
dren in their environment. Required for certification in all teach- 
ing fields. Dr. Whittlesey and Dr. Summers. 

194s. Principles of Physical Education. SI. 2 Hrs. 

This course considers the aims, objectives and functions of physi- 
cal education. Consideration is given to the underlying principles 
of physical education in the light of modern educational procedure. 

Mr. Samuel. 

276. Health Education. I. 3 Hrs. 

The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with the 
aims of health with respect to their significance to the student as 
well as to the teacher, to outline the present trends of health, to 
present every day health problems and methods of solution, with 
special reference to the part played by the schools in the health 
education program. Essential subject matter for the teacher will 
be supplied and educational problems will be discussed. Accident 
prevention and first aid will be considered and a program for 
junior and senior high school will be outlined. Dr. Whittlesey. 

277. Organization and Administration of Physical Education. II. 3 
Hrs. 

This course will take up the modern theories in physical educa- 
tion; guiding principles in the organization and administration of 
physical education; and the objects, content, and materials of 
activities in the gymnasium and on the playground. The organi- 
zation of a department of health and physical education in the 
high school from the standpoint of the teacher and supervisor, will 
be considered and criteria for determining the worth of such a 



312 Courses of Instruction 

program will be developed. The course will also deal with the ad- 
ministration of gymnasiums, swimming pools, and playgrounds, 
and with the organization and administration of inter-scholastic 
and intramural athletics. Other administrative problems relating 
to the health of the students will be discussed. Mr. Schott. 

278. Problems in Physical Education. IT, 3 Hrs.; SI (278s), 2 Hrs. 
This course deals with the solution of problems in physical edu- 
cation. The nature and purpose of education and of physical edu- 
cation, as well as the biological foundation of physical education, 
are considered. The relation between physical education and 
organic development, health, character training, and socialization 
is discussed. Problems which arise in connection with the develop- 
ment of leadership, building of curricula, methods in teaching, 
and the selection and adaptation of activities are considered and 
possible solutions evolved. Mr. Schott. 



PartV 

DEGREES CONFERRED BY THE 
UNIVERSITY 



DEGREES CONFERRED, 1931-32 

The following is a list of degrees conferred by the University during the year 
1931-32. Degrees conferred September 1, 1931, are indicated by an asterisk (*) ; 
and those conferred February 1, 1932, by a double asterisk (**). All other 
degrees were conferred on Commencement Day, June 7, 1932. 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 
Division of Biology and Agrirculture: 

Bailey Sleeth Plant Pathology Linn 

B. S. Agr., West Virginia University, 1927 
M. S. Agr., West Virginia University, 1928 

Thesis : Studies of Fusarium Niveum Efs. 



Division of INDUSTRIAL SCIENCES: 

John Frank Bartlett Chemistry 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1925 
A. ML, West Virginia University. 19~7 

Thesis : Nitration of Cyclohexyl Phenols. 



Gassaway 



MORGANTOWN 



Alvah John Washington Headlee Chemistry . . 

B. S., Waynesburg College, 1924 

M. S., West Virginia University, 1930 

Thesis : A Study of Ethvlene Oxide and Some of Its Derivatives. 



Forest Grove, Ore. 



Virgil Greene Lilly ...... Chemistry . . 

A. B., Pacific University, 1926 

A. M.. West Virginia University, 1929 

Thesis : The Regeneration of Plumic Acids from Coal by Nitric 
Acid Oxidation. 



Charles Scott Lynch Chemistry . 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1925 
A M., West Virginia University, 1930 

Thesis : The Electrolytic Oxidation of Coal. 

Walter Hamilton Walker . . . Chemistry . 

A. B. and B. S., Morris Harvey College, 1921 
A. M., West Virginia University, 1929 
Thesis : The Oxidation of Propane. 



Glenville 



MORGANTOWN 



MASTER OF ARTS 



Division of Education: 
*Kermit Alderson Cook .... Educational Sup. Oceana 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1929 

Lorain S. Cornwell Educational Adm. Morgantown 

A. B., Fairmont State Teachers' College, 1928 

*Henry George Deahl Educational Psy. Morgantown 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1927 

Ira Russell Glover Educational Adm. Littleton 

A. B., Salem College, 1927 

*Elmer DeWitt Goddin Educational Adm. Thomas 

A. B., Fairmont State Teachers' College, 1928 

Kirkland Shepherd McKee . . . Educational Sup. Elkins 

A. B., Davis and Elkms College, 1929 

♦Degree conferred September 1, 1931 
"♦Degree conferred February 1, 1932 

(315) 



316 



Degrees Conferred by the University 



♦George Milton Parker Educational Sup. Glen Hedrick 

B. S., Lynchburg College, 1924 

Clarence Gilbert Peregoy . . . Educational Sup. Glen Hedrick 

A. B., Washington College, 1923 

* Albert Luke Rogers Educational Adm. Paw Paw 

A. B., West Virginia Wesleyan College, 1924 

Cecil Glenn Rollins Educational Adm. Cornwallis 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1929 

Daisy Ella Timmons Educational Adm. Triadelphia 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1916 

Paul William Watson Educational Adm. Tunnelton 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1924 
Division of Social Sciences: 
*Stuart Polsley Armstrong . . . English .... Ripley 

A. B m West Virginia University, 1928 

Katherine Anne Bird English .... Beckley 

A. B., Fairmont State Teachers' College, 1930 

Harry Morgan Brawley .... Political Science Charleston 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1931 

*Nellie B. Caldwell English .... Logan 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1923 

Julius Cohen Political Science Morgantown 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1931 

*DORA COSTELOW ENGLISH .... TUNNELTON 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1926 

*Ruby Elizabeth Cox English .... Industrial 

A. B., Salem College, 1925 

*Ralph Cunningham English .... Cowen 

A. B., Morris-Harvey College, 1927 

Elizabeth Pullen Engle .... English .... Clendenin 

A. B., Marshall College, 1927 

* Chester Newton Fannin .... English .... Barboursville 

A. B., Morris-Harvey College, 1924 

Louise Durham Frasure .... English .... Morgantown 

B. of Ed., Southern Illinois State Normal University, 1929 

Gladys Brown Jones History .... West Union 

A. B., Salem College, 1930 

*Mary Fon Elizabeth Mayfield . French .... Morgantown 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1931 

*Emily Menefee English .... Morgantown 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1928 

Elizabeth Lucinda Moore . . . English .... Elkins 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1930 

**Mary Helen Nethken English .... Newburg 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1930 

**Helen Louisa Reed English .... Millville 

A. B., New River State School, 1929 

Linn Ford Saunders English .... Dunbar 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1929 

Sophronia Lucille Tallman . . . English .... Elkins 

A. B., Davis and Elkins College, 1928 

♦Alexander Clinton Taylor . . . English .... Parkersburg 

A. B., Antioch College, 1905 

Virginia Elizabeth Toney . . . English .... Boomer 

A. B., New River State School, 1929 

*Degree conferred September 1, 1931 
♦♦Degree conferred February 1, 1932 



Graduate Degrees Conferred, 1931-1932 



317 



MASTER OF SCIENCE 



Division of Biology and Agricultures 

Landis Seawell Bennett .... Plant Pathology 

B. S. Agr., North Carolina Stale College of Agricultu 

Bonita Baker Blair Botany .... 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1931 

Richard Kennard Brown .... Zoology .... 

A. B., Davis and Elkins College, 1926 

James Frederick Ferry .... Botany .... 

A. B., West Virginia Wesleyan College, 1928 

Mary Edith Goodwin Botany .... 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1930 

Wendell Dawley Henry .... Plant Pathology 

B. S., Rhode Island State College 1930 

Carman Ewart Irvine Botany .... 

A. B., Davis and Elkins College, 1923 

Robert Compton Patterson . . . Zoology .... 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1932 

Isaac I. Pitsenberger Botany .... 

B. S., Agr., West Virginia University, 1926 

Elmer Rudolph Roth Botany .... 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1931 

Mortimer Sigmund Schofield . . 

A. B., West Virginia University, 

Benjamin Irvan Speicher . . . 

A. B., West Virginia University, 

Alfred Reeves Stanley .... 

A. B., Penn College, 1930 
Carmon Edward Teague .... 

B. S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1930 

♦Audrey Howard Van Landingham Agri. Chemistry . 

B. S. Agr., South Georgia Agricultural and Mechanical 

*Fenton Tyree West Zoology 

A. B., Marshall College, 1927 

*Isaiah Alonzo Wiles Zoology 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1931 



Zoology .... 

1930 

Botany . . . . 

1931 

Plant Pathology 
Dairy Husbandry 



Division of Industrial Sciences: 

Christine Arnold Chemistry . 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1930 

Elton W. Bush Physics . . 

A. B., Marshall College, 1928 

Robert Carland Conn Chemistry . 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1927 

♦John William Copenhaver . . . Chemistry . 

B. S., Emory and Henry College, 1929 

Reginald Horton Downing . . . Mathematics 

A. B., Acadia University, 1930 

♦William Nelson Dunn, Jr. . . . Chemistry . 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1929 

♦Owen Reginald Gates Chemistry . 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1930 

James Lester Hall Chemistry . 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1931 



Jackson Spg's, N. C 

re, 1930 
MORGANTOWN 

Bluefield 

Weston 

Cairo 

West Warwick,R.I. 

Elkins 

morgantown 

morgantown 

McMechen 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

morgantown 

Des Moines, Iowa 

Danville, Ala. 

Morgantown 

College, 1929 

Huntington 
Morgantown 



. Weston 

. Cox's Mills 

. Morgantown 

. Tazewell, Va. 

. Montreal, Canada 

. Martin sburg 

. Flemington 

. Fairmont 



•Degree conferred September 1, 1931 
••Degree conferred February 1, 1932 



318 



Degrees Conferred by the University 



Gerhard Oliver Ovrebo Mathematics 

A. B. ( St. Olaf College, 1930 

Carl Brand Post Physics . . 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1931 

*Sol Taplits Chemistry . 

B. S., College of the City of New York, 1930 

Marvin Lewis Vest Mathematics 

B. S., Davis and Elkins College, 1927 

CIVIL ENGINEER 



Aneta, N. D. 
Clarksburg 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Morgantown 



David Edward Donley Norfolk, Va. 

B. S. C. E., West Virginia University, 1926 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 
*Rex LeRoy Fossnight Ottawa, Kan. 

B. S. C. E., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1930 

Edmond Teerink Roetman Albia, Iowa 

B. S., Iowa State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, 1927 
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 
Avery Howe Goddin Elkins 

B. S. E. E., West Virginia University, 19?1 
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING OF MINES 
Charles Thomas Holland Winona 

B. S. E. M., West Virginia University, 1928 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 



♦Charles Anderson . . . 
Kilbourne Ceylon Arnold 
Adrian Lincoln Ashworth 

**Dorothy Pauline Baker 
Rosalie Randolph Baker 
Mary Elizabeth Ballengee 
Beatrice Vivian Barnes 
Henry Evans Baum . . 
Stanley Wilbur Bendeum 
Elizabeth Lee Bennett . 
*Helen Virginia Bennett 
Virginia Fern Bickerton 

** Julia Bierer 

Julius Lewis Boiarsky . 

** Gladys Goodall Boone . 
*Orland Howson Booton, Jr 
Benson Glenn Brand . 

**John Marcus Brand . . 



♦Degree conferred September 1. 
♦♦Degree conferred February 1, 1932 



History . . 
Chemistry . 
Zoology . . 
Journalism 
English . . 
History . . 
Mathematics 
Zoology . . 
Chemistry . 
English . . 
French . . 
French . . 
French . . 
Chemistry . 
History . . 
English . . 
Chemistry . 
Chemistry . 



Morgantown 

Clarksburg 

Morgantown 

Grafton 

Elkins 

Beckley 

Morgantown 

Princeton 

Morgan sville 

Rocky Mount, Va. 

Morgantown 

monongahela clty, pa. 

Morgantown 

Charleston 

Charleston 

Williamson 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 



1931 



Baccalaureate Degrees Conferred, 1931-1932 



319 



Margaret Hamilton Brooks 
* Carrie Alberta Brown . 

James Willard Brown . 

Alicia Daryl Brownfield 

Phyllis Lucile Buck . 

Catharine Louise Burch 

Richard Ray Cameron . 

Mary Porter Carper . . 

Julius Milo Carringer . 

George William Carroll 

Dante L. Castrodale . . 

William J. B. Chafin . 
*Harry Marvin Chenoweth 

Henry Cady Chitwood . 

John Henry Clifford . 

Lucy Virginia Coleman . 

Edmund E. Collins . . 

John Byron Conn . . . 

Lurain Darthy E. Connelly 
♦Frank Pickering Cobbin, Jr. 

William Moore Corwin . 

Oscar Jules Coudoux . . 

Louis Grant Craig . . 

James Homer Crow . . 

Mabel Viola Cunningham 

David Earle Cuppett, Jr. 

Richard Forrest Currence 

Harriet Virginia Davis . 

Mary Alice Davis . . . 

Ruth Du Puy Davis . . 

James Michael Donlan . 

Leo Dotson 

Robert Uriel Drinkard . 
'♦David Myron Dunbar . 

Mina Duty .... 

Earle L. Elmore . 

Helen Emsley . . 

Martin Farinetti . 

Madgelene Farmer 
♦John Donovan Faust 

Earl Lloyd Fisher 

Harry Carrington Fleming 

C. Irving Foote .... 

Margaret Matilda French 

Charles Wesley Furbee, Jr 



•Degree conferred September 1, 1931 
**Degrree conferred February 1, 1932 



Zoology .... 
Sociology . . . 
Chemistry . . . 
History .... 
English .... 
Public Speaking . 
Zoology .... 
History .... 
Political Science 
Economics . . . 
Zoology .... 
Chemistry . . . 
Economics . . . 
Chemistry . . . 
Economics . . . 
English .... 
Chemistry . . . 
Chemistry . . . 
Public Speaking . 
Physics .... 
Journalism . . 
French .... 
Political Science 
History .... 
English .... 
History .... 
Economics . . . 
Chemistry . . . 
History .... 
Psychology . . 
Chemistry . . . 
Journalism . . 
Chemistry . . . 
French .... 
Public Speaking . 
Chemistry . . . 
French .... 
Economics . . . 
English .... 
Chemistry . . . 
Chemistry . . . 
Chemistry . . . 
Economics . . . 
Botany .... 
Geology .... 



Morgan town 

Morgantown 

Albright 

Uniontown, Pa. 

Sistersville 

Parkersburg 

Wheeling 

Charleston 

Wheeling 

New Cumberland 

An aw alt 

Matewan 

Simpson 

Morgantown 

Clarksburg 

Farmington 

Mona 

Point Marion, Pa. 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Point Marion, Pa. 

Weston 

Dallas 

Saint Marys 

Thomas 

Clarksburg 

Charleston 

Morgantown 

Beckley 

Parkersburg 

Richwood 

Wheeling 

Norwalk, Conn. 

Carolina 

Tariff 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Beckley 

Hepzibah 

Gassaway 

Grafton 

South Norwalk, Conn. 

Morgantown 

Clarksburg 



320 



Degrees Conferred by the University 



♦William Joseph Gaal . 
Paul J. Garrison . . . 
Helen Smith Gerwig 
Charles David Ginsburg 
Katherine Gonano . . 
Charles Berzill Grossman 
Mary Belle Haggerty . 
Roy Robert Hale . . . 
Robert Charles Hamilton 
Samuel Francis Hammer 

♦Ralph M. Hartman . . 
Elizabeth Roths Hayes 
George Harris Healey 
Edward T. Heck . . 
♦♦Lyle Eddy Herod . . 
Dexter May Hess . . 
Virginia Lee Highland 
Mary Hiner .... 
Nancy Elizabeth Hogg 
Mary Withers Hooker 
** Henry Sheldon Hopkins 

♦William Thomas Hughes 

♦Humbert Albert Imbro . 

Alexander Earl Jackson, Jr. 

♦♦Everett Osbourne Jeffreys . 

♦Olive Mae Johnston . . 
Ralph Junior Jones . . 
Kenneth William Keever 

♦Marvin R. Kiger . . . 
Marjorie Adair King . . 
Robert A. Kopp .... 

♦Frederick Kosanovic . . 
Fred R. Lardin, Jr. . . 
Harold Howard Layman 
Lawrence Raymond Leeson 

♦Grace Edna Lemley . . 
Herman Bijou Levensohn 
Mary Margery Lewis . . 
Heil Henderson Lichliter 
Edna Jane Lindley . . 
Frances Miriam Lockhart 

♦Dora Marie Long . . . 
♦♦James Sereno Love . . 

♦Edward J. Loy .... 
Nellie Virginia Lynch . 



♦Degree conferred September 1, 1931 
•♦Degree conferred February 1, 1932 



Political Science 
History .... 
Home Economics 
Economics 
Sociology 
Zoology . 
English . 
Economics 
Economics 
Chemistry 
Economics 
Botany . 
Philosophy 
Geology . 
Botany . 
Botany . 
French . 
History . 
French . 
English . 
Chemistry 
Economics 
Zoology . 
Economics 
Chemistry 
English . 
Zoology . 
Zoology . 
History . 
Psychology 
Economics 
Chemistry 
Economics 
Geology . 
Chemistry 
English . 
Zoology . 
Sociology 
Economics 
English . 
Chemistry 
Latin . . 
Journalism 
Chemistry . 
Mathematics 



Chattaroy 

Morgantown 

Parkersburg 

Huntington 

Pageton 

Charleston 

Fairmont 

Weston 

Hinton 

Green sburg, Pa. 

tunnelton 

Morgantown 

Wellsville, N. Y. 

Spencer 

Grafton 

Morgantown 

New Martinsville 

Marlinton 

Point Pleasant 

buckhannon 

Charleston 

Morgantown 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Fairmont 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Bridgeport 

Belleville 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Huntington 

Weirton 

New Kensington, Pa. 

Morgantown 

Raven swood 

Morgantown 

New York, N. Y. 

Fairmont 

Salisbury, Pa. 

Montgomery 

Wheeling 

Clarksburg 

Morgantown 

Augusta 

Grafton 



Baccalaureate Degrees Conferred, 1931-1932 



321 



Dorothy Norris McCoy . 

Donald L. Mahanna . . 

Toivo John Mahl . . . 

Louis Marvin Mankoff . 

Marvin I. Manuel . . . 

William H. Markwood, Jr. 

Lena May Mathews . . 

*Sue M. Mathews . . . 

** George Elmer May . . 

Evelyn Adeline Meadows 
*Lewis Medvin 

Sidney Gene Melnicoff . 
*Mary Jean Michael . . 

Phyllis Maxine Miller . 
*Rufus Glen Miller . . 

Lawrence Hoy Mills . . 

Wanda Blye Mitchell . 

Fredrica McDonald Moore 
** Alfred John Morello . 

Dortha Berc Morrison . 

Thomas Fitch Mum . . 

Mary Ruth Murphy . . 
**Amadeo Nazario Janer . 

Earl Milton Neff . . . 
*James Donald Neill . . 

Harlan M. Nelson . . 

Dorothy Hedges Newman 

Eugene Jennings Null . 
*Carl Joe Nutter . . . 
*H. Wesley O'Brien . . 
**Eduardo Ocoma y Calicdan 

Paul James O'Farrell . 

Walter Ernest Paller . 
**Robert Compton Patterson 

John Robert Poland 
♦Carl Brand Post . 

Evelyn Faye Preest 

Sue Proctor . . . 

Helen Ruth Pyles 

Geraldine Reed . . 

Philip Jeffreys Reed 

Henry Sabe Richardson . 

Emily Winifred Roberts 

Bess Louise Robey . . 

Cyril Fred Ruble . . . 



♦Degree conferred September 1, 1931 
•♦DegTee conferred February 1, 1932 



English .... 
Chemistry . . . 
Economics . . . 
Economics . . . 
Economics . . . 
Chemistry . . . 
French .... 
History .... 
Chemistry . . . 
Chemistry . . . 
Zoology .... 
Political Science 
Education . . . 
Chemistry . . . 
History .... 
Zoology .... 

Latin 

Spanish .... 
French .... 
Public Speaking . 
Chemistry . . . 
French .... 
Chemistry . . . 
French .... 
History .... 
Economics . . . 
English .... 
Geology .... 
History .... 
Political Science 
Chemistry . . . 
Economics . . . 
Economics . . . 
Zoology .... 
Botany .... 
Physics .... 
English .... 
Journalism . . 
Public Speaking . 
English . 
History . 
History . 
History . 
History . 
Economics 



SlSTERSVILLE 

Parkersburg 

Weirton 

Williamson 

Charleston 

Keyser 

Morgan town 

Grantsville 

Keyser 

H in ton 

Akron, Ohio 

Morgantown 

morgantown 

KlNGWOOD 

KlNGWOOD 

Clarksburg 

Parkersburg 

West Alexander, Pa. 

Jamaica, N. Y. 

Charleston 

New York, N. Y. 

Charleston 

Mayaguez, P. R. 

Slatington, Pa. 

Cairo 

Circleville 

Moundsville 

Hundred 

Spencer 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Mangaldan, P. I. 

White Sulphur Sp'gs. 

Dehue 

Morgantown 

Martinsburg 

Clarksburg 

Morgantown 

Raven swood 

New Martinsville 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Grafton 

Morgantown 



322 



Degrees Conferred by the University 



♦Carol Virginia Scanlon 
Herman L. Schiff . . 
Virginia A. Schiffler 
Jacob L. Sebulsky . . 
Edmund Keefer Selby 

* Robert Emory Sellers 
Theo Beatrice Shearer 
Douglas Burris Shipley 
Jack K. Shipman . . 
Virginia Shonk . . . 

♦Kingsley Richard Smith 
Margery S. Smith . . 
Mary Louise Smith . 
Pauline Wilma Smith 
George Witten Smoot 
William R. Sonderman 
Helen Virginia Spangler 
George Dauphinee Stathers 
Helen Glenn Stevenson 

* Byron Eddy Stewart 
*Roy R. Stewart . . . 

Ouida E. Stonestreet 

Edward Daniel Storck 

Mary Heaphy Strong . 

Morris G. Sutton . . 
♦♦Anna Theresa Swing . 

Charles William Sydnor, Jr. . 

Kirk C Tallman . . 

Edward Lee Taylor . 
♦Edith May Thomas . 

Richard Bailey Tibbs . 

John Tinivell . . . 

John Leslie Towler . 

Michael A. Viggiano . 

Frank L. Vodopivec . 

Nina Lee Waddell . 

Richard Lee Waddell 

John A. Walker . . 
♦Helen Virginia Wallace 
♦Elmer Kay Walters . 

Jeannetta E. Watson 

Mary Ellen Weightman 
♦* Stephen Weisman . . 

Elmer Edward Welsh 
♦L. Taxer Welshans . 



♦Degree conferred September 1, 1931 
'♦Degree conferred February 1, 1932 



History . 

Economics 

French . 

History . 

Economics 

Economics 

Economics 

Economics 

Journalism 

Sociology 

History . 

French . 

French . 

History . 

Economics 

Economics 

Botany . 

French . 

English . 

Chemistry 

Chemistry 

Journalism 

Economics 

Economics 

Zoology . 

Chemistry 

History . 

Economics 

Economics 

English . 

Economics 

Economics 

Economics 

Chemistry 

Economics 

French . 

Economics 

Spanish . 

Zoology . 

Chemistry 

English . 

French . 

Zoology . 

Chemistry 

Chemistry 



Morgantown 

morgantown 

Wheeling 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Martin sburg 

Maben 

Charleston 

Weston 

Morgantown 

Marlinton 

Morgantown 

Bluefield 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Fairmont 

Littleton 

Morgantown 

Wellsburg 

Morgantown 

Wheeling 

Rainelle 

Wheeling 

Kincheloe 

Charleston 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Winifred 

Yonkers, N. Y. 

Blaine 

Philippi 

Philippi 

Clarksburg 

West Union 

Worthington 

Pine Grove 

Shinnston 

New Brunswick, N. J. 

Uniontown, Pa. 

Shepherdstown 



Baccalaureate Degrees Conferred, 1931-1932 



323 



James W. White . . . 
**John William Whitlock 
*Cordie Myrle Wilkinson 
Roy Edward Williams 
Mary Virginia Willis 
Katharine Hay Wilson 
Miriam H. Wilson . . 
Maxie Alva Withrow 

*RlCHARD MlLBURN WOTRING 

Lillian Em aline Yocke 
Charles M. Young . . 



Economics . . . 

Chemistry . . . 

Mathematics . . 

Chemistry . . . 

History . . . . 

Spanish . . . . 

Public Speaking . 

English . . . . 

Chemistry . . . 

Mathematics . . 

Mathematics . . 



Wheeling 

MacAlpin 

Shinnston 

East Bank 

Bluefield 

Washington, D. C 

Clarksburg 

Lewisburg 

Terra Alta 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



Walter Harold Balley Dawson, Pa. 

B. S., Allegheny College, 192S 

Jack Basman Charleston 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1931 

Edgar Charles Blum Elm Grove 

Harold Carl Boylen Jane Lew 

A. B., Marshall College, 1925 

Alfred Spates Brady, Jr Elkins 

Ph. B., Yale University, 1928 

John Marcus Brand Morgantown 

A. B. f West Virginia University, 1932 

Henry Allen Brown Charleston 

John Morrison Brown Summersville 

John Chiavetta Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1930 

George Raymond Cunningham .... Morgantown 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1931 

R. Stanley Cunningham Wheeling 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1931 

Anthony Marion DeAngelis Morgantown 

Carmelo Eugene DeAngelis Morgantown 

Thomas Henry Deely East Rockaway, N. Y. 

B. S., Fordham University, 1927 

Frederick Henry Dobbs Wheeling 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1931 

John Camden Eakle Sutton 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1931 

Harry Ehrlich Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Alice W. Elliott Youngstown, Ohio 

B. S., University of Pittsburgh, 1930 

Manuel Fernandez y Fuster ..... Guayama, P. R. 

Jaime Fuster y Fuster Guayama, P. R. 

John Simon Gaynor Wheeling 

Harry Sheldon Good Allentown, Pa. 

B. S., Muhlenberg College, 1924 

Edward Goodman New York, N. Y. 

♦Degree conferred September 1, 1931 
•♦Degree conferred February 1, 1932 



324 Degrees Conferred by the University 

William Karl Graham Hollidays Cove 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1929 

Ralph Greenberg Kansas City, Mo. 

A- B., University of Kansas, 1930 

Frank Abram Hale Weston 

Wilbur Dallas Hall Mannington 

Frank Robert Jamison Fairmont 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1924 

Calvin E. Kielsmeier Cleveland, Ohio 

A. B., Ohio State University, 1929 

Alan Frank Kreglow Martinsburg 

James Webber Lent Westfield, N. J 

B. S., Rutgers University, 1928 

John Alastair Love Moorefield 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1930 

Auren Wellington McConkey .... Canton, Ohio 

Joseph Thomas Mallamo Fairmont 

Leonard Esker Neal Clarksburg 

Philip Henry Nippert Beaver Falls, Pa. 

B. S., Geneva College, 1928 

Rex Arthur Patterson Morgantown 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1931 

Clarence H. Plymale Huntington 

Dennis H. Robinson Morgantown 

David Rosenbergr New York, N. Y. 

Ph. G., Columbia University, 1915 

Cecil Wendell Shafer Wayne 

Charles Mansfield Smith Huntington 

Clyde Arthur Smith Rainelle 

Harry Anthony Smith Wheeling 

Ph. B., Bethany College, 1917 

Anna Theresa Swing Rainelle 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1932 

Jose Roberto Vivas Orocovis, P. R. 

Robert Daniel Walter Wheeling 

John William Whitlock Charleston 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1932 

Samuel Harrison Williams East Palestine, Ohio 

B. S., Geneva College, 1926 

James Ralph Woodford Philippi 

Everett B. Wray Glen White 

Richard Wallace Young Buckhannon 

B. S., West Virginia Wesleyan College, 1929 
BACHELOR OF LAWS 

♦♦Howard C. Boggess Morgantown 

James Henry Brewster, Jr Weston 

Frank Lee Bushong, Jr Charleston 

A. B., Roanoke College, 1929 

Arthur Bates Butler, Jr Wheeling 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1931 



•Degree conferred September 1, 1931 
•♦Degree conferred February 1, 1922 



Baccalaureate Degrees Conferred, 1931-1932 325 

Marion Keith Cunningham Elkins 

♦Wilton Howell Davis Morgantown 

Carl Frankovitch Weirton 

♦♦Howard Joseph Gibson Kingwood 

'Frederick Hardman Goff Clarksburg 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1929 

Frances Frederick Haney Morgantown 

♦Edwin Forrest Hartley, Jr Fairmont 

Elizabeth Aileen Hatfield Logan 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1928 

Harry Rader Hesse Wheeling 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1931 

John Hampton Hoge Princeton 

♦♦Chester Russell Hubbard, II Wheeling 

A. B., Lafayette College. 1928 

Donald Merideth Hutton Clarksburg 

Jacob Stephen Hyer Buckhannon 

A. B., West Virginia Wesleyan College, 1929 

Charles Louis Ihlenfeld Wheeling 

♦Jack Dowell Jennings Buckhannon 

A. B., West Virginia Wesleyan College, 1927 

♦Walter Broughton Johnston .... Princeton 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1928 

Willis Lyle Jones Bridgeport 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1930 

Mac Albert Kaplus Verona, N. J. 

♦♦George E. Loucas Weirton 

♦♦Francis Johnson Love Wheeling 

A. B., Bethany College, 1924 

James Alessandro McWhorter .... Charleston 

Lee Frederic Malone Morgantown 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1929 

Marion Meredith Fairmont 

A. B., Marshall College, 1928 

Richard Conway Moore Fairmont 

A. B., Marietta College, 1928 

Robert Chesney Morris Fairmont 

Francis Evan Parrack Kingwood 

August William Petroplus Wheeling 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1930 

Eugene M. Prager Wheeling 

Myer Robinson Wheeling 

Lloyd Earle Sample, Jr Fairmont 

A. B., W r est Virginia University, 1928 

Abraham Bernard Sclove Charleston 

A. B. ; West Virginia University, 1930 

Harold David Slaven Morgantown 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1931 

♦♦Henry Provance Snyder Morgantown 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1930 

Ward Day Stone Morgantown 

A. B., West Virginia University, 1930 

♦Degree conferred September 1, 1931 
••Degree conferred February 1, 1932 



326 Degrees Conferred by the University 

Louis Wildstein Newark, N. J. 

* Lloyd Huffman Young, Jr. Lost Creek 

Robert Bortner Ziegler Clarksburg 

Julius William Zwicker Wheeling 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

**Harold Leonard Herbert New York, N. Y. 

William Price McCue Morgantown 

♦William Donald Musgrove Fairmont 

Edward J. Niehaus, Jr Wheelingg 

J. Bartlett Sutton Bridgeport 

Ira S. Young Morgantown 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Thomas Jacobs Adams New Martinsville 

William L. Cottle, Jr Mount Hope 

*Roy D. Koch Grafton 

Anthony J. Kranaskas Thomas 

Ambrose Everett McCaskey, Jr New Martinsville 

John Robert Mercer Moundsville 

Charles Richard Nuzum Hepzibah 

John Patton Poling Morgantown 

James Banks Shepherd Charleston 

Edgar F. Spedden Bluefield 

Wilbur Goodwin Strickler Jefferson, Pa. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Rolla Warren Blair Sandyville 

* Samuel Whanger Boone Ronceverte 

Charles John DeLancy Jefferson, Pa. 

Henry Kenneth DeMoss Grafton 

Albert Wiley Friend Morgantown 

George Edward Hervey, III Morgantown 

Clarence E. Higgins Reader 

Duncan C. Kennedy, Jr Charleston 

Lawrence P. Kirwln Charleston 

Harold V. Locker Parkersburg 

Charles J. McCormick Parkersburg 

Willie Carl McMillion Lewisburg 

**Thomas Frances Manion, Jr Wheeling 

Lewis Edwin Palmer Sherman 

Philip S. Skaff Charleston 

Okey B. Spangler Bluefield 

Carter Barnes Withers Parkersburg 

♦Degree conferred September 1, 1931 
••Degree conferred February 1, 1932 



Baccalaureate Degrees Conferred, 1931-1932 327 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Ralph Miller Gilkeson Springdale 

James Elmore Godwin Huntington 

Reginald Pike East Woodstock, Conn. 

John P. Plovanich Littleton- 
Philip Arthur Saunders Dunbar 

William Holland Sterling Masontown, Pa. 

**Roy Monroe Taggart Morgantown 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

*Glen Kern Henry Connellsville, Pa. 

James Otto Stephan Parkersburg 

*Robert Henry Tiggelbeck Wheeling 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (ENGINEERING ELECTIVES) 

Carroll Norman Mumford Fairmont 

Norman Welbec Parsons Morgantown 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE 

Charles William Anderson Cameron 

*Edward Allan Auld Morgantown 

*John Wesley Barnard Morgantown 

William Edgar Bell Point Pleasant 

William Carson Brown Morgantown 

*Harley Alvin Burton Elizabeth 

Buell Howard Clark Hemlock 

Robert Glenn Donley Maidsville 

James Nevin Dyer Fort Seybert 

Paul Ernest Gessler Parkersburg 

Cecil Leonard Hawkins Lumberport 

Charlie Wickline Hill Hillsboro 

Hayward Harry Huff Harrisville 

**Luther Frank Hutton Clarksburg 

Sherrill D wight McMillen Masontown 

** James Robert Pitsenberger Poole 

Eugene Joseph Powell Clarksburg 

Rufus Pope Reed Morgantown 

Richard Gerald Repair Parsons 

**Chesleigh Rosamond Ripley Alma 

James Edward Saville Levels 

E. Walter Van Steenburgh Oak Hill 

Ralph Wick Welch Harrisville 

Earnest Howard Wotring Morgantown 

♦Degree conferred September 1, 1931 
••Degree conferred February 1, 1932 



328 Degrees Conferred by the University 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS 

Bertha Marie Antram Hibbs, Pa. 

* Barbara Frances Atwood Morgantown 

**Martha Louise Baker Scarbro 

** Mildred Irene Bayles Morgantown 

Katherine Dolores Broderick .... Rowlesburg 

Edna Virginia Cornell Grantsville 

Mary Garnette Dearien Saint Albans 

Anna Irene Dillon Bridgeport 

Roxy Downs Farmington 

**Lucia Jean Emerson Morgantown 

Eulan Engel Chapel 

Josephine Ferris Moundsville 

Dorotha Lea Field Morgantown 

Essie Himmelrick Burton 

Una Lee Jarvis Grantsville 

Jeanette Agnes Jordan Richwood 

Janet Mankin Kirby Charleston 

**Ida Fitzhugh Limerick J/organtown 

Ph. C, West Virginia University, 1920 

Gladys McConkey Copen 

**Mary Jane McKain Fairmont 

Harriet Jane Miller Morgantown 

Elizabeth Morgan Farmington 

**Louise Emma Neal Alderson 

Lottye Mae Pack Hinton 

Marion Goodman Parsons Ripley 

**Doshia Christine Richards Casar, N. C. 

Agnes Millar Rush Scottsville, N. Y. 

Helen Mae Schafer Elm Grove 

Mary Catherine Scheuer Republic, Pa. 

Nelle Margaret Shepherd Morgantown 

Margaret Virginia Shira Salem 

A. B., Salem College, 1931 

Madolyn Louise Shrum Morgantown 

Martha Beatrice Stemple Aurora 

Bertha Mae Strother Brown 

Helen Elizabeth Tucker Morgantown 

Oma Lucretia Umbel Morgantown 

♦Ada Kathryn Ward Elkins 

Eva America Wharton New Martinsville 

Helen Fairfax Wolfe Kingwood 



♦Degree conferred September 1, 1931 
••Degree conferred February 1, 1932 



Baccalaureate Degrees Conferred, 1931-1932 329 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 

Winnie Viquesney Booth Morgantown 

Helen Doris Cattrell Hollidays Cove 

♦Nevada Clawson Parkersburg 

Mary Louida Colebank Morgantown 

Mary Virginia Conn Morgantown 

♦Ruth Gertrude Cummings Saint Albans 

Clarence H. Drepperd Clarksburg 

♦♦Ira G. Duncan Buckhannon 

♦Everett Cecil Flesher Reedy 

♦Frances Stahl Hall Stotesbury 

Vivien Estella Kester Clarksburg 

Helen Lake Fairmont 

Frankie Lee Lanham Pennsboro 

Harold Parker Lynch Keyser 

♦♦Charles W. McCoy Fairmont 

♦Carl Francis Montgomery Mole Hill 

John Lester Patterson Morgantown 

♦♦Ethel Virginia Peaslee Rowlesburg 

♦Carrol Hunter Quenzel Morgantown 

Evelyn Lois Riedel McMechen 

Sophia Josephine Simons New Cumberland 

Agnes Virginia Simpson Morgantown 

Charles Verna Stewart War 

Virgil Harvey Stewart Pineville 

Margaret Straley Ripley 

BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN VOICE 

Loisbelle Baker Morgantown 

BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN PIANO 

Madeline Roxane Fitzpatrick .... Clarksburg 

Martha Jane Lewis Morgantown 

Thomas Benjamin Richner Point Marion, Pa. 

T helm a Marie Wilcox Clarksburg 

BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC 

Philip J. Davies Elkins 

Beatrice Eleanor Donley Morgantown 

♦Mary Christine Gilhooley Ronceverte 

♦Virginia Aileen Guthrie Eccles 

Beatrice Janet Lough Morgantown 

♦Degree conferred September 1, 1931 
♦•Degree conferred February 1, 1932 



330 Degrees Conferred by the University 

Katharine Irene Lough Morgantown 

Margaret Jean Martin Elkins 

Doris Lee McLaughlin Monongah 

♦Auther Allison Whitener Morgantown 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Malcolm Raymond Arnold Blooming Rose 

Caroline S. Brackett Fairmont 

Edward Burdette Cordray Morgantown 

Edward Hermon Cubbon Shinnston 

William Edward Dole Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Marie Leona Gans Point Marion, Pa. 

James Timothy Gwilliam Sabraton 

Ruth E. Henry Morgantown 

Isaac Lewis Newlonton 

August Anthony Marques New York, N. Y. 

Eunice Perine Morgantown 

Carroll Foster Reynolds Morgantown 

Vental Forest Waggoner Belington 

Helen Elizabeth Williams Beckley 

Grethel Goldie Young Lonaconing, Md. 

Esther Elizabeth Zearley Morgantown 

*Marie Elizabeth Zwick Fredericktown, Pa. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING OF MINES 

** William A. Haslam Logan 

Hugh D. Lowe McComas 

Joseph S. Malesky Lake Lynn, Pa. 

**Bernard F. Rinehart Morgantown 

Garold Ralph Spindler Kingwood 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY 

Abraham S. Chinn Connellsville, Pa. 

Ph. C, West Virginia University, 1932 

Sidney J. Schatz Morgantown 

PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMIST 

** Abraham S. Chinn Connellsville, Pa. 

*Edward Furzer Clarke Connellsville, Pa. 

Edith Boone McMillion Lewisburg 

Richard Garrett McNamara Wheeling 



♦Degree conferred September 1, 1931 
♦♦Degree conferred February 1, 1932 



Degrees Conferred, 1870-1932 



331 



DEGREES CONFERRED 1870-1932 
BACHELORS' DEGREES 



YEAR 


pa 
< 




pa 
3 


ui 

od 

pa 


od 


s 

w 

od 

pa 


H 

CO 

pa 


O 

CO 

PQ 


1 

1— 1 

to' 
pa 


< 

< 


.5 
pa 
< 


pa 

id 




> 


pa 


b 




3 


H 
od 
pq 


1 

od 

pq 


1 

CO 

pq 


CO 

1 


1870 


1 

4 

7 

7 

6 

3 

7 

5 

2 

2 

3 

7 

9 

3 

4 

5 

2 

4 

9 

6 

8 

6 

12 

8 

10 

8 

11 

9 

12 

46 

30 

25 

29 

28 

20 

18 

32 

20 

27 

27 

27 

27 

28 

28 

35 

40 

62 

40 

42 

79 

93 

56 

125 

130 

132 

169 

198 

211 

230 

264 

252 

209 

2960 










































1 

2 


1871 


1 








































1872 








































4 


1873 


6 








































13 

7 
7 
9 
9 
6 


1874 








































1875 


6 
2 
1 
1 
2 








































1876 








































1877 








































1878 








































1879 


1 
2 






































4 


1880 






































6 


1881 






































3 


1882 


2 

G 

3 

1 

3 

"4 
2 
2 

2 
4 
3 


1 
5 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
7 
6 
14 
18 
11 
23 
24 
35 






































10 


1883 






































17 


1884 






































9 
13 
13 


1885 






































1886 






































1887 






































11 


1888 






































13 


1889 






































19 


1890 






































12 


1891 






































26 


1892 


4 

5 
5 
3 

"2 
6 
7 




































30 


1893 




































30 


1894 












1 
























39 


1895 


































41 


1896 


1 
2 










1 
























48 


1897 


2 44 










5 
5 

2 






















66 


1898 


5 

2 

1 

"i 

"2 
1 

3 
4 
3 

6 
5 

12 
9 
13 
25 
8 
9 
8 
11 
22 
29 
48 
47 
43 
53 
58 
55 
48 
49 
42 
42 
54 

771 


18 

40 

9 

9 

17 

10 

8 

22 

17 

12 

8 

2 

12 
12 
17 
15 
12 
14 
9 

16 
5 
2 
16 
12 
17 
20 
IS 
26 
26 
37 
35 
42 
42 
40 
42 

885 










1 

2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
2 
1 
2 


1 




















45 


1899 


1 




























66 


1900 




























58 


1901 


3 
8 
6 
2 
4 
9 

14 
6 

15 
7 
6 
9 
3 
4 
8 
2 
5 
4 

11 
7 
7 
4 
9 

14 
19 
13 
7 
8 
7 
9 
11 

273 
































45 


1902 


2 
1 
2 
3 
6 
4 
6 
4 
5 
7 
9 

1 
4 
4 

2 
4 

2 
5 
5 
8 
8 
3 
5 
7 
3 
7 
2 
4 
7 

136 






























54 


1903 
































48 


1904 
































49 


1905 
































•ft 


1906 














3 
7 

1 
6 


















55 


1907 


























75 


1908 


























•>1 


1909 










1 






















56 


1910 










2 
















60 


1911 


2 








3 
4 
3 

12 
10 
10 
19 
17 
5 

14 
25 
IS 
41 
25 
19 
22 
14 
15 
21 
22 
23 
24 

384 




















68 


1912 






















84 


1913 


' i 

1 
5 
1 
2 

5 
7 

9 
2 

6 

11 
10 
7 
3 
3 
2 
5 

82 


2 
5 
5 
6 






















61 


1914 






1 


















76 


1915 


















10? 


1916 
























80 


1917 










2 

10 
17 

17 

25 

19 

28 

22 

39 

321 














T>1 


1918 


4 

3 
5 
7 
6 
9 
18 
17 
9 

IS 
17 
15 
24 
21 
17 

205 


2 
3 
4 
7 
6 
4 
7 
4 
6 
9 
7 
6 

65 


i 

' i 
"i 

"a 
3 

9 
















85 


1919 






















76 


1920 










"5 

10 
4 

37 


1 

10 

11 

5 








2 


169 


1921 
















199 


1922 
















194 


1923 


















?94 


1924 
















1 


?98 


1925 
















307 


1926 










1 






2 
3 

2 
20 


351 


1927 










394 


1928 










383 


1929 










46 


10 
14 
41 


23 
25 

87 


17 

24 


430 


1930 










48? 


1931 










491 


1932 










479 


Totals 


13 


3 


34 


4 


6400 





332 



Degrees Conferred by the University 



MASTERS' DEGREES 



YEAR 


A.M. 


M.S. 


LL. M. 


M. S. 
Agr. 


, M.S. 
C.E. 


M.S. 
M.E. 


M. S. 
Ch.E. 


M.S. 


M.S. ! 

E. E. Totals 


1873 


2 
4 
7 
2 
12 
3 
7 
5 
2 
3 
3 
3 
9 
3 
5 
4 

a 


















2 


1874 


















2 


1875 


















4 


1876 


5 
















12 


1877 
















2 


1878 


















12 


1879 


5 

2 
















8 


1880 
















9 


1881 
















5 


1882 


2 
















3 


1883 
















5 


1884 
















3 


1885 


















3 


1886 


3 
3 
4 
















12 


1887 
1888 
















6 
















9 


1889 
















4 


1890 


1 
















2 


1*'U 
















2 


1892 




















1893 






















1894 
1895 


i 


















1 




















1896 


i 


















1 


1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 


















\ 




1 














I 


3 
4 

3 

4 
4 
4 
2 
2 
















3 


















4 


















3 


1 
















5 
















4 




2 














6 














2 


















2 


1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 
1919 
1920 
1921 
1922 
1923 
1924 
1925 
1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 
1930 
1931 
1932 




















6 
2 
3 

2 
1 
2 
5 
5 




2 














3 














6 




1 














3 














3 




2 














2 














4 














1 


1 


1 














4 


1 












6 
















5 


2 




1 


1 










5 












4 
5 
11 
13 
15 
14 
21 
27 
30 
36 
64 
39 
33 


2 
2 
2 
1 
2 
3 
3 

3 
5 
4 

29 
29 
















6 
















7 
















13 








1 








15 




2 
3 
6 
5 
5 
3 
7 




1 






20 


2 








22 




2 






32 




1 


2 




36 
41 






45 






1 




76 


2 


1 


2 


72 






1 


1 


66 












Totals 


448 


116 


10 


33 


6 3 8 


5 l| 630 



Degrees Conferred, 1870-1932 



333 



DOCTORS' DEGREES 



Doctor of 
Philosophy- 



Total 



1902 
1907 
1932 



Total 8 



HONORARY DEGREES 



YEAR 


! 

2 

Ph 

s 


1 

> 

5 
1 

1 

Q 


to 

S 

i 




I 



I 


1 

"> 

5 

"8 
j 


8 

a 
'3 
= 
W 

"> 

S 


I 

a 

a 

B 


i 

a 

s 


iJ 

1 


1875 


1 
















1 


1883 


2 


1 
1 
3 












3 


1885 














1886 
















3 


1887 


2 

1 
1 


1 
2 

"4 
2 












1 


1888 


2 

1 
1 
1 

1 
.... 












4 


1889 






3 






7 


1890 










3 


1891 












6 


1892 












4 


1893 












1 


1894 


3 


3 

1 


1 










7 


1896 










3 


1897 




1 


1 

1 






3 


1898 












1909 












1 


2 


3 


1915 












3 


3 


1918 
















1 


1919 






15 




2 






17 


1920 






1 






1 


1921 






1 






1 


1 


2 


1924 










1 


2 


1928 






1 
3 






2 


1929 












4 


1930 














1932 






2 






1 




3 


















Totals 


11 


16 3R 


1 


3 


12 


4 


4 


87 











Part VI 

ALPHABETICAL LIST OF FACULTY 
AND STAFF 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF FACULTY AND STAFF 



The information following each staff member's name is arranged in 
the following order : degree and college, position on staff, year of appoint- 
ment to this position, year of first appointment (where two dates are 
given), residence street address, residence telephone number, and office 
room number, building, and telephone number. 

The following abbreviations are used: W, Woodburn Hall; S, Science 
Hall; M, Martin Hall; MH, Mechanical Hall; C, Hall of Chemistry; OH, 
Oglebay Hall; E, Experiment Station Building; L, Old Library; H, 
Horticulture Building; MB, Medical Building; LB, Law Building; FH, 
Men's Field House; EM, Elizabeth Moore Hall; SM, School of Music; 
SMA, School of Music Annex; A, Armory; HS, University High School; 
UL, New Library. 

Persons with asterisk (*) before name are married. 

Abbott, Mrs. Elizabeth B., Assistant Preceptress, ' Woman's Hall 
Annex; 1923; 1919; 247 Willey Street; 258. 

Ackerman, Richard Atkins, M. S. Agr. (W. V. U., 1930) ; Assistant 
Dairy Husbandman, Agricultural Experiment Station. In charge 
of Reymann Memorial Farms, Wardensville, W. Va.; 1930. 

* Adams, Edward F., 1 (U. S. M. A., West Point, N. Y., 1923); First 

Lieutenant, Infantry, D. 0. L., United States Army; Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Military Science and Tactics; 1929; 508 Boughner Lane; 
876; A; 1900. 

Adkins, John McLean, Second Lieutenant; Engineer Reserve; Student 
Assistant in Military Science and Tactics; 1931; 657 Price Street; 
1162-J; A; 1900. 

* Allen, Howard Bushnell, Ph. D. (Cornell, 1932) ; Professor of Agri- 

cultural Education; 1932; 1920; 347 Cornell Avenue; 2339-R; 207 
OH; 1900. 

* Ambler, Charles Henry, Ph. D. (Wisconsin, 1908) ; Professor of His- 

tory; 1929; 1917; 128 Simpson Street; 1241-R; 413 C; 1900. 

Amidon, Lee Leonard, M. S. M. E. (W. V. U., 1927) ; Instructor in 
Power Engineering; 1923; 320 Cobun Avenue; 233; 107 MH; 1900. 

Ammons, Nellie Perrel, A. M. (W. V. U., 1923) ; Instructor in Botany; 
1920; 299 Glendon Avenue; 870-M; 35 S; 1900. 

* Andrews, Edoar Lewis, M. S. Agr. (Cornell. 1924) ; Associate Pro- 

fessor of Poultry Husbandry; 1924; 1913; North Willey Street; 
2329-M; E; 1900. 

♦Armentrout, Walter Wardlaw, Ph. D. (Minnesota, 1931) ; Associate 
Professor of Farm Economics; and Associate Farm Economist, Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station; 1932; 1924; 420 Beverly Avenue; 
247-R; 311 OH; 1900. 



Returned to duty with troops, February, 1933. 



338 Alphabetical List of 

♦Armstrong, Robert Allen, A. M. (Harvard, 1903) ; L. H. D. (Alle- 
gheny, 1908)) LL. D. (W. Va. Wesleyan, 1927); Professor of 
English; 1903; 1893; University Chaplain, 1910; 814 College Ave- 
nue; 29-R; 26-C W; 1900. 

*Arnett, Lonna Dennis, Ph. D. (Clark University, 1903); Librarian; 
Instructor in Library Science; 1910; 11 Grant Avenue; 2532-W; 
UL; 1900. 

Arnold, Christine, M. S. ( W. V. U., 1932) ; Graduate Assistant in 
Chemistry; 1931; 1929; 124 Simpson Street; 485-M; C; 1900. 

Ashburn, Harry Virgil, A. B. (W. V. U., 1931) ; Graduate Assistant 
in Chemistry; 1928; 118 Walnut Street; 2566; 125 C; 1900. 

Ashburn, Howard Gilmer, A. B. (W. V. U., 1931) ; Graduate Assistant 
in Chemistry; 1931; 118 Walnut Street; 2566; 125 C; 1900. 

* Ashburn, Robert Russell, A. M. (W. V. U., 1928) ; Instructor in 
French and Spanish; 1927; 1925; 26 North Street; 11 W; 1900. On 
leave second semester, 1932-33. 

*Ashcroft, Joseph Myers, M. S. (W. V. U., 1931) ; Graduate Assistant 
in Plant Pathology; 1932; 226 Quay Street; 309 OH; 1900. 

*Aspinall, Richard, Ph. D. (New York University, 1926) ; University 
Extension Agent; 1930; 417 Beverly Avenue; 1875; L; 1900. 

*Atkeson, Thomas Clark, Ph. D. (Central Normal School, 1891) ; Pro- 
fessor of Animal Husbandry, Emeritus; 1910; Washington, D. C 

*Atwood, Horace, M. S. Agr. (Cornell, 1897) ; Professor Emeritus of 
Poultry Husbandry; 1931; 1911; 1090 Charles Avenue; 1642-M; E; 
1900. 

Auxier, Gwendolen, M. S. (W. V. U., 1931) ; Graduate Assistant in 
Zoology; 1930; 401 McLane Avenue; 1262-M; S; 1900. 

*Ayers, Alton M., Instructor in Mining Extension; 1930; Montgomery. 
West Virginia. 

Baldwin, Geoffrey P., (U. S. M. A., West Point, N. Y., 1916) ; Major, 
Infantry, D. O. L., United States Army; Professor of Military 
Science and Tactics; 1932; Junior Avenue, Suncrest; 2573-M ; A; 
1900. 

Baldwin, Robert Dodge, Ph. D. (Cornell, 1926) ; Professor of Educa- 
tion; 1933; 1931; Riverview Drive; 1858-W; 16 W; 1900. 

*Barnhart, John Donald, Ph. D. (Harvard, 1930) ; Associate Professor 
of History; 1931; 1926; 327 Watts Street; 172-M; 426 C; 1900. 

Barrett, Samuel Jaynes, Student Assistant in Chemistry; 1931; 
Chemistry Building; 1509-R; C; 1900. 

Bayles, Mary Catherine, Secretary to the Registrar; 1929; 1924; 608 
Monongalia Avenue; 2312-R; Registrar's Office; W; 1900. 



Faculty and Staff 339 



Bennett, Landis Seawell, M. S. (W. V. U., 1932) ; Graduate Assistant 
in Agronomy; 1930; 678 Spruce Street; 691-J; 107 OH; 1900. 

Berg, Anthony, M. S. (Wisconsin, 1923) ; Associate Professor of Plant 
Pathology and Associate Plant Pathologist, Agricultural Experiment 
Station; '1925; 1913; 141 Willey Street; 1067; 308 OH; 1900. 

*Bergy, Gordon Alger, M. S. (Michigan, 1916) ; Ph. C. (Michigan, 
1913); Professor of Pharmacy; 1917; 1916; Hopecrest; 1724-M; 2 
W; 1900. 

Bierer, Barbara, A. B. (W. V. U., 1927) ; Assistant in Library; 1929; 
2041 University Avenue; 627 UL; 1900. 

*Billig, Thomas Clifford, A. B. (Geneva, 1918) ; A. M. (Pennsylvania, 
1922) ; LL. B., J. S. D. (Yale, 1925, 1928) ; Associate Professor of 
Law; 1931; Faculty Club; 1067; 2 LB; 1900. 

Bishop, Carter Richard, M. A. (W. V. U., 1928) ; Instructor in 
English; 1929; 19 McLane Avenue; 1654; 30 W; 1900. 

Black, Louis, Artist Diploma, (New England Conservatory of Music, 
1898); Director of the School of Music and Professor of Music; 
1909; 109 McLane Avenue; 495. 

Bloom, Edith McCay, Storekeeper in Chemistry; 1922; 487 High 
Street; 1249; 227 C; 1900. 

Boettcher, Victor Henry, Jr., Second Lieutenant, Infantry Reserve; 
Student Assistant in Military Science and Tactics; 1932; 270 
Walnut Street; 554; A; 1900. 

Boggess, Ella Louise, B. S. (Carnegie, 1925) ; Assistant in Home Eco- 
nomics and Teacher in University High School; 1928; 198 Foundry 
Street; 2595-J; HS; 1793-J. 

Boggess, Thomas Earle, II, Student Assistant in Library; 1930; 349 
Dorsey Avenue; 593-J; UL; 1900. 

*Boggs, Ira Brooks, State Boys' Club Agent, Agricultural Extension 
Division; 1929; 1922; 445 Linden Street; 571-M; 202 OH; 1900. 

*Bohan, John Emlin, Ph. D. (Minnesota, 1926) ; Professor of Educa- 
tion; 1931; Suncrest; 2483-R; 15 W; 1900. 

*Bonar, Martin Loxley, M. S. (W. V. U., 1915) ; M. D. (Western Re- 
serve, 1919) ; Professor of Pharmacology; 1921; 1920; 451 Jefferson 
Street; 2147; 106 MB; 1900. Resigned, June 30, 1932. 

*Boomsliter, George Paul, M. S. C. E. (Illinois, 1914) ; Professor of 
Mechanics; 1920; 21 Wilson Avenue; 1764-J; 221 MH; 1900. 

*Booth, Leland, B. S. Agr. (W. V. U., 1924) ; Associate Editor, Agri- 
cultural Extension Division; 2020 University Avenue; 1413-W; 202 
OH; 1900. 

*Booth, Winifred, B. S. Ed. (W. V. U., 1932) ; Secretary to Dean of 
the College of Education; 1930; 2020 University Avenue; 1413-W; 
W; 1900. 



340 Alphabetical List of 



Boughner, Jennie, A. B. (W. V. U., 1912) ; Reference Librarian; 1927; 
1915; 705 Willey Street; 2303-J; UL; 1900. 

Bowlby, Edward C, Part-time Teacher in Manual Arts in University 
High School; 1932; 31 Morrison Avenue; HS; 1793-J. 

Bowling, George Augustus, M. S. (Michigan State College, 1930) ; 
Assistant Professor of Dairy Husbandry, and Assistant Dairy Hus- 
bandman, Agricultural Experiment Station; 1931; 426 Jefferson 
Street; 902; 7 OH; 1306-J. 

Boyers, Flora, Assistant, Package Library Service; 1927; 160 Fayette 
Street; 144-J; UL; 1900. 

Braden, Ruth, M. A. (Teacher's College, Columbia, 1931) ; Instructor 
in Foods and Dietetics; 1931; 160 Fayette Street; 1582-W; 112 OH; 
1900. 

♦Brand, Benson Glenn, A. B. (W. V. U., 1932) ; Graduate Assistant in 
Chemistry; 1932; 1928; 591 Jones Avenue; 1314-J; 319 C; 1900. 

*Bray, Charles McChesney, B. S. (W. V. U., 1915) ; M. D. (Western 
Reserve, 1917); Instructor in Physical Diagnosis; 1920; 200 Euclid 
Avenue; 1128; MB; 1788. 

Brooks, Chandler Linn, Assistant Superintendent of Buildings and 
Grounds; 1932; 1917; 1021 College Avenue; 1974-W; 9 W; 1900. 

*Brouzas, Christopher George, Ph. D. (Illinois, 1926) ; Associate Pro- 
fessor of Latin and Greek; 1931; 1926; 1000 Grand Street; 1713-R; 
311 C; 1900. 

*Brown, Charles Fleming, M. S. (W. V. U., 1931) ; Graduate Assistant 
in Chemistry; 1932; 404 Kingwood Street; C; 1900. 

*Brown, Edna Johnson, Assistant Secretary of the College of Engi- 
neering; 1925; 362 Overdale Street; 1526; 123 MH; 1900. 

*Burke, Stephen Patrick, Chem. E., Ph. D. (Columbia University, 
1920; 1922); Professor of Industrial Sciences, Chairman of the 
Graduate Council, and Director of the Industrial Science Division of 
the Graduate School; 1930, Hopecrest; 2142; 205 C; 1900. 

♦Callahan, James Morton, Ph. D. (Johns Hopkins University, 1897) ; 
Professor of History and Political Science; 1902; 632 Spruce Street; 
1772; 416 C; 1900. 

Cameron, Hazel Crabill, M. A. (Columbia, 1926) ; Research Specialist 
in Nutrition, Agricultural Experiment Station; 1926; 917 Brown 
Street; 2388-W; E; 1900. 

*Carl, William John, Instructor in Foundry Practice; 1920; 565 Brock- 
way Avenue; 1 MH; 1900. 

Carlin, Leo, A. B. (W. V. U., 1909); LL. B. (W. V. U., 1910); Pro- 
fessor of Law; 1921; 1916; 224 Wilson Avenue; 1775-R; 3 LB; 1900. 

•Carney, Emerson, Manager of University Book Store; 1923; 221 Rich- 
wood Avenue ; 65-J ; LB ; 1900. 



Faculty and Staff 341 



"Carpenter, Lewis Van, M. S. in San. Eng'g. (Illinois, 1926) ; Professor 
of Civil and Sanitary Engineering; 1932; 1923; 225 Cornell Avenue; 
1628; 304 MH; 1900. 

*Cather, Carl Henry, M. S. (Illinois, 1922) ; Assistant Professor of Me- 
chanics; 1924; 1916; 815 Price Street; 2380-J; 225 MH; 1900. 

♦Cather, Harold Malcolm, M. S. M. E. (W. V. U., 1923) ; Instructor in 
Drawing and Machine Design; 1919; P. 0. Box 380; 1045-M; 210 
MH; 1900. 

*Chappell, Louis Watson, M. A. (Virginia, 1921) ; Associate Professor 
of English; 1928; 1923; 425 Grand Street; 32 W; 1900. 

Chidester, Floyd Earle, Ph. D. (Clark, 1911); Professor of Zoology; 
1923; 1919; 25 Wilson Avenue; 24 S; 1900. 

Childs, William Henry, M. S. (Illinois, 1931) ; Instructor in Horti- 
culture; and Assistant in Horticulture, Agricultural Experiment 
Station; 1931; R. 4; 2333-W; 104 OH; 1306-R. 

*Chitwood, Oliver Perry, Ph. D. (Johns Hopkins, 1905) ; LL. D. (Wil- 
liam and Mary, 1926) ; Professor of History; 1907; 312 Park Street; 
1775-J; 411 C; 1900. 

Christopher, David Alfred, A. M. (W. V. U., 1921) ; Office Manager, 
Department of Intercollegiate Athletics and West Virginia Uni- 
versity Stadium Corporation; 1923; 264 Waitman Street; 1929; 181 
Bank Street, Monongahela Bldg.; 1641. 

* Clark, Friend Ebenezer, Ph. D. (Johns Hopkins, 1902) ; Professor of 
Chemistry; 1914; 649 Spruce Street; 1785; 307-309 C; 1900. 

*Clark, Robert, M. A. (George Peabody College, 1926); Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Education; 1929; 1927; 346 Cobun Avenue; 1150-M; 19 
W; 1900. On leave of absence, 1931-32. 

Clark, Samuel Friend, Student Assistant in Chemistry; 649 Spruce 
Street; 1785; C; 1900. 

*Clark, Thomas Baird, B. S. A. (Toronto University, 1927) ; Assistant 
in Poultry Research, Agricultural Experiment Station; 1927; 528 
Monongalia Avenue; 1005-J; Farm Poultry Laboratory; 1020-J. On 
leave first semester, 1932-33. 

Cline, Russell Walter, M. S. (Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1927) ; 
Instructor in Agricultural Education and Demonstration Teacher of 
Vocational Agriculture; 1928; Masontown, West Virginia. 

Clulo, Genevieve B., A. M. (W. V. U., 1929) ; Graduate Assistant in 
Botany; 1932; 244 Beechurst Avenue; S; 1900. 

Coffroth, Olive Woodburn, A. B. (Fairmont State College, 1929) ; 
Part-time Teacher in English, University High School; 1932; 
Woman's Hall; 1398; HS; 1793-J. 

*Colebank, George Henry, M. A. (Iowa, 1928) ; Assistant Professor of 
Education and Principal of University High School; 1928; 10 Jones 



Avenue; 474-J; HS; 1793-J. 



342 Alphabetical List of 



*Collett, Arm and Rene, Ph. D. (Yale, 1923) ; Associate Professor of 
Chemistry; 1931; 1924; 806 Des Moines Avenue; 1642-J; 121; C; 
1900. 

Collins, Edmund E., A. B. (W. V. U., 1932) ; Graduate Assistant in 
Chemistry; 1932; Mona, W. Va.; 48-F-22; C; 1900. 

*Colwell, Robert Cameron, Ph. D. (Princeton, 1918) ; Professor of 
Physics; 1924; 1918; 332 Demain Avenue; 671-J; 12 M; 1900. 

Colwell, Rachel Hartshorn, M. A. (Columbia, 1905) ; Professor of 
Home Economics; 1920; 1910; 101 Jackson Avenue; 2372-J; 111 
OH; 1900. 

Conley, Dolph Joseph, Superintendent, Animal Husbandry Farm; 
Stewartstown Road, R. F. D. No. 4; 10-F-ll. 

Conn, John Byron, A. B. (W. V. U., 1932) ; Graduate Assistant in 
Chemistry; 1932; 23 Main Street, Point Marion, Pa.; 224, Point 
Marion. 

*Cook, Kermit A., A. M. (W. V. U., 1931) ; Part-time Teacher in Social 
Studies, University High School; 1932'; 344 Stewart Street; HS; 
1793-J. 

Cope, David Franklin, Student Assistant in Physics; 1930; 221 Spruce 
Street; 1657; M; 1900. 

Coplin, Lucy May, A. M. (Columbia, 1932) ; Instructor in Education, 
College of Education; and Teacher of Social Studies in University 
High School; 1931; 1925; Delmar Building, High Street; 1630-J; 
HS; 1793-J. 

Cordray, Harry N., Secretary of the Botany Department and Curator 
of the Herbarium; 1930; Core, West Virginia; 32 S; 1900. 

*Core, Earl LemLey, M. A. (W. V. U., 1928) ; Instructor in Botany; 
1928; Core, West Virginia; 34 S; 1900. 

* Cornell, Ferris Dewey, Jr., M. S. (Cornell, 1924) ; Assistant Professor 

of Farm Mechanics, and Assistant Farm Mechanician, Agricultural 
Experiment Station; 1929; 1921; 421 Beverly Avenue; 247-J; 311 
OH; 1900. 

Cox, John Harrington, Ph. D. (Harvard, 1923) ; Litt. D. (Ohio Wes- 
leyan, 1923); Professor of English Philology; 1904; 1902; 34 
Campus Driveway; 674; W; 1900. 

*Crane, Dee, Potato Specialist, Agricultural Extension Division; 1918; 
900 College Avenue; 2534-J; E; 1900. 

* Creech, Benjamin Franklin, B. S. Agr. (Kentucky, 1917) ; Animal 

Husbandman, Agricultural Extension Division; 1919; 1917; Cornell 
and Cayton; 2534-M; 106 OH; 1900. 

*Cresswell, John Reginald, Ph. D. (Cornell, 1926) ; Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Philosophy; 1929; 661 Price Street; 2389-R; 36 L; 1900. 

Crisler, George Russell, Ph. D. (Chicago, 1928); M. D. (Chicago, 
1931); Associate Professor of Physiology; 1928; 141 Willey Street; 
1067; 202-A; MB; 1788. 



Faculty and Staff 343 



♦Crocker, Stephen Fuller, A. M. (Princeton, 1923) ; Assistant Pro- 
fessor of English; 1931; Evansdale; 1789-M; 32 W; 1900. 

Cubbon, Edward Herman, B. S. Phys. Ed. (W. V. U., 1932) ; Instructor 
in the Division of Physical Education; 1932; 642 High Street; 1907; 
FH; 1900. 

Cunningham, Mary Lucile, Secretary and Librarian, University High 
School; 1931; 712 Weaver Street; 1006-R; L; 1793-J. 

♦Dadisman, Andrew Jackson, Ph. D. (Cornell University, 1924) ; Pro- 
fessor of Farm Economics; Farm Economist, Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station; and Director of the Summer Session; 1929; 1914; 305 
Beverly Avenue; 803-J; 311 OH; 1900. 

Darby, Arleigh Lee, A. M., Litt. D. (Waynesburg, 1907, 1927) ; Pro- 
fessor of Romance Languages; 1920; 1910; 487 High School; 374-R; 
14 W; 1900. 

♦David, Norman Austin, A. B., M. D. (California, 1925, 1931); 
Assistant Professor of Pharmacology; 1932; 210 South High Street; 
1241-J; 106 MB; 1900, 1788. 

*Davies, Earl C. H., Ph. D. (Chicago, 1917); Professor of Chemistry; 
1931; 1920; 321 Richwood Avenue; 944-M; 114 C; 1900. 

♦Davis, Al., Superintendent, Dairy Husbandry Farm; Cheat Road; R. F. 
D. 3; 513-W; Farm, 514-R. 

*Davis, Bruce, Superintendent, Horticulture Farm; 513-M. 

♦Davis, Fred Arthur, B. S. C. E. (W. V. U., 1898) ; Special Lecturer in 
Highway Engineering; 1929; Suncrest Park; 2584-J; 105 MH; 1665. 

♦Davis, Hannibal Albert, Ph. D. (Cornell, 1928) ; Assistant Professor 
of Mathematics; 1929; 1921; 307 Duquesne Avenue; 34-J; 210 C; 
1900. 

♦Davis, Roland Parker, Ph. D. (Cornell, 1914); Dean, and Professor 
of Structural and Hydraulic Engineering, College of Engineering; 
1932; 1911; 333 Demain Avenue; 2120; 123 MH; 1900. 

♦Davis, Wayne McVeigh, Instructor in Mining Extension; 1929; Madi- 
son, West Virginia. 

Deahl, Jasper Newton, Ph. D. (Columbia, 1906) ; Professor of Edu- 
cation; 1903; 1901; 442 Park Street; 1168-J; 15 and 18 W; 1900. 

DeAngelis, Carmelo Eugene, B. S. (W. V. U., 1932) ; Assistant in 
Pathology and Bacteriology; 1932; 315 High Street; 1324; 209 MB; 
1900 or 1788. 

Dearborn, Harley L., Staff Sergeant, D. E. M. L., United States 
Army; Assistant to Professor of Military Science and Tactics; 1921; 
420 Grant Avenue; 1101-R; A; 1900. 

♦Deatrick, Eugene Peyton, Ph. D. (Cornell, 1917) ; Associate Professor 
of Agronomy, and Extension Agronomist (4-H Club Work), Agri- 
cultural Extension Division; 1930; 1921; Stewartstown Road; 
1961-J; 105 OH; 1900. Resigned, August 31, 1932. 



$44 Alphabetical List of 



*Deatrick, Lily Bell, Ph. D. (Ohio State, 1921) ; Associate Professor 
of Chemistry; 1927; 1920; Stewartstown Road; 1961-J; 223 C; 1900. 

DeLancy, Frances Priscilla, A. M. (W. V. U., 1931); Graduate 
Assistant in Political Science; 909 College Avenue; 1974-R; 412 
C; 1900. 

Detch, John Lewis, Assistant in Law Library; 1932; Rivesville; LB; 
1900. 

♦Dickinson, Edmund Charles, A. B. (Earlham, 1903) ; J. D. (Michigan, 
1911); Professor of Law; 1921; 317 Simpson Street; 477-J; 5 LB; 
1900. 

Dietrich, Montelle, M. S. (Minnesota, 1929) ; Instructor in Home Eco- 
nomics; 1929; Evansdale; 1789-W; 212 OH; 1900. 

*Diffey, Carter L., LL. B. (Virginia, 1924) ; Assistant Coach of Fresh- 
man Football; 1931; Hotel Madeira; 600; FH; 1900. 

Dixon, Evalyn Spurgeon, Ph. D., (Cornell, 1929), Instructor in His- 
tory; 1925; 2157 University Avenue; 764-R; 427 C; 1900. 

*Dodds, Gideon Stanhope, Ph. D. (Pennsylvania, 1910) ; Professor of 
Histology and Embryology; 1925; 1918; 829 Price Street; 1267-R; 
303 MB; 1788. 

♦Donley, Robert Tucker, A. B. LL. B. (W. V. U., 1924; 1926) ; Lecturer 
in Law; 1929; 427 Spruce Street; 2196; 174 Chancery Row; 751. 

*Dorsey, Ervin, M. A. (Peabody College, 1922; Teacher of Vocational 
Agriculture and Biology in University High School; 1927; 1926; 338 
Cornell Avenue; 785-R; HS; 1793-J. 

♦Downing, Reginald Horton, M. S. (W. V. U., 1932); Graduate 
Assistant in Mathematics; 1930; 658 Spruce Street; 212 C; 1900. 

Downs, William Richard, Student Assistant in Chemistry; 1932; 204 
Euclid Avenue; 1763-J; 319 C; 1900. 

♦Downs, William Smith, B. S. C. E., C. E. (W\ V. U., 1906, 1915) ; 
Assistant Professor of Railway and Higlrway Engineering; 1931; 
204 Euclid Avenue; 1736-J; 220 MH; 1900; 128. 

♦Draper, John William, Ph. D. (Harvard, 1920) ; Professor of English; 
1929; 200 McLane Avenue; 2166; 26-A W; 1900. 

♦Duncan, Ira J., B. S. A. (University of Georgia, 1930) ; Assistant in 
Agricultural Chemistry, Agricultural Experiment Station; 1930; 
Box 64; 797-J; E; 1900. 

♦Dustman, Robert Barclay, Ph. D. (Chicago, 1924) ; Professor of Agri- 
cultural Chemistry and Agricultural Chemist, Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station; 1929; 1924; 108 Cornell Avenue; 2534-W; E; 1900. 

♦Dye, Arthur Pingree, M. S. Agr. (W. V. U., 1927) ; Instructor in 
Horticulture; and Assistant in Horticulture. Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station; 1930; 1923; 296 Prospect Street; 127-J; U; Green- 
house; 704-J. 



Faculty and Staff 345 



Eckhardt, Elizabeth Margaret, M. A. (Columbia, 1921) ; Extension 
Rural Sociologist, Agricultural Extension Staff; 1928; 1921; Oglebay 
Park, Wheeling, West Virginia; Woodsdale, 891. 

*Eiesland, John Arndt, Ph. D. (Johns Hopkins, 1898) ; Professor of 
Mathematics; 1907; 316 Demain Avenue; 2308-R; 209 C; 1900. 

Elmore, Earle Looney, A. B. (W. V. U., 1931) ; Graduate Assistant 
in Chemistry; 1932; 504 N. High Street; 9766; C; 1900. 

*Ennis, Thomas Edson, M. A. (North Dakota, 1924) ; Instructor in His- 
tory; 1930; 508 Jefferson Street; 1199-W; 409 C; 1900. 

Fairfield, Mildred, Secretary to Dean of the College of Arts and 
Sciences; 1926; 447 Pennsylvania Avenue; 454-M; 1900. 

Fairfield, Rilla L., Secretary to the Secretary of the Board of Gover- 
nors; 1927; 447 Pennsylvania Avenue; 454-M; 13 W; 1900. 

*Fear, Marja Steadman, M. A. (W. V. U., 1928) ; Part-time Instructor 
in Public Speaking; 1930; 1920; 344 Jackson Avenue; 1860; 30 M; 
1900. 

*Federer, George Andrew, Jr., M. A. (W. V. U., 1922) ; Teacher of 
Physical Sciences, University High School; 1928; Flats; 1551-R; 5 
HS; 1793-J. 

Fenton, Clement Coleman, M. D. (Cornell, 1925) ; Professor of 
Pathology and Clinical Pathology; 1926; 1922; 101 Jackson Avenue; 
1545-J; 208 MB; 1900. 

*Flippen, Clarence Jackson, Part-time Instructor in Mining Extension, 
Williamson, West Virginia. 

Ford, Frederick, A. B. (W. V. U., 1931); Assistant in Library; 1931; 
678 Spruce Street; UL; 1900. 

Ford, O. Rex, M. A. (W. V. U., 1923) ; Ph. D. (Cornell, 1932) ; Associate 
Professor of Physics; 1931; 1925; Evansdale; 1512-J; 10 M; 1900. 

*Fordham, Jefferson Barnes, A. B., A. M., J. D. (North Carolina, 1926, 
1929); J. S. D. (Yale, 1930); Associate Professor of Law; 1931; 
1930; 686 Grand Street; 1734- J; 1 LB; 1900. 

*Forman, Alexander Hardie, M. M. E., Ph. D. (Cornell, 1909, 1912) ; 
Professor of Electrical Engineering; 1916; 1913; 233 Morris Street; 
893-M; 124 MH; 1900. 

*Fortney, Camden Page, B. S. C. E. (W. V. U., 1907) ; Chairman of the 
State Road Commission; Director of School of Good Roads; Charles- 
ton, West Virginia. 

*Frame, Nat Terry, A. B. (Colgate, 1899); D. Sc. (Colgate, 1928); 
Director of Agricultural Extension; 1919; 1914; 631 Spruce Street; 
219-J; 200 OH; 1900. 

*Frasure, Carl Maynard, Ph. D. (Ohio State, 1928) ; Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Political Science; 1930; 1927; 237 South High Street; 
U29-R; 429 C; 1900. 



346 Alphabetical List of 



♦Friant, Ray Jerome, B. S. (Perm State, 1916) ; Agronomy Specialist, 
Agricultural Extension Division; 1929; 835 Price Street; 2084; 105 
OH; 1900. 

♦Fridley, Harry M., Ph. D. (Cornell, 1928) ; Assistant Professor of 
Geology; 1928; 412 Beverly Avenue; 1844-J; 128 C; 1900. 

♦Friend, Lloyd Lowndes, M. A. (Columbia, 1906) ; Registrar of the Uni- 
versity; 1929; 1925; 312 Euclid Avenue; 1992; W; 1900. 

*Fromme, Fred Denton, Ph. D. (Columbia, 1914) ; Dean of the College 
of Agriculture, Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station; 
Director of Division of Biology and Agriculture, Graduate School; 
1928; R. F. D. 4; 1622; 101 OH; 1900. 

Fullmer, Lee, Mechanician in Department of Physics; 1924; 1916; 308 
Highland Avenue; 3 M; 1900. 

Fulton, Martha Theoda, M. A. (Columbia, 1923) ; Instructor in 
English; 1929; 1923; 201 Waitman Street; 1376-M; 22 W; 1900. 

*Galpin, Sidney Longman, Ph. D. (Cornell, 1912) ; Professor of 
Geology; 1927; 424 Clark Street; 864-RX; 202 C; 1900. 

*Garber, Ralph John, Ph. D. (Minnesota, 1922) ; Professor of Agron- 
omy and Genetics; Agronomist, Agricultural Experiment Station 
and Extension Division; 1923; 1920; Riverview Drive; 2415-J; 105 
OH; 1900. 

♦Garland, Clarence Eugene, Ph. D. (Johns Hopkins, 1924) ; Associate 
Professor of Chemistry; 1931; 1924; Riverview Drive, Evansdale; 
2427-R; 404 C; 1900. 

*Gauger, Charles, A. B. (Gettysburg College, 1905) ; Instructor in Eco- 
nomics; 1928; 1353 College Avenue; 2576-J; 40 W; 1900. 

*Geiler, Frederick Linck, B. Sc. Phar. (Ohio State, 1928) ; Instructor 
in Pharmacy and Health Service Pharmacist; 1928; 341 Dorsey Ave- 
nue; 2450; 9 W; 1900. 

♦Gibson, John Arthur, Jr., Ph. D. (M. I. T., 1926) ; Assistant Professor 
of Chemistry; 1931; 1926; R. F. D. 4, Box 321, Star City Road; 
1843-M; 301 C; 1900. 

♦Gill, James Herbert, M. E. (Minnesota, 1894) ; Professor of Machine 
Construction and Superintendent of Shops; 1920; 617 Grand Street; 
1689-R; 101 MH; 1900. 

♦Gist, Russell Henderson, B. S. Agr. (W. V. U., 1915) ; District Agent, 
Agricultural Extension Division, Northern District of West Vir- 
ginia; 1924; 1922; 1265 South Oak Street, Clarksburg, West Vir- 
ginia, P. O. Box 1071. 

♦Gnagey, William Oliver, Instructor in Machine Shop Practice; 1920; 
R. F. D. 4; 101 MH; 1900. 

Godley, Roy Walter, B. S. (Oklahoma A. & M. College, 1932); 
Graduate Assistant in Animal Husbandry; 1932; 413 McLane Ave- 
nue; 909-R; 106 OH; 1900. 

Gould, Edwin, B. S. Agr. (W. V. U., 1928) ; Assistant in Entomology. 
Experiment Station; 1929; Kearneysville, West Virginia. 



Faculty and Staff 347 



*Gray, Thomas Davis, B. S. Hort. (Maryland, 1915) ; Landscape Archi- 
tect, Agricultural Extension Division; 1929; 1920; Riverview Drive; 
1239-W; E; 1900. 

♦Grabble, Lloyd Raymond, M. S. (West Virginia, 1931); Instructor in 
Zoology; 1930; 1929; 22 Jones Avenue; 2505-M; 22 S. 

Griffin, Grace Margaret, M. A. (W. V. U., 1927) ; Assistant Professor 
of Physical Education and Director of Service Program for Women; 
1927; 1923; 160 Fayette Street; 2032; EM; 1900. 

♦Grow, George Walter, B. S. M. E. (W. V. U., 1912) ; M. S. (M. I. T., 
1916); Assistant Professor of Drawing and Machine Design; 1917; 
1912; Star City Road; 1045-J; 303 MH; 1900. 

*Grumbeix, John Behny, M. M. E. (Cornell, 1914) ; Professor of Power 
Engineering, 1916; Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds, 1932; 
1903; 204 McLane Avenue; 1885; 120 MH; 1900. 

♦Hager, Buena Brand, Assistant Financial Secretary; 1920; 1918; 305 
South High Street; 431-R; First Floor S; 1900. 

Hagy, Elizabeth Virginia, B. S. (W. V. U., 1931) ; Assistant in Home 
Economics; 1932; 58 Campus Driveway; 2015; 212 OH; 1900. 

Hall, Adrian H., Second Lieutenant, Corps of Engineers; Student 
Assistant in Military Science and Tactics; 1932; 467 Union Street; 
45-J; A; 1900. 

♦Hall, Arthur A., B. S. M. E. (W. V. U., 1906) ; Professor of Electrical 
Engineering; 1922; 1916; 316 Forest Avenue; 175-M; 124 MH; 1900. 

*Hardman, Thomas Porter, B. A., M. A. (Oxford, 1911, 1914) ; LL. B. 
(W. V. U., 1914) ; J. D. (Yale, 1915) ; Dean of the College of Law, 
and Professor of Law; 1931; 1913; 601 Grand Street; 1522; Dean's 
Office, 1900. 

♦Hare, Alfred Jarrett, A. M. (W. V. U., 1902) ; Professor of Latin 
Language and Literature, Emeritus; 1929; 1889; 571 Spruce Street; 
870-W. 

Hake, Edna Margaret, Secretary to the Dean of Men; 1929; 388 
Dorsey Avenue; 1179-M; 11 M; 1900. 

Harman, George Berlin, Student Assistant in Chemistrv; 1931; 150 
Third Street; C; 1900. 

♦Harris, Thomas Luther, Ph. D. (Wisconsin, 1912) ; Professor of 
Sociology; 1923; 1921; Box 358 A, R. F. D. 4, Morgantown, West Vir- 
ginia; 1239-M; 26B W; 1900. 

♦Hartley, Charles Henry, B. S. Agr. (W. V. U., 1917) ; Assistant 
Director of Agricultural Extension Division; 1919; 1914; The Flats; 
147-R; 202 OH; 1900. 

Hartley, Mrs. Louise Farrell, Secretary to the Dean of the College of 
Law; 1924; 331 South High Street; 1485-J; LB; 1900. 

Havener, John Franklin. Chemistry Laboratory Assistant; 1932; 
316 Grant Avenue; 2517-W; 319 C; 1900. 



348 Alphabetical List of 



Hayes, Isabel Ray, Preceptress of Woman's Hall; 1923; Woman's Hall; 
1398. 

* Hayes, Leslie David, M. E. (Cornell, 1908) ; Professor of Machine De- 

sign and Construction; 1918; 804 College Avenue; 2384; 209 MH; 
1900. 

•Hayman, Joseph Lester, Ph. C, M. S. (Michigan, 1919; 1925); 
Associate Professor of Pharmacognosy; 1929; 1919; 325 Ash Street; 
1065-J; 2 W; 190(5. 

: Headlee, Alvah John Washington, Ph. D. (W. V. U., 1932); 
Graduate Assistant in Chemistry; 1929; R. D. 4; 123 C; 1900. 

Hechmer, Rosemarie, B. S. (Columbia, 1928) ; Assistant Cataloguer; 
1930; 160 Fayette Street; UL; 1900. 

Heermans, Mrs. Florence Elliott, Secretary to the Dean of the 
School of Medicine; 1920; 1919; 391 Protzman Street; 102 MB; 
1900 or 1788. 

* Henderson, Harry Oram, Ph. D. (Minnesota, 1928) ; Professor of 

Dairy Husbandry, and Dairy Husbandman, Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station; 1928; 1920; 424 Grand Street; 860-J; 8 OH; 1306-J. 

Henry, Wendell Dawley, M. S. (W. V. IL, 1932) ; Graduate Assistant 
in Plant Pathology, College of Agriculture and Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station; 1930; 48 Campus Driveway; 2532-R; 308 OH; 1900. 

Herod, Lyle Eddy, A. B. (W. V. XL, 1931) ; Graduate Assistant in 
Botany; 1932; 2163 University Avenue; 34 S; 1900. 

Herrmann, Louis Ferdinand, B. S. (Mich., State College, 1932) ; 
Graduate Assistant in Dairy Husbandry; 1932; 413 McLane Ave- 
nue; 909-R; 7 OH; 1306-J. 

Hesen, J. William, Jr., Student Assistant in Zoology; 1932; 200 
Wilson Avenue; 1110; 1900. 

Hetherington, Hugh William, A. M. (Michigan, 1927) ; Instructor in 
English; 1931; 108 Wilson Avenue; 22 W; 1900. 

*Hill, Hubert, M. S. (North Carolina, 1908) ; Professor of Chemistry; 
1928; 1911; 312 First Street; 1958-R; 322 C; 1900. 

*Hill, Lawrence Benjamin, Ph. D. (Columbia, 1922) ; Professor of 
Education; 1920; 1918; 301 Carson Street; 2590; 19 W; 1900. 

*Hilliard, Robert Christy, Second Lieutenant, Infantry Reserve, Stu- 
dent Assistant in Military Science and Tactics; 1931; 615 Allen Ave- 
nue; 879-J; A; 1900. 

Hinkel, Lydia Irene, Mus. B. (Syracuse, 1916) ; Assistant Professor of 
Music; 1921; 354 Spruce Street; 2027; 8 SM; 1900. 

Hite, Mrs. Evelyn Pratt, A. B. (W. V. U., 1898) ; Cataloguer in 
Library; 1924; 1922; 134 Hunt Street; 1221- J; UL; 1900. 

Hodge, Willard Wellington, M. A. (Yale, 1914) ; Professor of Chemi- 
cal Engineering and Assistant Director of Engineering Experiment 
Station; 1921; Evansdale; 1045-W; 109 MH; 1900. 



Faculty and Staff 349 



♦Holmes, Maurice Coffyn, Sc. D. (M. I. T., 1930) ; Assistant Professor 
of Physics; 1930; 1927; 422 Grand Street; 360; 10 M; 1900. 

♦Hoover, Max Manley, M. S. (Kansas State Agricultural College, 
1925) ; Ph. D. (Cornell, 1932) ; Associate Professor of Agronomy 
and Associate Agronomist, Agricultural Experiment Station; 1932; 
1925; Star City Road; 1843-J; 105 OH; 1900. 

♦Hopkins, James Vincent, M. S. Agr. (W. V. U., 1930) ; Dairy 
Specialist, Agricultural Extension Division; 1929; 1923; 46 Jackson 
Avenue; 1919; OH; 1900. 

Horack, Frank E., Jr., A. B., J. D. (Iowa, 1926, 1929) ; LL. M., S. J. 
D. (Harvard, 1930, 1931); Assistant Professor of Law; 1931; 337 
South High Street; 4 LB; 1900. 

♦Howard, Hubert Coleman, M. A. (Ohio State, 1928) ; Instructor in 
English; 1928; 200 Jackson Avenue; 1744-M; 30 W; 1900. 

Howard, Zack, Student Assistant in Library; 1932; 579 Price Street; 
1696-M; UL; 1900. 

♦Hudelson, Earl, Ph. D. (Columbia, 1923) ; Dean of the College of Edu- 
cation and Professor of Education; Director of the Division of Edu- 
cation of the Graduate School; 1930; 1920; 63 Wilson Avenue; 1943; 
W; 1900. 

Hudgins, Paul Stuart, Assistant in Law Library; 1932; 121 Kingwood 
Street; 2049-W; LB; 1900. 

Humphreys, Gertrude, A. B. (Illinois, 1919); State Home Demonstra- 
tion Agent, Agricultural Extension Division; 1928; 1918; 107 High 
Street; 389-R; 202 OH; 1900. 

Hurst, Beatrice, M. A. (Columbia, 1928) ; Instructor in Physical Edu- 
cation; 1928; 198 Foundry Street; 2595-J; EM; 1900. 

Hutchinson, Bernard M., Student Assistant in Zoology; 1931; 364 
High Street; S; 1900. 

Hutchinson, Kenneth Douglas, M. A. (Harvard, 1932) ; Instructor 
in Business Administration; 1932; 141 Willey Street; 1067; 40 W; 
1900. 

♦Jacobson, Carl Alfred, Ph. D. (Johns Hopkins, 1908) ; Professor of 
Chemistry; 1920; 447 Cedar Street; 1743-M; 110 C; 1900. 

♦James, Joseph Alphonso, M. A. (W. V. U., 1930) ; Instructor in 
French; 1928; 2137 University Avenue; 373-M; 45 W; 1900. 

♦Jenni, Clyde Bernard, M. S. Ch. E. (W. V. U., 1931); Instructor in 
Chemical Engineering; 1928; 801 Price Street; 2381-M; 107 MH; 
1900. 

♦Jenny, Gerald, M. S. (Wisconsin, 1926) ; Instructor in Agricultural 
Journalism; Agricultural Editor, College of Agriculture and Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station; 1929; 1161 College Avenue; 1714-R; 
102 OH; 1900. 

♦Johnson, Arnold Waldemar, M. B. A. (Harvard, 1929) ; Assistant 
Professor of Accounting; 1931; 1929; 313 Kingwood Street; 570-R; 
40 W; 1900. 



350 Alphabetical List of 



* Johnson, David Dale, A. M. (W. V. U., 1903) ; Litt. D. (Marietta, 

1928); Professor of English; 1920; 1902; 20 Campus Driveway; 
711-M; 23 W; 1900. 

Johnson, Mildred, Secretary of the College of Engineering; 1925; 362 
Overdale Street; 1526; 123 MH; 1900. 

Johnston, John Charles, Secretary to the Dean of the College of 
Agriculture, and Chief Clerk of the Agricultural Experiment 
Station; 1914; 413 High Street; 765-J; 101 OH; 1900. 

* Jones, Clement Ross, M. M. E. (Cornell, 1900) ; Dean Emeritus of the 

College of Engineering, 1932; Professor of Power Engineering, 
1901; 1895; 317 Willey Street; 2'05-J; 219 MH; 1900. 

*Jones, Edwin Channing, M. S. E. E. (Illinois, 1929) ; Instructor in 
Electrical Engineering; 1926; Suncrest Park; 1209-W; 107 MH; 
1900. 

* Jones, Lloyd Meredith, A. M. (Columbia, 1927) ; Assistant Professor 

of Physical Education and Director of Service Program for Men; 
1929; 1928; 1464 University Avenue; 2305-R; FH; 1900. On leave 
of absence, 1932-33. 

Judy, Alta Frances, Student Assistant in Library; 1932; 412 Beverly 
Avenue; 1844-J; UL; 1900. 

*Kay, Wilbur Jones, M. A. (Washington and Jefferson, 1919) ; Pro- 
fessor of Public Speaking; 1919; 519 Park Street; 1786-W; 30 M; 
1900. 

Keener, Louise, B. A. (Wellesley, 1924) ; Secretary to the President; 
1929; Cheat Canyon Park; 3-F-24; W; 2561. 

Keller, Arnold Louis, B. S. Agr. (Ohio State, 1931) ; Graduate Assist- 
ant in Horticulture; 1931; 830 College Avenue; 2'464-J; 104 OH; 
1306-R. 

*Kendrick, William Henry, A. B. (W. V. U., 1913) ; Assistant Director, 
Agricultural Extension Staff; 1913; West Virginia Four-H Camp, 
Weston, West Virginia ; Jane Lew, 51-F-2. 

Kile, Lester G., Superintendent of Agronomy Farm; Agronomy Farm, 
Cheat Road; 12-F-21. 

*King, Benjamin Walter, A. M. (Harvard, 1917) ; University Editor 
and Statistician; 1929; 1907; 705 North Willey Street; 2370-J; 1 W; 
1900. 

Knapp, John Oliver, B. S. Agr. (W. V. U., 1916) ; District Agent, 
Agricultural Extension, Southern District of West Virginia; 1923; 
1917; Court House, Hinton, West Virginia. 

*Knight, Marion Eugene, A. B. (W. V. U., 1931) ; Graduate Assistant 
in Education; 1932; 299 Wiles Street; 1201; W; 1900. 

*Knowlton, Harry Edward, Ph. D. (Cornell, 1920) ; Professor of Horti- 
culture; and Horticulturist, Agricultural Experiment Station; 1930; 
1919; 100 Jackson Avenue; 1545-R; 104 OH; 1306-R. 

Knuttt, Mrs. Eleanor Eddy, Director, Package Library Service; 1923; 
Suncrest; 484; UL. 



Faculty and Staff 351 



*Koehler, Walter Allos, Ph. D., Ch. E. (Wisconsin, 1924, 1920) ; Pro- 
fessor of Chemical and Ceramic Engineering; 1929; 1924; 253 Park 
Street; 2108-J; 109 MH; 1900. 

Kozak, Andrew, B. S. (Susquehanna, 1932) ; Graduate Assistant in 
Mathematics; 1932; 658 Spruce Street; 1469; 212 C; 1900. 

Largent, H. William, A. B. (W. V. U., 1931) ; Second Lieutenant, In- 
fantry Reserve; Student Assistant in Military Science and Tactics; 
1931; 230 Green Street; 483-J; A; 1900. 

*Lawall, Charles Elmer, M. S., E. M. (Lehigh, 1921, 1914) ; Director 
of the School of Mines; Director of Mining and Industrial Ex- 
tension; Professor of Mining Engineering; 1930; 1921; 209 Grant 
Avenue; 1864-J; 121 MH; 74. 

*Lazzell, Charles Lester, Ph. D. (Yale, 1927) ; Assistant Professor of 
Chemistry; 1929; 1922; 209 McLane Avenue; 2523-J; 304 C. 

*Lazzell, Frances, A. B. (W. V. U., 1923) ; Graduate Assistant in 
Chemistry; 1931; 209 McLane Avenue; 2523-J; C; 1900. 

*Leith, Theodoric Briant, M. A. (W. V. U., 1926) ; Assistant Chemist, 
Agricultural Experiment Station; Evansdale; 2045-J; E; 1900. 

*Leonian, Leon H., Ph. D. (Michigan, 1922) ; Associate Professor of 
Plant Pathology; and Associate Plant Pathologist, Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station; 1927; 1922; 836 Price Street; 1267-J; 309 OH; 
1900. 

Levsen, Anna Margo, B. A. (Grinnell College, 1932) ; Graduate Assist- 
ant in Mathematics; 1932; 204 McLane Avenue; 1885; 212 C; 1900. 

* Lewis, Melba M., Secretary to Superintendent of Buildings and 
Grounds; 1932; 1928; 804 University Avenue; 1106-J; 120 MH; 
1900. 

*Lienau, Carl Christian, B. S. E. E. (Pennsylvania, 1929) ; Instructor 
in Electrical Engineering; 1930; 128 Simpson Street; 1241-R; 129 
MH; 1900. 

Lighthiser, Orville James, Assistant in Pathology and Bacteriology; 
1932; 806 Willey Street; 203 MB; 1900 or 1788. 

♦Lincoln, Ralph A., C. E. (Cornell, 1927); (U. S. M. A., West Point, 
N. Y., 1925) ; First Lieutenant, Corps of Engineers, D. O. L., 
United States Army; Assistant Professor of Military Science and 
Tactics; 1932; 204 South High Street; 623-R; A; 1900. 

*Livesay, Edward Alexander, D. Sc. (Harvard, 1928) ; Professor of 
Animal Husbandry; and Animal Husbandman, Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station; 1919; Oliver Drive, Evansdale; 1858-R; 106 OH. 

*Long, J. Everett, A. B. (W. V. U., 1926) ; Assistant to the Registrar; 
1929; 12 West Front Street; 1038-J; Registrar's Office; W; 1900. 

*Longwell, John Harwood, A. M. (Missouri, 1920) ; Assistant Professor 
of Animal Husbandry; and Assistant Animal Husbandman, Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station; 1927; 1921; Star City Road; 1890-R; 106 
OH; 1900, 



352 Alphabetical List of 



Love, Mabel M., R. N. (Bellevue Memorial Hospital, 1919) ; Health 
Service Nurse; 1930; 216 Park Street; 1296; Infirmary; 475. 

Lowther, James B., M. A. (Northwestern, 1930) ; Instructor in Public 
Speaking; 1931; 195 Grant Avenue; 2468-W; 30 M; 1900. 

Lytle, Clara, M. A. (Columbia, 1921); Instructor in English; 1918; 
208 Park Street; 1165; 29 W. 

*Maclin, Edward Silver, B. S. Ed. (Tennessee, 1916) ; M. A. Peabody, 
1932); Professor of Industrial Education; 1921; 203 Jackson Ave- 
nue; 1744-J; 114 MH; 1900. 

Madigan, Mrs. Virginia Gilmore, B. S. H. E. (W. V. U., 1922) ; 
Assistant in Library; 1930; 2175 University Avenue; 685-R; UL; 
1900. 

*Mahan, Walter Everett, A. B., LL. B. (W. V. U., 1925, 1927) ; 
Assistant in Athletics and Assistant Coach of Football ; 1928 ; Wells- 
burg, West Virginia. 

Manning, Warren Francis, A. M. (Harvard, 1924) ; Instructor in 
French; 1928; 369 Chestnut Street; 1750; 48 W; 1900. 

Manus, Louis John, B. S. (State College of Washington, 1932) ; 
Graduate Assistant in Dairy Husbandry; 1932; 413 McLane Ave- 
nue; 909-R; 1 OH; 1306-J. 

Marple, Bertha Freda, A. B. (W. V. U., 1931) ; Graduate Assistant in 
Education; 1932; 272 Prospect Street; 349-M; 18 W; 1900. 

*Martens, James Hart Curry, Ph. D. (Cornell, 1926) ; Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Geology; 1929; 519 Jefferson Avenue; 1733^R; 202 C; 1900. 

* Mason, Ralph Lee, (Connecticut Agricultural College, 1910, special 

course); Poultry Specialist, Agricultural Extension Division; 1919; 
deceased, January 13, 1933. 

Mathews, Mrs. Lena May, Librarian, College of Law; 1930; 332 South 
High Street; 970; LB; 1900. 

* Maxwell, George Ralph, M. D. (Cincinnati, 1923) ; Instructor in 

Physical Diagnosis; 1923; 608 Davis Avenue; 2513; 106 MB; 1788. 

Maynard, Sidney Baker, M. A. (Nebraska, 1927) ; Instructor in 
Spanish; 1928; 516 Cobun Avenue; 665-M; 48 W; 1900. On leave 
first semester, 1932-33. 

*McBride, Arthur Cook, B. A. (Ohio State, 1920) ; Instructor in 
French; 1930; 1927; 340 Cobun Avenue; Classroom 3 LB; 1900. 

McCall, Agnes Wynne, B. S. (University of Wisconsin, 1931) ; In- 
structor in Physical Education; 1931; 160 Fayette Street; 1905-J ; 
EM; 1900. 

McCaskey, Ambrose E., Jr., B. S. C. E. (W. V. U., 1932) ; Student 
Assistant in Military Science and Tactics; 96 Marion Street; 
1005-R; A; 1900. 

♦McClung, Harold Gordon, Secretary to the Director of the Division of 
Physical Education; 1931; FH; 1900. 



Faculty and Staff 353 



♦McCubbin, Earl Noel, A. M. Agr. (Missouri, 1928) ; Instructor in 
Horticulture, and Assistant Horticulturist in Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station; 1928; 774 Garrison Street; 103 OH; 1306-R. 

♦McElroy, Dennis Lee, M. S. (W. V. U., 1930) ; Assistant Director of 
Mining Extension; 1930; 1928; 126 Maryland Avenue; 1150-J; 116 
MH; 74. 

*McIlvaine, Theodore Clinton, Ph. D. (Ohio State, 1924) ; Assistant 
Agronomist, Agricultural Experiment Station; 1920; 1918; Lakin 
Sub-Station, Lakin, West Virginia. 

McQuain, George William, Assistant in Law Library; 1932; 124 
Lorentz Avenue; LB; 1900. 

Meredith, Lona Kate, A. B. (W. V. U., 1916) ; Teacher of Art in Uni- 
versity High School; 1927; 50 Lincoln Avenue; 971-R; HS; 1793-J. 

Mestrezat, Walter Alexander, Chief Musician, Cadet Corps, and 
Director in Band; 1901; 950 University Avenue; 23 A; 1900. 

Millard, Jack A., Second Lieutenant, Engineer Reserve Corps; Student 
Assistant in Military Science and Tactics; 1932; 301 Beverly Ave- 
nue; 1091-W; A; 1900. 

♦Mitrani, Charles, Ph. D. (Harvard, 1929) ; Associate Professor of 
Romance Languages; 1931; 1921; 45 Maple Avenue; 1764-M; 43 W; 
1900. 

♦Molby, Fred A., Ph. D. (Cornell, 1910); Professor of Physics; 1921; 
1920; 301 Cornell Avenue; 391; 12 M; 1900. 

*Moody, Charles Oliver, B. S. (W. V. U., 1928) ; M. D. (Medical College 
of Virginia, 1931) ; Instructor in Pathology and Bacteriology; 1931; 
1928; 313 Brockway Avenue; 853-J; 208 MB; 1900 or 1788. 

♦Moore, Earl Neil, D. V. M. (Ohio State, 1930) ; Assistant Veterinarian, 
Agricultural Experiment Station, in cooperation with State Depart- 
ment of Agriculture; 1931; Evansdale; 1952-J; 305 OH; 1900. 

Moore, Gladys Elizabeth, Secretary to the University Editor and 
Statistician; 1930; 229 Cherry Street; 452-J; 1 W; 1900. 

♦Moore, Julia Helmick, Secretary to the Dean of Women; 1929; R. F. 
D. 3, Box 116; 10-F-ll; EM; 2018. 

Moore, Susan Maxwell, A. B. (W. V. U., 1909) ; Instructor in Piano 
and Sight Playing; 1932; 1903; 174 First Street; 1958-J; 14 SM; 
1900. 

♦Morris, Samuel, Ph. D. (Ohio State, 1921); Professor of Chemistry; 
1921; 1916; 126 Simpson Street; 623-M; 106 C; 1900. 

♦Morris, Samuel John, M. D. (W. V. U., Maryland, 1912) ; Professor 
of Anatomy, 1920; Assistant to Dean of the School of Medicine, 
1932; 1912; 205 Kingwood Street; 960-J; 301 MB; 1788. 

Myers, Dennis Edward, A. B. (Iowa, 1930) ; Assistant Football Coach 
and Coach of Wrestling; 1932; 216 Park Street; 1296; FH; 1900. 

♦Myers, Ira Odell, M. S. (W. V. U., 1927) ; Instructor in Physics; 1927; 
2119 University Avenue; 10 M; 1900. 



354 Alphabetical List of 



*Neale, A. Earle, Assistant Professor of Athletics, Head Coach of Foot- 
ball; 1930; 225 Grand Street; FH; 1900. 

*Neff, Charles Thompson, Jr., A. B. (W. V. U., 1921) ; Secretary of 
the Board of Governors; 1927; 308 Morris Street; 2557; 13 W; 1900 
and 2560. 

Nelson, Roy Ezekiel, M. S. C. E. (W. V. U., 1925) ; M. S. Highway 
Engineering; (Iowa State, 1925) ; Assistant Professor of Railway 
and Highway Engineering; 1925; 1921; 373 Brockway Avenue; 
1563; 222 MH; 1900. 

Nesbit, Robert L., Captain, Infantry, D. O. L. United States Army; 
Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics; 1931; River- 
view Avenue; 2085; A; 1900. 

Nesbitt, Nell, A. M. (Chicago, 1912) ; Assistant Professor of Home 
Economics, 1923; 160 Fayette Street; 1582-W; 212 OH; 1900. 

Noer, Ruth Douglas, M. S. (Minnesota, 1925) ; Dean of Women and 
Assistant Professor of Home Economics; 1929; 1925; 358 Spruce 
Street; 1623-R; EM; 2018. 

*Nuzum, James Richard, Jr., Second Lieutenant, Infantry Reserve; 
Student Assistant in Military Science and Tactics; 1932; 284 Wiles 
Street; 249-W; A; 1900. 

Ojala, Sulo, Creamery Superintendent; 1930; 307 Beverly Avenue; 
803-J. 

*Olney, Roy A., Ph. D. (Cornell, 1929) ; Associate Professor of Agricul- 
tural Education; 1930; 1923; 796 North Willey Street; 329-R; 207 
OH; 1900. 

*Orton, Clayton Roberts, Ph. D. (Columbia, 1924) ; Professor of Plant 
Pathology, and Plant Pathologist, Agricultural Experiment Station; 
1929; 36 Campus Drive; 667-W; 309 OH; 1900. 

Page, Nadine, M. A. (Chicago, 1925); Instructor in English; 1926; 
1925; Evansdale; 1789-W; 29 W; 1900. 

Palmer, Beth Mae, M. S. (Iowa State, 1927) ; Assistant Professor of 
Home Economics; 1927; 2157 University Avenue; 2449-J; 211 OH; 
1900. 

* Parry, Vernon Frank, M. S. (Carnegie Tech., 1923) ; Lecturer in In- 

dustrial Science Division; 1931; 424 Linden Avenue; 2066. 

* Parsons, Dickson Ward, Ph. D. (Cornell, 1930) ; Associate Professor 

of Agricultural Education; 1930; 1923; 1239 College Avenue; 
1714-W; 207 OH; 1900. 

Parsons, Norman W., Second Lieutenant, Infantry Reserve; Student 
Assistant in Military Science and Tactics; 1932; 1239 College Ave- 
nue; 1714-W; A; 1900. 

Patterson, John L., A. B. (W. V. U., 1932) ; Graduate Assistant in 
Education; 1932; 110 South Walnut Street; 1090-R; 16 W; 1900. 

♦Patterson, Rex Arthur, B. S. (W. V. U., 1932) ; Assistant in Anatomy 
and Histology; 1932; 7 Clement Street; 429-R; 310 MB; 1900 or 
1788. 



Faculty and Staff 355 



Patterson, Robert Comptin, M. S. (W. V. IL, 1932) ; Second Lieu- 
tenant, Infantry Reserve; Student Assistant in Military Science and 
Tactics; Graduate Assistant in Zoology; 1930; 2134 University Ave- 
nue; 375-R; A; S; 1900. 

♦Peairs, Leonard Marion, Ph. D. (Chicago, 1925) ; Professor of Ento- 
mology and Entomologist, Agricultural Experiment Station; 1914; 
1912; 104 Jones Avenue; 895; 306 OH; 1900. 

Peterson, Mildred Lenore, Cafeteria Manager; 1933; 134 Hunt Street; 
1221-J; C; 1939. 

Pettigrew, Mrs. Helen Purinton, M. A. (W. V. U., 1921) ; Instructor 
in English; 1924; 1919; 76 Grandview Avenue; 427; 21 W; 1900. 

Pickens, Byrd Lea, M. A. (W. V. U., 1930) ; Assistant Librarian in 
Charge of Reserve; 1930; 148 Fayette Street; 1049-R; UL; 1900. 

*Pierre, William Henry, Ph. D. (Wisconsin, 1925) ; Associate Professor 
of Agronomy, and Associate Agronomist, Agricultural Experiment 
Station; 1929; 792 Grand Street; 972-R; 1900. 

*Pohlman, George Gordon, Ph. D. (Iowa State College, 1930) ; Assistant 
Professor of Agronomy, and Assistant Agronomist, Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station; 1930; 729 James Street; 1340-J; 105 OH; 1900. 

Pollock, Rebecca Luella, Ph. D. (Iowa, 1926) ; Professor of Educa- 
tion; 1928; 1916; 300 Glendon Avenue; 2381-R; 18 W; 1900. 

Poole, Robert C, Student Assistant in Chemistry; 1932; 2126 Uni- 
versity Avenue; 772; C; 1900. 

*Porterfleld, Allen Wilson, Ph. D. (Columbia, 1910) ; Professor of 
German; 1924; 1899; 141 Willey Street; 1067; 26 W; 1900. 

Post, Carl Brandt, M. S. (W. V. U., 1932) ; Graduate Assistant in 
Physics; 1932; 232 Wilson Avenue; 97; M; 1900. 

*Poundstone, James Stanley, Instructor in Mining Extension; 1924; 
513 Madison Avenue; 1333-R; MH; 74. 

Powell, Rupert Wendell, B. S. (W. V. U., 1931) ; Assistant in Bio- 
chemistry and Pharmacology; 1931; 355 Wilson Avenue; 1528; 430 
C; 1900. 

Power, Paul Edwin, A. B. (Fairmont State Teacher's College, 1932) ; 
Graduate Assistant in Education; 1932; 205 Columbia Street, Fair- 
mont; 2975; 16 W; 1900. 

♦Pray, Henry Augustus Holden, Ph. D. (Wisconsin, 1925) ; Assistant 
Professor of Chemistry; 1931; 1926; 505 Beverly Avenue; 2422-R; 
214 C; 1900. 

♦Prettyman, Hugh Willard, B. S. Agr. W. V. U., 1917) ; Extension 
Horticulturist-Marketing, Agricultural Extension Division, 1917; 
Inwood, West Virginia; Inwood 7. 

*Price, Paul Holland, Ph. D. (Cornell, 1930); Instructor in Geology; 
1930; 313 Wagner Road; 814-W; 314-315 C; 1900. 

Pride, Cecil Benjamin, M. D. (Western Reserve, 1923) ; Instructor in 
Principles and Practice of Surgery; 1926; 451 Jefferson Street; 
2146; 103 MB; 1788. 



856 Alphabetical. List of 



Purinton, Mrs. Bertha Browning, A. M. (W. V. U., 1903) ; Assistant 
Registrar; 1928; 1919; 109 Gaston Avenue; 311-R; W; 1900. 

Purinton, Daniel Boardman, Ph. D. (Nashville, 1892) ; LL. D. 
(Dennison University, 1889) ; President and Professor of Philosophy, 
Emeritus; 1911; 1873; 85 Grandview Avenue; 1724-R. 

Rafferty, Michael Alphonse, Ph. C. (W. V. U., 1929) ; Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Biochemistry and Pharmacology; 1932; 1929; 446 Spruce 
Street; 2078; 430 C; 1900. 

♦Rapking, Aaron Henry, A. B. (Baldwin Wallace, 1912); B. D. 
(Garrett Biblical Institute, 1914) ; Rural Organization Specialist, 
Agricultural Extension Division; Lost Creek, Route 1, Telephone, 
West Milford. 

♦Ratcliffe, George Jackson, B. S. Phys. Ed. (W. V. U., 1931); In- 
structor in the Division of Physical Education; 1932; 126 South 
Walnut Street; 1150-W; FH; 1900. 

Reay, Margaret Virginia, B. S. (Columbia U. School of Library 
Service, 1931); Assistant Cataolguer; 1927; 154 Holland Avenue; 
53; UL; 1900. 

♦Reed, Elizabeth Frost, A. M. (Columbia, 1919) ; Instructor in 
English; Hopecrest; 2366-J; 21 W; 1900. 

*Reed, Mildred Arnett, A. B. (W. V. U., 1931) ; Assistant in Circula- 
tion Department of the Library; 1930; 701 Willey Street; 1006-J; 
UL; 1900. 

♦Reed, Perley Isaac, Ph. D. (Ohio State, 1916) ; Professor of 
Journalism; 1927; 1920; Lebanon Avenue, Hopecrest; 2366-J; 52 
W; 1900. 

♦Reese, Albert Moore, Ph. D. (Johns Hopkins, 1900) ; Professor of 
Zoology; 1907; Hopecrest; 1724-W; 24 S; 1900. 

♦Reynolds, Clarence Newton, Jr., Ph. D. (Harvard, 1919) ; Professor 
of Mathematics; 1931; 1921; 217 McLane Avenue; 235-J; 209 C; 
1900. 

Richardson, Mary Louise, A. B. (W. V. U., 1927) ; Head of Circula- 
tion Department; 1927; Apartment 5, Delmar Building, High Street; 
1630-M; UL; 1900. 

Richmond, Jean Elnora, M. A. (Iowa, 1924) ; Assistant Professor of 
Home Economics and Education; 1924; 334 Willey Street; 963-W; 
111 OH; 1900. 

♦Rietz, John Harrison, D. V. M. (Ohio State, 1903) ; Associate Pro- 
fessor of Veterinary Medicine and Associate Veterinarian, Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station; Assistant Veterinarian West Virginia 
State Department of Agriculture; 1927; Rotary Street; 1933-M; 301 
OH; 1030. 

Riley, Frederick Frazier, A. B. (W. V. U., 1931) ; Second Lieutenant, 
Infantry Reserve; Student Assistant in Military Science and 
Tactics; 1931; 2146 University Avenue; 2449-R; A; 1900. 



Faculty and Staff 357 



Rinehart, George Raymond, M. A. (University of Wisconsin, 1932) ; 
Instructor in Journalism; 1931; 318 Brockway Avenue; 245-R; 52 
\V; 1900. 

Rinehart, Oliver Nelson, Second Lieutenant, Engineer Reserve Corp; 
Student Assistant in Military Science and Tactics; 1933; 601 Louise 
Avenue; 1426-R; A; 1900. 

Roberts, Warren Rangeley, Instructor in Mining Extension; 1929; 
Logan, West Virginia. 

♦Robinson, Dennis Hardesty, B. S. (W. V. U., 1931) ; Assistant in 
Physiology; 1931; 308 Carson Street; 2187-W; 202 A; 1788. 

♦Robinson, Robert Ross, Jr., B. S. Agr. (W. V. U., 1931); Graduate 
Assistant in Agronomy; 1931; 1929; 421% Beverly Avenue; E; 
1900. 

Rodgers, Edward G., Second Lieutenant, Engineer Reserve; Student 
Assistant in Military Science and Tactics; 1931; 657 Price Street; 
1162-J; A; 1900. 

♦Rodgers. Ira Errett, A. B. (W. V. U., 1920) ; Assistant Professor of 
Athletics; Assistant Coach of Athletics; 1931; 1920; 301 Glendon 
Avenue; 956; FH. 

Roesch. Lydia, Ph. D. (Tuebingen, 1931) ; Instructor in German; 1926; 
1925; 168 Spruce Street; 293-W. 

♦Roetman, Edmond Teerink, M. S. C. E. (W. V. U., 1932) ; Graduate 
Assistant in Civil Engineering; 1932; 601 Clinton Avenue; 112 MH; 
1900. 

♦Roth, Clarence Edward, A. M. (W. V. U., 1930) ; Graduate Assistant 
in History; 1932; 1930; 728 Weaver Street. 

Rothey, Kenneth Brown, B. S. (W. V. U., 1931) ; Assistant in Bio- 
chemistry and Pharmacology; 1932; 754 Willey Street; 401 C; 1900 
or 1788. 

♦Rowley, Homer King, M. S. Agr. (W. V. U., 1927); Seed Analyst 
Agricultural Experiment Station; 1925; 1924; OH; 1030. 

♦Rufener, Louis August, Ph. D. (Harvard, 1915) ; Professor of Eco- 
nomics; 1922; 1920; Hopecrest; 1724-R; 28 W; 1900. 

♦Rumsey, William Earl, B. S. Agr. (Cornell, 1891) ; State Ento- 
mologist; 1913; 1893; 415 Park Street; 671-R; 306 OH; 1030. 

♦Runner, Charles Michael, Stationary Engineer; 1919; 213 Kingwood 
Street; 696-R; 15 MH; 1900. 

Ryan, Ralph, Student Assistant in the Library; 1932; Price Street; 
207-R; NL; 1900. 

St. Clair, John Thomas, Student Assistant in Physics; 1932; 720 
Ridgeway Avenue; 651-W; M; 1900. 

* Samuel, Harry Lawrence, M. S. (Michigan, 1928) ; Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Physical Education; and Director of Intramural Athletics; 
1929; 1928; Rawley Avenue, Evansdale; 2045-R; FH; 1774. 



Alphabetical L: 



Jacob Charles, M. A. (Columbia. 1917) ; : Pro- 

r of Sociology _ " 1900. 

IB, Greek. M. A. iW. V. U.. 1920); Instructor in I 
Street; 193- W; 1900. 

: HTALY Her.v ":rk Univ 

Gradua: Ass . - in Mathematics; 1932; 2105 Unive. -.ue; 

.'I .- "': _:_ C; 1900. 

.'ETDERHAN, Fells Job Plant 

logist, Agrk "dent, 

". rcperiment Farm, Kearneysville ; 1929; Kearneysville, 
West Virginia. 

mm Clinton, B. S. Agr. (W. V. U.. nsion 

-Ho-R; 202 OH; 1900. 

3. (W. V. U.. 1931) ; Assistant in Law Library; 
rnue; LB; 1900. 

♦Schott. Carl Pit . rlumbia, 1928) ; Director of the D: 

of Physical Education and 7 ration; 1921 

mie; 2419; FH; 1 

:. D. E. M. L., Un nny; 

ence and Ta. sian 

Avenue; A; 1900. 

Raymer Egbert, In- in Woodworking and Foundry 

Practice; 1912; 750 College Avenue; 205 MH; 1900. 

Su* Iva Ireni. : _ :ant Professor of Home 

Economics and E " I 1: 1930; Masontowr . nia. 

Resigned, October, 1932 

v, Edward Lee, B. Sc. (Ohio State, 1902) ; Sheep Specia; 
tmral Ext- I 1 ; Extension Division; OH. 

*Shepard, Volney William, A. B. (Washington State College, 192 

Diploma (Oregon State College, 1922) ; B. M. (Chicago Musical Col- 
lege, 1932' uit Professor of Music; 1930: 
rn Road; 2535-W; SMA; 1900. 

Sherwo- I _ . : Extension Plant 

Pathologist, and Plan: . and Insect Spec:;, List, Agricultural 

Kxtension Division; 1920; 834 College Avenue; 2419; OH; 1900. 

♦Shipman, George Anderson, Ph. D. (Cornell, 1931 A ~:ant Pro- 
fessor of Political Science; 1930; 205 Gordon SI Jll-J; 410 C; 
1900. 

Shirey, Zola, B. S. (Minnesota, 1930) ; Assistant Dietitian a: 

ant in Home Economics; 1931; I 58 Spruce Street; 141- 

Woman's Hall; 1359. 

•Shortridge, Wilson Porter, Ph. D. (Minnesota, 1919) ; Dean of the 
College of Arts and Sciences, Professor of History, and Chairman of 
the Division of S -::ences of the Graduate School; 1929; 1922 

151 Wagner Road; 1215-R; 10 W; 1900. 






Speaking; 1925; 2157 University Avenue; 764-R; 30 MH; 1900. 

Simpson, John Nathan, A. B. (Peabody, 1893); M. J). (Johns Hopkins, 
1902 > • Dean of the School of Medicine, and Professor of Medicine; 
1912; '19(^321 Smips^Street; 244-J; 101, IB; 1* 

*Skl '-as Wflnnr, B. S. (Michigan State, 1924); Forestry 

Specialist; Agricultural Extension Division; 1925; Rhreroew Drive; 
2427-M; E; 1900. 

Sleeth, Bailey, Ph. D. (W. V. U., 1932) ; Assistant in Plant Pathology; 
1932; 48 Campus Drive; 2532-R; OH; 1900. 

*Sly, John Fairfield, Ph. D. (Harvard, 1926) ; Pixrfessor of Politieal 
•Smith. Andrew H^ Supervisor of Mine Foreman Training; 1928; 



♦Smtth, Arthur Newell, A. B. (Buffalo, 1912) ; Assistant Professor of 
Athletics and Coach of Track; 1931; 1923; 244 Waitman Street; 
914-W; FH. 

Surra, Fred Manning, Ph. D. (Cornell, 1S2Z) ; Associate ^ofe^cr of 
English; 1931; 1927; 200 South High Street; 485^T; 31 W; 1900. 

♦Surra, Howard Carrollton, B. S. Agr. (W. V. XL, 1^1); Superm- 

*Snrra, Willard I*, Captain, Infantry. D. O. L-, United Stete Army, 
Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics; 1932; 6 Botary 
Street, Sunerest; 2487-M; A; 1900. 

Snee, Mrs. Grace Martin, B. M. (Virginia, 1879) ; Instructor in Pk"» 
and Pipe Organ; 1901; 1898; 253 Grand Street; 621-W; 14 SM; 



.Swill-- V.^v::; H-v.,, : 2. ~ ~. V. V.. 1V:1 : -'--.- .A-.- ;-^v- 
Spangler, Helen V, A. B. (W. V. TX, W; graduate 



Sparks, Margaret Rose, A. B. {HaggL 1928) [; Secretary to the 

■:: :z: ::::. 

Speicher, B. Ietam, M. S. (W. V. XL, 1932); Graduate Assistant in 
Botany; 1932; 512 Grove Street; 1900. 



360 Alphabetical List of 



Speiden, Henry Withers, B. S. C. E. (W. V. U., 1925); Graduate 
Assistant in Civil Engineering; 1931; 2154 University Avenue; 
1143; 305 MH; 1900. 

*Spiker, Claude Carl, Ph. D. (Chicago, 1922) ; Professor of French and 
Spanish; 1926; 1913; 104 Jackson Avenue; 1545-W; 48 W; 1900. 

*Spray, Robb Spalding, Ph. D. (Chicago, 1923) ; Professor of Bacteri- 
ology and Public Hygiene; 1926; 1921; 308 South High Street; 
997-R; 209 MB; 1900 or 1788. 

*Staab, William Anderson, E. M. (Lehigh, 1910) ; Assistant Professor 
of Mining Engineering; 1926; 762 Willey Street; 2034-M; 117 
MH; 74. 

*Stadsvold, Francis, LL. B. (Minnesota, 1920); Assistant in Athletics; 
Coach of Basketball; 1920; FH; 1900. 

Stalnaker, Elizabeth Mattingly, Ph. D. (Johns Hopkins, 1923) ; Pro- 
fessor of Psychology; 1928; 1925; 354 Spruce Street; 1623-M; 30 L; 
1900. 

♦Stanley, Alfred Reeves, M. S. (W. V. U., 1932) ; Graduate Assistant 
in Plant Pathology, College of Agriculture and Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station; 1930; 448 Stewart Street; 569-R; 309 OH; 1900. 

*Stansbury, Harry Adams, B. S. (West Virginia Wesleyan, 1915) ; 
Director of Intercollegiate Athletics; 1916; 108 Wilson Avenue; 59; 
181 Bank Street, Monongahela Building; 1641. 

*Stathers, Madison, Ph. D. (Grenoble, 1905) ; Professor of Romance 
Languages; 1910; 1906; 236 Grand Street; 594-W; 11 W; 1900. 

Steely, Marlin Luther, B. S. Ch. E. (W. V. U., 1931); Graduate 
Assistant in Chemical Engineering; 1931; 746 Willey Street; 
2371-M; 109 MH; 1900. 

*Stelzer, Roland Otto, M. S. (Wisconsin, 1931) ; Assistant in Farm 
Economics, Agricultural Experiment Station; and Farm Manage- 
ment Specialist, Agricultural Extension Division; 1929; 331 Beverly 
Avenue; 586-W; 311 OH; 1900. 

*Stemple, Forrest Wilbur, Ph. D. (Cornell, 1930) ; Professor of Educa- 
tion; 1931; 1918; 10 McLane Avenue; 2414-J; 17 W; 1900. 

* Stewart, James Scott, M. S. (W. V. U., 1880) ; Professor of Mathe- 
matics, Emeritus; 1907; 1877; 146 Willey Street; 120-R. Deceased, 
February 9, 1933. 

Stewart, Joseph K., A. B. (Marshall, 1927) ; M. S. (W. V. U., 1931) ; 
Instructor in Mathematics; 1932; 1930; 2000 University Avenue; 
2517-J; 212 C; 1900. 

Stewart, Marvin Terrill, Second Lieutenant, Infantry Reserve; Stu- 
dent Assistant in Military Science and Tactics; 1932; 80 Holland 
Avenue; 544; A; 1900. 

*Stillman, Herman Deloss, Assistant in Woodworking; 1920; 357 
Falling Run; 11 W; 205 MH; 1900. 

*Stockdale, Charles Ellsworth, M. S. Agr. (W. V. U., 1926) ; Eco- 
nomist, Agricultural Extension Division; 1930; 1916; 504 Grand 
Street; 1948-R; 200 OH; 1900. 



Faculty and Staff 361 



♦Stone, Harry Everette, A. M. (Columbia, 1922) ; Dean of Men; 1922; 
208 Maple Avenue; 1163-W; 11 M; 1900. 

♦Stoops, Lowry McElvaine, A. B. (W. V. U., 1917) ; Assistant Director 
of Intercollegiate Athletics; 1926; 414 Grant Avenue; 1146; 181 
Bank Street, Monongahela Building; 1641. 

♦Stout, Clyde Graham, Instructor in Mining Extension; 1925; Welch, 
West Virginia. 

♦Strausbaugh, Perry Daniel, Ph. D. (Chicago, 1920) ; Professor of 
Botany; 1923; 213 McLane Avenue; 2523-W; 32 S; 1900. 

Strickland, Lucile, M. A. (Missouri, 1932) ; Instructor in Home Eco- 
nomics Education; 1932; Masontown, West Virginia. 

Sturgiss, Marie H., Secretary to the Chairman of the Graduate 
Council; 1930; 240 Wagner Road; 1931; 205 C; 1900. 

♦Summers, Festus Paul, A. M. (Chicago, 1927) ; Graduate Assistant in 
History; 1932; 316 Beverly Avenue; 422 C; 1900. 

♦Summers, Roy Roosevelt, B. S. (W. V. U., 1925) ; M. D. (Medical Col- 
lege of Virginia, 1927) ; Assistant Director, Student Health Service; 
1932; 1 Koontz Avenue, Flatts; 2583; Infirmary; 475. 

♦Sutton, Joseph Bartlett, B. S. Ch. E. (W. V. U., 1932); Graduate 
Assistant in Chemistry; 1932; 419 Cobun Avenue; C; 1900. 

Swing, Leonard Carl, B. S. Ch. E. (W. V. U., 1931) ; Second Lieu- 
tenant, Chemical Warfare Service Reserve Corps; Student Assist- 
ant in Military Science and Tactics; 1931; 225 Wilson Avenue; 
1735; C; A. 

Talbott, Ralph Edward, A. B. (W. V. U., 1930) ; Assistant in Anatomy 
* and Histology; 1930; 141 Willey Street; 1067; 110 MB; 1900. 

Talbott, William Brown, Instructor in Mining Extension; 1928; 
Bramwell, West Virginia. 

Tallman, Charles Cameron, LL. B. (W. V. U., 1925) ; Assistant in 
Athletics; Coach of Freshman Football; 1929; Madeira Hotel, 
Morgantown ; Beech Hill, West Virginia. 

♦Taylor, Jennings Bryan, M. S. (Kentucky, 1922) ; Instructor in 
Anatomy; 1927; Suncrest Park; 1891-J; 308 MB; 1900 or 1788. 

♦Taylor, Leland Hart, Sc. D. (Harvard, 1922) ; Associate Professor of 
Zoology; 1927; 1922; 116 Lincoln Avenue; 1733-J; 24 S; 1900. 

Thomas, Beatrice, B. S. (Wisconsin, 1928) ; Instructor in Physical 
Education; 1928; 160 Fayette Street; 1905-J; EM; 1900. 

Thomas, Beaumont, Student Assistant in Chemistry; 1932; 504 High 
Street; 9766; 125 C; 1900. 

Thomas, Bessie, Assistant Secretary of the College of Engineering; 
1931; 1928; 96 Marion Street; 1005-R; 123 MH; 1900. 

Thomas, Charles Danser, A. B., M. S. (W. V. U., 1930, 1931) ; In- 
structor in Physics; 1931; 1928; 146 Hunt Street; 523-J; 10 M; 
1900. 



362 Alphabetical List of 

Thomas, E. Ivan, Student Assistant in Chemistry; 1932; 305 Second 
Street; 1101-J; C; 1900. 

Thorniley, Ruth, Student Assistant in Nutrition Research; 1930; 445 
Lorentz Avenue; 1879; E; 1900. 

*Thurston, Lloyd Massena, Ph. D. (Minnesota, 1928) ; Associate Pro- 
fessor of Dairy Husbandry, and Associate Dairy Husbandman, Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station; 1931; 1929; 701 Grand Street; 1726-W; 
1 OH; 1306-J. 

Tibbs, Richard Bailey, Second Lieutenant, Infantry Reserve; Student 
Assistant in Military Science and Tactics; 1932; 314 Prospect 
Street; 834-M; A; 1900. 

*Tisdale, Ellis Spence, B. S. San. Eng'g. (M. I. T., 1915) ; Director, 
Division of Sanitary Engineering (State Department of Health.) 
Director of Conference on Water Supply and Purification; Charles- 
ton, West Virginia. 

*Trotter, Frank Butler, A. B., A. M. (Roanoke, 1890, 1893) ; LL. D. 
(West Virginia Wesleyan, 1914) ; President Emeritus, and Pro- 
fessor of Latin, 1928; 1907; 108 McLane Avenue; 151; 310 C; 1900. 

Tucker, Evelyn Mae, Secretary to the Director of the School of Mines; 
1929; 88 Marion Street; 2387-J; 121 MH; 74. 

Tuckwiller, Ross Homan, B. S. Agr. (W. V. U., 1916) ; Assistant 
Animal Husbandman, Agricultural Experiment Station; 1916; 
Lewisburg, West Virginia. 

Turner, Bird Margaret, Ph. D. (Bryn Mawr, 1920) ; Professor of 
Mathematics; 1931; 1923; 107 High Street; 253- J; 210 C; 1900. 

*Turner, John Roscoe, Ph. D. (Princeton, 1913) ; LL. D. (W. V. *U., 

1928; U. So. CaL, 1932); President; 1928; 1549 University Ave- 
nue; 216; President's Office, W; 2561. 

Vacheresse, Edward, Coach of Boxing; 1928; 1489 University Avenue; 
1188; FH; 1900. 

*VanLandingham, Audrey Howard, M. S. (W. V. U., 1931) ; Assistant 
in Agricultural Chemistry, Agricultural Experiment Station; 1931; 
1929; 441 Clark Street; 693-M; E; 1900. 

*Van Liere, Edward Jerald, M. D. (Harvard, 1920) ; Ph. D. (Chicago, 
1927); Professor of Physiology; 1921; 129 Maryland Avenue; 
1150-R; 202 MB; 1900. 

*Vehse, Charles Henry, M. S. (Brown, 1926) ; Ph. D. (Brown, 1932) ; 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics; 1929; Suncrest Park; 2428-R; 
207 C; 1900. 

*Verner, Leif, M. S. (Penn State, 1926) ; Assistant Horticulturist, Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station, and Horticulture Specialist, Agricul- 
tural Extension Division; 1930; University Experiment Farm, 
Kearneysville, West Virginia. 

*Vest, Marvin Lewis, M. S. (W. V. U., 1932); Instructor in Mathe- 
matics; 1932; 1931; 313 Ford Street; 839-M; 212 C; 1900. 



Faculty and Staff 363 



♦Vickers, Enoch Howard, A. M. (Harvard, 1894) ; Professor of Econo- 
mics and Sociology; 1911; 820 College Avenue; 2136; 28 W; 1900. 

Waddell, Maymb Elizabeth, B. S. (Minnesota, 1930) ; Dietitian and 
Instructor in Institutional Management; 1930; 134 Hunt Street; 
1221-J; Cafeteria; 1939. On leave second semester, 1932-33. 

Wade, Georgia Chorpening, A. B. ( W. V. U., 1926) ; Assistant in 
Library; 1930; 256 Prairie Avenue; 210-R; UL; 1900. 

♦Wadepuhl, Walter, Ph. D. (Wisconsin, 1921) ; Assistant Professor of 
German; 1926; 201 Jones Avenue; 2340; 20 W; 1900. 

Warnick, Vianna Ruth, Secretary to the Department of Chemistry; 
1928; 312 Dewey Street; 642-R; 309 C; 1900. 

Watson, Glenn Sanford, M. S. (W. V. U., 1931) ; Graduate Assistant 
in Chemistry; 1931; C; 1900. 

Watson, Hobart, Instructor in Mining Extension; 1925; Mount Hope, 
West Virginia. 

♦Weakley, Charles Edward, Jr., M. A. (W. V. U., 1930) ; Assistant 
Chemist, Agricultural Experiment Station; 1907; Star City Road; 
2481-R; 1900. 

Weil, Jeannetta, Chief Clerk, Agricultural Extension Division; 1919; 
1911; 590 Spruce Street; 1696-R; 201 OH; 1900. 

Wells, Dana, M. A. (Kansas, 1930) ; Instructor in Geology; 1930; 633 
Spruce Street; 333-R; 202 C; 1900. 

West, Mrs. Helen G., Secretary, Health Service; 1929; 364 Spruce 
Street; 1623-J; Infirmary; 475. 

West, Rufus Asa, Instructor in Metal Working; 1919; 1892; 301 First 
Street; 368- J; 2 MH; 1900. 

*Westover, Kyle Chester, M. S. Agr. (W. V. U., 1924) ; Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Horticulture, and Assistant Horticulturist, Agricultural 
Experiment Station; 1921; Riverview Drive, Evansdale; 1858-J; 103 
OH; 130 W. 

♦Whipple, Stephen C, B. S. (California, 1914) ; Captain, Corps of 
Engineers, D. O. L., United States Army; Assistant Professor of 
Military Science and Tactics; 1930; 325 Maple Avenue; 505; A; 
1900. 

White, Anna B., Student Assistant in Library; 115 Quay Avenue; 
1634; UL; 1900. 

♦White, Bennett Sexton, B. S. M. E. (W. V. U., 1897) ; Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Drawing and Machine Design; 1922; 1919; 115 Quay 
Street; 1634; 210 MH; 1900. 

White, Ralph M., Student Assistant in Library; 100 McLane Avenue; 
1252; UL; 1900. 

♦Whittlesey, Frederick Rendell, B. A. (Wooster, 1921) ; M. D. 
(Western Reserve, 1925) ; Director, Student Health Service, 1931) ; 
Instructor in Physical Diagnosis, 1932; 1930; 124 Lincoln Avenue; 
521; Infirmary; 475. 



364 Alphabetical List of 

Wiant, Isaac Joseph, Student Assistant in Chemistry; 1931; 284% 
Prospect Street; 1298-J; C; 1900. 

Wightman, Ernest Thomas, M. S. Agr. (W. V. U., 1926) ; Instructor 
in Poultry Husbandry; and Assistant in Poultry Husbandry, Agri- 
culture Experiment Station; 1926; 1924; 141 Willey Street; 1067; 
E; 1900. 

♦Wiles, Isaiah A., M. S. (W. V. U., 1931); Graduate Assistant in 
Zoology; 1931; 1929; Dille Street; S; 1900. 

*Wiley, Andrew Valentine, A. B. (W. V. U., 1930) ; Order and Bindery 
Department, Library Staff; 1930; 751 Snider Street; UL; 1900. 

♦Williams, Curtis Chandler, Jr., A. B. (Princeton, 1917) ; LL. B., 
S. J. D. (Harvard, 1925, 1931) ; Professor of Law; 1932; 229 Grand 
Street; 2581; 6 LB; 1900. 

♦Williams, Ena Vandervort, Secretary of the College of Education; 
1931; R. F. D. 3, Box 91-B; 243-W; W; 1900. 

♦Willis, Dennis Martin, A. B., LL. M. (W. V. U., 1903, 1905); 
Financial Secretary; 1917; 1895; 244 Park Street; 1666; S; 1900. 

♦Wilson, Charles Vinyard, M. S. (Iowa State, 1924) ; Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Animal Husbandry; and Assistant Animal Husbandman, 
Agricultural Experiment Station; 1924; 1919; 2201 University Ave- 
nue; 1530-J; 106 OH; 1900. 

Wilt, May Landstreet, M. A. (Columbia, 1929) ; Instructor in Educa- 
tion, College of Education; and Teacher of Mathematics in Uni- 
versity High School; 1931; 1924; Delmar Building, High Street; 
1630-J; HS; 1793-J. 

♦Winter, John E., Ph. D. (Michigan, 1917) ; Professor of Psychology; 
1923; 1921; 324 Grandview Avenue; 1716-W; 33 L; 1900. 

Wise, Charles, Student Assistant in Psychology; 1932; 220 Prospect 
Street; 2424-R. 

Wood, Kenneth, B. M. (Syracuse, 1918) ; Assistant Professor of Violin 
and Ensemble; 1931; 1928; 204 Grant Avenue; 542-R; SMA; 1900. 

Young, Joseph Emmet, Sergeant, D. E. M. L., United States Army, 
Assistant to Professor of Military Science and Tactics; 1932; 340 
Green Street; A; 1900. 

♦Zimmerman, Ernest L., B. S. (Indiana, 1927) ; Teacher in Commerce, 
University High School; 1932; 958 Grand Street; HS; 1793-J. 

♦Zucchero, Peter Joseph, A. B. (W. V. U., 1929) ; Graduate Assistant 
in Zoology; 1932; 2154 University Avenue; 1143; 1900. 



Part VI I 
STUDENTS ENROLLED, 1932-1933 



LIST OF STUDENTS 



ENROLLED IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Note : The following list includes the names of all students enrolled in the 
University, arranged in alphabetical order. Following each student's name and 
address are given his class, and the course of study which he is pursuing, or the 
degree for which he is a candidate. The word freshman, sophomore, etc., follow- 
ing the student's name, indicates his rank on the first day of November, 1932. 
Students marked as special students are classified in accordance with the regula- 
tions found on page 69 of this Catalogue. 



Abbot, Alois Bahlman, Jr. Fayetteville 

Abbott, Thomas Gilbert Martinsburg 

Abel, Milton R. New York, N 
Abernethy, Margaret Stansbury Maidsville 

Abramson, Eva Piedmont 

Adams, Gerald Valentine Reader 

Addison, Carrie Maye Morgantown 

Adkins, John McLean Wheeling 

Agee, Elizabeth LaNelle Morgantown 

Ahern, Virginia Isabelle Fairmont 

Akeroyd, Joseph H., Jr. Morgantown 

Akers, Robert H. Kermit 

Akins, Louise Carolyn Morgantown 

Albright, Erbie Claire Morgantown 

Albright, George F. Morgantown 

Alcott, William Maxwell Morgantown 

Alexander, Elizabeth Bluefield 

Allan, Frances Louise Beverly 

Alleman, Gay Zearley Point Marion, 

Allen, Dana William Morgantown 

Allen, George E. Ashland, Ky. 

Allison, Edward Burdette Morgantown 

Allison, Sara Ruth Morgantown 

Allman, Floy Cox's Mills 

Allman, Marguerite Weston 

Altizer, John A. Canebrake 

Ammar, Fayaz K. Williamson 

Ammons, Nellie Perrel Morgantown 

Amos, Stephen E. Folsom 

Anderson, Asa Howard Smithfield 

Anderson, Charles Sabraton 

Anderson, Charles Lee Hinton 

Anderson, Clair Sherrill Littleton 

Anderson, Louise Lynch Union 

Andrews, Frances Spicer Morgantown 

Andrews, Graham Atkins Bluefield 

Andrews, Jessie J. Alderson 

Andrick, Evah M. Elizabeth 

Andy, Leo Leonard Clarksburg 

Angel, Harry Robert Huntington 

Anwyll, Vincent Thomas Fairmont 

Applebaum, Eli New York, N. 

Arbaugh, J. Meredith Montgomery 



Fr., B. S. Ch. E. 

Jun., A. B. 
Y. Fr, A. B. 

Fr., B. S. H. E. 

Jun., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Sen., B. E. Ed. 

Jun., B. S. C. E. 

Sen., A. B. 

Sen., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Grad., Chemical Eng' 

Fr., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Spec, Grad. 

Soph., B. S. Ch. E. 

Fr., A. B. 

Soph., B. S. H. E. 

Fr, A B. 
Pa. Grad., Education 

Grad., Education 

Soph, B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Sen, A. B. 

Fr, B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Grad, Zoology 

Jun, A. B. 

Sen, B. S. E. E. 

Sen, A. B. 

Grad, Botany 

Soph, B. S. M. E. 

Grad, Entomology 

Spec, Grad. 

Jun, B. S. E. E. 

1st Yr. Med. 

Fr, B. S. H. E. 

Sen, B. S. H. E. 

Jun, A. B. 

Sen, B. S. Ed. 

Soph, B. S. H. E. 

Fr, A. B. 

2nd Yr. Law 

Grad, Chemistry 
Y. Soph, A. B. 

Jun, B. S. Ch. E. 



368 



Students Enrolled, 1932-1933 



Arcuri, Joseph 
Areford, Henry Sheldon 
Argenbright, Margery Price 
Argenbright, Marvin K. 
Armistead, Charles Spencer 
Armstrong, Keith Stuart 
Arnett, Denver Floyd 
Arnett, Mary Louise 
Arnold, Archie Freeland 
Arnold, Christine 
Arnold, Gladys Kathryn 
Arrick, Kenneth Harris 
Ash, Columbus I* 
Ash, Ruth Alene 
Ashburn, Harry Virgil 
Ashburn, Howard Gilmer 
Ashcroft, Joseph Myers 
Ashworth, Adrian Lincoln 
Ashworth, Glenn 
Aspinall, Catherine V. 
Aspinall, Samuel R. 
Atha, Charles Lester 
Atwood, Barbara Frances 

Atwood, Hilda Ruth 
Auld, John T. 
Austin, Frank Edwin 

Auxier, Gwendolen Gertrude 

Axtell, Sallie 

Ayersman, George Parker 

Aziar, Louis Joseph 

Baber, Helen Virginia 

Backus, Virginia Mae 

Baer, Trenna Kathryn 

Bailey, Carl Harrison 

Bailey, Clementine 

Bailey, Gerald C. 

Bailey, George Gilbert 

Bailey, Harvey Peery 

Bailey, James S. 

Bailey, Margaret Elizabeth 

Bailey, Richard Edwin 

Bailey, Robert F. 

Bailey, Ruhl Judson 

Bailey, Thomas Crockett 

Bailey, Verona Ann 

Baird, Margery 

Baker, Betty Sue 

Baker, Dan R. 

Baker, Dorothy Pauline 

Baker, Eddie M. 

Baker, Edwin 

Baker, Glenn Hicks 

Baker, Harriet Barlow 

Baker, J. Burchinal 

Baker, Jonathan Jefferson 

Baker, Josephine Brown 

Baker, Lyle Eugene 

Baker, Margaret C. 



Fairmont 

Morgantown 

Madison 

Beckley 

Bluefield 

Morgantown 

Wick 

Morgantown 

Mannington 

Weston 

Great Cacapon 

Proctor 

Clarksburg 

Shepherdstown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Farmington 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Prichard 

Claysville, Pa. 

Rowlesburg 

New Martinsville 

Morgantown 

Montgomery 

Mount Morris, Pa. 

Princeton 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Fairmont 

Weston 

Bluefield 

Craigsville 

Morgantown 

Davy 

Charleston 

Elm Grove 

Morgantown 

Elkins 

Grafton 

Clarksburg 

South Charleston 

Cameron 

Elkins 

Morgantown 

Piedmont 

Morgantown 

Parkersburg 

Elkins 



Soph., A. B. 
Grad., Education. 
Grad., History 
Jun., B. S. Ch. E. 
Fr., A. B. 
Spec, Music 
Grad., Education 
Soph., A. B. 
Soph., B. S. Ind. Ed. 
Grad., Chemistry 
Jun., A. B. 
Fr., B. S. Agr. 
Grad., Education 
Grad., English 
Grad., Chemistry 
Grad., Chemistry 

Grad., Plant Pathology 

1st Yr., Med. 

1st Yr. Med. 

Jun., B. S. Ed. 

Soph.. A. B. 

Grad., Botany 

Spec, Grad. 

Sen., B. S. H. E. 

Grad., Education 

Fr., B. S. E. E. 

1st Yr. Med. 

Soph., B. S. H. E. 

Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

1st Yr. Med. 

Fr., A. B. 

Soph., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Fr., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Summer School 

Jun., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Sen., B. S. Ch. E. 

Jun., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

2nd Yr. Law 

1st Yr. Med. 

Soph., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Spec, Music 

1st Yr. Med. 

Grad., Education 

Sen., A. B. 

Sen., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Soph., B. S. C. E. 

Grad., English 

Sen., A. B. • 

Spec, Grad. 

Spec, Grad. 

Jun., B. S. E. E. 

Sen., B. S. H. E. 



List of Students 



369 



Baker, Martha Louise 
Baker, Nellie Myrle 
Baker, Olive Ruth 
Baker, Robert A. 
Baker, Rodney 
Baker, Rosalie Randolph 
Baker, Thomas Taylor 
Baker, William P. 
Baldwin, John Braithwaite 
Ballantyne, Irene Virginia 
Ballantyne, Robert B. 
Ballard, Mary Katharine 
Ballard, Oscar David 
Ballard, Sally Blanche 
Ballard, Wade Hampton II 
Ballengee, Sara E. 
Bait, John Robert 
Bandi, Robert T. 
Bank, Gilbert 
Barbe, Mary 
Barberio, Irene 
Barbers, George Franklin 
Barger, Rosa G. 
Barkalow, Frank Douglas 
Barker, Jessie Genevieve 
Barley, Albert Alfred 
Barnard, John Deems 
Barnes, Beatrice Vivian 
Barnett, Eleanor 
Barnett, Frederick Haumann 
Barnhart, John Dove 
Barrackman, Pearl 
Barrett, Samuel Jaynes 
Barrick, Fred W. 
Barrick, Margaret Mathers 
Barrickman, David Samuel 
Barrickman, Milton Robert 
Barrickman, Ray Ellsworth 
Bartholomew, Elizabeth Ann 
Bartlett. Denora 
Barton, Harry N. 
Bartram, Paul 
Basic, Josephine Anna 
Basle, Gene Z. 
Bass, Dorothy Elizabeth 
Bates, A. E. Griffith 
Bates, Mary Casey 
Batson, James Albert 
Batten, John Edward, Jr. 
Battin, Donald Henry 
Battles, Ford Lewis 
Bauer, Dorothy Caroline 
Baum, Henry Evans 
Bauman, Betty Anne 
Baumgardner, Marie Arabelle 
Bavely, Ernest 
Bavely, Ruth Greer 
Bayles, Frances Elizabeth 



Scarbro 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Piedmont 

El kins 

Huntington 

Morgantown 

New York, N. Y. 

New Cumberland 

Ne>n Cumberland 

Glen Jean 

Glen Jean 

Glen Jean 

Peterstown 

Beckley 

Weirton 

AVhreling 

Williamson 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Fairmont 

Charleston 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

W. lch, 

Cumberland, Md. 

Morgantown 

Clarksburg 

Glenville 

Greensburg, Pa. 

Farmington 

Ireland 

Lost Creek 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Wheeling 

Clarksburg 

Charleston 

Fort Gay 

Weirton 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Elm Grove 

Elm Grove 

Reader 

Lost Creek 

Man 

Erie, Pa. 

Moundsville 

Princeton 

Wheeling 

Logan 

Fairmont 

Fairmont 

Morgantown 



Grad., Home Econ. Ed. 

Sen., B. S. H. E. 

Spec, A. & S. 

Pr., A. B. 

Grad., History 

Spec, Grad. 

3rd Yr. Law 

Soph., A: B. 

Grad., English 

Fr., A. B. 

Jim.. A. B. 

Jun.. A. B. 

1st Yr. Med. 

Soph., A. B. 

2nd Yr. Law 

Jun., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Fr., A. B. 

1st Yr. Med. 

1 st Yr. Law 

Jun., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Spec, Grad. 

Summer School 

Fr., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

ard Yr. Law 

Jun., A. B. 

Spec, Grad. 

Fr., A. B. 

3rd Yr. Law 

Grad., Dairy Husb. 

Grad., English 

Sen., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

.'Jrd Yr. Pharm. 

Grad., Botany 

Grad., Botany 

Jun., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Sen., B. S. M. E. 

Soph., a. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. E. E. 

Summer School 

Grad., Education 

Grad., Education 

Fr., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Grad., English 

2nd Yr. Med. 

Fr., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Grad., English 

Fr., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 



370 



Students Enrolled, 1932-1933 



Bayles, Mary Catherine 
Bayles, Robert E. 
Beagle, Elizabeth 
Bealke, Charles Francia 
Beall, Ralph Rodney 
Beall, Richard Hugh 
Bean, Oscar Hedrick 
Bean, Ralph" Judy 
Beane, Edythe Irene 
Bear, Emanuel 
Beardsley, James Sadler 
Beatty, James Frederick, Jr. 
Beavers, Donald Hoffman 
Becker, Clarence Edward 
Beckett, Earnest Clyde 
Beckwith, May 
Beddow, Herbert Mather 
Bedwinek, Merril Lee 
Bee, Ural G. 
Beeghly, Hugh F. 
Beerbower, Fred Vance 
Beeson, Colin Reed 
Belcher, Carrie 
Belcher, William Alexander 
Belcher, William Herbert 
Belford, Abraham Maurice 
Bell, Edmund Serle 
Bell, John Wade, Jr. 
Bennett, Dana F. 
Bennett, Edward Benjamin 
Bennett, Gay 
Bennett, Katherine 
Bennett, Landis Seawell 
Bennett, Louis Raymond 
Bennett, Wayman Shirley 
Benson, Arthur August 
Benson, Clarence J. 
Berg, Marjorie La "Verne 
Bergdoll, Virginia 
Berry, Edward Oldham 
Bertie, Rayma Aletta 
Bertollini, Antioco Vincent 
Bess, Elizabeth Grant 
Best, Ethel Towzey 
Best, Glenn Edward 
Beto, Frank 

Bevington, Geraldine Margaret 
Bias, Ernest Gaujot 
Bibbee, Charles 
Bibbee, William Jay 
Bibby, James A. 
Bierer, Julia 
Bishop, Carter Richard 
Bishop, Margaret Llewellyn 
Bishop, Ronald A. 
Bishop, Ruby D. 
Bishop, Zella Clara 
Bissett, Arietta Vivian 



Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Spencer 

Maplewood, Mo. 

Beallsville, Pa, 

Hedgesville 

Moorefield 

Moorefield 

Pocataligo 

Fairmont 

Point Marion, Pa. 

Mannington 

Fairmont 

Martinsburg 

Clarksburg 

Parkersburg 

Charleston 

Charleston 

Berea 

Brandonville 

Kingwood 

Four States 

Iaeger 

Gloucester, Va. 

Cinco 

New Haven, Conn. 

Morgantown 

Quinwood 

Fairmont 

Steubenville, Ohio 

Morgantown 

Jackson Sp'gs, N. C. 

Jackson Sp'gs, N. C. 

Morgantown 

Buckhannon 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Point Marion, Pa. 

Moorefield 

Sutton 

Morgantown 

Uniontown, Pa. 

Keyser 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

East View 

Morgantown 

Williamson 

Clarksburg 

Walker 

Charleston 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Pocahontas, Va. 

Wadestown 

Summerlee 

Summerlee 

Keyser 



Spec, A. & S. 

Soph., A. B. 

Sen., B. S. H. E. 

Summer School 

Jun., B. S. C. E. 

Sen., B. S. Ed. 

Sen., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Sen.. B. S. H. E. 

Fr., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Sen., B. S. M. E. 

Soph., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Jun., B. S. Mus. 

Summer School 

2nd Yr. Med. 

Fr., A. B. 

Soph., B. S. Agr. 

Soph., B. S. Ch. E. 

Jun., A. B. 

Summer School 

Summer School 

Fr., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Spec, A. & S. 

Soph., B. S. E. M. 

Soph., B. S. Ch. E. 

Jun., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Sen.. A. B. 

Grad., Agronomy 

Soph., A. B. 

1st Yr. Law 

Fr., B. S. M. E. 

Jun., A. B. 

Soph., B. Mus. 

Summer School 

Soph., B. S. E. E. 

Jun., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Fr., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

.lun., B. S. Ed. 

Sen., B. S. Ind. Ed. 

Summer School 

Sen., B. S. Ed. 

3rd Yr. Law 

Jun., B. S. C. E. 

Jun., B. S. Ed. 

Sopn., A. B. 

Spec, Grad. 

Grad., English 

Sen., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Sen., B. S. Ed. 

Grad., Education 

Jun., B. S. Ed. 



List of Students 



371 



Bitonti, Angelina Rita 
Bitonti, Joe Laverne 
Bitonty, Louis Fred 
Black, Donald Fought 
Black, Frank Albert 
Black, McDonald Bland 
Blackburn, Ben F. 
Blackburn, Charles Wesley 
Blackhurst, Warren E. 
Blackwood, Attarah Beall 
Blair, Andrew Lane 
Blair, Bonita Baker 
Blair, Forrest Lloyd 
Blake, Norman Bradbury 
Blake, William Jasper 
Bland, Russell Charter 
Blaney, Judson A. 
Blaney, Kathryn Virginia 
Bledsoe, Luther Edgar 
Bledsoe, Raymond Leonard 
Bletner, James Karl 
Bly, Lillian Doris 
Boal, Doris Adele 
Board, Frances Lillian 
Board, John Claudius 
Bobbitt, Jesse Chambers 
Bochicchio, Anthony Joseph 
Bock, Edward Sidney 
Bock, Robert Courtney 
Boettcher, Victor Henry 
Boggess, Thomas Earle 
Boggs, Edward H. 
Boiarsky, Julius L, 
Boley, Noah W. 
Bollinger, James Leroy, Jr. 
Bollinger, William Wilson 
Bolton, Neal 
Bolyard, Lester Neil 
Bolyard, Margaret Carter 
Bolyard, Thomas A. 
Bonar, Martin Clemens 
Bonar, Matthew Dale 
Bonar, Robert Reed 
Bonar, Ross 
Bond, Orville Booth 
Bone, William H. 
Boone, Roy Elliott 
Boomsliter, Alice Colgan 
Boomsliter, Paul Colgan 
Boomsliter, Peggy 
Boor, Elynor Melrose 
Booth, Winnie M. 
Boreman, William Inghram 
Borinsky, Abe 
Borror, Almonta 
Borror, John W. 
Bosely, Gracie Viola 
Bosely, June Fordyce 



Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Parkersburg 

Blacksville 

Logan 

Wellsburg 

Keyser 

Cass 

Point Pleasant 

Weston 

Morgantown 

Sandyville 

Ronceverte 

Nellis 

Clarksburg 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Webster Springs 

Webster Springs 

Mason 

Clarksburg 

Piedmont 

Dunbar 

Charleston 

Crichton 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Charleston 

Charleston 

Charleston 

Morgantown 

Franklin 

Charleston 

Runa 

Morgantown 

Mount Pleasant, 

Belington 

Independence 

Philippi 

Philippi 

Moundsville 

Moundsville 

Moundsville 

Buckhannon 

Masontown 

Wheeling 

Martinsburg 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Mannington 

Morgantown 

Parkersburg 

Princeton 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Simpson 

Simpson 



Sen., B. S. Phys. Ed. 
Jun., A. B. 
Grad., Education 
3rd Yr. Law 
Grad., Education 
3rd Yr. Law 
Soph., B. S. Agr. 
Grad., English 
Grad., English 
Grad., English 
Fr., A. B. 
Grad., Botany 
Fr., A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
Jun., B. S. E. E. 
Sen., A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Grad., Education 
Spec, Grad. 
Jun., B. S. Agr. 
Spec, Grad. 
Sen., B. Mus. 
Jun., A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
Grad., Education 
Soph., A. B. 
1st Yr. Law 
Soph., A. B. 
Jun., A. B. 
Jun., A. B. 
1st Yr. Med. 
2nd Yr. Med. 
Grad., Dairy Husb. 
Fr., B. S. C. E. 
Pa.Fr., B. S. E. E. 
Jun., B. S. Agr. 
Fr, B. S. Agr. 
Grad., French 
Sen., B. S. Ind. Ed. 
Fr„ A. B. 
Grad., Zoology 
Fr., B. S. Ind. Ed. 
Grad., Education 
Grad., Education 
Jun., B. S. Ind. Ed. 
Grad., Education 
Spec, Grad. 
Fr., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. Phys. Ed. 
Soph., B. S. Phys. Ed. 
Grad., Education 
Sen., A. B. 
Sen., A. B. 
Spec, A. & S. 
Soph., B. S. Ch. E. 
Fr., B. S. H. E. 
Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 



372 



Students Enrolled, 1932-1933 



Bosley, Frederick Bruce 
Bosworth, John Woodbridge 
Bouffioux, Francis J. 
Boughner, Rosalie 
Bourn, Chester W. 
Bourn, Jennie Mae 
Boutwell, Delos Sisler 
Bowcock, John Overton 
Bowen, Robert 
Bowers, Frank Earl 
Bowers, Joseph William 
Bowers, Mayme E. 
Bowers, Patty Lou 
Bowlby, Edward C. 
Bowles, Mazil Winfield 
Bowling, Virginia Ellen 
Bowman, Frank Llewellyn, Jr. 
Bowmaster, Naomi Alta 
Boyd, Donald Van Gilder 
Bracken, Coulter Reid 
Brackett, George Sylvester, Jr. 
Braden, James W. 
Bradford, Arthur Dewey 
Bradford, Bert, Jr. 
Bradford, Harriet 
Bradley, Ellis Alton 
Bradley, Garnet Beatrice 
Bradley, Mary Edna 
Bradley, Opal 
Bradshaw, James Ohlen 
3rady, John Michael 
Brady, Margaret Vaughan 
Bragg, Pauleen Elizabeth 
Bragonier, Arthur Taylor 
Brake, Judson M. 
Brake, Zenna Mildred 
Brand, Benson Glenn 
Brand, Esther D. 
Brand, Jesse Samuel 
Brand, Mary K. 
Brand, Richard Clyde 
Brashear, Doris Gail 
Bratton, Robert Andrew 
Brawley, Andrew V. 
Breinig, Clarence 
Bremer, Frank, Jr. 
Breslow, Philip Harvey 
Brick, John P. 
Brochick, Anna 
Brody, Sydney 
Broglio, John A. 
Brohard, Thomas Warren 
Brookover, Bertie Leon 
Brookover, Harry Albert 
Brookover, Virgil Glen 
Brown, Allan Gordon 
Brown, Barbara Klock 
Brown, Carolyn E. 



New Creek 

Mill Creek 

Clarksburg 

Morgantown 

Charleston 

Charleston 

Scottsville, N. Y. 

Morgantown 

Paden City 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Weirton 

Weirton 

Morgantown 

Gary 

Princeton 

Morgantown 

Meyersdale, Pa. 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Fairmont 

Woodruff 

Seth 

Pennsboro 

Charleston 

Madison 

Hundred 

Clarksburg 

Hundred 

Ravenswood 

Uniontown, Pa. 

Morgantown 

Hinton 

Huntington 

Morgantown 

Buckhannon 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Marlinton 

Charleston 

Romney 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Perth Amboy, N. 

Charleston 

Morgantown 

Perth Amboy, N. 

Morgantown 

Grafton 

Fairview 

Morgantown 

Jacksonburg 

Moundsville 

Charleston 

Grafton 



Grad., Education 
Grad., English 
Fr., A. B. 
Sen., A. B. 
Soph., B. S. Agr. 
Sen., B. S. H. E. 
Spec, Grad. 
Fr., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
Sen., B. S. Ind. Ed. 
Spec, Grad. 
Sen., B. S. H. E. 
Sen., A. B. 
Sen., A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Soph., B. S. M. E. 
2nd Yr. Med. 
Grad., Education 
2nd Yr. Med. 
Spec, Grad. 
Sen., A. B. 
2nd Yr. Med. 
Soph., A- B. 
Sen., B. S. H. E. 
Grad., Education 
Fr., A. B. 
Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 
Sen., A. B. 
Grad., Civil Eng'g. 
Soph., B. S. Agr. 
Spec, Grad. 
Grad., Chemistry 
Soph., B. S. H. E. 
Fr., B. S. Agr. 
Fr., A. B. 
Grad., English 
Fr., B. S. H. E. 
Soph., A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
Jun., B. S. Agr. 
Fr., A. B. 
J. Soph., A. B. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Grad., English 
j.Fr., A. B. 
3rd Yr. Law 
Grad., English 
Fr., B. S. Agr. 
Jun., A. B. 
Sen., B. S. Agr. 
Fr., B. S. C. E. 
Soph., A. B. 
Jun., A. B. 



List of Students 



373 



Brown, Charles Arnold 
Brown, Charles Fleming 
Brown, Charles Leonard 
Brown, Clifford Woodrow 
Brown, David Laing 
Brown, Dorothy Marie 
Brown, Flavia H. 
Brown, Fletcher Esley, Jr. 
Brown, Frederick Q. 
Brown, George Penman 
Brown, Haron Lee 
Brown, James Willard 
Brown, Jessie Frances 
Brown, John Harold 
Brown. John Matthew Gay, Jr. 
Brown, John Scott 
Brown, Linden Bonn 
Brown, Margaret Mae 
Brown, Marion Monroe 
Brown, Mary Virginia 
Brown, Richard Lewis 
Brown, Roland Craig 
Brown, William B. 
Brown, William Carson 
Browning, George Monroe 
Browning, Hugh C. 
Bryan, Fred I. 
Bryant, Earl Alger 
Buck, Orlan Denzil 
Buck, Robert William 
Buckey, William E. 
Bucklew, Jay Mason, Jr. 
Bundy, Eunice Jean 
Bundy, Henry Carter 
Bunten, Thomas E. 
Burch, Catharine Louise 
Burchinal, Ruth Virginia 
Burdett, Jack Conner 
Burdett, Joe Floyd 
Burdette. William P. 
Burford, Rupert O. 
Burk, Paul N. 
Burk, Robert William 
Burkley, George William 
Burnett, William Howard 
Burns, Charles C. 
Burns, Helen Elizabeth 
Burns, John D. 
Burnside, H. Edgar W. 
Burt, Virginia 
Burton, Beachley Ernest 
Burton, Bryanna 
Bush, Charles R. 
Bush, Margaret B. 
Butcher, Mattie Nell 
Butler, Andrew Kimmins 
Butler, Edydd, G. M. 
Butler, Lois Mildred 



Saint Albans 

Morgantown 

Point Pleasant 

Smithfield, Pa. 

Grant Town 

Grafton 

Sunnnersville 

Caperton 

London 

Grant Town 

An await 

Albright 

McGraws 

Fairmont 

Morgantown 

New Cumberland 

Elkins 

Charleston 

McMeohen 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Widen 

Morgantown 

Verona, Mo. 

Kingwood 

Uniontown, Pa. 

Charleston 

Sistersville 

Saint Marys 

Fairmont 

Morgantown 

Minden 

Minden 

Morgantown 

Parkersburg 

Morgantown 

Point Pleasant 

Point Pleasant 

Saint Albans 

Charleston 

Saint Marys 

Saint Marys 

McMechen 

Fairmont 

West Alexander, 

Martinsburg 

Lewisburg 

Bellevue, Pa. 

Mannington 

Morgantown 

Elizabeth 

Grafton 

Morgantown 

Clay 

Elm Grove 

Morgantown 

Hinton 



Jun., A. B. 
Grad., Chemistry 
Soph., A. B. 
Sen., B. Mus. 
Sen.. B. S. E. M. 
Soph., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Fr., B. S. E. E. 
Sen., B. S. E. E. 
Fr., A. B. 
Soph., B. S. E. M. 
Spec, Grad. 
Soph., A. B. 
Grad., Education 
Grad., History 
Fr., A. B. 
2nd Yr. Law 
Summer School 
Grad., Chemistry 
2nd Yr., Law 
1st Yr. Med. 
Fr., A. B. 
2nd Yr. Med. 
Grad., Dairy Husb. 
Grad., Agronomy 
Fr., A. B. 
Summer School 
Sen., A. B. 
Sen., A. B. 
1st Yr. Law 
Grad., Education 
Fr., B. S. Ind. Ed. 
Fr., B. S Phys Ed. 
Summer School 
Sen., B. S. Ind. Ed. 
Spec, A. & S. 
Jun., A. B. 
3rd Yr. Law 
Jun., A. B. 
Grad., Education 
Sen., B. S. Ch. E. 
4th Yr. Pharm. 
1st Yr. Law 
Soph., B. S. M. E. 
Jun., A. B. 
Pa.Soph., A. B. 
Sen., B. S. Ed. 
Fr., A. B. 
Soph.. B. S. Ch. E. 
Sen., B. S. Ed. 
Grad., History 
Jun., B. S. H. E. 
Jun., A. B. 
Soph., B. S. H. E 
Soph., A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
Jun., A. B. 
Soph., B. Mus. 



374 



Students Enrolled, 1932-1933 



Butts, Frank Henry 
Byrd, Elizabeth Walton 
Byrd, Wallace Charlton 
Byrnside, John H. 
Caddock, Robert 
Caldwell, Charles William 
Callahan, John Ralph 
Callahan, William Oscar 
Calvert, Everly G. 
Calvert, Lena Dorothy 
Camp, Charles 
Camp, Edwin H. 
Camp, Kenneth Emerson 
Campbell, Fay Thompson 
Campbell, James Anthony, Jr. 
Campbell, Martha Vivian 
Campbell, Mary Louise 
Campbell, Robert Earle 
Campbell, Robert John 
Canfield, Dewey Melvin 
Canich, Thomas William 
Cannell, Allene Roberta 
Cantor, Paul David 
Caplan, Irvin Leon 
Cappellanti, Lawrence 
Carden, John Dana 
Carlin, William Lee 
Carlino, James Thomas 
Carmichael, Mary Jane 
Carney, Mary Louise 
Carney, Oval L. 
Carpenter, Elmer Karl 
Carpenter, Hiram Ambler 
Carpenter, John Franklin 
Carpenter, Simon William 
Carper, Virginia 
Carrico, John H. 
Carroll, Fred C. 
Carson, Betty L. 
Carson, William Dana 
Carspecken, Henry L., Jr. 
Carte, Lillian Taylor 
Carter, Harry Edward 
Carter, Howard Thomas 
Carter, Virginia Lee 
Case, Charles C. 
Casey, Addis Emmett 
Casey, Margaret Ruth 
Caskey, Margaret Rebecca 
Caskey, Wilson Rufus 
Cassady, Maryjane 
Cassis, Zarife Mary 
Casteel, James Ralph 
Castleberry, Edith Frances 
Casto, Florence Elizabeth 
Casto, Ford Lewis 
Casto, Mabel Anna 
Casto, Ruth Virginia 



Charleston 

Mannington 

Mannington 

Madison 

Newark, N. J. 

Dunbar 

Fairmont 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Charleston 

Meadville 

Beckley 

Grafton 

Morgantown 



Soph., A. B. 
Sen., A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
3rd Yr. Law 
Sen., B. S. E. E. 
2nd Yr. Law 
Grad., Education 
3rd Yr. Law 
Sen., B. S. Ind. Ed. 
Fr., A. B. 
Sen., A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Grad., History 
Soph., A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
Fr., B. S. H. E. 



Kessler's Cross LanejSummer School 



Corrine 

Morgantown 

Beaver Falls, Pa. 

Fairmont 

Morgantown 

Clarksburg 

Morgantown 

Weston 

Morgantown 



4 th Yr. Pharm. 

Soph., B. Mus. 

Jun., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Grad., English 

Fr., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Spec, Music 

Sen., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Fr., A. B. 



Punxsutawney, Pa. 2nd Yr. Med. 



Carnegie, Pa. 

Wheeling 

Dunbar 

Salem 

Saint Marys 

Saint Marys 

Morgantown 

Charleston 

Morgantown 

Kingwood 

Charleston 

Newell 

Morgantown 

Clendenin 

Caretta 

Wheeling 

Middlebourn 

Morgantown 

Frostburg, Md. 

Princeton 

Martinsburg 

Martinsburg 

Morgantown 

Sistersville 

Bayard 

Huntington 

Jackson Hts., N. Y. 

Buckhannon 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 



Fr., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Grad., English 

Sen., B. S. Agr. 

Soph., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Soph., B. S. H. E. 

Soph., A. B. 

Soph., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Jun., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. M. E. 

Jun., A. B. 

Grad., English 

Sen., A. B. 

Grad., French 

Fr., A. B. 

Sen., B. S. E. M. 

Grad., Classics 

Grad., Education 

Fr., A. B. 

Spec, Mus. 

Grad., English 

Fr., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Sen., A. B. 

3rd Yr. Law 

Jun., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Soph., B. S. Phvs. Ed. 



List of Students 



375 



Cather, Charles W. 
Cather, Mary Jane 
Cattrell, William M. 
Chafin, Rathburn 
Chain, Nellie Flynn 
Chambers, Edith Eleanor 
Chambers, Franklin Paul 
Chandler, Everett Roller 
Chaney, John Francis 
Chaney, Vincent Verlando 
Chaplin, Allen Lester 
Chapman, Vincent A. 
Charles, Robert 
Chesrown, Donald L. 
Chesrown, Harold 
Chidester, William Damond 
Childs, William Henry 
Chittum, George David, Jr. 
Chittum, Margaret Jane 
Chittum, Mildred Marie 
Chittum, Richard Dale 
Chitwood, Agnes Cady 
Chit-wood, Elizabeth Anne 
Chotiner, Morris 
Chu, Yu-Lun 
Cinci, Louis 

Claiborne, William Leman 
Clara, James Joseph 
Clark, Buell H. 
Clark, George Henry 
Clark, Price Everett 
Clark, Robert A. 
Clark, Samuel Friend 
Clark, Ursula 
Clark, Zelith A. 
Clatworthy, Emily Cathleen 
Clatworthy, William Herbert 
Clemens, Melvin S. 
Clendening, Virginia Gold 
Clifford, John Henry 
Cline. Charles Calvin 
Cline, Marian Jane 
Clipfel, Lucien C. 
Clovis, Catharine Rose 
Clovis, Virginia N. 
Clulo, Genevieve Bernice 
Clune, Natalie Marie 
Cobb, Donald Prentice 
Cobun, Dennis B. 
Cochran, Regina June 
Cochran, Virginia Miller 
Coffey, David Harold 
Coffey, James Austin 
Coffindaffer, Mary Lee 
Coffindaffer, Wade H. 
Coffman, Daniel Roy 
Coffman, Frank H. 



Littleton 

Fairmont 

Hollidays Cove 

Logan 

Kingwood 

Moundsville 

Huntington 

Chester 

West Alexander, Pa. 

Fairmont 

Morgantown 

Huntington 

Spencer 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Kingwood 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Fairmont 

Lui Cheng, China 

Masontown, Pa. 

Ansted 

Rivesville 

Hemlock 

Buckhannon 

Mill Creek 

Richwood 

Morgantown 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Fire Creek 

Fire Creek 

Clarksburg 

Bunker Hill 

Clarksburg 

Morgantown 

Grafton 

Duquesne, Pa. 

Hundred 

Hundred 

Morgantown 

Peekskill, N. T. 

Fairview 

Newburg 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Baden, Pa. 

Staunton, Va. 

Shinnston 

Clarksburg 

Lewisburg 

Clarksburg 



Sen., B. S. Ed. 

Jun., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Soph., B. S. M. E. 

Jun., A B. 

Grad., Education 

Sen., B. S. H. E. 

Fr., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Soph., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Soph., B. S. E. E. 

Soph., B. S. Ch. E. 

Spec, Grad. 

Sen., B. S. Ed. 

Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Grad., Horticulture 

Fr., B. S. M. E. 

Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Fr., B. S. H. E. 

Fr,, A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Jun., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Grad., Mining 

Soph., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. Ch. E. 

Grad., Education 

Spec, Grad. 

Soph., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Soph., B. S. E. E. 

Jun., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Spec, Grad. 

Jun., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. H. E. 

2nd Yr. Law 

Fr., A. B. 

Soph., B. S. H E. 

Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Sen., B. S. H. E. 

Soph., A. B. 

Grad., Botany 

Fr., B. S. H. E. 

Soph., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Spes., Grad. 

1st Yr. Med. 

Sen., B. S. Agr. 

Fr., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Grad., Education 

Sen., A. B. 



376 



Students Enrolled, 1932-1933 



Coffroth, Olive Woodburn 
Cohen, Julius 
Cohen, Leon 
Cohen, Sylvia 
Colabrese, Felix Anthony 
Colborn, Ralph Humphrey 
Cole, Dale V. 
Cole, Donald Elliott 
Cole, Elsie B. 
Cole, Evelyn Frances 
Cole, Melissa Elizabeth 
Cole. Walter Wilson 
Colebank, Albert Deahl 
Colebank, Harry George 
Coleman, Elenore Louise 
Coleman, James Howard, Jr. 
Collett, Vivienne Eugenie 
Collins, Edmund E. 
Collins, Floyd Guy 
Collins, James M. 
Compton, Ulla Zoe 
Comuntzis, Peter George 
Comuntzis, Trula Georgia 
Conant, Roger Bradbury 
Conaway, Charles Cameron 
Conaway, Edmund Macaulay 
Conaway, Ernest Daniel 
Condry, John Charles 
Condry, Margaret Cecelia 
Conn, Howard F. 
Conn, John Byron 
Conn, Mary Virginia 
Conn, Robert Carland 
Connell, Patrick Mullen 
Connell, Robert E. 
Connell, William Cline 
Conner, Bernard Granvel 
Conner, Fay 
Conner, Myrtle Ida 
Connor, Charles William, Jr. 
Conway, Charles Hughston 
Conway, Delbert Henry 
Cook, C. Norman 
Cook, Chalmer Glen 
Cook, John Robb 
Cook, Kermit A. 
Cook, O. Noel 
Cooke, Harry Wilbert 
Cooke, Johnsie Sue 
Cookman, Margaret A. 
Coombs, Fred M. 
Cooper, Ernestine 
Cooper, Kent Barnett 
Cooper. Martin Luther 
Cope, David Franklin 
Cope, Edwin M. 
Copeman, James Lawrence 
Coplin, Robert Wade 



Moundsville 

Morgantown 

Trenton, N. J. 

Morgantown 

Albert 

Alma 

Farmington 

Philippi 

Morgan lown 

Bridgeport 

Elkins 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Charleston 

Farmington 

Morgantown 

Mona 

Morgantown 

Fairmont 

Keyser 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Board Tree 

Mannington 

Clarksburg 

Clarksburg 

Smithfield, Pa. 

Point Marion, Pa. 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Clarksburg 

New Cumberland 

Charleston 

Morgantown 

Glen Dale 

Nellis 

Webster Springs 

Morgantown 

Ramage 

McMechen 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Oceana 

Pineville 

Charleston 

Lost Creek 

Morgantown 

McComas 

Parkersburg 

Davis 

Crumpler 

Morgantown 

Kingwood 

Elizabeth 



Grad., Education 

1st Yr. Law 

Soph., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Sen., B. S. E. E. 

Grad, English 

Sen., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Grad., Home Econ. Ed. 

Sen., B. S. Ed. 

Jun., B. S. Ch. E. 

Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Spec, Grad. 

Sen., A. B. 

3rd Yr. Law 

Fr., A. B. 

Grad., Chemistry 

Soph., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Fr., A. B. 

Sen., B. S. Ed. 

Jun., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. Ch. E. 

Soph., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. H. E. 

Sen., B. S. Agr. 

Grad., Chemistry 

Grad., Education 

Grad., Chemistry 

Sen., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. E. E. 

G'-ad., Education 

Sen., A. B. 

Soph., B. S. E. M. 

Grad., History 

Sen., B. S. Ed. 

Jun., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. Agr. 

Soph., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Sen., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Grad., English 

Sen., B. S. H. E. 

Sen., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Soph., A. B. 

Sen., B. S. Ch. E. 

Soph., B. S. E. E. 

Sen., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Sen., B. S. Agr. 

Soph., A. B. 



List of Students 



377 



Coram, James M. 
Corbin, Darst 
Corbitt, Richard Wylie 
Corder, Edward M. Wood 
Cordray, Edward B. 
Cordray, Harry N. 
Core, Ernest B. 
Corker, Buster B. 
Cormany, Marguerite Stroup 
Cormany, "William John Benjamin 
Cosner, Alice Mae 
Costanzo, Vincent A. 
Cotrel, Joseph Charles 
Cottle, William L., Jr. 
Cottrell, James R. 
Cottrell, Mary Elizabeth 
Counts, Elizabeth Ellen 
Covert, Margaret Von 
Covey, Thomas 
Cox, Frank Gilmore 
Cox, Hugh Forrest 
Cox, M. Evelyn 
Cox, Marie Frances 
Cox, Paul Kester 
Cox, Wilbur Edwin 
Coyner, Lois Ligon 
Cozad, Florence Elizabeth 
Cozart, Phyllis Loretta 
Cracraft, Russell Hubbard 
Crago, Felix Hughes 
Crago, William Russell 
Craig, Katherine Speights 
Craig, Louis G. 
Craig, Robert Eugene 
Cramer, Kathryn V. 
Cramer, Robb H. 
Crane, Dwight 
Crawford, Alice 
Crawford, Charles Henry 
Crawford, Gene 
Crawford, Ronald E. 
Creel, Robert Beckley 
Cresce, Joe 

Crichton, Andrew Beachly, Jr. 
Crickenberger, Du Boia 
Crigler, Edgar 
Crislip, Colvert Rudolph 
Crist, Julian Gardner 
Cromer, Viris W. 
Crooks, Sarah Ruth 
Cropp, Hosmer Hyer 
Cross, Margaret 
Cross, William Robert 
Crow, Howard Burdette 
Crow, James Homer 
Crow, Margarette Francis 
Crow, Roberta H. 
Crowther, James Irving 



Saint Marys 

Morgantown 

l';ukersburg 

Philippi 

Morgantown 

Core 

.Morgantown 

Hinton 

Stotesbury 

Stotesbury 

Blaine 

Wheeling 

Farniington 

Mount Hope 

Charleston 

Charleston 

Lewisburg 

Cameron 

Surveyor 

Morgantown 

Junior 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Pullman 

Charleston 

Clover Lick 

West Alexander, Pa 

Smithfield 

Wheeling 

Wheeling 

Hollidays Cove 

Morristown, Tenn. 

Weston 

Richwood 

Morgantown 

New Cumberland 

Harrisville 

Morgantown 

Tiltonville, Ohio 

Morgantown 

Bethany 

Morgantown 

Tamroy 

Johnstown, Pa. 

Nitro 

Franklin 

Weston 

Clarksburg 

Haywood 

Clarion, Pa. 

Clarksburg 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Moundsville 

Dallas 

Point Marion, Pa. 

Point Marion, Pa. 

Baltimore, Md. 



2nd Yr, Med. 

.Tun., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Sen., B. S. Ch. E. 

Spec, Grad. 

Soph., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Soph., B. S. E. E. 

Soph.. B. Mus. 

Grad., Education 

Soph., B. S. H. E. 

Sen., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Grad., Civil Eng'g. 

Fr., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. Phvs. Ed. 

Jun., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Fr. ; A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. Ed. 

Fr., A. B. 

sen., B. S. H. E. 

Grad., English 

Summer School 

Jun., A. B. 

2nd Yr. Med. 

Fr., A. B. 

Spec, Grad. 

1st Yr. Law 

Soph., B. S. C. E. 

Sen., B. S. Ed. 

Sen., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Summer School 

Jun., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Soph., B. S. M. E. 

Fr., B. S. Ch. E. 

Sen, B. S. E. M. 

Sen., B. S. Jnd. Ed. 

Fr., A. B. 

Soph., B. S. Ind. Ed. 

Jun.. A. B. 

Grad., Mathematics 

Sen., B. S. Ed. 

Fr., A. B. 

Sen., B. S. H. E. 

Fr., B. S. C. E. 

Jun., B. S. Agr. 

Spec, Grad. 

Sen., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Soph.. B. S. C. E. 



378 



Students Enrolled, 1932-1933 



Crozier, Dan M. 

Cruikshank, Dwight Phelph, Jr. 

Crynock, Susan E. 

Crystal, Bessie K. 

Cubbon, Edward H. 

Cubbon, George 

Cullinan, Mary Agnes 

Cummings, Carl Paul 

Cunninghamm, Charles E. f Jr. 

Cunningham, Eleanor Josephine 

Cunningham, Joann Ross 

Cunningham, Paul Wilson 

Cunningham, Pauline Jane 

Cuppett, David Earle, Jr. 

Cuppett, Reardon Stuart 

Currence, Richard F. 

Currence, Robert L>. 

Current, Wilbur Russell 

Currie, Francis 

Currie, Thomas 

Curry, Edward Dale 

Custer, Ruhl L. 

Dacono, Gerardo y Marino 

Dadisman, Stanley Everett 

Dahmer, Floyd Johnson 

Dailey, Earl Leora 

Dailey, Evelyn Booker 

Danenberg, Esther 

Daniels, Andrew W. 

Danielson, Gonell 

Darnallfi Herbert Llewellyn 

Darnall, Rose Catherine 

Darrah, James Edward 

Dastoli, Theodore 

Daugherty, Elizabeth Thomas 

Davenport, Elizabeth 

Davidse, Joseph C. 

Davis, Edna Leona 

Davis, Elmo Kase 

Davis, Eloise 

Davis, Francis Sidney 

Davis, George William 

Davis, Gladyce Gwendolynn 

Davis, James Frederick 

Davis, John Morrow 

Davis, Mary Margaret 

Davis, Paul F. 

Davis, Rebecca Lucille 

Davis, Samuel Morris 

Davis, Scott Homer 

Davis, Tyreeca Stemple 

Davis, William Edgar, Jr. 

Davisson, Arthur Paul 

Davisson, Claude R. 

Davisson, John Granville 

Dawson, Archie Anthony 

Dawson, John Russell 

Day, Franklin Kaercher, Jr. 



Matoaka 


Fr. ( A. B. 


Lumberport 


Fr., A. B. 


Pursglove 


Soph., A. B. 


Fairmont 


Grad., History 


Shinnston 


Grad., Education 


Shinnston 


Soph., B. S. Phys. Ed. 


Dean 


Grad., Education 


Kingwood 


Grad., English 


Morgantown 


Soph., A. B. 


Morgantown 


Fr., A. B. 


Fairmont 


Soph., A. B. 


Clarksburg 


Fr., B. S. C. E. 


Marlinton 


Soph., A. B. 


Thomas 


2nd Yr. Law 


Thomas 


Grad., History 


Clarksburg 


2nd Yr. Law 


Bulltown 


Soph., B. S. Ch. E. 


Huntington 


Grad., Education 


Sabraton 


Soph., B. S. Ch. E. 


Sabraton 


Soph., A. B. 


Fairmont 


Fr., B. S. Agr. 


Weirton 


Grad., Education 


Labrador, P. I. 


Soph., B. S. Agr. 


Belington 


2nd Yr. Law 


Kline 


Grad., History 


Morgantown 


Grad., Education 


Uniontown, Pa. 


Sen., B. S. Ed. 


Wheeling 


Fr., A. B. 


Coalton 


Grad., History 


J amesto wn, N. Y. 


Sen., A. B. 


Mount Hope 


1st Yr. Law 


Mount Hope 


Fr., A. B. 


Fairmont 


Jun., B. S. E. E. 


Lowellville, Ohio 


Soph., B. S. C. E. 


Fayetteville 


Fr., A. B. 


Ranson 


Jun., A. B. 


Wheeling 


1st Yr. Med. 


Morgantown 


Soph., A. B. 


Parkersburg 


Fr., B. S. Agr. 


De Kalb 


Soph., A. B. 


Rainelle 


3rd Yr. Law 


Kingwood 


Soph., B. S. E. M. 


Maidsville 


Fr., A. B. 


Rowlesburg 


Grad., Education 


New Cumberland 


Sen., A. B. 


Morgantown 


Soph., A. B. 


Middlebourne 


Grad., Education 


Terra Alta 


Jun., A. B. 


Lost Creek 


Jun., B. S. Agr. 


Wadestown 


Grad., History 


Morgantown 


Spec, Grad. 


Fairmont 


Fr., A. B. 


Fairmont 


Grad., Zoology 


Mount Claire 


1st Yr. Med. 


Weston 


Jun., A. B. 


Morgantown 


Jun., B. S. E. E. 


Fairmont 


Grad., Education 


Webster Springs 


3rd Yr. Law 



List of Students 



379 



Day, Ralph Homer 

Day, William J. 

Dayton, Ervin Leslie 

Deahl, Henry George 

Deahl, Marion Henry 

Deahl, Martha Kline 

Dean, A. Bernard 

Dean, Alice E. 

Dean, Hoyt 

Dean, William Howard 

Deane, Harold Wilson 

De Angelis, Eugene 

Dearien, Katherine E. 

Dearing, Edward Newton, Jr. 

Dearman, Austin Ellery 

De Baugh, John Folk 

De Bell, John Daniel 

De Berry, Max 

De Blasio, Gene Ronald 

Deems, George Clair 

Deitrick, Frank Walton 

Deitz, Edna Marie 

Deitz, Jean E. E. 

De Lancey, Lessie 

De Lancy, Charles John 

De Lancy, Frances Priscilla 

Delaney, John Joseph, Jr. 

De Lung, Harry 

De Marco, Frank 

De Marco, Rosario Frank 

De Meester, Lucienne 

Dennison, Icy Katherine 

Dent, Charles F. 

Dent, Emma L. 

Dent, Ruth Vivian 

De Paolis, Louis 

Derenge, Lawrence F. 

De Renzo, Anthony 

Detch, John Lewis 

De Turk, Harry Martin 

Deusenberry, Eugene 

Dever, George Bayley, Jr. 

Devore, Helen May 

Devore, Leland Swarts, Jr. 

Dexter, Cordelia Jeanette 

Diamond, Oscar Kantor 

Dice, John Mooman 

Dickenson, Paul Harold 

Dickerson, Leon A. 

Dickinson, Emily Claire 

Dickinson, Mary Althea 

Dill, Mary Eleanor 

Dillaman, Roy 

Dillon, Charles Kensey 

Dillon, David Reynolds 

Dillon, Howard S. 

Di Maria, Antonio Petrillo 

Dionis, Nick 



Clarksville, Pa. 

New Martinsville 

Keyser 

Morgantown 

Davis 

Morgantown 

Buckhannon 

Grafton 

Richwood 

Martinsburg 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Saint Albans 

Clarksburg 

Reedy 

Martinsburg 

Maiden 

Harrisville 

Connellsville, Pa. 

Newell 

Clarksburg 

Ronceverte 

Ronceverte 

Pennsboro 

Jefferson, Pa. 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Hinton 

Fairmont 

Fairmont 

Clarksburg 

Walkersville 

Kingwood 

Parkersburg 

Wheeling 

Uniontown, Pa. 

Fairmont 

Fairmont 

Rivesville 

Fairmont 

Morgantown 

Victor 

Parkersburg 

Wheeling 

Fairmont 

New York, N. Y. 

Franklin 

Clarksburg 

Scarbro 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Reedsville 

Smithfield 

Mount Pleasant, Pa. 

Martinsburg 

Bridgeport 

Clarksburg 

Weirton 



Sen., A. B. 

Fr. A. B. 

Grad., Economics 

Grad., Education 

Grad., Education 

Grad., Education 

Summer School 

Sen., A. B. 

Soph., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Sen., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. E. E. 

Grad., Education 

Fr., B. S. Agr. 

Fr., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Soph., A. B. 

Sen., B. S. Agr. 

Fr., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Jun.. B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Grad., E. E. 

Grad., Pol. Sc. 

Fr., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

2nd Yr. Law 

Fr., B. S. H. E. 

Grad., Education 

4th Yr. Pharm. 

1st Yr. Law 

2nd Yr. Pharm. 

Fr., B. S. E. E. 

Soph., B. S. C. E. 

Jun., B. S. M. E. 

1st Yr. Law 

Sen., B. S. Ind. Ed. 

Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Sen., B. S. Agr 

Jun., B. Mus. 

Fr., B. S. M. E. 

Jun., A. B. 

1st Yr. Med. 

Grad., Botany 

Grad., Education 

2nd Yr. Med. 

Fr., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Grad., Zoology 

Sen., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Grad., Chemistry 

Jun., A. B. 



380 



Students Enrolled, 1932-1933 



Doak, Virginia Katherine 

Dobbins, Porter F. 

Dobbins, Samuel Herman 

Dobbs, Lee Fillmore 

Dodge, Dwight A. 

Dodson, Dorothy Annette 

Dolinsky, Edward Milton 

Doll, William Edgar 

Dollison, Charles B. 

Doman, Eleanor Lynn 

Doman, Nellie Hazel 

Doman, Roy Alfred 

Donahue, Sarah June 

Donaldson, Frank Parfltt 

Doner, Harry W. 

Donley, Beatrice Eleanor 

Donley, Richard Harmon 

Doolittle, Mary Louise 

Dorr, Irene 

Dorr, John T. 

Dorsey, Ervin 

Dorsey, Lloyd Elmer 

Dorsey, Mary Merle 

Dotson, M. Avery 

Dougherty, Marie F. 

Dougherty, Virginia A. 

Doughty, Joseph Bayne 

Doughty, Ducile Buchanan 

Doughty, Thomas Paramour, Jr. 

Douglass, John Bence 

Douglass, Lottie Jane 

Douthat, James Robert 

Douthat, Mary Elizabeth 

Douthat, Robert 

Dower, Louise 

Dowler, Betty Gertrude 

Dowler, Edwin A. 

Downing, Reginald Horton 

Downs, James Albright 

Downs, William Richard 

Doyle, John Edward 

Dragoo, Alma Irene 

Drinkard, Paul Banford 

Drobeck, Morris James 

Du Bois, Martha Violet 

Duda, William Walter 

Duddington, Emogene 

Duffield, Carper Paul 

Duffield, Charles Allen 

Duffy, Virginia 

Dulaney, Nellie Elizabeth 

Duling, Charles Wesley 

Duncan, Ira Jeriah 

Dunn, Charles 

Duval, Edna Harding 

Duvall, Eleanor Louise 

Dye, Winifred 

Dyer, Jasper Streit 



Morgantown 

Chapmanville 

Wheeling 

Wheeling 

Tera Alta 

Charleston 

Charleston 

Grafton 

Fairmont 

Cameron 

Cameron 

Cameron 

Raysal 

Morgantown 

Mill Creek 

Morgantown 

Mount Morris, Pa. 

Fairmont 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Moundsville 

Thomas 

Fennsboro 

Smithfield, Pa. 

Morgantown 

Ronceverte 

Ronceverte 

Ronceverte 

Hinton 

Smithburg 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Bluefield 

Point Pleasant 

Wheeling 

Moundsville 

Montreal, Canada 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Greenwood 

Smithfield 

Wheeling 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Scarbro 

New Martinsville 

Sutton 

Sutton 

Fairmont 

Uniontown, Pa. 

Blue Sulphur Sp'gs. 

Morgantown 

Edwardsville, Pa. 

Wheeling 

Claysville, Pa. 

Elkins 

Fort Seybert 



Spec, Grad. 
Summer School 
Fr., A. B. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Jun., B. S. Ch. E. 
Summer School 
Fr., A. B. 
Sen., A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
Jun., B. S. Ed. 
Jun., B. S. Ed. 
Soph., B. S. C. E. 
Soph., A. B. 
Spec, A. & S. 
Sen., B. S. Ed. 
Sen., B. Mus. 
Fr., A. B. 
Jun., B. S. H. E. 
Sen., A. B. 
2nd Yr. Law 
Grad., Education 
Jun., A. B. 
Jun., A. B. 
Grad., Education 
Sen., A. B. 
Summer School 
Jun., A. B. 
Spec, Grad. 
Jun., A. B. 
Sen., B. S. C. E. 
Sen., B. S. H. E. 
Jun., B. Mus. 
Soph, A. B. 
Soph., B. S. Phys. E< 
Soph., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Soph., B. S. E. E. 
Grad., Mathematics 
Fr., B. S. M. E. 
Jun., A. B. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Sen., A. B. 
Fr., B. S. M. E. 
Sen., B. S. Phys. Ed. 
Sen., B. S. Ed. 
Jun.. A. B. 
Grad., French 
Soph., A. B. 
3rd Yr. Law 
Fr., A. B. 
Sen., B. S. H. E. 
Grad., Education 
Grad., Agr. Chem. 
Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 
Fr., A. B. 
Summer School 
Summer School 
Grad., History 



List of Students 



381 



Eagle, Harold Bentley 
Eary, Gladys 
Easley, John White 
Easton, Wiliam Reese 
Eaton, Alma Grace 
Eberhart, Guy Fast 
Eberle, Fred Wilson 
Echols, Emma Hamilton 
Eckert, Julia Pauline 
Eddy, Alice Boyer 
Eddy, Donald Jerome 
Eddy, Hilda Jane 
Edeburn, Eugene Jurrardus 
Edgar, Ann Davis 
Edgar, Justin King 
Edgell, Jacob Henry 
Edmondson, Richard Edward 
Edwards, Donald Graham 
Edwards, Dorothy Pearl 
Edwards. Elizabeth Ellen 
Edwards, George Dewey 
Edwards, Herbert Frederick 
Edwards, Laurens Frank 
Eib, Irene Eleanor 
Ekman, Fanny Vickers 
Elder, Clemma Irvin 
Elkin, James Elwell 
Elliott, Cleon Edward 
Elliott, Crystal Evelyn 
Elliott, John Walter 
Ellis, Clifford L. 
Ellis, Helen Meade 
Ellison, Harriet Petrie 
Elmore, Earle Looney 
Elmore, Gene Francis 
Embrey, Bruce Mac Donald 
Emerson, Roy Wade 
Endsley, Alexandra Tait 
England, Marjorie Elizabeth 
Engle, Earl Dancing 
Engstrom, Charles G. 
Eppstein, Stanley M. 
Erb, Paul Edward 
Erd, Theodora 
Ernest, Ruth Gantt 
Eskey, Charles Wesley 
Eskins, Harold Eugene 
Espada, Felix Angel 
Estlack, Goldie Pearl 
Eubank, Mildred Olevia 
Evangelista, Joseph John 
Evans, Davis Warden 
Evans, Elizabeth Ann 
Evans, Eugene Everly 
Evans, Eugene Reese 
Evans, George Thomas 
Evans, Helen Kay 
Evans, Thomas Jackson 



Hinton 

Fayetteville 

Charleston 

Romney 

Morgantown 

New Geneva, Pa. 

Glenville 

Alderson 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Pieice 

Marlinton 

New Martinsville 

Charles Town 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Grantsville 

Welch 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Charleston 

Elkins 

Morgantown 

West Union 

Morgantown 

Charles Town 

Oakland. Md. 

Waynesburg 

West Milford 

Hedgesville 

Greenville 

Tariff 

Tariff 

Fairmont 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Charleston 

Clendenin 

Wheeling 

Fairmont 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Belington 

Charleston 

Charleston 

San Juan, P. R. 

Wallace 

Gary 

Belleville, N. J. 

Grafton 

Ansted 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Fairmont 

Morgantown 

Bloomsburg, Pa. 



Fr., A. B. 
Grad., English 
Soph., A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
Spec, Grad. 
Summer School 
Grad., Economics 
Sen., B. S. H. E. 
Soph., A. B. 
Spec, Grad. 
Sen., A. B. 
Jun., B. S. Ed. 
Fr., B. S. Agr. 
Soph., A. B. 
I sr Yr. Pharm. 
Jun., B. S. M. E. 
Sen., A. B. 
3rd Yr. Law 
Sen., B. S. Phys. Ed. 
Sen., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
Sen.. B. S. Ed. 
Grad., English 
Spec, Grad. 
Grad., Education 
Jun., B. S. Ch. E. 
Sen., B. S. Ed. 
Soph., A. B. 
Spec. Grad. 
Fr., B. S. C. E. 
Summer School 
Soph., B. S. H. E. 
Grad., Chemistry 
Soph., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
Jun., A. B. 
Jun., B. S. H. E. 
Sen., B. S. E. E. 
Spec, A. & S. 
Jun., A- B. 
1st Tr Law 
Jun., B. S. H. E. 
Fr.. B. S. Phys. Ed. 
Fr, A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 
Fr., B. S. H. E. 
Grad., English 
Fr., A. B. 
Soph., B. Mus. 
Jun., A. B. 
Grad., Education 
1st Yr. Med. 
Jun., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Sen., A. B. 



382 



Students Enrolled, 1932-1933 



Everhart, Frank Brown 
Everley, Pearl Blanch 
Everly, Madalene B. 
Evick, Louise Elizabeth 
Ewing, Merle 
Ewing, Wanda Marie 
Ewing, Wilma Jane 
Exley, Ben 

Fadeley, Carl Richard 
Fagerlund, Arthur Carl 
Fahey, William Thomas 
Fairfield, Rilla Louise 
Falbo, Edna Antionette 
Falck, Edgar Lloyd 
Fallon, Neil Joyce 
Farland, Joseph Simpson 
Farley, Palmer 
Farmer, Guy Otto 
Farr, Paul Douglass 
Farrell, Wray Gordon 
Fasick, Ralph Nelson 
Feaster, Eston Kermit 
Federer, George Andrew, Jr. 
Feingold, Myer M. 
Ferguson, Florna Cameo 
Ferra'ra, Lola Mary 
Ferrara, Louis 
Ferrell, Kista 
Ferris, John Thomas 
Fetty, Edith Phoebe 
Fetty, Isaac Nicholas 
Fetty, Lulu Mary 
Fetty, Mildred Agnes 
Fiandaca, Patsy Marion 
Fidler, Frank Henry, Jr. 
Fidler, Kester Farnsworth 
Fidler, Louis 
Field, George Frank 
Field, Lucy Frances 
Fife, Sallie Conner 
Fike, Mildred Savilla 
Files, Ralph Brimlow 
Findlay, Avice Bernita 
Findley, Harry Lawson 
Finger, Ben Sardon, Jr. 
Finlay, Julia 
Finn, Freida Sylvia 
Finn, Minna Rosalyn 
Fischer, Marjorie 
Fishbach, Mary Ellen 
Fisher, Carl Rush 
Fisher, Earl Lloyd 
Fisher, Edgar Maxwell 
Fisher, Eloise 
Fisher, Frances Gertrude 
Fisher, Hobart Hokil 
Fisher, John Joseph 
Fisher, Robert Martin 



Terra Alta 

Masontown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Wheeling 

Parkersburg 

Morgantown 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Everettsville 

Wheeling 

Omar 

Clarksburg 

Beckley 

Maybeury 

Charleston 

Morgantown 

Renick 

Maysville 

Morgantown 

Wheeling 

Montrose 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Seth 

Moundsville 

Core 

Core 

Morgantown 

Clarksburg 

Mount Pleasant, 

Tioga 

Salem 

Ashland, Ky. 

Kingwood 

Charleston 

Buffalo 

Nutter Fort 

Martinsburg 

Clarksburg 

Flemington 

Fairmont 

Glen Ferris 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Glenville 

Gassaway 

Gassaway 

Sabraton 

Walton 

Sutton 

Pocataligo 

Ben wood 

McMechen 



Jun., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Jun., B. S. Ed. 
Sen., B. Mus. 
Soph., B. S. Phys. Ed. 
Sen, B. S. H. E. 
Sen., B. S. Ed. 
4th Yr. Pharm. 
Fr., A. B. 
Fr., B. S. M. E. 
2nd Yr. Law 
Spec, A. & S. 
Fr., A. B. 
Jun., B. S. Ch. E. 
Fr., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Sen., A. B. 
Jun., A. B. 
2nd Yr. Law 
Soph., B. S. C. E. 
Grad., English 
Jun., A. B. 
Grad., Education 
Jun., A. B. 
Sen., B. S. Ed. 
Sen., B. S. H. E. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Soph., B. S. H. E. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Fr., B. S. H. E. 
Soph., B. S. Agr. 
Spec, A. & S. 
Soph., A. B. 
Pa. Soph., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. M. E. 

Grad., Education 

Soph., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Jun., A. B. 

Grad., English 

Grad., English 

Sen., B. S. Ed. 

Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Sen., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Fr., A. B. 

Jun , B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Soph., B. S. H. E. 

Sen., B. Mus. 

Fr., B. S. E. E. 

2nd Yr. Med. 

Jun., B. S. Ind. Ed. 

Sen., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

2nd Yr. Md. 

Spec, Grad. 

Fr., B. S. Ch. E. 



List of Students 



383 



Fisher, Stanley Robert 
Fisher, William Dodson 
Fisher, William Emerson 
Fitzgerald, Marie Bernece 
Fizer, Elmer Parsons 
Fizer, Homer 
Flanagan, Bertha Marie 
Fleck, Ray Vincent 
Fleenor, Joseph Blankenship 
Fleming, Caroline 
Fleming, Carrie Kathryn 
Fleming, Harold Downs 
Fleming, Howard Earl 
Flenniken, James McGrew 
Fleshman, Mary lone 
Flowers, Rose Marie 
Ford, Charles Sterrett 
Ford, Frederick Wayne 
Ford, Pearl Michels 
Foresman, David Brown 
Foresman, Henry Melich 
Forman, Irene Mae 
Forman, John Emery 
Forman, Theodore McClellan 
Forman, William Bayard 
Forse, Idabel 
Fortney, Ann 
Fortney, Carl Roy 
Fortney, Elihu L 
Fortney, Jerald Byrum 
Fortney, Jessie 
Fortney, Page 
Fossa, Albert 
Foster, Carson Mead 
Founds, Clarence Melvin 
Fout, Howard Lee 
Fox, Amanda J. 
Fox, Downey Harold 
Fox, George M. 
Fox, Irvin Franklin 
Fox, Martha Pearle 
Fox, Nelson Henry 
Fox, Oma Virginia 
Fox, Sarah Fredericks. 
Frame, Robert Nat 
Frame, Silas William 
Frank, Harry Charles 
Franklin, Elizabeth Jane 
Franssen, Marie Sonja 
Frantz, Howard Welfley 
Frantz, Katherine Helen 
Frantz, Marian Browning 
Frantz, Richard Alden 
Franz, Gerrard Albert 
Fraser, Alma Mae 
Frasure, Louise Durham 
Freeman, Maurice Monroe 
French, David Garfield 



Morgantown 
Grafton 
Sissonville 
Mount Morris, Pa. 
Morgantown 
Morgantown 
Shirley 
Morgantown 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
Fairmont 
Grafton 
Gassaway 
Charleston 
Morgantown 
Walton 
Clarksburg 
Charleston 
Dunbar 
Morgantown 
Montcoal 
Montcoal 
Morgantown 
Morgantown 
Morgantown. 
Liumberport 
Beech Bottom 
Charleston 
Thomas 
Xewburg 
Reedsville 
Charleston 
Charleston 
Providence, R. I. 
Seth 

New Martinsville 
Montgomery 
Wheeling 

Mount Morris, Pa, 
Pine Grove 
Wheeling 
Mount Morris, Pa. 
Wheeling 
Gilbert 
Morgantown 
Morgantown 
Morgantown 
Charleston 
Point Pleasant 
Morgantown 
Confluence, Pa, 
Red Star 
Fairmont 
Red Star 
Clarksburg 
Ethel 

Morgantown 
Parsons 
Morgantown 



Spec, Grad. 

2nd Yr. Pharm. 

Ft., B. S. Agr. 

Spec, Music 

Jun., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Sen., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Grad., Education 

Jun., A. B. 

Grad., English 

Grad., Education 

Sen., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. Ch. E. 

2nd Yr. Daw 

Grad., Education 

Soph., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Fr., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Soph., B. S. E. E. 

Jun., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Sen., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. Ch. E. 

Soph., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. C. E. 

Jun., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Spec, A. & S. 

Spec, Home Ecoomics 

Fr., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. Agr. 

Spec, Music 

Jun., B. S. Agr. 

Jun., B. S. Ed. 

Jun., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

1st Yr., Pharm. 

Spec, Grad. 

Spec, A. & S. 

Fr., B. S. Agr. 

Sen., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Soph., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed 

Soph, A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Spec, Grad. 

Grad., Education 

Soph., A. B. 



384 



Students Enrolled, 1932-1933 



French, Millard Filmore 
Frey, Lawrence William 
Friedel, John Edward 
Friedman, Louis Bernard 
Friend, Gladys Gaye 
Friend, Leota Lisbeth 
Friend, Lloyd Lowndes, Jr. 
Fromer, David Irwin 
Fromme, Jean Louise 
Front, Charles 
Frost, Jean Emily 
Frye, Maxie 
Fueg, John William 
Fulks, Paul 
Fulton, Pearl Lillian 
Fultz, Daisy Eleanor 
Funk, Durward Rose 
Funt, Morris Sidney 
Furbee, Kenneth Dameron 
Furbee, Louise Shoup 
Furbee, Martha Virginia 
Furbee, Sarah Martha 
Furlong, Edward Colson 
Gall, James Charles 
Gadd, William Aaron 
Gainer, James Vincent 
Gainer, Walter Paul 
Gallagher, Mary Virginia 
Gallin, Herman 
Gallo, John 
Galperin, Samuel E. 
Galpin, Sidney Stewart 
Gamble, Floy 
Gandee, Roy Edison 
Garcia, Charles Todd 
Gardner, Howard Gus 
Gardner, Willis C. 
Garletts, Marguerite 
Garner, Mary Lorentz 
Garner, Mildred Mabel 
Garner, Nancy Eleanor 
Garner, Woodrow 
Garrett, Henry Lee 
Garrett, Wiley Scott 
Garrison, Paul Johnston 
Garrison, William McKinley 
Garvin, Wilda Anne 
Gaskins, Charles 
Gaston. James Harry 
Gates, Eleanor Elizabeth 
Gaudino, Domenick 
Gay, Julius Maywood 
Gaydosh, Anne Therese 
Gaydosh, Marie Julia 
Gaydosh, Michael Andrew 
Geary, James Joseph 
Geddes, David Morrison 
Gedwillas, Barney 



Beckley 

Clarksburg 

Saint Clairsville, O. 

Martinsburg 

Dupont, Pa. 

Morgan town 

Morgantown 



2nd Yr. Law 
1 st Yr. Pharm. 
Soph., A. B. 

Jun.. A. B. 
1st Yr. Pharm. 
1st Yr. Pharm. 
Soph., B. S. Ch. E. 



East Norwalk, Conn.Sen., A. B. 



Morgantown 

Wheeling 

Keyser 

Davin 

Wheeling 

Weston 

Forest Hills, N. Y 

Fairmont 

Rowlesburg 

Clarksburg 

McMechen 

Clarksburg 

Mannington 

Clarksburg 

Morgantown 

Chattaroy 

New Salem, Pa. 

Tunnelton 

Morgantown 

Charleston 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Lor ado 

Charleston 

Morgantown 

New Martinsville 

Clendenin 

New York, N. Y. 

Charleston 

Blacksville 

Moi gantown 

Proctor 

Proctor 

Proctor 

Proctor 

Martinsburg 

Fairmont 

Morgantown 

Wayne 

Cunard 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Richwood 

Charleston 

Wheeling 

Wheeling 

Wheeling 

Alicia, Pa. 

Bellaire Park. N. 

Thomas 



Jun., A. B. 
1st Yr Med. 
Grad., Education 
Sen., A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Fr., B. Mus. 
Jun., B. S .Phys. Ed. 
Soph., B. S. Phys. Ed. 
1st Yr. Law 
(Trad., Education 
Jun., B. Mus. 
Sen.. B. S. Ed. 
Summer School 
Fr., B. S. Ch. E. 
Sen., B. S. Ch. E. 
Soph., B. S. Phys. Ed. 
Grad., Education 
Jun., B. S. Agr. 
Fr.. A. B. 

Soph., B. S. Phys. Ed. 
Fr., A. B. 
Jun.. A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Grad., English 
Sen., A. B. 
2nd Yr. Med. 
Fr., A. B. 
Jun., B. S. E. E. 
Jun., B. S. H. E. 
Fr., B. S. H. E. 
Grad., Home Econ. Ed. 
Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 
Fr., A. B. 
Sen., A. B. 
Grad., Sociology 
3rd Yr. Law 
Grad., Education 
Jun., A. B. 
Jun., B. S. Phys. Ed. 
Sen., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Fr., B. S. C. E. 
2nd Yr. Med. 
Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Fr., A. B. 
Y.Sen., A. B. 
Fr., Eng'g. 



List of Students 



385 



Gentilcore, Peter A. 
Gentilcore, Rose Raquel 
George, Tony Albert 
George, William Taylor, Jr. 
Geppert, William Henklng 
Geuting, Bernard George 
Geuting, George Henry 
Geyer, Hannah Virginia 
Gibbs, Harold Buckley 
Gibbud, Mervin Joshua, Jr. 
Gibson, Cramer Watson 
Gibson, Otis Leonard 
Gibson, Susie Elizabeth 
Gibson, Virginia Bess 
Gidley, Alice June 
Gidley, Irma 
Giesey, Margaret Helen 
Giffin, James Vincent 
Gifford, William Encil 
Giglia, Rose Ann 
Gilbert, Eleanor Matilda 
Gilmore, John Thomas 
Gilmore, Sam Shaffer 
Giltner, Virginia Bartlett 
Glass, Gwyndolia 
Glass, William James, Jr. 
Glasscock, Paul Cordray 
Glassman, Danny 
Glisan, Helen Virginia 
Glover, Helen Kathleen 
Glover, Ira Russel 
Glover, Margaret Ann 
Goad, Sidney Eugene 
Gocke, Mary Frances 
Goddin, Elmer D. 
Goddin, Winnie Stalnaker 
Godley, Roy Walter 
Goetz, John Edwin 
Goff, William Hunter 
Golden, Evelyn 
Goldenberg, Abe 
Goldman, Morris Benjamin 
Goldsboro, Loretta Mae 
Goldsborough, Gladys Thomas 
Goldstein, Ruby Irene 
Gompers, Howard William 
Gonano, Katherine 
Gonder, Thomas A., Jr. 
Gonzalez, Juan 
Gonzalez, Maria Luisa 
Goodall, Frederic Clinton, Jr. 
Goodall, Mary Kathleen 
Goodman, Harold 
Goodman, Horace Littleberry 
Goodrich, Cecile Pearl 
Goodrich, Mary Jane 
Goodrich, William Lloyd 
Goodwin, Carl Vernon 



Uniontown, Pa. 

Uniontown, Pa. 

Benwood 

Philippi 

Clarksburg 

Hamburg, N. Y. 

Hamburg, N. Y. 

Martinsburg 

Fairmont 

New Haven, Conn. 

Kingwood 

Sissonville 

La viand 

Kingwood 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Wheeling 

Elm Grove 

Wallace 

Glen Jean 

Morgantown 

Wheeling 

Wheeling 

Parkersburg 

Sissonville 

Sissonville 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

West Union 

Littleton 

Fairchance, Pa. 

Clendenin 

Clarksburg 

Thomas 

Thomas 

'"ale, Arkansas 

Fairmont 

Burnt House 

Frenchton 

Parkersburg 

Charleston 

Clifton Mills 

Romney 

Morgantown 

Wheeling 

Pageton 

Oakland, Md. 

Aibonito, P. R. 

Aibonito, P. R. 

Bluefield 

Charleston 

New York, N. Y. 

Ronceverte 

Mount Morris, Pa. 

Mount Morris, Pa. 

Kingwood 

Grafton 



Summer School 
Sen., B. S. Ed. 
Fr., A. B. 
1st Yr. Law 
1st Yr. Law 
Soph., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Jun., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
1st Yr. Law 
Spec, Grad. 
Fr., A. B. 
Grad., Education 
Sen., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Sen., A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
Summer School 
Fr., B. S. Agr. 
Jun., B. S. Ed. 
Sen., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
1st Yr. Law 
Sen., B. S. Phys. Ed. 
Fr., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Jun., A. B. 
2nd Yr. Med. 
Soph., A. B. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Grad., Education 
Sen., B. S. H. E. 
3rd Yr. Law 
Soph., A. B. 
Grad., Education 
Spec, Grad. 
Grad., Animal Husb. 
Jun., B. S. Phys. Ed. 
2nd Yr. Med. 
Jun., B. S. H. E. 
Jun., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Fr., B. S. H. E. 
Sen., B. S. Phys. Ed. 
Fr., A. B. 
2nd Yr. Law 
Spec, Grad. 
Jun., A. B. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Jun., A. B. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Soph., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Jun., A. B. 
Jun., B. S. H. E. 
Soph., A. B. 
Soph., B. S. E. E. 



386 



Students Enrolled, 1932-1933 



Goodwin, Charles Ralph 
Goodwin, Evelyn 
Goodwin, Vera L. 
Gorby, John Henry 
Gordon, Evelyn Belle 
Gordon, Jerame Zollers 
Gordon, Samuel 
Gorrell, Chester Woodrow 
Gorrell, Elizabeth 
Gorsuch, Daisy M. 
Goshorn, John Lynn 
Gotard, William J. 
Gott, Julia 

Gottlieb, Sidney Leon 
Gouker, Roy Edward 
Gould, Thelma 
Gower, Elmer Biggs 
Grace, James Eugene 
Graham, Ben Irvin 
Graham, Glenda Faith 
Graham, Luther Boyd 
Graham, Paul Victor 
Grapel, Edward 
Gray, Paul Lorraine 
Greathouse, Eugene Vernon 
Greathouse, Lyla Gertrude 
Green, Evelyn Virginia 
Greenberg, Herbert 
Greenburg, Samson Martin 
Greene, Harry Horton 
Greene, Marie 
Greene, Robert Lee 
Greenlee, Grace Genevieve 
Greenlee, Leslie Eugenia 
Gregg, Charles Walter 
Gregg, Robert Aubrey 
Gregory, Catherine Elizabeth 
Gregory, Dolores Valinda 
Gregory, Harold D. 
Gribbin, John Francis 
Gribble, Llyod Raymond 
Griffin, Hubert D. 
Griffin, Loy Edgar 
Griffin, Regina Mary 
Griffith, Frances Lenore 
Griffith, John Edward 
Griffith, Stephen Douglas 
Grimal, Adolf 
Grimes, Jane Ellen 
Grimes, Robert Austin 
Grimm, Harper Granville 
Grimmett, Mary Catherine 
Grisinger, George Floyd 
Grogg, Evelyn Lee 
Grossman, Charles Bergill 
Grove, Percy Kermit 
Groves, Ancell Byron 
Groves, James Hiding 



Wheeling 
Cairo 

Morgantown 
New Martinsville 
Morgantown 
Morgantown 
Newark, N. J. 
Charleston 
Charleston 
Wheeling 
Charleston 
Wheeling 
Princeton 
Paterson, N. J. 
Dunbar, Pa. 
McClellandtown, Pa. 
Ridge ley 
Monessen, Pa. 
Fairmont 
Morgantown 
Summersville 
Hollidays Cove 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Cameron 
Flemington 
Flemington 
Morgantown 
Morgantown 
Wheeling 
Fairmont 
Weston 
Montcoal 
Charleston 
Charleston 
Morgantown 
Morgantown 
Follansbee 
Martinsburg 
Newell 
Rachel 
Morgantown 
Pisgah 
Wyatt 
Clarksburg 
Hambleton 
Fairmont 
Clarksburg 
Thomas 
Morgantown 
Fairmont 
Friendly 
Clarksburg 
Beckley 
Morgantown 
Charleston 
Charleston 
Winchester, Va. 
Sistersville 



Soph., B. S. Phys. Ed. 
Sen., A. B. 
Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 
Grad., Education 
Sen., A. B. 
1st Yr. Law 
Fr., A. B. 
Fr., B. S. M. E. 
Sen., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Fr., B. S. M. E. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Sen., A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
Summer School 
1st Yr. Law 
Jun., A. B. 
Jun., A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
2nd Yr. Med. 
Jun., A. B. 
Fr., B. S. M. E. 
Fr., A. B. 
Sen., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Grad., Education 
Sen., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Sen., B. S. H. E. 
Sen., B. S. Ed. 
Soph., A. B. 
Jun., A. B. 
Jun., A. B. 
Spec, Grad. 
Jun., B. S.« Ed. 
Fr., B. S. E. E. 
Grad., Zoology 
Jun., B. S. Ed. 
Jun., B. S. Ind. Ed. 
Fr., A. B. 
Summer School 
Sen., A. B. 
1st Yr. Law 
Soph., B. S. M. E. 
Jun., A. B. 
Grad., Education 
Sen., A. B. 
Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 
Fr., A. B. 
Sen., A. B. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Fr., A. B. 

Grad., Plant Pathology 
Sen., A. B. 



List of Students 



387 



Groves, Owen Allen 
Grow, James Foster 
Grow, Joseph George 
Grow, Lillian Irene 
Groza, John Alex 
Grubb, John Edward 
Grumbein, Mary Louise 
Gruner, Henry 
Gulentz, Amelia Beryl 
Gum, Beulah Mae 
Gunneau, Dorothy Elizabeth 
Gunnoe, George Hutchinson 
Gurtis, Belphine Geraldine 
Guseman, Freda Jane 
Gustkey, Harry Earl 
Guthrie, George Nye 
Guyer, Curtis 
Gwilliam, Minnie Ida 
Gwynn, Marsh Bennett 
Gwynn, Roy Verner 
Gwynne, Albert Calvin 
Gwynne, J. Howard 
Habig, John Howard 
Hacker, Tressie 
Haddad, Abraham A. 
Haddad, Louis Michael 
Haddock, George Henry 
Haden, Charles Harold 
Hagberg, Rudolph Eric 
Hager, Robert Arnold 
Haines, Ralph Wilson 
Hall, Adrian Hunter 
Hall, Frank 
Hall, Frank Vincent 
Hall, Ivan Wright 
Hall, James Frederick 
Hall, James Lester 
Hall, Jean Elizabeth 
Hall, Jesse Samuel 
Hall, Lawrence Wilbur 
Hall, Mildred L. 
Hall, Myra 
Hall, Nathan Isaac 
Hall, Paul William 
Hall, Roy Olney 
Hall, Stanley Roy 
Hall, William Darlington 
Hall, William Lloyd 
Haller, Eleanor Jean 
Haller, Morris Jacob 
Haller Nell 
Hamilton, Alice 
Hamilton, Frances 
Hamilton, Henry Alexander 
Hamilton, James Carroll 
Hamilton, Owen Stealey 
Hamilton, Towers William 
Hamilton, Walter Edwin 



Summersville 
Morgantown 
Parkersburg 
Clarksburg 



Sen., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Sen., B. S. Ed. 



Martins Ferry, OhioFr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Rowlesburg 4th Yr. Pharm. 

Morgantown Soph., A. B. 

Logan 1st Yr. Med. 

Philippi Sen., A. B. 

White Sulphur Sp'gs. Fr., A. B. 

Charleston Sen., B. S. H. E. 

Huntington Grad., History 

Morgantown Fr., A. B. 

Reedsville Soph., B. S. H. E. 

Independence Jun., A. B. 

Charleston Fr., A. B. 

White Sulphur Sp'gs. Fr., A. B. 



Sabraton 

Morgantown 

Mabscott 

Morgantown 

Carmichaels, Pa. 

Wheeling 

Weston 

Charleston 

Charleston 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Follansbee 

Weston 

Romney 

Morgantown 

Fairmont 

Buckhannon 

West Union 

Cheat Neck 

Fairmont 

Clay 

Fairmont 

Proctor 

Kingwood 

Morgantown 

Elkins 

Bridgeport 

Morgantown 

Hurst 

Elkins 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Elm Grov 

Hinton 

Rich wood 

Elkins 

Mannington 

Morgantown 

Norwalk, Conn. 

Morgantown 



Soph., A. B. 

Soph., B. S. E. E. 

Fr., B. S. Ind. Ed. 

Sen, B. S. Phys. Ed 

Fr., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Grad., English 

3rd Yr. Law 

Soph., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

3rd Yr. Law 

1st Yr. Law 

Soph., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. C. E. 

Grad., Education 

Grad., Zoology 

Jun., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. Agr. 

Grad., Chemistry 

Sen., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. E. E. 

Jun., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Sen., B. S. E. E. 

Jun., A. B. 

Grad., Pol. Sc. 

Grad., History 

Jun., B. S. E. E. 

Jun., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Jun., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. H. E. 

Fr., B. S. H. E. 

Grad., Education 

Fr., B. S. E. E. 

Sen., B. S. Agr. 

Jun., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 



388 



Students Enrolled, 1932-1933 



Hamilton, Wilson Page 
Hammer, Samuel Francis 
Hamrick, Morgan Tamblyn 
Hamstead, Elwood Obed 
Handler, John William 
Handlan, Bertha 
Haney, Katharine Ann 
Hanifan, Ella Louise 
Hanifan, Floyd R. 
Hannah, Electa 
Hannah, Laura 
Hannum, Kathryn Virginia 
Harahan, William 
Harbert, Bert Leslie 
Harbert, Jessie Irene 
Harbert, Richard Edward 
Harden, Anna Laura 
Harden, Florence Evelyn 
Hardman, Gwendolyn Mae 
Hardman, Russell Vernon 
Hare, Charles Edmond 
Hare, James Donald 
Harman, George Berlin 
Harman, Harry William 
Harman, Richard Lee 
Harman, Snyder S. 
Harney, Mary Virginia 
Harper, Charles Price 
Harper, Fay 
Harper, Hal Thomas 
Harper, Mildred Virginia 
Harper, Stelman 
Harr, Betty Brooks 
Harrick, Stephen 
Harris, Coleman John 
Harris, Earl Kenneth 
Harris, Elmore D. 
Harris, Ernie Wilson 
Harris, Georgine Ritland 
Harris, Lillian Adeline 
Harris, Ray Eldridge 
Harris, Stanley Robert 
Harrison, Charles Samuel 
Harrison, Frank Late 
Harrison, Paul William 
Harshberger, Delbert Willard 
Hart, Lyle Bruce 
Hart, William Tanquary 
Hartley, Carrie M. 
Hartley, Kathryn Virginia 
Hartman, Edwina Virginia 
Hartman, Jane 
Hartman, Mary Lou 
Hash, John Wythe 
Hastings, Lynn, Sr. 
Hastings, Lynn, Jr. 
Hatfield, Laura Bell 
Hatfield, Robert Chester 



Grantsville 

Greensburg, Pa. 

East Bank 

Morgantown 

Ellwood City, Pa. 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Williamson 

Williamson 

Morgantown 

Cass 

Levels 

East Orange, N. J. 

Folsom 

Lumberport 

Lumberport 

Glen Rogers 

Fairmont 

Spencer 

Kyger 

Morgantown 

Parkersburg 

Morgantown 

Harman 

New Martinsville 

Harman 

Wheeling 

Romney 

Buckhannon 

Spelter 

Spelter 

Harman 

Fairmont 

Morgantown 

Barboursville 

Little Birch 

Mannington 

Little Birch 

Morgantown 

Ellsworth, Pa. 

Little Birch 

Little Birch 

Clarksburg 

Weston 

Grafton 

Morgantown 

Nellis 

Clarksburg 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Kingwood 

Swissvale, Pa. 

Kingwood 

Elkhorn 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Gilbert 

Simon 



1st Yr. Med. 
2nd Yr. Med. 
Grad. History 
Fr., A. B. 
Soph., B. S. Ind. Ed. 
Grad., English 
Fr., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Grad., Education 
Summer School 
Jun., B. Mus. 
Jun., B. S. Ed. 
Fr., A. B. 
Spec, Grad. 
Soph., B. S. H. E. 
Grad., Agriculture 
Fr., A. B. 
Summer School 
Soph., A. B. 
Fr., B. S. Agr. 
Sen., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
4th Yr. Pharm. 
Fr., B. S. M. E. 
1st Yr. Pharm. 
Jun., B. S. Ed. 
Soph., A. B. 
Grad., Economics 
Grad., Zoology 
Fr., A. B. 
Grad., French 
Sen., B. S. Ed. 
Sen., A. B. 
Grad., Education 
Grad., Botany 
Sen., B. S. Ed. 
Sen., B. S. E. E. 
Sen., B. S. Ed. 
Spec, Grad. 
Jun., B. S. Phys. Ed. 
Grad., Botany 
Grad., Zoology 
1st Yr. Pharm. 
Jun., B. S. Ch. E. 
Soph., A. B. 
Fr., B. S. E. M. 
2nd Yr. Med. 
Fr., A. B. 
Jun., B. S. Ed. 
Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 
Sen., A. B. 
Fr., B. S. Agr. 
Sen., B. S. H. E. 
Spec, Grad. 
Grad., Education 
Fr., A. B. 
Jun., A. B. 
2nd Yr. Med. 



List of Students 



389 



Hathaway, Frederick Hamilton 

Haught, Arthur Paul 

Haught, Edwin Pascal 

Haught, Harriett Kathleen 

Haught, Howard Elbert 

Haught, Oscar Lee 

Haught, Thomas Wetmore 

Haught, Warren Edward 

Havener, John Franklin 

Hawke, Clarence Milton 

Hawkins, Carroll James 

Hawkins, Edward Samuel 

Hawley, Eva Claire 

Hayes, Eleanor Virginia 

Hayes, Elizabeth Roths 

Hayes, Mary Ellen 

Hayhurst, Frank Bronson 

Haynes, Loyd Charles 

Haynes, Sheldon Elias 

Hays, Francis Calvin 

Haythe, Woodville Carthon 

Hazlett, Paul Jackson 

Headlee, Alvah John Washington 

Healey, George Harris 

Healey, John Allen 

Hearst, David Sampson 

Heath, George Richard 

Heatherman, William Frank 

Hecht, Arthur L. 

Heckert, Virginia 

Hedrick, Ralph W. 

Heflin. Mary 

Heinze, James Henry 

Heiston, Juliet 

Helmbright, Katherine Mary 

Hemington, Ralph Wilson 

Henderson, Alene R. 

Henderson, John Gibson 

Henderson, Virginia Belle 

Henkel, Carroll Hess 

Hennen, Kathleen Matilda 

Hennen, Louise Reiner 

Hennen, Lydia Josephine 

Henry, Berch 

Henry, Edward Carlyle 

Henry, Leslie Everett 

Henry, Percy Byron 

Henry, Wendell Dawley 

Henry, William Frederick 

Hensell, Beulah 

Herd, Charles Thomas, Jr. 

Herd, Josephine Virginia 

Hereford, Dymple Maude 

Herman, May 

Herod, John Blaker 

Herod, Lyle Eddy 

Herod, Willis Glen 

Herold, Everette Gilmore 



Grantsville 

Belle 

Clay 

Mannington 

Mannington 

Littleton 

Buckhannon 

Belle 

Morgantown 

Ashley, Pa. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Fairmont 

Morgantown 

Hopemont 

Morgantown 

Wheeling 

Pennsboro 

Clarksburg 

White Sulphur Sp'gs 

South Charleston 

Hinton 

Princeton 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Kane, Pa. 

Morgantown 

Wellsburg 

Huntington 

Marianna, Pa. 

Bridgeport 

Alderson 

West Union 

Fairmont 

Martinsburg 

Wheeling 

Uniontow r n, Pa. 

Wheeling 

Fairmont 

Morgantown 

Martinsburg 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Terra Alta 

Morgantown 

Fairmont 

West Warwick, R. I. 

Morgantown 

Sistersville 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

South Side 

East Orange, N. J. 

Grafton 

Grafton 

Maidsville 

Marlinton 



Fr., A. B. 

Sen., B. S. Ch. E. 

Grad., Education 

Jun., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Sen., A. B. 

Grad., French 

Jun., B. S. M. E. 

Sen., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. Ch. E. 

Sen., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Spec, Grad. 

Jun., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Sen., B. S. Ind. Ed. 

3rd Yr. Law 

1st Yr. Law 

Fr., B. S. Ch. E. 

3rd Yr. Law 

Sen., A. B. 

Grad., Chemistry 

Grad., English 

Sen., A. B. 

1st Yr. Med. 

Fr., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

1st Yr. Med. 

Sen., B. S. Ed. 

Grad., English 

Jun., B. S. H. E. 

Fr., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Grad., History 

Jun., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. E. E. 

Jun., B. S. Ed. 

Sen., B. S. Ch. E. 

Sen., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Jun., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Soph., B. S. Agr. 

1st Yr. Law 

Grad., Plant Pathology 

Fr., A. B. 

Summer School 

Jun., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Soph., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Grad., Botany 

Soph., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 



390 



Students Enrolled, 1932-1933 



Herold, Virgil Arlington 
Herrera, Frank 
Herrmann, Louis Ferdinand 
Hershberger, Ernest Wilmer 
Herskovitz, Anna 
Herskovitz, Frances Alice 
Hesen, William John 
Hess, Clarence R. 
Hess, James Robert 
Hess, Maude Frances 
Hesse, Jane Allison 
Hester, Eugene Joseph 
Heston, Arthur Jolliffe 
Hetrick, Grace Edith 
Hetrick, Harold Franklin 
Hibbert, Richard Blair 
Hickel, John Riley 
Hickman, Dolph 
Hickman, Hally Burton 
Hickman, Harriett Mary 
Hickman, Lenore Z. 
Hickman, William 
Hiehle, Forbes R. 
Hiett, Jewel Frances 
Higgins, Clarence Earl 
Higgins, Pansy Ercell 
Higgs, Howard Hughes 
Higgs, Marie Stroup 
Hildreth, Eslie Donald 
Hill, Alta Wood 
Hill, Benjamin Frederick 
Hill, Blair 
Hill, James Hornor 
Hill, Lawrence Rymer 
Hill, Lawson M. 
Hill, Nancy Jane 
Hill, Pierre Frederick 
Hiller, Woodrow W. 
Hilliard, Robert Christy 
Hilston, Neal William 
Hiner, Mary 
Hinkel, Albert M. 
Hinkle, Eleanor 
Hirshon, Sidney 
Hite, Ralph Mason 
Hite, Thomas A. 
Hoard, Eleanor Elizabeth 
Hoblitzell, John Dempsey 
Hocking, Martha Louise 
Hockman, Marvin Stanley 
Hodges, Dermott Templeton 
Hodges, F. Jay 
Hodges, Kathleen 
Hoenig, Harold H. 
Hoff, Burl L. 
Hoffa, John Wilson 
Hoffer, Stephen Alexander 
Hoffman, Emily Gray 



Persinger 

Price Hill 

Steuben, Mich. 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Lancaster, Pa. 

Plymouth, Pa. 

Wilsonburg 

Morgantown 

Roaring Spring, Pa. 

Ronceverte 

Belmont 

Pennsboro 

Charleston 

Morgantown 

Harrisville 

Pennsboro 

Parkersburg 

Martinsburg 

Reader 

Reader 

Parsons 

Parsons 

Lumberport 

Alderson 

Charleston 

Lumberport 

Lumberport 

Morgantown 

Hillsboro 

Wheeling 

Fairmont 

Clarksburg 

Morgantown 

Warren, Ohio 

Marlinton 

Ashland, Pa. 

Weston 

Morgantown 

Mannington 

Mannington 

Hoard 

Parkersburg 

Wheeling 

Augusta 

Morgantown 

Alderson 

Morgantown 

Trenton, N. J. 

Cairo 

Harrisburg, Pa. 

Irvington, N. J. 

Bunker Hill 



Jun., B. S. Agr. 

Fr., A. B. 

Grad., Dairy Husb. 

Fr., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Jun., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Fr., A. B. 

Grad., Botany 

Soph., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Fr., B. S. Phys Ed 

Grad., English 

Spec, Grad. 

Grad., Pol. Sc. 

Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

3rd Yr. Law 

Sen., A. B. 

Sen., B. S. M. E. 

Fr., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. Ed. 

Grad., English 

2nd Yr. Law 

Summer School 

Grad., Elec. Eng'g. 

Jun., B. S. H. E. 

Soph., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Sen., B. S. Agr. 

Sen., B. S. Ed. 

1st Yr. Law 

Fr., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Soph., B. S. Agr. 

Fr., A. B. 

Sen., B. S. E. E. 

Jun., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Soph., B. S. Agr. 

Grad., History 

Jun., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Soph., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

1st Yr. Law 

Soph., B. S. H. E. 

Jun., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. Ed. 

Soph., B. S. Ind. Ed. 

Summer School 

Sen., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Sen., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 



List of Students 



391 



Hogan, Howard Knox 
Hoge, F. Virginia 
Hogue, Harlan Bailey 
Hogue, Hilda 
Hogue, Homer Hayhurst 
Hogue, Junior Lee 
Hogue, Mahala Mae 
Hohannes, Bushrod Unger 
Holden, Virginia Lourine 
Holden, Wilson Edwin 
Holland, Charles Thomas 
Holland, James Walter 
Holland, Lunsford Bigony 
Hollandsworth, Nina Mildred 
Holilday, Flora Virginia 
Holt, James Findlay 
Holt, Jane 

Holt, Mildred Schafer 
Holy, John Sterrett 
Homburg, John William 
Homer, Harry Marshall 
Homer, James D. Garard 
Hopper, William Falcon, Jr. 
Horn, Laura Doris 
Horn, Woodrow Shellia 
Hornor, James Richardson 
Hoskins, Wilbur Jolliffe 
Hott, Ann Elizabeth Baer 
Houck, Claude Lacy 
Houck, Helen Frances 
Houck, Marvin Russel 
Hough, Charles Wayne 
Hoult, Charles Shircliffe 
Houseman, Violet Roxey 
Houze, Armand Leon 
Houze, Roger Joseph 
Howard, Edwin Burley 
Howard, Elizabeth Alyce 
Howard, Hubert C. 
Howard, Jane M. 
Howard, Zack Mike 
Howder, John Lynch 
Howder, William McCune 
Hoy, Nevin Douglas 
Hoylman, Mary Virginia 
Hrusovsky, Louis 
Hubbs, George Logan 
Hubbs, Mary 
Hudelson, Helena Houf 
Hudgins, Geraldine Isabelle 
Hudgins, John Gilbert 
Hudgins, Paul Stuart 
Hudson, Elizabeth Louise 
Hudson, Ida H. 
Huey, Elizabeth Jane 
Huffman, Kathryn 
Huggins, Denver L. 
Hughart, Flossie Mildred 



Parkersburg 

Waynesburg, Pa. 

Pennsboro 

Pennsboro 

Morgantown 

Pennsboro 

Morgantown 

Winchester, Va. 

Clarksburg 

Clarksburg 

Lookout 

Morgantown 

Sandstone 

Stanaford 

Pai^kersburg 

Grafton 

Weston 

Morgantown 

Weston 

Wheeling 

Martinsburg 

Martinsburg 

Martinsburg 

Newark, N. J. 

Madison 

Lumberport 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Lewisburg 

Ronceverte 

Lewisburg 

Morgantown 

Fairmont 

Morgantown 

Point Marion, Pa. 

Point Marion, Pa. 

Triadelphia 

Cameron 

Morgantown 

Parkersburg 

Charleston 

Elizabeth, Pa. 

Elizabeth, Pa. 

Santa Ana, Cal. 

Morgantown 

Benwood 

Charleston 

Moundsville 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Hinton 

Bluefield 

Uniontown, Pa. 

Morgantown 

Mannington 

Morgantown 

Williamstown 

Scarbro 



Soph., B. S. Ind. Ed. 

Summer School 

Jun., B. S. Agr. 

Soph., B. S. H. E. 

Grad., Education 

Sen., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Sen., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Fr., B. Mus. 

Fr., A. B. 

Grad., Mining 

Spec, A. & S. 

Jun., B. S. C. E. 

Sen., B. S. Ed. 

Sen., A. B. 

2nd Yr. Law 

Jun., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

2nd Yr. Law 

Jun., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. Ch. E. 

Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Fr., B. S. H. E. 

Soph., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

1st Yr. Med. 

Jun., A. B. 

2nd Yr. Law 

Grad., English 

Soph., B. S. Ch. E. 

Spec, Music 

Sen., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Grad., English 

Fr., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. E. E. 

Sen., A. B. 

Spec, Grad. 

Soph., B. S. Ch. E. 

Soph., B. S. M. E. 

Sen., B. S. H. E. 

Spec, A. & S. 

Jun., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

3rd Yr. Law 

Soph., A. B. 

Sen., B. S. H. E. 

Sen., B. S. H. E. 

Grad., Chemistry 

Fr., A. B. 

Summer School 



392 



Students Enrolled, 1932-1933 



Hughes, Belmont 
Hughes, Edward Brown 
Hughes, Helen Louise 
Hughes, "William Edward 
Hughes, William Thomas 
Hulbert, Reba 
Hume, Isaac Campbell 
Hume, Thomas Dixon 
Humphries, Robert Elmer 
Hunger. Jane Dickie 
Hungerford, Frank Levi 
Hungerford, Gory Light 
Hunt, Anne Lydia 
Hunt, George Ray 
Hunter. Ethel Farley 
Hunter, Gladys Fisher 
Hunter. Helen 
Hunter, Homer Glenn 
Hunter. Jack Morgret 
Hunter. Marjorie Ann 
Huston, Helen Hope 
Hutchinson, Bernard M. 
Hutchinson. Blanche Cook 
Hutson, Arnold 
Hutson, Robert Hiram 
Hyden, William Ulysses 
Hyer, Hale Dow 
Hyer, Lucile 
Hyer, Lyda Ellis 
Hyman, Phil Ephraim 
Idleman, Dorothy May 
Ihlenfeld, Alfred Edward Carl 
Imbro, Humbert Albert 
Ireland, Emory 
Ireland, Hosea Dewain 
Ireland. Katherine Roberta 
Irvine, Carman Ewart 
Isner, Dorothy Elizabeth 
Israel, Sarah Margaret 
Jackson, Delvery Howard 
Jackson, John Haig 
Jackson, Richard Edward 
Jackson, Ruth Elinor 
Jackson, Susan R. 
Jackson, William Edward 
Jacobs, Grace Baldwin 
Jacobs, Samuel 
Jacobs, Walter Leroy 
Jakeman, Arthur Edward 
Jakeman, Virginia Kelly 
Jamison, Agnes May 
Jamison, Beulah Mary 
Jamison, Georgia Garnet 
Jamison, Lelan Ray 
Jamison, Lucile Mildred 
Jarrett, Ella May 
Jarrett, Joe Nelson 
Jarrett, Marion Fisher 



Sharon, Pa. 

McMechen 

King wood 

Fairmont 

Morgantown 

Buffalo 

Williamsburg 

Williamsburg 

Ronceverte 

Point Marion, Ta. 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Fairmont 

Welch 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Pax 

Berkeley Springs 

Mannington 

Morgantown 

Flat woods 

Morgantown 

AVest Union 

West L'nion 

Warren, Ohio 

Flat woods 

Flatwoods 

Flatwoods 

Bluefield 

Scherr 

Wheeling 

Brooklyn. N. Y. 

"Washington, D. C. 

3'ullman 

Washington, D. C. 

Elkins 

Elkins 

Clarksburg 

Littleton 

Laconing, Md. 

Weston 

Weston 

Kingwood 

Kingwood 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Follansbee 

Oceana 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Charleston 

Charleston 

Charleston 



Fr., B. S. Ch. E. 
Pr., B. S. Ch. E. 

Soph., A. B. 
Fr, B. S. Ch. E 
:!rd Yr. Law- 
Soph., B. S. H. E. 
Jun.. A. B. 
Summer School 
Sen., B. S. Ch. E. 
Soph., B. S. H. E. 
Jun.. A. B. 
Spec. A. & S. 
Soph., A. B. 
Grad., Zoology 
Soph.. A. B. 
Soph.. A. B. 
Grad., Education 
.lun.. A. B. 
Pr., A. B. 
S-.ph.. A. B. 
Sen., A. B. 
Sen.. A. B. 

P.. S. Ed. 
Sen.. B. S. Agr 
Pr., B. S. M. E. 
Soph, A. B. 
Fr.. A. B. 
Jun.. B. S. H. E. 
Soph.. A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
Grad., English 
Spec. Grad. 
Sen., B. S. Ed. 
Fr., B. S. C. E. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Jun.. A. B. 
Grad., Botany 
Grad.. English 
Jun.. A. B. 
Sen.. B. S. Ed. 
Soph.. B. S. C. E 
Fr.. A. B. 
Jun. B. Mus. 
Fr.. A. B. 
Fr.. B. S. Phys. Ed. 
Jun.. A. B. 
Sen. A. B. 
Jun.. B. S. E. E. 
Grad., Civil Eng'g. 
Jun.. B. S. Phys. Ed. 
Jun., A. B. 
Spec. Grad. 
Grad.. Education 
Fr.. A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Fr.. B. S. Agr. 
Soph.. A. B. 
Soph.. A. B. 



List of Students 



393 



Jarrett, Nannie Marie 
Jarvis, Jackson Marquis 
Jarvis, Myrtle 
.Taynes, Frank Akin 
Jefferys, Nina Lucille 
Jeffreys, Jane 
Jelea, John Thomas, Jr. 
Jenckes, Josephine Harris 
Jenkins, David Edward 
Jenkins, Harold Otis 
Jenkins. Lula Merrill 
Jenkins, Martha Edythe 
Jenkins, Orville Lee 
Jester, Jane 
Jester, Mary Louise 
Jobe, Theresa Marie 
John, Bernard Thomas 
Johnson, Charles Carl 
Johnson, Frank L. 
Johnson, Fred Oren 
Johnson, Harry Joseph 
Johnson, Homer S. 
Johnson, Ireta Hawley 
Johnson, Katherine Dale 
Johnson, Lillian Posten 
Johnson, Margaret 
Johnson. Marguerite Helen 
Johnson, Mary Elizabeth 
Johnson, Mary Florence 
Johnson, Oliver William 
Johnson, Paul Core 
Johnson, Pearle Irene 
Johnson, Thomas Haskins 
Johnson, Virginia 
Johnston, Harriet Malinda 
Johnston, Howard Feighner 
Johnston, John Ervin 
Johnston, Olive Mae 
Johnston, Ruth Helene 
Jolliffe, Florence Mae 
Jones, Amy Elizabeth 
Jones, Clarence Ray 
Jones, Delmas Bernard 
Jones, Edna B. 
Jones, Evelyn Lee 
Jones, George Floyd, Jr. 
Jones, Irma Turner 
Jones, John Oldham 
Jones, Leoda 
Jones, Lloyd Meredith 
Jones, Loretta Blanche 
Jones, Mae 
Jones, Orren Lee 
Jones, Ralph Junior 
Jones, Theresa Dower 
Joseph, Nime Kareem 
Judy, Alta Frances 
Judy, Marguerite Kerran 



Charleston 

Wilsonburg 

Orantsville 

Fairmont 

Belington 

Loga n 

Follansbee 

Wheeling 

Morgan town 

Clarksburg 

Morgantown 

Fairmont 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Glen Jean 

Uniontown, Pa. 

Morgantown 

East Hank 

Morgantown 

Barrett 

Day brook 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Claysvllle, Pa. 

Barrett 

West Alexander, 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Wheeling 

Thomas 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

New Cumberland 

Morgantown 

Moundsville 

Morgantown 

Glenville 

Morgantown 

Mount Hope 

West Alexander, 

Elkins 

Morgantown 

Mount Hope 

Elkins 

Sistersville 

Bridgeport 

Morgantown 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Peru 



Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Soph., B. S. C. E. 

Jun., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. Ed. 

Jun., B. Mas. 

Fr., B. S. Ch. E. 

Sen., A .B. 

Fr., B. S. H. E. 

Spec. Ind. Ed. 

Grad., English 

Jun., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Sen., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Soph., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Fr., Eng'g. 

Fr., A. B. 

I rrad., Education 

Spec, Grad. 

Fr., A. B. 

Spec, Grad. 

Jun., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 
PaSoph., B. S. Agr. 

Fr., B. S. Ch. E. 

Spec, A. & S. 

3rd Yr. Law 

Fr., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Spec, Grad. 

Fr., B. S. Agr. 

Grad., English 

Grad., Education 

Sen., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. Ed. 

Jun., B. S. Agr. 

1st Yr. Med. 

Spec, Grad. 

Soph., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Fr., A. B. 

Summer School 
Pa.Fr., A. B. 

Soph., B. S. H. E. 

Grad., Education 

Spec, Grad. 

Grad., English 

Jun., A. B. 

Spec, Grad. 

Grad., Education 

Soph., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Sen., B. S. H. E. 



394 



Students Enrolled, 1932-1933 



Juszczyk, Frank Stanley 
Kaden, Dorothy 
Kahle, Mary Witten 
Kahn, Emanuel 
Kahn, Goldye 
Kaplan, Irving 
Karnes, Virginia 
Karr, William Morrison 
Kasdin, Morris 
Katz, Hyman 
Kayuha, Joseph 
Kean, Elsa Schultze 
Kean, James Samuel 
Kearns, Joseph Andrew 
Kearns, William Paul, Jr. 
Keck, Arlice Vera 
Keck, Kathryn Elizabeth 
Keck, Winona Helen 
Keener, Louise 
Keller, Arnold Louis 
Keller, Ben DeForest 
Kelly, Francis B. 
Kelly, Gilmore E. 
Kelly, Lockie Genevieve 
Kelly, Preston Henderson 
Kelly, Ruth Elizabeth 
Kendrick, James G. 
Kennedy, Charles Loyd 
Kennedy, Clyde 
Kennedy, Frank Price 
Kennedy, Melba Alyce 
Kennedy, Paul 
Kennedy, Wanda Nita 
Kent, Jean Annette 
Kent, Mary Grant 
Kergan, Delia Verna 
Kerns, Thomas Evans 
Kerr, George Giffln 
Kerr, Kenneth D. 
Kerr, Vaughn Willhide 
Kessell, Faith 
Kessler, Harold V. 
Kessler, Herschel Sonier 
Kessler, Robert Jennings 
Keys, Frank G. 
Kiester, John Henry 
Kiger, Marvin Ralph 
Kim, Raymond Eung 
Kimble, Florence Louise 
Kime, Edward Blaine 
Kincaid, Martha Elma 
Kinder, Robert Alfred 
King, Edwin D. 
King, Genevieve Nanette 
King, Harry Hayhurst 
King, Helen Louise 
King, James Madison 
King, Julia Ann 



Weirton 

Roanoke 

Bluefield 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Princeton 

Ripley 

New York, N. Y. 

Ferndale, N. Y. 

Triadelphia 

Charleston 

Charleston 

Rowlesburg 

Elbert 

Core 

Morgantown 

Core 

Morgantown 

Elyria, Ohio 

Charleston 

Clarksburg 

Huntington 

Walton 

Montgomery 

Wheeling 

Weston 

Morgantown 

Porters Falls 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Blaine 

Porters Falls 

Jerome, Pa. 

Jerome, Pa. 

Fairmont 

Connellsville, Pa. 

Fairmont 

Hundred 

Clarksburg 

Ripley 

Wheeling 

Elkins 

Oak Hill 

Middlebourne 

Saint Marys 

Morgantown 

Syren-Chun, Korea 

Morgantown 

Moundsville 

Morgantown 

Hollidays Cove 

Morgantown 

Huntington 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 



Fr., B. S. Ch. E. 

Sen., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. H. E. 

1st Yr. Med. 

Jun., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Soph., A. B. 

Grad., Chemistry 

Jun., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Sen., B. S. E. E. 

Fr., B. Mus. 

Soph., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Sen., B. S. Ed. 

Soph., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Sen., B. S. Ed. 

Spec, Grad. 

Grad., Horticulture 

Soph., B. S. M. E. 

Summer School 

Fr., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. H. E. 

4th Yr. Pharm. 

Soph., A. B. 

Sen., B. S. Agr. 

Fr., B. S. Agr. 

1st Yr. Med. 

Jun., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

1st Yr. Med. 

Grad., Education 

Soph., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Summer School 

Jun., A. B. 

Grad., Chemistry 

Soph., B. S. Ind. Ed. 

Sen., B. S. M. E. 

Summer School 

Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Jun., B. S. Ind. Ed. 

Jun., A. B. 

Gred, Education 

4th Yr. Pharm. 

2nd Yr. Law 

Sen., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Sen., B. S. E. M. 

Spec, Grad. 

Soph., B. S. M. E. 

Fr., A. B. 

Grad., Botany 

Soph., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 



List of Students 



395 



King, Marjorie Adair 
King, Mary Belle 
King, Maxine Kathran 
King, Paul Z. 
Kinney, Earl Ray 
Kirk, Dora 

Kissell, Esther Lorena 
Kizer, John Oscar 
Klein, Harold Jerome 
Klein, Jules Isaac 
Klein, Salma B. 
Kline, Ruth Geraldine 
Klinger, Earl W. 
Klug, Francis Joseph 
Klug, William Harry 
Klyza, Stanley James 
Knee, Hugh Robert 
Knight, Arthur Argyle 
Knight, Genevieve Kinsley 
Knight, Glenn Thomas 
Knight, Marion Eugene 
Knotts, Edwin R. 
Kochenderfer, Martha Bayles 
Koons, Agnes Vera 
Koontz, Clarence John 
Koontz, Mary Kathryn 
Koontz, Thomas David 
Kopko, John Walter 
Koslow, Lillian Sylvia 
Kossuth, Louis Caspar 
Kourey, Roger E. 
Kovich, Joe Anderson 
Kozak, Andrew 
Kraft, William Herbert 
Kramer, Helen Shuttleworth 
Kranaskas, Cecelia 
Kranaskas, John L. 
Krause, Edward Smallwood 
Krause, Reginald 
Kreger, Elizabeth 
Kreiger, Edward M. 
Kroll, Milton 
Krug, Mary 
Kuhn, Russell Clifford 
Kutz, Harry C. 
Kuykendall, Joseph Pancake 
Kuykendall, Susan Parsons 
Kyle, Gordon Maurice 
Kyle, Gotha Olive 
Kyle, John Walter 
Kyle, Oliver Riggs 
Ladwig, Margaret Cornelia 
Laing, William Buster 
Lambert, George Philip 
Lambert, James Kenton 
Lambie, Robert A. 
Landron, Daniel 
Lane, Agnes L. 



Pa. 



Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Huntington 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Ida May 

Kermit 

Springfield, Ohio 

Wheeling 

New York, N. Y. 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Proctor 

Gary, Ind. 

Clarksburg 

Morgantown 

Clarksburg 

Renick 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Grafton 

Grantsville 

Greensburg, 

Elkins 

Belington 

Clendenin 

Weirton 

Northfork 

Wheeling 

Charleston 

Lorado 

Coraopolis, 

Sharon 

Gutter Fort 

Thomas 

Thomas 

Fairmont 

Petersburg 

Monessen, Pa, 

Elm Grove 

Paterson, N. J 

Sistersville 

Morgantown 

Nallen 

Romney 

Romney 

Princeton 

Morgantown 

Princeton 

Williamsburg 

Wilsonburg 

Lewisburg 

Bluefield 

Parsons 

Charleston 

Cayey, P. R. 

Mannington 



Pa. 



Spec, Grad. 

Soph., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Sen., B. S. H. E. 

2nd Yr. Med. 

Fr., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Spec, Grad. 

Jun., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Jun., B. S. En'g. Elect 

Jun., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Jun, A. B. 

1st Yr. Law 

Grad., English 

Jun., B. S. H. E. 

Fr., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Sen., B. S. Ind. Ed. 

Spec, Grad. 

Sen., A. B. 

3rd Yr. Law 

Soph., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

1st Yr. Pharm. 

Soph., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. C. E. 

Grad., Mathematics 

1st Yr. Med. 

Summer School 

2nd Yr. Med. 

Spec, Grad. 

Fr., A. B. 

Summer School 

Soph., B. S. H. E. 

1st Yr. Med. 

Soph., A. B. 

Soph., B. S. H. E. 

Fr., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. Ch. E. 

Sen., B. S. Agr. 

Jun., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. M. E. 

Fr., B. S. H. E. 

Soph, B. S. E. E. 

Grad., Education 

Jun., A. B. 

Soph., B. S. E. M. 

Soph., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

2nd Yr. Med. 

Grad., English 



396 



Students Enrolled, 1932-1933 



Lane, Jane 

Lang, James Hamilton 
Lang, Virginia Nelle 
Langham, Wilbur Snyder 
Langley, Donald Joseph 
Lanham, Dottridge 
Lantz, Harry L. 
Lantz. Lewis Edwin, Jr. 
Lantz, Sarah Louise 
Largent, Harry William 
Larson, Bror E. 
Latham, Robert Spalding 
Laughlin, Marguerite Louise 
Law, Lewis Bryan 
Lawler, Beulah Grayce 
Lawrence, Faith 
Layman, Madalyn 
Lazear, Edis Eleanor 
Lazzell, Mildred Blanche 
Lazzell, Rufus Fenton, Jr. 
Lea, Ellis 

Leach, Dennis Elbert 
LeChien, Cecelia Aileen 
Ledoux, Clarence Watson 
Lee, Estous 
Lee, Frank Shin 
Lee, Marvin Shelby 
Leedy, Howard Massey 
Leeson, Lawrence Raymond 
Lefevre, George Frank 
Leinwand, Irving 
Lemaster, Dick A. 
Lemasters, Herman Ray 
Lemley, Edith Pauline 
Lemley, Katherine Dalrymple 
Lemley, Violet Edith 
Lemons, Mary Ann 
Lemons, Richard 
Leonard, Guy Lester 
LePera, Joseph Frank 
LePera, Mary 
Leppert, Wilson C. 
Leshkow, Nickey 
Levensohn, Herman Bijou 
Levin, Emanuel 
Levin, Ruth 
Levine, Bernard 
Levine, Max 
Levsen, Anna Margo 
Lewellyn, Gerald A. 
Lewin, Thomas Fred 
Lewis, Albert Kyle 
Lewis, Clarence W. 
Lewis, Kathleen A 
Lewis, Margaret Jane 
Lewis, Martha Jane 
Lewis, Mary Lorrayne 
Lewis. Raymond Howard 



Clarksburg 

Bridgeport 

Morgantown 

Johnstown, Pa. 

Uniontown, Pa. 

Charleston 

Jacksonburg 

Jacksonburg 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Mexico, N. Y. 

Buckhannon 

Fairmont 

Camden-on-Gauley 

Lumberport 

Morgantown 

Fairmont 

Mannington 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Charleston 

Parkersburg 

South Charleston 

Clarksburg 

Clarksburg 

Honolulu, T. H. 

Charleston 

Powhatan 

Ravenswood 

Point Marion, Pa. 

New York, N. Y. 

Charleston 

Clarksburg 

Core 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Spring Hill 

Spring Hill 

Charleston 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

McMechen 

Osage 

New York, N. Y. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

West Orange, N. J. 

Bronx, N. Y. 

Fairmont 

Maquoketa, la. 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Grant Town 

Morgantown 

Fayetteville 

Fayetteville 

Morgantown 

Newburg 

Junction 



Fr., A. B. 

Soph., B. S. C. E. 

Soph., B. S. H. E. 

1st Yr Law 

Soph., B. S. Ind. Ed. 

Jun., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Soph., B. S. E. E. 

Grad., French 

3rd Yr. Law 

Soph., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Spec, Grad. 

Sen., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Grad., English 

Fr., B. S. H. E. 

Fr., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

2nd Yr. Pharm. 

Jun., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

1st Yr. Med. 

Grad.. Zoology 

Sen., B. S. Ed. 

2nd Yr. Med. 

Sen., B. S. E. E. 

1st Yr. Med. 

Soph.. B. S. Ch. E. 

Soph., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Jun.. A. B. 

Jun., B. S. Ed. 

Grad., English 

Grad., Education 

Fr., B. S. M. E. 

Fr.. A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Jun., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. C. E. 

1st Yr. Med. 

Sen., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

2nd Yr. Med. 

Fr., A. B. 

Grad.. Mathematics 

Jun., B. Mus. 

Fr., A. B. 

2nd Yr. Pharm. 

Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Soph., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Grad., Education 



List of Students 



397 



Lewis, Renwick Johnson 
Lewis, Thomas Watson 
Lewis, Virginia Claiborne 
Lewis, William David 
Lichliter, Heil Henderson 
Lieberman, Benjamin 
Lienau, Carl Christian 
Liggett, Bassell B. 
Liggett, Vivian 
Liller, Henry Oliver 
Lilly, Kenneth O. 
Lineberg, Oliver Wayne 
Lindley, Edna Jane 
Lingar, Ailon Burford 
Linger, Carter Woods 
Linger, Margaret Virginia 
Linger, Paul N. 
Linger, Roderick 
Lipphardt, Jack William 
Lippucci, Mary Theresa 
Little, Virginia Orr 
Llewellyn. Marion 
Llewellyn, Ruth Sylvia 
Lockhart. Basil Gordon 
Lockwood, Carrol Eugene 
Loehr, Margaret Kathryn 
Long, Cloyd Darl 
Long, Frankie Harriett 
Long, Helen Louise 
Long, Ida Mae 
Long, J. Everett 
Long, Pauline McCauley 
Long, Virginia Josephine 
Longanecker, William Lantz 
Lopez, Richard 
Lorant, Jules Arthur 
Lough, Donald 
Love, Raymond Cecil 
Love, Ronald Walker 
Love, Ruth Pearle 
Lovett, Lane Paul 
Lovett, Thelma 
Loving, Frances Sydna 
Lovio, John 
Lovitch, Clarence 
Lowe, Beverly 
Lowe. Opie Clarence 
Lowe, Robert Wertz 
Lowe, Scott Cephas, II 
Loy, A. Clinton 
Lucas, Basil 
Lucas, Chester Weaver 
Lucas, Gertrude Armstrong 
Luchini, Joseph 
Ludwig, Edythe Rose 
Ludwig, Ross 
Lusebrink, Dorothy Ethel 
Lusebrink, Esther Louise 



Greenwich, Conn. 

Kingwood 

Davis 

Wheeling 

Salisbury, Pa. 

Huntington 

Morgantown 

Saint Albans 

Buckhannon 

Keyser 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Montgomery 

Wharton 

Buckhannon 

Clarksburg 

Morgantown 

Buckhannon 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Parsons 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

McMechen 

Midland, Pa. 

New Martinsville 

Fairmont 

Elkins 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Scarbro 

New Martinsville 

Carmichaels, Pa. 

Shinnston 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Moorefield 

Moorefield 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Napier 

Morgantown 

Owings 

Williamson 

Charleston 

Walton 

Fairmont 

Fairmont 

Ruckman 

Shinnston 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 



Fr., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Grad., Pol. Science 

Soph., A. B. 

1st Yr. Law 

Jun., B. S. Ch. E. 

Grad., Elect. Eng'g. 

Grad., Education 

Grad., Education 

Grad., Education 

Spec, A. & S. 

Fr., B. S. Ch. E. 

Grad., English 

Soph.. A. B. 

Grad., Mathematics 

Sen., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. Ch. E. 

Fr., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. Ch. E. 

Fr., A. B. 

Soph, A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Grad., History 

Fr., A. B. 

Soph., B. S. Phys. Ed 

Grad., Education 

Sen., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Grad., Political Science 

Sen., B. S. Ed. 

Sen., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. Ind. Ed. 

Grad., Education 

Jun., B. S. Ch. E. 

1st Yr. Med. 

1st Yr. Law 

Soph., A. B. 

Sen., B. S. Ed. 

Soph., B. S. E. E. 

Spec, Grad. 

Jun., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. M. E. 

1st Yr. Law 

Soph., A. B. 

Soph., B. S. Agr. 

1st Yr. Law 

Grad., English 

Grad., Education 

Jun., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. Ch. E. 

Spec, A. & S. 

Fr., A. B. 

Summer School 

Grad., Education 

Fr., B. S. H. E. 

Fr., B. S. H. E. 



398 



Students Enrolled, 1932-1933 



Lycan, /sabelle 
Lynch, Louise 
Lynch, Mary Virginia 
Lynch, Nellie Virginia 
Lynch, Sylva Virginia 
Lyons, Omer Raymond 
McBee, Alfred Roy 
McBurney, Malcolm Edgar 
McCall, Robert George 
McCarty, Pearl Sands 
McCaskey, Ambrose Everett, Jr. 
McClanahan, Normington Pell 
McClaugherty, Bernard 
McClaugherty, Jack 
McClay, Francis Bender 
McClelland, Gilmer Odell 
McClelland, Clarence Allen 
McClintic, John William 
McClintic, Laura Byrner 
McClung, Harold Gorden 
McClung, Helen Gertrude 
McClung, Holden Burruss 
McClung, Jacob O. 
McClung, James Edward 
McClung, Lonza T. 
McClure, Harold DeWitt 
McClure, Iris Marguerite 
McClure, Jane Garred 
McClure, Marian Innes 
McClure, Phebe Gwynn 
McClure, Robert George 
McCollum, Louise Katherine 
McComas, Maurine Audell 
McCormick, William Carlyle 
McCoy, Charles W. 
McCoy, Elizabeth Barbara 
McCoy, Harold 
McCoy, Joseph Hanford 
McCoy, Paul Wells 
McCray, Charles Malcolm 
McCubbin, Earl Noel 
McCue, Alan McLane 
McCue, Roy Russell 
McCuskey, John F. 
McDaniel, Mary Ruth 
McDaniel, Nell Rae 
McDaniel, Paul Williams 
McDermott, Agnes Bernadine 
McDermott, Bernard Joseph 
MoDermott, Louis Leo 
McDonald, Mae 
McDonald, Mary Ruth 
McDonald, Romeo Tell 
McDonald, Verda Blanche 
McDonnell, William James, Jr. 
McDougle, Harold Eugene 
McElroy, Kathryn Blanche 
McFadden, Virginia Kathryn 



Fort Gay 

Hinton 

Wheeling 

Mount Clare 

Morgantown 

Point Marion, Pa. 

Flemington 

Hollidays Cove 

Follansbee 

Fairmont 

New Martinsville 

Morgantown 

Bluefield 

Bluefield 

Charleston 

Branchland 

Hundred 

Frankford 

Lewisburg 

Morgantown 

Reedy 

Hico 

Charleston 

Richwood 

Blooming Rose 

Greenville, Pa. 

Morgantown 

Charleston 

Charleston 

Charleston 

Charleston 

Saint Marys 

Huntington 

Morgantown 

Fairmont 

Jane Lew 

Fishertown, Pa. 

Sistersville 

Sistersville 

Princeton 

Morgantown 

Clarksburg 

Weston 

Buckhannon 

Spelter 

Cabin Creek 

Cumberland, Md. 

Cameron 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Bridgeport 

Grantsville 

Grantsville 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Parkersburg 

Fairview 

Bethany 



Grad., Botany 

Sen., B. S. Ed. 

Soph., A. B. 

Spec, Grad. 

Jun., B. S. Ed. 

Sen., B. S. Ind. Ed. 

Grad., Economics 

2nd Yr. Pharm. 

Soph., B. S. C. E. 

Grad., English 

Grad., Civil Eng'g. 

Fr., A. B. 

3rd Yr. Law 

Sen., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. M. E. 

1st Yr. Med. 

Grad., English 

Jun., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

1st Yr. Law 

Sen., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Grad., History 

Jun., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Grad., Education 

Fr., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

GraJ., Mathematics 

Fr., A. B. 

Soph., B. S. Phys. Ed 

Fr., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Sen., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. E. E. 

Soph., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. Agr. 

Grad., Horticulture 

Soph., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. E. E. 

1st Yr. Med. 

Sen., A. B. 

Sen., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Jun., B. S. Ch. E. 

Grad., Education 

Jun., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. Agr. 

Jun., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Jun.. B. S. H. E. 

Soph., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Grad., English 

Jun., A. B. 

Soph., B. S. Ch. E. 

Jun., B .Mus. 

Summer School 



List of Students 



399 



McFarland, William Frank 
McGarvey, Myron Loring 
McGeever, Margaret Marie 
McGinnis, Mary Elizabeth 
McGraw, Elmer 
McGregor, Bernard Ronald 
McGuffie, Harriett Jeannette 
McHale, Edward William 
Mcllvain, William Earl 
Mclntire, Thornton Stallings, Jr. 
McKean, Bernece 
McKee, Florence Melva 
McKeever, Kermit 
McKeever, Vincent 
McKenney, Marion McKinley 
McKenzie, James Albert, Jr. 
McKinley, Evelyn Louise 
McKinley, George William 
McKinley, James Floris 
McLane, Charles Phillips 
McLane, William Alan, Jr. 
McLaughlin, James Orville 
McLaughlin, Vida L. 
McMahon, Anna 
McMillan, Elbert Clare 
McMillan, George John 
McMillen, Harold Luther 
McNamara, James Joseph 
McNeer, Mattie Shipley 
McNeer, William Paul 
McParland, Rose 
McPhail, Hugh Richard 
McPhail, Louise 
McPheeters, Harold Dupler 
McQuain, Edna C 
McQuain, George William 
McQuilkin, Mary Jane 
McQuillan, Lavinia 
McQuinn, Marian Plymale 
McWhorter, John Parrish 
McWhorter, John Scott, Jr. 
McWhorter, William Paul 
Macdonald, Robert William 
Maclin, Luttrell 
Mackey, Melvin Laumotto 
MacMillan, Anne Smith 
Maddy, Irvin Stanford 
Maddy, William Richard 
Maderia, Kenneth Haymond 
Madigan, Mary Elizabeth 
Madigan, William Robert 
Madill, Lucille Marguerite 
Mahaney, Earl Wesley 
Mahanna, Robert Guy 
Malcolm, Edward Willard • 

Malone, Ernest 
Malone, Lee Frederic 
Mamin, Harry 



Keyser 

Bridgeville, Pa. 

Homestead, Pa. 

Wellsburg 

Follansbee 

Parkersburg 

Keyser 

Morgantown 

Glen Easton 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Triadelphia 

Frankford 

Frankford 

Tunnelton 

Richwood 

Parkersburg 

Clarksburg 

Morgantown 

Spencer 

Spencer 

Wire Bridge 

Morgantown 

Wheeling 

Ursina, Pa. 

Oakfield, N. Y. 

Masontown 

Williamson 

Alderson 

Alderson 

Wheeling 

Grafton 

Grafton 

Clearco 

Troy 

Troy 

Roanoke, Va. 

Follansbee 

Huntington 

McWhorter 

Lewisburg 

Buckhannon 

Bradford, Pa. 

Morgantown 

Cameron 

Scottsville, N. Y. 

Marie 

Greenville 

Morgantown 

New Martinsville 

Morgantown 

Shinnston 

Cumberland, Md. 

Parkersburg 

Farmington 

Weston 

Morgantown 

Elkins 



1st Yr. Med. 
2nd Yr. Med. 
Jun., A. B. 
Sen., A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
Soph., B. Mus. 
Grad., English 
Grad., Sociology 
2nd Yr. Med. 
Soph., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Sen., B. S. Ed. 
Jun., A. B. 
Soph., B. S. C. E. 
Jun., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Summer School 
Sen., B. S. M. E. 
Soph., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
Grad., History 
Grad., History 
Jun., B. S. Ed. 
Soph., B. S. E. E. 
Soph., A. B. 
Sen., A. B. 
Fr., B. S. E. E. 
Grad., Education 
Grad., Education 
Grad., Education 
Jun., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Soph., B. S. Ch. E. 
Grad., Classics 
3rd Yr. Law 
Fr., A. B. 
Grad., History 
Summer School 
Sen., B. S. M. E. 
3rd Yr. Law 
2nd Yr. Law 
Fr., A. B. 
Jun., A. B. 
Grad., Education 
Sen., A. B. 
Grad., Education 
Fr., B. S. E. E. 
Fr., A. B. 
Sen., B. S. H. E. 
Fr, B. S. Ind. Ed. 
Jun., B. S. Ed. 
Soph, B. S. Ch. E. 
Fr., B. S. M. E. 
Grad, History 
Soph., A. B. 
3rd Yr. Law 
Soph., A. B. 



400 



Students Enrolled, 1932-1933 



Manackas, Walter John 
Mango, Carl Louis 
Mankin, Warren Ward 
Manley, John Wayland 
Manley, Regina 
Mann, A. Mason 
Mann, George Lloyd 
Manning, Charles William 
Manuel, Marvin Ira 
Manus, Louis John 
Marcus, Martin 
Margolis, Samuel Lewis 
Margules, Louis 
Mark, Robert Klectner 
Marker, Harry Joseph 
Markey, Vincent John 
Marple, Bertha Freda 
Marsh, Ethel Margaret 
Marshall, Alice Elizabeth 
Marshall, Ronald 
Marston, Rumsey Bissell 
Martin, Carolyn Alcott 
Martin, Charles Herman 
Martin, Earl Howard 
Martin, Edgar Blair 
Martin, Elizabeth Roles 
Martin, Frances Elizabeth 
Martin, Fred Harrison 
Martin, Georgia Blocher 
Martin, Gilbert Adrian 
Martin, Henry George 
Martin, Hey ward Erington 
Martin, Irene Christianna 
Martin, Kenneth C. 
Martin, Mabel Virginia 
Martin, Margaret Eloise 
Martin, Mary Broughton 
Martin, Mary Margaret 
Martin, Meredith Aldine 
Martin, Miles Herbert 
Martin, Paul Buck 
Martin, Randall Howard 
Martin, Richard Robert 
Martin, Robert Franklin 
Martin, Ruby Jane 
Martin, Thelma Carmen 
Martin, Thelma Elaine 
Martin, Wayne Stephen 
Martin, William Preston 
Mascioli, Loreto Victor 
Mascioli, Philip Anthony 
Mason, Delaine D. 
Mason, John William, III 
Mason, Julia Ward 
Mason, Ruth 
Mason, Seybert 
Mason, William Carl 
Massie, Oswald Jennings 



South Boston, Mass. 

Erie, Pa. 

Beckley 

Fairmont 

Wheeling 

Elkview 

Clarksburg 

Moundsville 

Charleston 

Lynden, Wash. 

Perth Amboy, N. J. 

Beverly, Mass. 

Ozone Park, N. Y. 

Blacksville 

Ligonier, Pa. 

McMechen 

Flatwoods 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Fairmont 

Morgantown 

Shinnston 

Beckley 

Ansted 

Bridgeport 

Shinnston 

Watson 

Benwood 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Wheeling 

Albright 

Ansted 

Clarksburg 

Clarksburg 

Morgantown 

Glasgow 

Martinsburg 

Morgantown 

Wilmerding, Pa. 

Shinnston 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Erwin 

Fairmont 

Fairmont 

MeyersdaleyPa. 

Seth 

Ravenswood 

Glen Morgan 



Fr., B. S. Agr. i 

1st Yr. Med. 
Soph., B. S. E. E. 
Soph., A. B. 
Grad., Education 
Grad., Education 
Soph., B. S. Ch. E. 
Jun., A. B. 
2nd Yr. Law 
Grad., Dairy Husb. 
Fr., A. B. 
Jun., A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
Jun., A. B. 
Soph., B. S. M. E. 
Grad., Education 
Sen., A. B. 

Soph., B. S. Phys. Ed. 
Jun., B. S. E. E. 
Grad., Education 
Grad., Botany 
Crad., Education 
Soph., B. S. C. E. 
Grad., Education 
Sen., B. S. Ed. 
Fr., B. S. H. E. 
Sen., B. S. Ch. E. 
Grad., Education 
Grad., Education 
Jun., A. B. 
Sen., A. B. 
Fr., B. S. H. E. 
Soph., B. S. Ch. E. 
Jun., B. S. H. E. 
Fr.. A. B. 
Jun., A. B. 
Jun., B. Mus. 
Sen., A. B. 
Jun., B. S. C. E. 
Fr., A. B. 
Fr., B. S. Agr. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Jun., A. B. 
Jun., A. B. 
June., B. S. Ed. 
Soph., A. B. 
Sen., B. S. Ind. Ed. 
3rd Yr. Law 
Soph., A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
Grad., Education 
Fr., B. S. E. E. 
Grad., English 
Sen., B. S. Phys. Ed. 
Fr., B. S. E. E. 
Sen., A. B. 
Jun., B. S. Ch. E. 



List op Students 



401 



Massie, Thelma Irene 
Matheny, Gwendolyn Eloise 
Mathews, Sue 
Mathias, John Allen 
Matloff, Simon 
Matson, Frank Lloyd 
Matthews, Gladys Mae 
Matthews, Helen 
Mattingly, Pauline 
Matusiewski, John Phillip 
Maupin, Frank Beverly 
Mausr, Grace Irene 
Mauzy, Frank 
Mawhinney, Samuel Lee 
Maxwell, Isaac Homer 
Maxwell, Jean 
Maxwell, John Brent 
Maxwell, Mary Agnes 
Maxwell, Mary Elizabeth 
May, Ruth Sylvia 
Mayer, Charles O. 
Mayes, Maurice Austin 
Mayfield, Julia Maxine 
Mayfield, Violet Leota 
Mayne, Mabel DeLillian 
Mayolo, Peter Louis 
Mazzei, Joseph William 
Meadows, Evelyn Adeline 
Meadows, Hulbert Amos 
Meaner, Elizabeth Ann 
Means, Milton Charles 
Meder, Sam Albert 
Meek, Elizabeth Anne 
Meeks, Voras Daniel 
Megibow, Harold J. 
Megrail, Altai Irma 
Melnicoff, Benjamin Ivan 
Melnicoff, Sidney 
Mendez, Lolin 
Menear, Clarence Wade 
Menear, Walter Raymond 
Menefee, Lawrence Venton 
Mentzer, Richard Lewis 
Meredith, Lona Kate 
Meredith, William Robinson 
Merendino, Salvatore Norman 
Merinar, Elmer Kirkwood 
Merricks, Robert Lincoln 
Merritt, Charles Marion 
Mesner, Owen James 
Messmore, Lindsey Ellison 
Mestrovic, Andrew Edward 
Metry, John Michael 
Meyer, Milton 
Meyers, Paul Thomas 
Michael, Edward Paul 
Michael, Ethel Wolfe 
Michael, George Thomas 



Glen Morgan 

Parkersburg 

Grantsville 

Moorefield 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Wellsburg 

Kimball 

Connellsville, Pa. 

Morgantown 

Hempstead, N. T. 

Elm Grove 

Clifton Mills 

Keyser 

Washington, Pa. 

Lost Creek 

Sistersville 

Clarksburg 

West Union 

Beckley 

Morgantown 

Salem 

Henderson 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Hundred 

Keyser 

Shinnston 

Hinton 

Beckley 

Charleston 

Lemont Furnace, Pa 

Wheeling 

Wheeling 

South Charleston 

Grantwood, N. J. 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Caguas, P. R. 

Grafton 

Green Spring 

Morgantown 

Hillside, N. J. 

Morgantown 

Shinnston 

Charksburg 

Wheeling 

Charleston 

Morgantown 

Berkeley Springs 

Brownsville, Pa, 

Weirton 

Charleston 

East Hampton. N. Y. 

Confluence, Pa. 

Rachel 

Morgantown 

Shinnston 



Summer School 

Grad., French 

Spec, Grad. 

Sen., B. S. Agr. 

Jun., A. B. 

Soph., A. B 

Jun., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Spec, Grad. 

Jun., A. B. 

Grad., History 

Grad., English 

Grad., Political Science 

Fr., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Soph., A- B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Soph., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Spec, Grad. 

Grad., History 

1st Yr. Med. 

1st Yr. Med. 

Jun., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Spec, Grad. 

Jun., A. B. 

Sen., B. S. H. E. 

2nd Yr. Law 

1st Yr. Law 

Soph., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. E. E. 

Soph., B. S. Agr. 

Jun., B. S. E. M. 

Grad., Education 

Fr., A. B. 

3rd Yr. Law 

Grad., Education 

Jun., A. B. 

Soph., B. S. M. E. 

Soph., B. S. Ind. Ed. 

Jun., B. S. E. E. 

Fr., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

2nd Yr. Med. 

Grad., Education 

Grad., English 

Fr.. A. B. 



402 



Students Enrolled, 1932-1933 



Michael, Hartzell Andrew 
Michael, Joe 
Michael, Newton G. 
Mick, Guy W. 
Mickles, Frank Eston 
Milam, John Thomas 
Milam, Marvin Carter 
Miles, Charles L. 
Millan, John Frederick 
Millard, Jack Anderson 
Miller, Charles Emmert 
Miller, Delmas Ferguson 
Miller, Earl Donald 
Miller, Elizabeth Little 
Miller, Eugene Page 
Miller, Evelyn Juanita 
Miller, French Ronald 
Miller, Gantt William, Jr. 
Miller, George Adams 
Miller, Gulie Alice 
Miller, James Edgell 
Miller, Jean Elizabeth 
Miller, Jean Ellen 
Miller, Jnseph Daniel 
Miller, Josephine Fitzwater 
Miller, Julius Pell 
Miller, Kathleen Alice 
Miller, Kenneth Clarke 
Miller, Lois Ina 
Miller, Nellie Marie 
Miller, Niles Glennor 
Miller, Olga Irene 
Miller, Page LeMoyne 
Miller, Faul Clifton 
Miller, Paul Gilbert 
Miller, Phyllis Maxine 
Miller, Robert Elberfield 
Miller, Rufus Glen 
Miller, Ruth 
Miller, Velma Walls 
Miller, Webster Earl 
Miller, William Blanchard 
Million, Robert 
Milliron, Herbert Edward 
Mills, Juanita Margaret 
Mills, Lawrence Hoy 
Mills, Leonard Charles 
Minear, Kenneth Ward 
Minney, Arlan Juanita 
Minney, Cray 
Minnich, Edgar Ray 
Minnick, Wayman Clark 
Minsker, Virginia Catherine 
Minter, Doyle 
Minter, Ernest Clyde, Jr. 
Mitchell, Carolyn Barton 
Mitchell, John W. 
Moats, Frank Charles 



Ruckman 
Clarksburg 
Fair view 
Buckhannon 
Binghamton, N. Y. 
Sissonville 
Sissonville 
Marlinton 
Littleton 
Morgantown 
Morgantown 
Glen Dale 
Kingwood 
Gerrardstown 
Berkeley Springs 
Grafton 
Morgantown 
Martinsburg 
Saint George 
Huntington 
Spencer 
Spencer 
Charleston 
DuBois, Pa. 
Beverly 
Huntington 
Sharpies 
Follansbee 
Morgantown 
Tunnel ton 
Berkeley Springs 
Morgantown 
McMechen 
Sharpies 
Saint George 
Kingwood 
Huntington 
Kingwood 
Uniontown, Pa. 
Morgantown 
Terra Alta 
Fairmont 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Wheeling 
Morgantown 
Clarksbnrg 
Charleston 
Parsons 
Lockney 
Lockney 
Wellsburg 
Hundred 
Charleston 
Beckley 
Beckley 
Charleston 
Huntington 
Morgantown 



Soph., B. S. E. E. 

Fr., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Summer School 

Soph., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Summer School 

Fr., B. S. Agr. 

Soph., B. S. M. E. 

Jun.. B. S. E. E. 

Grad., Education 

Grad., Education 

Fr., A. B. 

Sen., B. Mus. 

Soph., A. B. 

Soph., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

1st Yr. Med. 

Sen., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Spec, Grad. 

Fr., B. S. Agr. 

Soph., B. S. H. E. 

.Jun., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Grad., English 

Grad., Education 

Fr., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. E. E. 

Jun., B. S. H. E. 

Sen., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. E. E. 

Fr., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. Agr. 

Fr., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. Agr. 

Grad., Education 

Soph., A. B. 

Spec, Grad. 

Sen., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Spec, Grad. 

Soph., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. Agr. 

Fr., A. B. 

2nd Yr. Med. 

Fr., B. S. Ch. E. 

Sen., B. S. Agr. 

Soph., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. Ind. Ed. 

3rd Yr. Law 

Fr., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

1st Yr. Law 

Jun., B. S. Ch. E. 



List of Students 



403 



Moats, Harry Edward 
Molenock, Anna 
Molner, Julia Norene 
Mong, Richard Grant 
Monteith, Victor St. Clair, Jr. 
Montgomery, Carl Francis 
Montgomery, Charles Botsford 
Montgomery, Marian Marsh 
Montgomery, Mary Moore 
Montgomery, Roy Kenneth 
Monti, Genevieve 
Montoney, Iva Harman 
Moore, Bernard Joseph 
Moore, Bertie Smith 
Moore, Byron Wayne 
Moore, Charles Daniel 
Moore, Edward 
Moore, Predrica McDonald 
Moore, Gail Salisbury 
Moore, George W. 
Moore, James Bennett 
Moore, John Mark 
Moore, Leslie Darl 
Moore, Martha Margaret 
Moore, Mary Field 
Moore, Mar> Louise 
Moore, Mary Virginia 
Moore, Mary Virginia 
Moore, Mary Virginia 
Moore, Oakey Don 
Moore, Thomas Jefferson 
Hoore, Thomas Spencer 
Moore, Virginia Miller 
Moosey, Louis 
Moran, Ulenna Leone 
Morgan, Harold Porter 
Morgan, Harvey 
Morgan, Ronald William 
Morgan, Samuel Cree 
Morgan, William Mason 
Moriarty, Gertrude 
Morley, Wilmer Vernon 
Moroose, Tucker Rock 
Morris, Bernice Leone 
Morris, James Lynn 
Morris, John Hite 
Morris, John Richard 
Morris, Langdon Clayton 
Morris, Lee McClure 
Morris, Madaline 
Morris, Margaret Cale 
Morris, Ollie B. 
Morris, Wentworth S. 
Morrison, Donald Harvard 
Morrison, Lewis French 
Morrison, Wilbur Cornell 
Moser, Ha Frances 
Moss, Florence Holbert 



Harrisville 

Uniontown, Pa. 

Pursglove 

Erie, Pa. 

Martinsburg 

Mole Hill 

Wheeling 

Mole Hill 

Montgomery 

Tunnelton 

Clarksburg 

Harman 

Morgantown 

Athens 

Daybrook 

Morgantown 

Crucible, Pa. 

West Alexander, Pa. 

Morgantown 

Athens 

Greensburg, Pa. 

West Alexander, Pa. 

Ripley 

West Alexander, Pa. 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Fairmont 

Rowlesburg 

Fairview 

Ronceverte 

Charleston 

Elkins 

Monongah 

Clarksburg 

Morgantown 

Panther 

Mount Pleasant, Pa. 

Greensburg, Pa. 

Weston 

Wheeling 

Mona 

Fairmont 

Grantsville 

Fairmont 

Morgantown 

Clarksburg 

Kayford 

Kayford 

Waynesburg, Pa. 

Masontown 

Bristol 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Beckley 



Fr., A. B. 
Jun., A. B. 
Fr., A- B. 
Jun., A. B. 
Sen., B. S. E. E. 
Grad., Education 
Grad., Education 
Sen., A. B. 
Grar., English 
Jun., B. S. Tnd. Ed. 
Jun., A. B. 
Jun., B. S. H. E. 
2nd Yr. Med. 
Summer School 
Soph., B. S. Agr. 
Fr., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
2nd Yr. Law 
Fr., B. S. C. E. 
Grad., Education 
Soph., A, B. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Grad., Education 
Grad., French 
Soph., A. B. 
Fr., A- B. 
Spec, Grad. 
Sen., B. S. H. E. 
Fr., A. B. 
Fr., B. S. Agr. 
2nd Yr. Med. 
1st Yr. Law 
Soph., A. B. 
2nd Yr. Med. 
Jun., A. B. 
Soph., B. S. C. E. 
Jun., A. B. 
Soph., B. S. Ch. E. 
Sen., A. B. 
Fr., B. S. E. E. 
Grad., Education 
Jun., A. B. 
2nd Yr. Law 
Fr., A. B. 
Soph., A- B. 
Sen., B. S. C. E. 
Jun., A. B. 
1 st Yr. Law 
Grad., Mining 
Fr., A. B.. 
Sen., A. B. 
Grad., Education 
Soph., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Grad., Education 
Sen., B. S. Ind. Ed. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Sen., B. S. H. E. 



404 



Students Enrolled, 1932-1933 



Moss, George Hubert 
Moss, Wahneta Ruth 
Muffly, Mary Josephine 
Muhleman, Charles Eugene 
Muhleman, John Henry 
Muir, Thomas Fitch 
Mullins, Virginia Edith 
Mummey, Thomas Cleary 
Munchmeyer, Robert John 
Murdock, Evelyn Catherine 
Murphy, Lora Hutson 
Murphy, William Anthony 
Murray, Jean Miller 
Murray, William Allen 
Musgrave, Paul Newman 
Musgrave, Sally Lou 
Musgrave, Vivian Maria 
Musgrove, William Donald 
Musser, Egbert Glenn 
Myer, Lawrence Gerald 
Myers, Ada Olive 
Myers, Alma Emma 
Myers, Bertha Vivian 
Myers, Clarence E. 
Myers, Clayton 
Myers, Dennis Edward 
Myers, Galen Sheets 
Myers, Ira Odell 
Myers, Mildred Frances 
Myers, Texa Louise 
Nach, Sara 
Nail, Charles Stephen 
Nale, Erma Mae 
Namay, Sleyman M. 
Nash, Julian Westbrook 
Naumann, Carolyne Virginia 
Naumann, Grace Henrietta 
Nay, John Edward 
Neely, Reva Belle 
Neely, William Edward 
Neff, Charles Thompson, Jr. 
Neff, Harold Hanna 
Neff, Thomas Brue 
Neill, James Donald 
Nekoranec, Mary Virginia 
Nekoranec, Paul Lawrence 
Nels, William 
Nelson, Albert Wendell 
Nelson, Carl H. 
Nelson, Francis Baker 
Nelson, Mona Susan 
Nemeth, Joseph Gabriel 
Nester, Hansford Dorsey 
Nethken, Mary Helen 
Newby, Rand 
Newell, Mae Elizabeth 
Newell, Pearl Ruth 
Newhouse, Esther Mary 



Beckley 

Glenville 

New Paltz, N. Y. 

Wheeling 

New Martinsville 

New York, N. Y. 

Madison 

Parkersburg 

Washington 

Morgantown 

West Union 

Wheeling 

Grafton 

Grafton 

Fairmont 

Point Pleasant 

Wallace 

Fairmont 

Charleston 

Philippi 

Morgantown 

Core 

Parsons 

Wolf Summit 

Richwood 

Huntington 

Mount Pleasant, Pa. 

Morgantown 

New Marinsville 

Waynesburg, Pa. 

Weirton 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Charleston 

Willow 

Triadelphia 

Triadelphia 

Lumberport 

Rivesville 

Jane Lew 

Morgantown 

Charleston 

Richwood 

Cairo 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Pursglove 

Turtle Creek 

Clarksburg 

Huntington 

Turtle Creek 

Osage 

Ronceverte 

Bayard 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Chester 

Chester 

Weston 



Fr., B. S. Ch. E. 

Summer School 

Grad., Education 

Jun., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. Ch. E. 

1st Yr. Med. 

Jun., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. Ch. E. 

Sen., B. S. Agr. 

Spec, Music 

Sen., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Soph., B. S. M. E. 

Grad., Zoology 

Jun., B. S. H. E. 

Jun., B. S. H. E. 

Grad., Chemical Eng'g. 

Grad., Zoology 

1st Yr. Law 

Soph., A. B. 

Spec, Grad. 

Sen., B. S. H. E. 

Grad., Education 

Soph., B. S. Ch. E. 

1st Yr. Law 

Soph., B. S. Agr. 

Spec, Grad. 

Grad., French 

Jun., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Soph., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

1st Yr. Phar. 

Soph., B. S. Ch. E. 

Jun., B. S. Ed. 

Jun., B. S. Ed. 

Fr., B. S. Agr. 

Sen., B. S. H. E. 

Jun., A. B. 

Grad., Political Science 

3rd Yr. Law 

Spec, Grad. 

Grad., Education 

Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Sen., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Grad., Education 

Fr., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

4th Yr. Pharm. 

Spec, Grad. 

Grad., English 

Fr., A- B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 



List of Students 



405 



Newhouse, Newman Henry 
Newlon, Mildred Elizabeth 
Newman, Dorothy Hedges 
Newman, Winifred Harriett 
Newton, Richard 
Newton, Robert Louis 
Nicholson, Naomi Dell 
Niehaus, Andrew James 
Niehaus, Jack LeRoy 
Niner, Albert James 
Nitshe, George A, 
Nixon, Roy M. 
Nixon, Thomas Daniel 
Noble, Louise 
Noel, Jessie Evelyn 
Nolan, Kathleen Patricia 
Noland, Edward William 
Noland, Erra Enid 
Noland, Velda 
Nolting, John Paul, Jr. 
Norman, Garner 
Norteman, Samuel Lash 
Nutter, Anita May 
Nutter, Mary Elizabeth 
Nutter, Phosa David 
Nutter, Virginia Lee 
Nuzum, David Graham 
Nuzum, James Richard 
Nuzum, Wilson 
Nyhan, David Gerald 
O'Brien, Lawrence R. 
Ocoma, Estanislao Manaois 
O'Connor, John Joseph 
Odell, Challens Beryle 
O'Farrell, Paul James 
Offner, Edward 
Oliverio, Domineck 
Onder, Angelo 
Oneacre, Paul Edward 
O'Neill, Joseph Brown 
Oppenheimer, Benjamin Rolland 
Organt, Daniel Orland 
Orler, Victor Joseph, Jr. 
Orr, Lynn Earl 
Orton, Jean Chapman 
Osborne, Mary Jane 
Ostrofsky, Ralph Eli 
O'Toole, Thomas 
Ott, Earl C. 
Ott, Marion Jane 
Ours, Fred 

Owen, Edward Morgan 
Owen, Emily Martha 
Owens, John Custer 
Owens, Mary Annunciata 
Owens, Sarah Virginia 
Oxenhorn, Benjamin Merton 
Page, Nadine 



East Lynn 

Simpson 

Moundsville 

Charleston 

Portland, Ore. 

Charleston 

Salem 

Wheeling 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Ocean City, N. J. 

Bridgeport 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Vivian 

McMechen 

Romney 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Clarksburg 

Parkersburg 

Wheeling 

Enterprise 

Fairmont 

Russellville 

Enterprise 

Hepzibah 

Morgantown 

Hepzibah 

Blacksville 

Powellton 

Mangaldan, P. I. 

Enterprise 

Shinnston 

White Sulphur Sp'gs 

Fairmont 

Clarksburg 

McCullough, Pa. 

New Martinsville 

Uniontown, Pa. 

Morgantown 

Masontown, Pa. 

Hollidays Cove 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Mattapan, Mass. 

Gary 

Littleton 

Lewisburg 

Moorefield 

Uniotown, Pa, 

Fairmont 

Clarksburg 

Wheeling 

Shepherdstown 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Morgantown 



2nd Yr. Med. 

Grad., Education 

Grad., English 

Grad., Education 

Grad., Chemical Eng'g. 

Soph., B. S. E.E. 

Sen., B. S. H. E. 

2nd Yr. Med. 

Fr., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. M. E. 

Fr., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. Agr. 

Sen., B. S. Ind. Ed. 

Spec, A. & S. 

Grad., English 

Fr., A. B. 

Grad., Mathematics 

Jun., B. S. H. E. 

Grad., Education 

Grad., Geology 

Summer.School 

Soph., B. S. Ch. E. 

Grad., French 

Soph., A. B. 

2nd Yr. Med. 
Grad., English 

Sen., A. B. 

Sen., B. S. Agr. 

Fr., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. Ed. 

Grad., History 

Soph., B. S. Ch. E. 

Fr., A. B. 

Sen., B. S. Agr. 

Spec, Grad. 

1st Yr. Med. 

Soph., B. S. E. E. 

Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

1st Yr. Pharm. 

3rd Yr. Law 

Sen., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. M. E. 

Soph., B. S. E. E. 

Soph., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. H. E. 

Soph., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Spec, Grad. 

Soph., B. S. C. E. 

Soph., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Sen., B. S. C. E. 

Grad., Education 

Sen., B. S. H. E. 

Soph., A. B. 

Grad., English 



406 



Students Enrolled, 1932-1933 



Painter, Camilla 
Paisley, Jean Leete 
Paladino, Francis Lewis 
Paletz, Samuel Arthur 
Palmer, Glenn Fair 
Park, Chester Moorlan 
Parker, Frank Floyd 
Parks, Edna May 
Parks, Seigle Wilson 
Parnes, David 
Parriott, Sarah Elizabeth 
Parriott, William Wright 
Parrish, Mary Arietta 
Parry, Irma Dillon 
Parry, Meredith 
Parsons, Earl George 
Parsons, Harold Ewing 
Parsons, Herbert 
Parsons, Norman Welbeo 
Parsons, Roy Cyrus 
Partlow, "Virginia 
Patterson, George Denison 
Patterson, James Howard 
Patterson, John Lester 
Patterson, Robert Compton 
Patton, Floyd Jackson 
Pavolak, Bertha 
Paxton, Harold Glenn 
Payne, Charles Henry 
Payne, Mae Mabe 
Peairs, Chalmers Addison, Jr. 
Peairs, Edith Pennington 
Pease, Alice Elizabeth 
Pease, John Stanley 
Peaslee, Ethel Virginia 
Peck, Melville Crim 
Pedgonay, John 
Pedigo, Rudolph William 
Pell, Van Elmis 
Pelley, Harry Benton 
Pelter, John Joseph 
Pence, John Wesley 
Pendergast, Rosalie Margaret 
Penn, Samuel Elvin 
Perilman, William 
Perkins, Reva Kate 
Perrine, Paul Watson 
Perry, James Leonard 
Perry, Pauline Watson 
Perryman, Virginia Clark 
Persinger, Sara 
Peters, Edwin Stephen 
Peters, Gilbert Burdette 
Peters, Susie Virginia 
Peters, Trixy McClaugherty 
Petersen, Sylvia 
Peterson, Arline Fern 
Pettengill, Ralph S. 



Morgantown 

Gassaway 

Clarksburg 

Morgantown 

Pine Grove 

Farmington 

Rivesville 

Elizabeth 

Fairmont 

Perth Amboy, N. J. 

Wheeling 

Morgatown 

Fairmont 

Montgomery 

Montgomery 

Chester 

Morgantown 

Proctor 

Morgantown 

SmithHeld 

Welch 

Huntington 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Fairmont 

Wheeling 

Walton 

Beckley 

Beckley 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

West Union 

Babylon, N. Y. 

Rowlesburg 

Morgantown 

Lumberport 

Athens, Ohio 

Morgantown 

Sherrard 

Dehue 

Fairmont 

Hutton 

Mount Pleasant, Pa. 

Wheeling 

Owens 

Exchange 

Talcott 

Philippi 

Ronceverte 

Williamson 

Masontown, Pa. 

Morgantown 

Bluefield 

Bluefield 

Dellslow 

Weston 

Henderson, N. Y. 



Soph., A. B. 

Sen., B. S. H. E. 

2nd Yr. Pharm. 

Soph., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Sen., B. S. Agr. 

Fr., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Grad., French 

Grad., English 

Grad., History 

Soph., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. M. E. 

Sen., B. S. C. E. 

Grad., Chemistry 

Soph., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Grad., Education 

Grad., Zoology 

Soph., A. B. 

2nd Yr. Pharm. 

Fr., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Soph., B. S. Agr. 

Jun., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

2nd Yr. Pharm. 

Fr., B. S. E. E. 

1st Yr. Med. 

Grad., Education 

Fr., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Grad., Political Science 

Summer School 

1st Yr. Med. 

Sen., A. B. 

Summer School 

Jun., B. S. Agr. 

Grad., Economics 

Grad., English 

Grad., Education 

Spec, Grad. 

Fr., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

2nd Yr. Law 

Sen., B. S. Ed. 

Summer School 

Soph., B. S. E. E. 



List of Students 



407 



Pettigrew, Helen Purinton 

Pettit, Elah Frances 

Pettit, Harold Starkey 

Pfalzgraf, Russell Alexander 

Phares, Verdie 

Phillips, Dorothy 

Phillips, Virgil Frank 

Piampiano, John Joseph 

Pickens, James Keith 

Pickens, Pearl 

Pierattini, Marino 

Pierson, Katherine McKee 

l'ietro, Frank James 

Pietro, George Henry 

Pietro, Helen Elizabeth 

Pilchard, William Albert 

Pilcher, Edwin Sharp 

Pinel, Rene Charles 

Pinnell, Margaret Smoot 

Pipes, Byron Thomas 

Pipes, Elreane 

Pitsenberger, Isaac Irvin 

Pitzer, Dove Lillian 

Plaster, Lawrence Andrew 

Plate, William Albert 

Pletcher, Robert Oliver 

Plymale, Hope Rebecca 

Plymale, Pauline Malcolm 

Poilek, Joseph Edward 

Polan, Charles Gabriel 

Polan, Lester Ray 

Poland. William Dickens 

Polen, Frederic Eugene 

Poling, Hansel Beverly 

Pomeroy, Willis Edward 

Pomykata, Joe 

Ponek, Stanley Joseph 

Ponka, Joseph 

Poole, John Augustus 

Poole, Robert Clay 

Pope, Mildred 

Porter, George Worth 

Porter, James Bennett, Jr. 

Porter, Mary Elizabeth 

Post, Carl Brand 

Post, Charles Lee 

Post, George Winfield 

Post, Lawrence Caldwell 

Posten, Donald Thornton 

Posten, Harold Bonafield 

Postlethwait, Raymond Woodrow 

Potesta, Pete S. 

Potter, Roy Edward 

Powell, Barbara Brenneman 

Powell, Charles W. 

Powell, James Edward 

Powell, Martin M. 

Power, Robert Stanley 



Morgantown 


Grad., English 


Hopemont 


Spec, Gfad. 


Hopemont 


Jun., A. B. 


Parkersburg 


Sen., B. S. Phys. Ed. 


Riverton 


Jun., B. S. Ed. 


Man 


Soph., A. B. 


Saint George 


Jun., A. B. 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


1st Yr. Med. 


Mount Clare 


Jun., A. B. 


Glenville 


Grad., English 


Masontown, Pa. 


Jun., A. B. 


Charleston 


Jun., A. B. 


Morgantown 


Soph., A. B. 


Morgantown 


Jun., A. B. 


Morgantown 


Sen., A. B. 


Bethany 


Jun., B. S. E. M. 


Charleston 


Jun., B. S. Agr. 


West New York, N. 


J. Sen., B. S. Eng'g. Elect. 


Piedmont 


Sen., A. B. 


Cameron 


Sen., A. B. 


Cameron 


Jun., B. S. Phys. Ed. 


Morgantown 


Grad., Botany 


Farmington 


Summer School 


Charleston 


Sen., B. S. Ed. 


Weston 


2nd Yr. Pharm. 


Cameron 


2nd Yr. Med. 


Huntington 


Summer School 


Huntington 


Grad., Education 


Jeanette, Pa. 


Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 


Charleston 


2nd Yr. Med. 


Salem 


Grad., Physics 


Martinsburg 


Fr., A. B. 


New Cumberland 


1st Yr. Med. 


Nellis 


Jun., A. B. 


Morgantown 


Jun., B. S. Ed. 


Oswald 


Soph., B. S. E. E. 


Osage 


Soph., B. S. Ind. Ed. 


Mona 


Fr., A. B. 


Morgantown 


Fr., A. B. 


Clay 


Jun., A. B. 


Renick 


Sen., A. B. 


Morgantown 


Grad., Education 


New Cumberland 


Fr., B. S. Agr. 


New Cumberland 


Grad., Home Ec. Ed. 


Clarksburg 


Grad., Physics 


Clarksburg 


Jun., B. S. E. E. 


Clarksburg 


Fr., A. B. 


Buckhannon 


1st Yr. Med. 


Morgantown 


Fr., Eng'g. 


Morgantown 


Soph., B. S. E. E. 


New Martinsville 


Soph., A. B. 


Richwood 


Soph., A. B. 


Wheeling 


Jun., B. S. Ind. Ed. 


New Cumberland 


Fr., A. B. 


Huntington 


2nd Yr. Med. 


Clarksburg 


Jun., A. B. 


Wyatt 


Spec, Grad. 


Huntington 


Sen., A. B. 



408 



Students Enrolled, 1932-1933 



Powers, Gerald Elmer 
Powers, Paul Edwin 
Prack, Elizabeth Louise 
Preest, Mildred Coreyne 
Prentice, Alison Maine 
Preston, Margaret Ann 
Price, B. Allen 
Price, James Allen 
Price, Lando Forrest 
Price, Vivian Swift 
Price, Walter Cassius 
Prichard, Claude 
Priddy, Newton D. 
Pritchard, Mona 
Propps, Ila Mae 
Propst, Beulah Lee 
Protzman, Garnet Hester 
Proudfoot, Blenda Lena 
Pruitt, George Monroe, Jr. 
Pugh, Charles Buster 
Pugh, Julian Lee 
Puglia, Peter 
Pushkin, Willard 
Pyle, George Russell, Jr. 
Pyle, Howard Scott 
Queen, Lloyd Goff 
Quenon, Clarence Anthony 
Quenzel, Carrol Hunter 
Radivojevic, Sava Mathew 
Kaemsch, Laurence Edwin 
Raese, Richard 
Rafferty, Michael Alphonse 
Ragase, Robert Hamilton 
Ragland, George Motley 
Ragland, Ned Hutter 
Raines, David Reed 
Ramage, Anna Margaret 
Ramage, Eleanor Conn 
Ramsay, Harry James 
Ramsay, Robert Lincoln 
Ramsey, Goff D. 
Ramsey, Harold Koontz 
Ramsey, Sylvia Sibyl 
Randall, Olive Rymer 
Randolph, Dale 
Rapp, Murrell Sine 
Rapsawich, John 
Ratcliffe, George Jack 
Ravson, Harold 
Rawe, Melvin Lloyd 
Rawn, Andrew Bryson, Jr. 
Rea, Henry Berlin 
Ream, Alvin Richard 
Ream, Violet Daniells 
Rector, Hazel G. 
Reed, Charles Allen, Jr. 
Reed, Helen Louisa 
Reed, Henry DuPont 



Elkins 

Fairmont 

Clarksburg 

Morgantown 

War 

White Sulphur Sp'gs. 

Hinton 

Morgantown 

Salem 

Morgantown 

Huntington 

Parkersburg 

Findlay, Ohio 

Pennsboro 

Fayetteville 

Philippi 

Morgantown 

Grantsville 

Collingswood, N. J. 

Buckhannon 

Seibert 

Uniontown, Pa. 

Charleston 

Morgantown 

Montgomery 

Clarksburg 

Farmington 

Morgantown 

Everettsville 

Elkins 

Davis 

Weston 

Wheeling 

Beckley 

Beckley 

Thomas 

Clarksburg 

Fairmont 

Munhall, Pa. 

Follansbee 

Cairo 

Morgantown 

Leander 

Morgantown 

McMechen 

Sistersville 

Rachel 

Morgantown 

East Orange, N. J. 

New Martinsville 

Huntington 

Morgantown 

Crellin, Md. 

Morgantown 

Shinnston 

Atl. Highlands, N. J. 

Millville 

Parkersburg 



Grad., Economics 
Grad., Education 
Fr., A. B. 
Soph., B. S. H. E. 
Soph., A. B. 
Jun., A. B. 
Soph., B. S. Ch. E. 
Fr., A. B. 
Grad., Education 
Jun., B. S. Ed. 
2nd Yr. Law 
Sen., A. B. 
3 st Yr. Med. 
Jun., B. S. Phys. Ed. 
Grand., Education 
Sen., A. B. 
Sen., A. B. 
Jun., A. B. 
Soph., B. S. E. E. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Soph., B. S. E. E. 
Soph., B. S. Agr. 
Jun., A. B. 
Jun., B. S. Ch. E. 
Jun., B. S. Ch. E. 
Fr., A. B. 
Jun., B. S. E. M. 
Grad., History 
2nd Yr. Med. 
Grad., Education 
Sen., A. B. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Soph., A. B. 
Jun., B. S. Ch. E. 
3rd Yr. Law 
Grad., Zoology 
Jun., A. B. 
Jun., A. B. 
Grad., Education 
Fr., A. B. 
Grad., Education 
Fr., A. B. 
Sen., B. S. Ed. 
Jun., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Sen., B. S. Agr. 
Fr., B. S. Ch. E. 
Grad., Education 
Soph., A. B. 
Fr., B. S. M. E. 
Jun., A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
Sen., A. B. 
Spec, A. & S. 
Grad., Education 
Soph., A. B. 
Spec, Grad. 
Sen., A. B. 



List of Studbnts 



409 



Reed, James Cornelius 
Reed, James Willis 
Reed, Jane Margaret 
Reed, Janet Carolyn 
Reed, Joseph 
Reed, Judson Wardlaw 
Reed, Laurence Guy 
Reed, Lena Maude 
Reed, Leon John 
Reed, Luther McClellan 
Reed, Mary Virginia 
Reed, Ruth Loretta 
Reed, William Wayne 
Reeder, Jacob Harvey 
Reese, Harry Douglas 
Reger, Mason Wood 
Reger, Verl K. 
Reger, Wray Hess 
Rehr, Bessie Baker 
Reinhart, Henry Baylor 
Reiser, Joseph Albert 
Reiter, Gertrude Katharine 
Remage, Russell, Sr. 
Remage, Russell, Jr. 
Renick, Erne Othella 
Rennon, Joseph 
Renstrom, Garnet Christina 
Repair, Richard Gerald 
Retzer, Robert, Jr. 
Rexroad, Emry Richard 
Rexroad, Thelma Leone 
Reyer, Gabriel 
Reynolds, Cedric Okell 
Reynolds, Mildred Irene 
Reynolds, Orlando Shay 
Rhodes, Hadden Sherman 
Rice, Harvey Mitchell 
Rich, Herman Anthony 
Rich, Louise Angeline 
Richard, Earl Sheilas 
Richards, John Herbert 
Richardson, Daniel Wayne 
Richardson, Edward Wright 
Richardson, Herbert Walter 
Richardson, Thelma Opal 
Richey, Guida 
Richey, Robert Maxwell 
Richman, Charles V. 
Richman, Earl Morgan 
Richmond, Jean Elnora 
Richmond, Laura Ruth 
Richmond, Neil Dwight 
Richmond, William Fred 
Riddell, Clyde Friedell 
Riddle, Denzil Clark 
Riddle, Harry Glenn 
Rider, Morgan Wesley 
Rider, Nellie Morris 



Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Clarksburg 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Kingwood 

Martinsburg 

Savannah, Ga. 

Procious 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

SmithHeld 

Charleston 

Shinnston 

Buckhannon 

Shinnston 

Oil City, Pa. 

Shepherdstown 



Soph., B. S. Phys. Ed. 
Jun., B. S. Ch. E. 
Soph., A. B. 
Pr., B. S. H. E. 
Spec, A. & S. 
Soph., A. B. 
Jun., A. B. 
Grad., English 
Spec, Grad. 
3rd Yr. Law 
Jun., A. B. 
Fr. A. B. 
Spec, Grad. 
Spec, Grad. 
Fr., A. B. 
Soph., B. S. Agr. 
Jun., A. B. 
Soph., B. S. E. E. 
Summer School 
Fr., B. S. E. E. 



White Sulphur Sp'gs. Fr., A. B. 



Morgantown 

Gassaway 

Gassaway 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Parsons 

Baltimore 

Bethany 

Nitro 

Brooklyn, 

Grafton 

Tanner 

Keyser 

Fairmont 

Princeton 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Sistersville 

Masontown 

Havaco 

Charleston 



Md. 



N. Y. 



Spec, A. & S. 
Grad., Education 
Fr., A. B. 
Grad., Education 
Soph., B. S. C. E. 
Soph., B. S. H.« E. 
Spec, Grad. 
Summer School 
Grad., Education 
Jun., B. S. Ed. 
Fr., A. B. 
Grad., History 
Jun., B. S. Ed. 
2nd Yr. Med. 
Grad., English 
Grad., History 
2nd Yr. Med. 
Jun., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Spec, Grad. 
Soph., B. S. E. E. 
Grad., Education 
1st Yr. Law 

Ed. 



Kesslers Cross LanesSen., B. S 

Chevy Chase, Md. Fr., A. B. 

Wellsburg 

Hastings 

Hastings 

Morgantown 

Hollidays Cove 

Fairmont 

Skelton 

Grantsville 

Cairo 

Cairo 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 



1st Yr. Law 
Soph., B. S. E. I 
Fr., A. B. 
Grad., Education 
Fr., A. B. 
Jun., A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
Grad., Education 
Fr., A B. 
Sen., B. S. Agr. 
Soph., A. B. 
Grad., Education 



410 



Students Enrolled, 1932-1933 



Rider, Warren Howard 
Ridgway, John Joseph 
Riemer, William Vernon 
Rietz, Louise Jean 
Riggs, Mary Wilma 
Right, Margaret Elizabeth 
Riley, Frederick Frazier 
Riley, Ulysses William 
Rinaldi, John Anthony 
Rine, Mary Beulah 
Rinehart, Karl Maxwell 
Rinehart, Oliver Nelson 
Rinehart, Willa Chenoweth 
Ripley, Raymond Graydon 
Rise, George Dallas, Jr. 
Ritter, John Meredith 
Ritter, Joseph Samuel 
Ritz, Elinor Cleon 
Roach, Mildred Ellen 
Roach, Pearle Lucinda 
Roberts, Darius 
Roberts, David John 
Roberts, Donald Russell 
Roberts, Edith Elizabeth 
Roberts, Emily Winifred 
Roberts, Ernest Edward 
Roberts, George Constable 
Roberts, Jacob Earle 
Roberts, Jean Valjean 
Roberts, Johnny Pauline 
Robertson, Mary B. 
Robey, George Wilson 
Robinson, Albert Francis 
Robinson, Bruce Gerald 
Robinson, Carl B. 
Robinson, Catharine Davison 
Robinson, Harry Grayden 
Robinson, Jessie Hunt 
Robinson, Lynden Talbott 
Robinson, Mary Louise 
Robinson, Robert Ross 
Robinson, Ruth Whisler 
Robinson, Virginia Eleanor 
Robinson, William Waldo 
Robison, James C. 
Robson, George H. 
Roca, Rafael, Jr. 
Rock, John Hampton 
Rockis, Joseph 
Rockwell, Ewing Hagan 
Roden, Harry 
Rodes, Jessie Howard 
Rodgers, Edward Galway 
Rodney, Emily 
Roeder, George C. 
Roetman, Edmond Teerlnk 
Rogers, Bernice Wells 
Rogers, Doris Martha 



Morgantown 

Point Mario, Pa. 

Newark, N. J. 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Belington 

Morgantown 

Glen Morrison 

Wellsburg 

Moundsville 

Hollidays Cove 

Morgantown 

McMechen 

Alma 

Latrobe, Pa. 

Confluence, Pa. 

Clarksburg 

Bluefield 

Morgantown 

New Cumberland 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Richwobd 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Chester 

Point Marion, Pa. 

Sistersville 

Glenville 

Frame 

Shinnston 

Fairmont 

Smithfield, Pa. 

Rochester, N. Y. 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Confluence, Pa. 

Fairmont 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Monongah 

Grafton 

Morgantown 

Charleston 

Guayama, P. R. 

Fairmont 

Jere 

Uniontown, Pa. 

Saint Marys 

Renick 

Clarksburg 

Clarksburg 

Cumberland, Md. 

Lake Park, Iowa 

Paw Paw 

Point Marion, Pa. 



Fr., A. B. 
Ft., B. S. Ch. E. 
Soph., A. B. 
Jun., A. B. 
Jun., B. S. Phys. Ed. 
Sen., B. S. H. E. 
Grad, Botany- 
Sen., A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
Jun., B. S. M. E. 
4th Yr. Pharm. 
Spec, Agr. 
1st Yr. Law 
Soph., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
3rd Yr. Law 
Fr., B. S. H. E. 
Spec, Grad. 
Soph., B. S. Ind. Ed. 
Jun., B. S. Phys. Ed. 
Jun., A. B. 
Sen., B. Mus. 
Grad., History 
Sen., A. B. 
1st Yr. Law 
Grad., Education 
Grad., Education 
Jun., A. B. 
Sen., A. B. 
2nd Yr. Pharm. 
Fr., A. B. 
Sen., B. S. Agr. 
Fr., A. B. 
Grad., Home Ec. Ed. 
Spec, Grad. 
Sen., A. B. 
Sen., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Grad., Agronomy 
Jun., A. B. 
Spec, Grad. 
Sen., A. B. 
Fr., B. S. C. E. 
Fr., A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
Fr., B. S. C. E. 
Soph., A. B. 
Jun., A. B. 
Sen., B. S. Eng. Elect. 
Fr., B. S. H. E. 
Sen., B. S. M. E. 
Jun., A. B. 
Fr., B. S. C. E. 
Grad., Civil Eng*g. 
Grad., English. 
Jun., A. B. 



List of Students 



411 



Rogers, Frank Tipton 
Rogers, Homer 
Rogers, Nathaniel Howard 
Rogers, Stanley Fisher 
Rogers, Waynor 
Rogerson, Charles Clinton 
Rogokos, William August 
Rohr, Harley Downton 
Rchrbough, Myrl G. 
Roles, Forrest 
Romano, James Anthony 
Romino, Dominick Joseph 
Romino, Joseph Dominick 
Roos, Josephine Marie 
Rose, Hersehel Hampton 
Rose, Irving 
Rose, Kenneth 
Rose, Mildred Gail 
Rosen, Eli Alvin 
Rosenberg, Carl Cussiel 
Rosenberg, Mortimer Wilson 
Rosenblatt, Bernard Bare 
Rcss, Anna Virginia 
Ross, Ella Jane 
Ross, John William 
Ross, Joseph Finley 
Ross, Joseph Vincent 
Ross, Sara Nelle 
Ross, William Victor 
Roth, Elmer Rudolph 
Roth, Mary Agnes Regina 
Rotunno, Carmen Augustine 
Rotunno, Michael Robert 
Rouse, Mac Earle 
Rovira, Carlos Pales 
Rovira, Joaquin Pales 
Rowan, Elizabeth Hall 
Rowell, Ruth Elizabeth 
Rowland, Sara Elizabeth 
Rubick, Rose Marian 
Rubin, Charles Edward 
Rubin, Herman 
Rubin, Murray 
Rubin, Ralph Robert 
Ruble, Clifford Harvey 
Ruble, Harry Robert 
Ruble. Kathirene Mae 
Rundell, Beu Alma 
Runner, Harry Clyde, Jr. 
Russell, Elizabeth Campbell 
Russell, Paul James 
Ruth, Finley Robert 
Ruziska, Elaine Gertrude 
Ryan, Clarence D. 
Ryan, Ernest Leeman 
Ryan, Orel Bernell 
Ryan, Ralph Waldo 
Sagle, Ray Abner 



Morgantov> n 

Richwood 

Keyser 

Richwood 

Brown 

Moundsville 

Paterson, N. J. 

Weston 

Weston 

Greenville 

Fairmont 

Fairmont 

Fairmont 

Point Marion, Pa. 

Fairmont 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

York, Pa. 

Morgantown 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Corona, N. Y. 

Tiffin, Ohio 

Newport, Del. 

Point Marion, Pa. 

Fairmont 

Fairmont 

Fairmont 

Pennsboro 

Charleston 

McMechen 
Wheeling 
Morgantown 
Morgantown 

Parkersburg 

Guayama, P. R. 

Guayama, P. R. 

Morgantown 

Charleston 

Williamson 

Jere 

Charleston 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Sistersville 

New Martinsville 

Morgantown 

Mannington 

Anmoore 

Pine Grove 

Ryan 

Kearneysville 



2nd Yr. Med. 
Grad., Education 
3rd Yr. Law 
Fr., B. S. M. E. 
Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 
1st Yr. Law 
Fr., B. S. M. E. 
Grad., Zoology 
Sen., B. S. Ed. 
3rd Yr. Law 
Soph., B. S. C. E. 
Sen., A. B. 
2nd Yr. Med. 
Jun., B. S. Ed. 
Sen., A. B. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Sen., B. S. Ch. E. 
Spec, Grad. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Soph., A. B. 
Jun., A. B. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Jun., B. S. Phys. Ed. 
Sen., B. S. H. E. 
Fr., B. S. Ch. E. 
Jun., B. S. M. E. 
Grad., Education 
Soph., B. Mus. 
Soph., A. B. 
Grad., Botany 
Grad., Education 
Sen., B. S. Ed. 
Fr.. A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 

Sen., B. S. Ed. 
Fr., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. E. E. 

Fr., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Soph., B. S. M. E. 

Soph., B. S. H. E. 

Soph., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Fr., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. Agr. 

Grad., Economics 

Fr., A. B. 

Grad., Economics 

Fr., B. S. Ch. E. 

Fr., B. S. Ch. E. 

Jun., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. M. E. 



412 



Students Enrolled, 1932-1933 



Sameth, Charles Franklin 
Sammeck, Ella B. 
Samples, Ressie Owen 
Sarasell, Virginia 
Samson, Howard William 
Santore, Anna 
Sarrett, Virgil Alonzo 
Satterfield, Martha Ann 
Satterfield, Mildred Loise 
Saum, Harold Jefferson 
Saunders, Kenneth Miller 
Saville, James E. 
Sawyers, Frederick William 
Sawyers, Lowry Lewis 
Sayre, Greek 
Scanlon, Mary Rebecca 
Schaeffer, William McDaniel 
Schafer, John Vernon 
Schafer, Mary Zoe 
Schenerlein, Harvey Paul 
Scheuer, Mary Catherine 
Schiffler, Virginia Agnes 
Schilansky, James Leonard 
Schilansky, Nathan 
Schimmel, Herald Davis 
Schlanger, Jacob 
Schleusener, Antoinette Clara 
Schmeichel, Edward Daniel 
Schmellner, Anne 
Schmellner, Naphtaly Herman 
Schneiderhan, Felix John 
Schnopp, Jessie May 
Schoff, John J. 
Schofield, Mortimer S. 
Scholz, Frances Elaine 
Scholz, Ruth 
Schoolnic, Louis 
Schott, Ivy Hall 
Schrader, Henry Stifel 
Schramm, Henry C. 
Schuchat, Helen Essie 
Schulman, Herman 
Schultz, Grayce Theresia 
Schupbach, Gladys Enid 
Schupbach, Ralph J. 
Schwartzwalder, Floyd Burdett 
Schweitzer, Fred Thompson 
Schwender, Paul George 
Scott, Dennis Karl 
Scott, Denny Fairfax 
Scott, Earl Shelbourne 
Scott, George W. 
Scott, Harry Eugene 
Scott, Isadore Meyer 
Scott, James W. 
Scott, Julian Stone 
Scott, Roger Burdette 
Scott, Samuel Verne 



Welch 

Morgantown 

Walton 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Uniontown, Pa. 

Stickney 

Rivesville 

Fairmont 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Levels 

Hinton 

Philippi 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Kingwood 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Wheeling 

Republic, Pa. 

Wheeling 

Thomas 

Thomas 

Fairmont 

New York, N. Y. 

White Sulphur Sp'gs. 

Wheeling 

Farmingdale, N. J. 

Botosani, Rumania 

Kearneysville 

Hazelton 

Dayton, Ohio 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Point Pleasant 

Point Pleasant 

Fairmont 

Morgantown 

Wheeling 

Luke, Md. 

Lewisburg 

Export, Pa. 

Parkersburg 

Saint Marys 

New Martinsville 

Huntington 

Huntington 

Huntington 

Charleston 

Terra Alta 

Welch 

Fredericktown, Pa. 

Wellsburg 

Welch 

Williamstown 

Fairmont 

Morgantown 

Beckley 



Soph., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Sen., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Soph., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Summer School 

Jun., A. B. 

Grad.. English 

Sen., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

1st Yr. Law 

Soph., B. S. E. E. 

Grad., English 

Sen., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Spec, Mus. 

Fr., A. B. 

Spec, Grad. 

Spec, Grad. 

Soph., B. S. Ch. E. 

Fr., B. S. Ch. E. 

] st Yr. Law 

2nd Yr. Pharm. 

Sen., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Grad., Mathematics 

Grad., Plant Pathology 

Grad., Education 

2nd Yr. Med. 

1st Yr. Med. 

Sen., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Jun., A. B. 

2nd Yr. Law 

Jun., A. B. 

2nd Yr. Law 

Grad., Mech. Eng'g. 

Jun., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Sen., A. B. 

Spec, Grad. 

Sen., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Soph., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. E. M. 

Jun., B. S. E. M. 

1st Yr. Law 

Soph., A. B. 

Soph., B. S. E. E. 

1st Yr. Law 

Jun., A. B. 

Soph., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Sen., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

3rd Yr. Law 



List of Students 



413 



Scott, Woodrow Wilson 

Sebulsky, Jacob L. 

Seffens, Virgie Irene 

Seibert, Cleveland McSherry 

Seibert, George H. 

Selby, Edmund Keffer 

Seligman, Sadie Reba 

Sellers, Robert Emory 

Senfeld, Sidney 

Sephowski, Ben Ed. 

Sergent, Jack Truxton 

Sergi, Charles N. 

Setlak, Stanley Frank 

Setty, Laurel Raymond 

Sexton, Thomas Scott 

Shafer, Hugh Mexico 

Shafer, Walter Fred 

Shaffer, Dempsey Brooks 

Shaffer, Dorothy Violet 

Shaffer, Francis M. 

Shaffer, Glenn Jefferson 

Shaffer, Harold E. 

Shaffer, Harold Wilbert 

Shaffer, Helen 

Shaffer, Howard C, Jr. 

Shaffer, Louis James 
Shaffer, Maurice Leon 

Shaffer, Robert F. 
Shaffer, Vertie M. 
Shaffer, Walter Elmer 
Shaffer, Xenoda Helen 
Shamblen. Norine 
Shanks, James Carroll 
Sharp, Ann Elizabeth 
Sharp, Glenna 
Sharp, Jean Stewart 
Sharpe, Ben R. 
Sharpe, George, Jr. 
Sharpless, Geraldine 
Shaw, Marion Louise 
Shawkey, Anabel Hope 
Shawkey, Leonard 
Shawver, George Davis 
Shein, Alice Louise 
Shelby, Sarah 
Sheldon, Clara Fleming 
Sheldon, Earl Fleming 
Shelton, Richard Thomas 
Shemanski, Clem John 
Shepler, Joseph Robert 
Sheppard, Mary Bodiford 
Sherrard, Thomas Johnson 
Sherren, Joseph E. 
Shertenlieb, Alfred Roland 
Sherwood, Elliott Bamford 
Shine, Frank 
Shirey, Mervin R. 
Shlanta, Stephen P. 



Williamson 

Wheeling 

Memphis, Tenn. 

Martinsburg 

Elm Grove 

Morgantown 

Northfork 

Morgantown 

Brooklyn. N. Y. 

Weirton 

Gassaway 

Mount Hope 

Weirton 

Emporia, Kan. 

Sistersville 

Philippi 

Cass 

Mona 

Masontown 

Morgantown 

Masontown 

Bayard 

Parsons 

Parsons 

Morgantown 

Mona 

Hyndman, Pa. 

Morgantown 

Fairmont 

Morgantown 

Rowlesburg 

Charleston 

Morgantown 

Wheeling 

Marlinton 

Marlinton 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Martinsburg 

Fayetteville 

Charleston 

Huntington 

Richwood 

Williamson 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Charleston 

Nanticoke, Pa. 

West Newton, Pa, 

Bradenton, Fla, 

Wellsburg 

Tunnelton 

Logan 

Charleston 

Cassville 

Gauley Bridge 

Weirton 



Jun., A. B. 
Spec, Grad. 
Summer School 
Fr., B. S. Ch. E. 
Soph., A. B. 
Spec, Grad. 
Fr., A. B. 
Grad., Education 
Jun., A. B. 
Jun., A. B. 
Fr., B. S. Ch. E. 
Jun., A. B. 
Fr., B. S. E. E. 
Spec, Grad. 
Fr., A. B. 
Sen., B. S. Ed. 
Spec, Grad. 
Jun., B. S. E. E. 
Grad., English 
Jun., B. S. Phys. Ed. 
Fr., A. B. 
Grad., Education 
Grad., Education 
Soph., B. S. H. E. 
Soph., A. B. 
2nd Yr. Pharm. 
Jun., B. S. M. E. 
Jun., A. B. 
Grad., Education 
Jun., B. S. Ed. 
Fr., B. S. H. E. 
Fr., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
Sen., B. S. H. E. 

Soph., B. S. Phys. Ed. 
Jun., A. B. 

Spec, Grad. 

Soph., B. S. H. E. 
Fr., B. S. H. E. 

Summer School 

3rd Yr. Law 

Fr., B. S. Agr. 

Soph., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. Ed. 

Spec, Grad. 

Soph., B. S. E. E. 

Soph., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

2nd Yr. Med. 

Spec, A. & S. 

3rd Yr. Law 

Fr., B. S. Ch. E. 

Fr.,B. S. M. E. 

Fr., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Grad., History 

Jun., B. S. Ed. 



414 



Students Enrolled, 1932-1933 



Shockley. Ruth 
Shonk, Edwin Garrison 
Shonk, Virginia 
Shor, Frances Leon 
Shore, Edwin J. 
Shortridge, Blanche Pauline 
Shortridge, Wilson Poole 
Showalter, Pearl 
Shreve, Margie 
Shriver, Ida Lois 
Shriver, Mildred Mae 
Shroyer, Hester Elizabeth 
Shroyer, Robert Andrew 
Shrum, Madolyn L. 
Shultz, Billy Bayard 
Shultz, Donley Taylor 
Shumaker, R. Worth 
Shuman, Chester Albert 
Shurtleff, Mary McCulloch 
Shurtz, Harold Eugene 
Shutko, Frank W. 
Shuttleworth, Mary Louise 
Siegel, Dorothy Helen 
Sigafoose, Esther Trew 
Silver, Anne Beall 
Silver, Gray, Jr. 
Silver, Mary Gray 
Simmons, Ora Leonard 
Simms, Elward Broaddus 
Simms, Philip R. 
Simpson, Agnes Virginia 
Simpson, Alvin Ross 
Simpson, James Lowery 
Simpson, John Nathan, Jr. 
Simpson, Mary Louise 
Simpson, Patricia Donley- 
Simpson, Ruth 
Simpson, William Edwin 
Sims, C. Binford 
Sinclair, Ila Cassio 
Siple, Mary Wilson 
Sites, Charles Judy 
Sizemore, William C. 
Skaff, Philip 
Skaff, Victor S. 
Skaggs, Harriet 
Skidmore, Katherine Lee 
Skidmore, Leonard James 
Skidmore, Marjorie Virginia 
Skinner, Mary Elizabeth 
Skinner, Minter Perry 
Slack, Charles N. 
Slate, Patsy Edward 
Slate, Thomas Andrew 
Slater, Cornelia Helen 
Sleeth, Charles Robert 
Sleeth, Clark Kendall 
Sligar, James S. 



Williamson 


Fr., A. B. 


Charleston 


Fr., A. B. 


Charleston 


Grad., Education 


Williamson 


Jun., A. B. 


Fairmont 


Sen., A. B. 


Morgantown 


Grad., English 


Morgantown 


Soph., A. B. 


Smithfield 


Jun., B. S. Ed. 


Elkins 


Grad., Education 


Morgantown 


Fr., B. S. H. E. 


Morgantown 


Spec, Grad. 


Moatsville 


Soph., A. B. 


Moatsville 


Fr., A. B. 


Clarksburg 


Spec, Grad. 


Charleston 


Jun., A. B. 


Morgantown 


Summer School 


Buckhannon 


Grad., Education 


Morgantown 


Jun., B. S. M. E. 


Fairmont 


Grad., Education 


Morgantown 


Fr., A. B. 


Sprague 


Soph., B. S. E. E. 


Fairmont 


Sen., A. B. 


Point Marion, Pa. 


Fr., A. B. 


Moundsville 


Grad., Botany 


Martinsburg 


Fr., A. B. 


Martinsburg 


Soph., A. B. 


Martinsburg 


Jun., A. B. 


Elk Garden 


Grad., Education 


Charleston 


Soph., A. B. 


Charleston 


3rd Yr. Law 


Morgantown 


Spec, Grad. 


Morgantown 


Jun., B. S. E. E. 


Morgantown 


Sen., B. S. E. E. 


Morgantown 


2nd Yr. Law 


Morgantown 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Soph., B. S. Phys. Ed. 


Morgantown 


Sen., B. S. Phys. Ed. 


Morgantown 


Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 


Fayetteville 


Jun., B. S. E. E. 


West Milford 


Summer School 


Romney 


Sen., A. B. 


Upper Tract 


Soph., A. B. 


Matoaka 


?rd Yr. Pharm. 


Charleston 


Grad., Electrical Eng'g 


Charleston 


Soph., A. B. 


Montgomery 


Sen., A. B. 


Charleston 


Soph., B. S. H. E. 


Crafton, Pa. 


Soph., B. S. Ch. E. 


Charleston 


Sen., A. B. 


Middleburg, Va. 


Fr., A- B. 


Weston 


Grad., Education 


Charleston 


Soph., B. S. Ch. E. 


Weirton 


Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 


Holidays Cove 


Jun., A. B. 


Parkersburg 


Fr., A. B. 


Morgantown 


Sen., A. B. 


Morgantown 


Sen., A. B. 


Triadelphia 


Soph., B. S. E. E. 



List of Students 



415 



Sloan, Charles Elonzo 


Baltimore, Md. 


Sen., B. S. C. E. 


Sloan. Ike 


Dunbar 


Soph., A. B. 


Slonaker, Moody Farmer 


Capon Bridge 


Grad., Education 


Slone, Dorothy Marie 


Anawalt 


Soph., A. B. 


Slutsky, Mary 


Charleston 


Fi\, A. B. 


Slut sky, Moses 


Charleston 


Jun., B. S. Ch. E. 


Smith, Charles John 


Oil City, Pa. 


Sen., A. B. 


Smith, Cleatrice Hannah 


Bridgeport 


Jun., B. S. H. E. 


Smith, Delbert Cleo 


Rivesville 


Fr., A. B. 


Smith, Dorothy Edith 


( 'hester 


Soph., A. B. 


Smith, Earnest F. 


West Union 


Grad., Education 


Smith, Edward Husted 


Parkersburg 


Sen., A. B. 


Smith, Elizabeth Hammond West 


Morgantown 


Sen., A. B. 


Smith, Elton Ray 


Philippi 


Grad., Political Science 


Smith, Emma Lou 


Gassaway 


Fr., A. B. 


Smith, Ervin Sylvester 


Oakland, Md. 


Spec, Grad. 


Smith, Eugene Cunningham 


Fairmont 


Soph., B. S. E. E. 


Smith, Eva Pauline 


Lost Creek 


Sen., B. S. H. E. 


Smith, F. Paul 


West Union 


Sen., B. S. Agr. 


Smith, George Emerson 


Morgantown 


1st Yr. Law 


Smith, Georgina 


Morgantown 


Grad., Education 


Smith, Helen 


Marlinton 


Grad., French 


Smith, Helen Erma 


Athens 


Grad., English 


Smith, Houston Alexander 


Hamlin 


1st Yr. Law 


Smith, James Boyd 


West Union 


Jun., A. B. 


Smith, Joe L, Jr. 


Beckley 


Soph., A. B. 


Smith, Juanita Helen 


Paden City 


Fr., A. B. 


Smith, Kenneth Lowell 


Cedar Grove 


Jun., B. S. E. E. 


Smith, Kingsley Richard 


"Weston 


3rd Yr. Law 


Smith. Mary Isabel 


Eureka 


Sen., B. S. H. E. 


Smith. Mary Louise 


Marlinton 


Spec, Grad. 


Smith, Mendel Wallace 


Masontown 


Jun., A. B. 


Smith, Mildred Dorothy 


Morgantown 


Jun., B. S. Ed. 


Smith, Preston Clark 


West Union 


Soph., B. S. C. E. 


Smith, Rex M. 


Fairmont 


Grad., Education 


Smith, S. Preston 


West Union 


Soph., B. S. Ch. E. 


Smith, Samuel Grover 


Charleston 


3rd Yr. Law 


Smith, Susan Roberts 


Parkersburg 


Jun., B. S. Ed. 


Smith, Vera Pearl 


Keyser 


Jun., A. B. 


Smith, Vincent Daner 


Montgomery 


Spec, A. & S. 


Smith, Virginia 


Morgantown 


Sen., B. S. Ed. 


Smith, Virginia May 


Hamlin 


Sen., B. S. Ed. 


Smith, William Hendron 


Morgantown 


Soph., A. B. 


Smith, William Martin 


New burg 


Fr., A. B. 


Smittle, Dillon B. 


Paden City 


Fr., A. B. 


Smoot, James Ray 


Fairmont 


Sen., B. S. Agr. 


Smoyer, Mary Catherine 


Clairton, Pa. 


Jun., A. B. 


Snider, Otis Ralph 


Watson 


Grad., English 


Snodgrass, Clifford D. 


Smithfield 


Grad., Education 


Snodgrass, Nora 


Charleston 


Soph., A. B. 


Snodgrass, Verba Maude 


Delta, Pa. 


Sen., A. B. 


Snyder, Audrey Frances 


Mason uown 


Jun., B. S. H. E. 


Snyder, James 


Morgantown 


Soph., A. B. 


Snyder, Marvin Howard 


Walton 


Grad., Genetics 


Snyder, Philip Melanchthon 


Mount Hope 


Sen., B. S. E. M. 


Snyder, Ruth 


Walton 


Fr., B. S. H. E. 


Sofko, James Joseph 


Manor, Pa. 


Fr., A. B. 


Soisson, Augustine Donald 


Connellsville, Pa. 


Fr., B. Mus. 



416 



Students Enrolled, 1932-1933 



Soisson, Melvin 

Sole, Kent B. 

Solomon, William 

Sonneborn, Robert M. 

Sortet, Wilbur John 

South, Gertrude Margaret 

South, John Lawrence 

Sowers, John Mason 

Sowers, Scott 

Spangler, Helen Virginia 

Spangler, Lynwill Kelsey 

Spangler, Vohnie Marie 

Sparacino, Charles 

Spargo, Caroline 

Sparks, Margaret Rose 

Speicher, Benjamin Irvan 

Speicher, Harper Hobart 

Speicher, John Ward 

Speiden, Henry W., Jr. 

Sperandeo, John J. 

Sperow, Fred T. 

Spiggle, Nina 

Spiker, Beatrice 

Spiro, Jerome 

Spitz, Irene Adele 

Spitznogle, Jess Clarence, Jr. 

Sponaugle, Ruth 

Sprigg, Morgan Lee, Jr. 

Springston, Albert Lynn 

Sprouse, Earl 

Spurgeon, Bronald Albert 

Staats, Beverley R. W. 

Staats, Wallace Waid 

Stahl, Janet Lucille 

Stahl, Marjoretta Jean 

Stalnaker, Harold B. 

Stalnaker, Mary Hale 

Stamm, Anne H. L. 

Stanley, Alfred Reeves 

Slathers, Allan 

Stathers, George Dauphinee 

Staub, William Shaffer 

St. Clair, Franklin John 

St. Clair, John Thomas 

Stealey, Philip B. 

Steele, Arden Glenn 

Steele, Glenna Elizabeth 

Steele, J. Hammond 

Steele, Jesse Ira 

Steele, Paul Edwin 

Steely, Marlin Luther 

Steenbergen, Peter Higgins, Sr. 

Steger, Mary Elizabeth 

Steinbicker, Katherine Ann 

Steiner, Starling Daniel 

Steinfeld, Benjamin B. 

Stemple, Alice E. 

Stemple, Fritz J. 



Connellsville, Pa. 

Hollidays Cove 

Far Rockaway, N. 

Wheeling 

Huntington 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Peterstown 

Kilsythe 

Wheeling 

Weston 

Morgantown 

Elkins 

Morgantown 

Bluefield 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Martinsburg 

Aurora 

Morgantown 

Fairmont 

Morgantown 

Follansbee 

Franklin 

Holly 

Fairmont 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Charleston 

Ripley 

Stotesbury 

Stotesbury 

Elkins 

Washington, D. C. 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Morgantown 

Buckhannon 

Morgantown 

Romney 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Middlebourne 

Parkersburg 

Iaeger 

Bluefield 

Morgantown 

McMechen 

Cumberland, Md. 

Point Pleasant 

Wheeling 

Wheeling 

Follansbee 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Webster Springs 



Fr., A. B. 

Spec, Grad. 

Soph., A B. 

Summer School 

Jun., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Jun., A. B. 

Soph., A B. 

Soph., B. S. E. M. 

Soph., A. B. 

Grad., Botany 

Fr., B. S. Ch. E. 

Spec, Grad. 

Fr., B. S. Ch. E. 

Soph., A. B. 

Grad., Sociology 

Grad., Botany 

Grad., Education 

Jun., A. B. 

Grad., Civil Eng'g. 

2nd Yr. Med. 

Jun., B. S. Agr. 

Sen., B. S. H. E. 

Soph., B. S. H. E. 

3rd Yr. Pharm. 

Jun., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Sen., B. S. E. E. 

Fr., A. B. 

Sen., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Jun., A. B. 

1st Yr. Med. 

Soph., A. B. 

Summer School 

Sen., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Sen., A. B. 

Summer School 

Grad., Plant Pathology 

Grad., Education 

Grad., French 

Jun., B. S. C. E. 

Fr., A. B. 

Sen., B. S. Ed. 

Summer School 

Fr., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. H. E. 

1st Yr. Med. 

Sen., B. S. Ind. E<L 

Fr., A. B. 

Grad., Chemical Eng'g. 

Grad., Education 

Sen.. A. B. 

Sen., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Jun., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Grad., History 



List of Students 



417 



Stemple, Roberta Ward 
Stender, John Lawrence 
Stenger. Harold X. 
Stentz, L'ortha 
Stephenson, Juanita 
Sterle. Frank 
Stern, Joseph 
Stevens, Dorothy Edna 
Stevens, Guy 
Stevens, Richard J. 
Stevens. Wilken Richard 
Stevenson, Charles Alexander 
Stevenson, Charles Fenton 
Stevenson, Jesse W. 
Stewart, Alfred Edaire 
Stewart, Fred Grant 
Stewart, Herbert 
Stewart, Joseph Henry 
Stewart, Joseph K. 
Stewart. Marietta 
Stewart. Marvin Terrill 
Stewart, Roy Russell 
Stewart. Virgil Harvey 
Stiles, Harry Virgil 
Stilwell, Mary Helen 
Stillman, Margueritte Weese 
Stine, Emmett 
Stites, Kenneth Priest 
Stockdale, C. Harold 
Stone, Edmund C., Jr. 
Stone, Kathleen B. 
Stonestreet, Blanche 
Stonestreet, Ouida 
Storck, Elizabeth 
Stork, Helen 
Stork. Robert A. 
Strader. William R. 
Straight, Fred Sanford 
Straight, Gaynelle 
Straight, Herschel Bryan 
Straight. Jennie 
Strain, Gordon Wiley 
Straley, Harry Goff 
Stratford. Mary Belle 
Stratton, James David 
Stiausbaugh. Warren Laverne 
Strawn, Lucien Martin 
Strickland, Cecil Calvert 
Strickler, Wilbur Goodwin 
Strochak, Henry 
Strosnider, Gladyse 
Strother, Bertha Mae 
Strouss. Adella Elizabeth 
Stuart, Agnes Catherine 
Stuart, Daniel Sumner, Jr. 
Stuck, Rosemary 
Stunkard. Harry Hurst 
Stargiss, Marie Helen" 



Thomas 

Huntington 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Wheeling 

Uniontown, Pa. 

Clarksburg 

Aliquippa, Pa. 

Metz 

Hutington 

Kimball 

Morgantown 

Parkersburg 

Morgantown 

Fairmont 

Larew 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Huntington 

Glen Dale 

Morgantown 

Littleton 

Pineville 

Hundred 

Moundsville 

Morgantown 

New Martinsville 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Bluefield 

Morgantown 

Wolf Summit 

Morgantown 

Parkersburg 

Charleston 

Charleston 

Bluefield 

Fairmont 

Rivesville 

Fairview 

Fairmont 

Sistersville 

Morgantown 

Follansbee 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Clendenin 

Jefferson, Pa. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

West Union 

Brown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

West Union 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 



Jan.. A B. 

Grad., English 

Fr.. A. B. 

Soph., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Jun., B. S. H. E. 

Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Jun., B. S Phys. Ed. 

Soph., B. S Phys. Ed 

Spec, Grad. 

2nd Yr. Med. 

Jun., A. B. 

Grad.. Education 

Sen., B. Mus. 

Soph., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Spec, A. & S. 

Soph., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Fr., A B. 

Grad., Mathematics 

Grad., Education 

Sen., B. S. E. E. 

Grad., Chemistry 

Grad., Education 

Jun., B. S. Agr. 

Sen., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Grad., Education 

Sen., A. B. 

Soph., B. S. Ch. E. 

Jun.. A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Spec, Grad. 

Grad., English 

Sen., B. S. H. E. 

Soph., B. S. H. E. 

2nd Yr. Med. 

1st Yr. Med. 

1st Yr. Pharm. 

Grad., History 

Spec, Grad. 

Jun.. B. S. Phys. Ed. 

1st Yr. Law 

Grad., Education 

Jun., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Spec, Grad. 

Fr., A. B. 

Grad., Botany 

Grad., Civil Eng^g. 

Soph , A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Spec, Grad. 

Grad., Home Ec. Ed. 

Sen., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Grad., Physics 

Sen., A. B. 



418 



Students Enrolled, 1932-1933 



Sturm, Charles 
Sturm, Horace Leslie 
Sturms, Hairy Ellis 
Stydahar, Joseph Lee 
Suder, Emil Ferdinand 
Sullivan, Mary E. 
Summerfield, Ellison S. 
Summers, Donald Kenneth 
Summers, Festus Paul 
Summers, Helen Page 
Summers, Robert Russell 
Sutton, David V. 
Sutton, Felix M. 
Sutton, Joseph Bartlett 
Sutton, Mack 
Sutton, Mary Louise 
Sutton, Myrwood 
Sutton, Sylvia Frances 
Swearingen, Helen 
Swecker, Flora Jane 
Swick, Loyal 
Swiger, Clyde S. 
Swiger, Dorothy E. 
Swindler, Harold Thornton 
Swing, Ethel J. 
Swing, Leonard C. 
Swinler, James Carroll 
Swint, Angela 
Swint, Francis James 
Swisher, Arthur Otis 
Swisher, Lenna Marie 
Swisher, Lloyd Dale 
Swisher, Maxjorie Glenna 
Sydnor, Charles "William, Jr. 
Taggart, Roy Monroe 
Tait, Mary 

Talbert, Kathryn Montgomery 
Talbert, Lois 
Talbot, Beulah Saffel 
Talbott, Lewis Wilson 
Talbott, Olive Hammond 
Talbott, Rex I. 
Talbott, Richard Kenneth 
Talbott, Stanley 
Tanner, George William 
Tassan, Charles Richard 
Tassan, Sainto John 
Tawney, Ruby 
Taylor, Clinton Creed 
Taylor, David Clarence 
Taylor, Eloise Virginia 
Taylor, Evelyn McWhorter 
Taylor, Glenn 
Taylor, Isaiah Ewen 
Taylor, John Reid 
Taylor, Mary Rose 
Teagarden, John Edward 
Teagarden, John Lee 



Fairview 

Shinnston 

Parsons 

Shinnston 

Thomas 

Morgantown 

Fayetteville 

Morgantown 

Barboursville 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Clarksburg 

Clarksburg 

Bridgeport 

Anstead 

Gassaway 

Wheeling 

Gassaway 

Morgantown 

Century 

Morgantown 

Fairview 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Rainelle 

Rainelle 

Clarksuurg 

Pickens 

Pickens 

Catawba 

Spelter 

Lost Creek 

Buckhannon 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Matewan 

Winchester, Va. 

Clarksburg 

Elkins 

Elkins 

Philippi 

Phiiippi 

French Creek 

Fniontown, Pa. 

Holden 

Holden 

Charleston 

Keyser 

Petersburg 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Jacksonburg 

Huntington 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Carmichaels, Pa. 

Glovers Gap 



Soph., B. S. C. E. 

Fr., B. S. Agr. 

Soph., B. S. C. E. 

Fr., A. B. 

Grad., Economics 

Spec, A. & S. 

3rd Yr. Law 

Fr., B. S. Agr. 

Grad., History 

Spec, Grad. 

Jun., B. S. I'hys. Ed. 

Sen., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Grad., Chemical Eng'g. 

Fr., B. S. Ch. E. 

Spec, Grad. 

2nd Yr. Med. 

Sen., B. Mus. 

Soph., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Grad., Education 

Sen., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Soph., B.S. H. E. 

Sen., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Grad., Chemical Eng'g. 

Soph., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. M. E. 

Soph., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Jun., B. Mus. 

Soph., A. B. 

Grad., Home Ec. Ed. 

Grad., History 

Spec, Grad. 

Grad., English 

Grad., Education 

Summer School 

Summer School 

Grad., Education 

Grad., English 

Soph., A. B. 

3rd Yr. Law 

Fr., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Soph., B. S. E. E. 

Fr., B. S. M. E. 

Grad., English 

( rrad., Botany 

Sen., B. S* Agr. 

Fr., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Spec, Grad. 

1 st Yr. Med. 

Fr., A. B. 

Soph., B. S. H. E. 

Fr., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 



List of Students 



419 



Thompson, 
Thompson, 
Thompson, 
Thompson, 
Thornt-ury 



Tebay, William Carl 
Teets, Gordon 
Tennant, Lelard Chesney 
Terry, Olis R. 
Tetrick, Catherine V. 
Tetrick, Willis Guy 
Thayer, Katharine Ann 
Thel, Louis Thomas 
Thomas, Beaumont 
Thomas, Bernard Lee 
Thomas, Charles Danser 
Thomas, Chester Charles 
Thomas, E. Ivan 
Thomas, Grant Jackson 
Thomas, John Rendle 
Thomas, Paul Stuart 
Thomas, R. Edward 
Thomas, Ruth Boundy 
Thomasson, Leslie Holly 
Thompson, Alta Mae 

Ida Mae 

Margaret Annesley 

Newell 

Paul B. 

James H. 
Tboriie, Marjorie Ann 
TfccrnJu!], Margaret Lp* 
Thcrn Iiy, Ruth 
Thorncon, John Thomas 
Thrasher, Elliott L. 
Thurber, Ethel Milroy 
Tibbs, Richard Bailey 
Tibbs, Robert Boze 
Tibbs, Ruth 
Tice, Hazel Pauline 
Tidier, Hazel 

Tiennebrunne, Yvonne Constan 
Tierney, Kaden 
Timmons, Daisy Ella 
Tinker, Wesley Rayner, Jr. 
Tippmann, Joseph John 
Tipton, Georgia Louise 
Tissue, Dorothy Marie 
Tissue, Raymond Edward 
Titus, Kenneth F. 
Titus, Robert Lee 
Tolley, Moffett Brook 
Tolley, Truman Blake 
Tomblyn, Ethel A. 
Tomchin, Harold 
Tomlinson, Lewis William 
Tomlinson, William Nathaniel 
Tonry, Charles Edward 
Toothill, George Edwin 
Toothman, Charles Holt, Jr. 
Topper, Elizabeth Hank 
Topper, John A. 
Topper, Paul Freola 



Parkersburg 


Fr., B. S. Agr. 


Buckhannon 


Fr., A. B. 


Morgantown 


Sen., A. B. 


Oak Hill 


Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 


Clarksburg 


Soph., B. S. H. E. 


Clarksburg 


Soph., B. S. E. E. 


Charleston 


Fr., A. B. 


Aliquippa, Pa. 


Fr., A. B. 


Follansbee 


Sen., A. B. 


Helen 


Soph., A. B. 


Morgantown 


Grad., Physics 


Blacksville 


Jun., A. B. 


Saint Albans 


Jun., A. B. 


Oak Hill 


Grad., Education 


Fairmont 


Fr., A. B. 


Piedmont 


ird Yr. Law 


Thornton 


Grad., English 


Cameron 


Sen., A. B. 


instead 


Fr., A. B. 


Fairmont 


Sen., B. S. Ed. 


Madison 


Grad., History 


Sector 


Fr., A.B. 


Three Churches 


Soph., B. S. Agr. 


Clarksburg 


Soph., B. S. Ch. E. 


Man 


1st Yr. Med. 


Elizabeth 


Soph., A. B. 


Buckhannon 


Jun., B. S. H. E. 


Morgantown 


Sen., B. S. H. E. 


Wheeling 


Jun., A. B. 


Bridgeport 


Jun., A. B. 


Wheeling 


Sen., A. B. 


Morgantown 


1st Yr. Law 


Morgantown 


Soph., A. B. 


Morgantown 


Grad., Sociology 


Morgantown 


Fr., B. S. H. E. 


Clarksburg 


Soph., A. B. 


Saiem 


Grad., French 


Clarksburg 


Sen., A. B. 


Morgantown 


Grad., Botany 


Moundsville 


3rd Yr. Law 


Wheeling 


Fr., B. S. Ch. E. 


Munhall, Pa. 


Summer School 


Mount Hope 


Summer School 


Mount Hope 


Grad., Education 


Point Marion, Pa. 


Crad., Zoology 


Point Marion, Pa. 


Jun., A. B. 


Lost Creek 


Jun., B. S. E. E. 


Lost Creek 


Soph., B. S. Agr. 


Flemington 


1st Yr. Med. 


Princeton 


Fr., A. B. 


Turtle Creek, Pa. 


Soph., A. B. 


Turtle Creek, Pa. 


Soph., A. B. 


Martinsburg 


3rd Yr. Law 


Trenton, N. J. 


Fr., A. B. 


Parkersburg 


Jun., A. B. 


Morgantown 


Soph., A. B. 


Hyndman, Pa. 


2nd Yr. Med. 


Thomas 


Grad., History 



420 



Students Enrolled, 1932-1933 



Tracy, James F. 

Traugh, Louise 

Travis, Ella Marjorie 

Travis, William David 

Traynor, Phyllis Elizabeth 

Trenary, Katherine Virginia 

Trickett, Arden 

Triece, Ellen 

Triplett, William Carryl 

Troynar, Anthony Arthur 

Trumbo, Dorothy Virginia 

Tucker, David Kenneth 

Tucker, Ruth Reed 

Tyler, John Wesley 

Ulrich, H. Julian 

Umbarger, Pauline Agness 

Umbel, Waneta Virginia 

Unterman, Elvin 

Updike, Dale Barradel 

Upton, Arthur V. G. 

Upton, Dorothy Belle 

Ursich, Charles 

Ushman, Robert 

Vacheresse, Edward 

Vacheresse, Matthew 

Vachon, Joseph Thomas 

Valan, Michael Jonathan 

Vanaman, Robert 

Van Camp, Ada 

Vance, Joseph Cochran 

Van Horn, W. Burl 

Van Landingham, Audrey Howard 

Vannoy, Paul Marion 

Van Scoy, William Beura 

Van Voorhis, Charles Edward 

Van Zandt, Cora Vivian 

Van Zandt, Mildred 

Vargo, John 

Varner, Helen R. 

Varner, Joe W. 

Varner, Mildred J. 

Varner, Philip Holt 

Vecellio, Ida Ann 

Vellines, Robert P. 

Veon, Barnett Neil 

Verona, Joseph Jack 

Vest, Marvin Lewis 

Viener, Reuben 

Viewig, George Louis, Jr. 

Viggiano. Michael A. 

Vincent, Opal Gertrude 

Virgin, Thelma M. 

Virgin, Thomas E. 

Vogel, Joseph 

Voorhees, Douglas Randolph 

Wachtel, Martin Luther 

Wachiel, William Hess 

Waddell, Jenny 



Clarksburg 

Fairmont 

Point Marion, Pa. 

Waynesburg, Pa. 

Cumberland, Md. 

Martinsburg 

Independece 

Wheeling 

Saint Marys 

Fairmont 

Prandywine 

Morgan town 

Morgantown 

Huntington 

Wheeling 

Richwood 

Morgantown 

New York, N. Y. 

Mill Creek 

Morgantown 

Clarksburg 

Cassville 

Wheeling 

Wheeling 

Wheeling 

Hambleton 

Wheeling 

Reedsville 

Paden City 

Morgantown 

West Milford 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgansville 

Beech Bottom 

Point Marion, Pa. 

Point Marion, Pa. 

Martins Ferry, Ohio 

Morgantown 

Saint Marys 

Clarksburg 

Morgantown 

Beckley 

Hinton 

Parkersburg 

Union City, N. J. 

Morgantown 

Charles Town 

Wheeling 

Yonkers, N. Y. 

Cairo 

Wellsburg 

Hundred 

New York, N. Y. 

Martinsburg 

Martinsburg 

Martinsburg 

Philippi 



Grad., Education 

Soph., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

1st Yr. Law 

Soph., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Soph., B. S. H. E. 

3rd Yr. Law 

3rd Yr. Law 

Fr., B. S. H. E. 

Soph., B. S. H. E. 

Fr., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Soph., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

2nd Yr. Med. 

Fr., A. B. 

Grad., Chemistry 

Soph., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Sen., B. S. Ed. 

Grad., English 

Grad., Education 

Grad., Agr. Chem. 

Sen., B. S. E. E. 

Grad., Education 

Jun., A. B. 

Sen., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Grad., Educa ion 

Soph., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Jun., B. S. H. E. 

Jun., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Sen., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Soph., A. B. 

Sen., B. S. H. E. 

Soph., B. S. Ch. E. 

2nd Yr. Law 

Soph., A. B. 

Grad., Mathematics 

Fr., A. B. 

2nd Yr. Med. 

1st Yr. Med. 

Grad., English 

Sen., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. E. E. 

Soph., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. Ch. E. 

Fr., B. S. Ch. E. 

Fr., B. S. H. E. 



List of Students 



421 



Waddell, Richard L. 
Wade, Bessie Beatty 
Wade, Jean Spencer 
"Wade, Mary Elizabeth 
Wadepuhl, Berniece Brown 
Waggoner, Eleanor Alice 
Waggoner, William G. 
Wagner, Carlton Dale 
Wagoner. Edra Onolee 
Wainwright, Lola Shriver 
Walker, Arthur E. 
Walker, Clarence Eugene 
Walker, Dudley Palmer 
Walker, Harold G. 
Walker, J. O. 
Walker, Jack William 
Walker, Oswald James 
Walker, Robert E. 
Walker, Silas 
Walker, Stephen Morrison 
Walkup, Homer Allen 
Wallace, Helen Virginia 
Wallace, J. Alfred 
Wallace, John B. 
Wallace, Joseph Edgar 
Wallace, Walter 
Walsh, Mary Betty 
Walsh, Robert Grimm 
Walter, Mary Virginia 
Walters, James Wilson 
Walters, Leota Hester 
Walters, Lillie Dale 
Walters, Virginia Maye 
Ward, Forrest Adam 
Ward, Pearl 
Ward, Robert J. 
Ward, Robert Roy 
Warden, William Pease 
Ware, Clarence Marvin 
Waring, Claude Lamonte 
Warne, Frances Rees 
Warner, Claude Kent 
Warner, Edwin Brooks 
Warner, Ira L. 
Warrick, Richard Allison 
Warwick, Harvey Hall 
Wasmuth, Gladys 
Wass, Cassandra 
Watkins, Alfred Hale 
Watkins, Charles E. 
Watkins, Elizabeth Priscilla 
Watkins, Herbert Vernon 
Watkins, Mary Ann 
Watring, Frank Marvin 
Watson, Barbara Jeanne 
Watson, Glenn S. 
Watson, Kenneth Stanley 
Watson, Sallie DeLaughter 



Philippi 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Weston 

Morgantown 

Hebron 

Shinnston 

Williamstown 

Summersville 

Stotesbury 

Helen 

Morgantown 

Helen 

Ripley 

Macdonald 

Huntington 

Kingston 

Gassaway 

Mount Hope 

West Union 

Huntington 

Morgantown 

West Union 

Morgantown 

Charleston 

Rowlesburg 

Morgantown 

Uniontown, Pa. 

Clarksburg 

Clarksburg 

Clarksburg 

Parkersburg 

Spencer 

Fairmont 

Parkersburg 

Baker 

Belington 

Mcrgantown 

Charleston 

Maiden 

Winona 

Winona 

Morgantown 

Green Bank 

Glen Dale 

Goffs 

Grafton 

Grafton 

North Braddock, Pa. 

New Martinsville 

Reedsville 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Masontown 

Morgantown 

Thomas 



1st Yr. Daw 

Grad., Education 

Sen., B. Mus. 

Sen., B. S. H. E. 

Sen., A. B. 

Ft., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Soph., B. S. Agr. 

Jun., B. S. Ed. 

Spec, A. & S. 

Sen., A. B. 

Spec, Grad. 

Sen., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Ft., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

2nd Yr. Med. 

Grad., Education 

Grad., Education 

Fr.. A. B. 

Grad., Mathematics 

1st Yr. Med. 

Sen., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Sen., B. S. E. E. 

Spec, A- & S 

Soph., A. B. 

Soph., A. B. 

Sen.. A. B. 

Soph., B. S. M. E. 

Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Grad., English 

Jun., B. S. H. E. 

Soph., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Sen., B. S. H. E. 

Soph., B. S. Ch. E. 

Jun., B. S. Agr. 

Soph., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Grad., Education 

Soph., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Grad., Zoology 

Sen., B. S. Ed. 

Grad., Education 

Soph., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. Agr. 

Soph., B. S. H. E. 

Fr., A. B. 

2nd Yr. Law 

2nd Yr. Med. 

Grad., English 

Jun., B. S. Agr. 

Jun., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. Ind. Ed. 

Soph., A. B. 

Grad., Chemistry 

Jun., B. S. Ch. E. 

Grad., English 



422 



Students Enrolled, 1932-1933 



Way, Durbin H. 

Weaver, Frank Hurst 

Weaver, Martha Jane 

Webb, Harry Lewis 

Webb, Robert Miller 

Weber, Charles Fred 

Webster, Richard Roy 

Webster, Robert William 

Weekley, Mary Susan 

Weiner, Jess J. 

Weiner, Morris 

Weisman, Stephen 

Weissenburger, Jason Ticknor 

Welch, Harry Francis 

Welch, Mary Pearson 

Wells, A. Linley 

Wells, Dana 

Wells, Frances 

Wells, George Ray 

Wells, James Leon 

Wells, Violet B. 

Welshans, Mary Elizabeth 

Welshonce, Katharine Elizabeth 

Werkman, John Kenneth 

West, Agnes Thornberry 

West, James Anderson 

West, John Eugene 

West, Mary Jane 

West, Miriam Jane 

West, Ruth 

Westfall, Justin 

Weston, Everett 

Westwood, Felix Edward 

Wexler, Jacob 

Weyand, Harold Henry 

Whaley, William C. 

Whanger, Julian Kean 

Wharton, Blanche 

Wheeler, William Mackall 

Whetsell, Elwood 

White, Anna Bancroft 

White, Annie Laurie 

White, Bennett Sexton, Jr. 

White, Carl B., Jr. 

White, Christian Streit 

White, DeWitt 

White, Dorothy Stone 

White, Douglas Miller 

White, George S. 

White, Harold Benson 

White, Henry Murray 

White, Howard Willard 

White, Ivan, Jr. 

White, Lorna Doone 

White, Marie Christine 

White, Martha Avys 

White, Mathew Weldon 

White, Orval F. 



Wheeling 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Sistersville 

Sisters ville 

Berkeley Springs 

Reedsville 

Wellsboro, Pa. 

Pennsboro 

Paterson, N. J. 

Ferndale, N. Y. 

New Brunswick, N. 

Point Pleasant 

Clarksburg 

Keyser 

Beech Bottom 

Morgantown 

Charleston 

Cameron 

Charleston 

Morgantown 

Wheeling 

Keyser 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Charleston 

Parkersburg 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Buckhannon 

Morgantown 

Wheeling 

Dorchester, Mass. 

Morgantown 

Faiimont 

Hinton 

Morgantown 

Charles Town 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Clarksburg 

Charleston 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

South Charleston 

Uniontown, Pa. 

Moundsville 

Hollis, N. Y. 

Clarksburg 

Hollidays Cove 

Morgantown 

Richwood 

Buckhannon 

Clendenin 

Morgantown 



Sen., B. S. Ch. E. 
Fr., A. B. 
Jun., A. B. 
Soph., B. S. Ch. E. 
Sen., B. S. Ch. E. 
Fr., B. S. E. E. 
Fr., B. S. Ch. E. 
Fr., B. S. E. M. 
Soph., B. S. H. E. 
Jun., A. B. 
Jun., A. B. 
J. 1st Yr. Med. 
3rd Yr. Law 
Sen., B. S. C. E. 
Jan., A. B. 
Grad., Education 
Grad., Geology 
2nd Yr. Law 
Fr., B. S. C. E. 
2nd Yr. Pharm. 
Soph., B. S. H. E. 
Soph., A. B. 
Sen., B. S. Ed. 
P'r., A. B. 
Grad., Zoology 
Sen., A. B. 
Grad., Education 
Soph., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Jun., A. B. 
Grad., History 
Soph., A. B. 
3rd Yr. Law 
Fr., A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
Grad., Education 
Soph., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Fr., B. S. E. M. 
Jun., B. Mus. 
Jun., A. B. 
Sen., B. S. Ed. 
Spec, Grad. 
Sen., A. B. 
1st Yr. Law 
Sen., A. B. 
Grad., English 
Soph., B. S. E. E. 
Jun., A. B. 
Jun., A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
Soph., B. S. M. E. 
Jun., B. S. M. E. 
Grad., English 
Grad., English 
Sen., B. S. H. E. 
Soph., A. B. 
Jun., B. S. Agr. 



List of Students 



423 



White, Ralph Milton Wadestown 

White, Roberta Huston Romney 

White, Ronald Francis Point Pleasant 

White, Simon Lewis Hundred 

White, Wayne Gilmer Clendenin 

Whitehair, Hugh Kelly Terra Alta 

Whiteley, Joe M. Connellsville 

Wiant, Isaac J. Lost Creek 

Wiant, Nina Lost Creek 

Wiant. Ruth Lost Creek 

Wichterman, Paul Herbert Wheeling 

Wiedebusch, Martha Virginia Morgantown 

Wiesner, Henry, Jr. Wheeling 

W'iland, Irene Kingwood 

Wilbourn, Helen Clark Morgantown 

Wilbourn, Margaret E. Morgantown 

Wilburn, Edna Jordan Bluefield 

Wilcox, Maurice Kenneth Morgansville 

Wildman, Irene Grace Mcrgantown 

Wildman. Lewis Maxwell Morgantown 

Wildman, Mary Elizabeth Morgantown 

Wiles, Isaiah Alonzo Tunnelton 

Wilhelm, Catherine Elbert 

Wilhelm, Millicent Mary Blaine 

Wilkinson, Cordie Myrle Shinnston 

Wilkinson, Lee Garrett Wheeling 

Wilkinson, Renick Eugene Morgantown 

Wilkinson, Starling Gorrell Shinnston 

Willetts, Elizabeth Kathleen Morgantown 

Willey, Norman Oliver Morgantown 

Willfong, Margaret Rose Beckley 

Benjamin Leo Charleston 

David Clarksburg 

Edgar Lowery, Jr. Fairmont 

Edward James Chester 

Frank James Charleston 

Kathleen Lewisburg 

Loring Rider Buckhannon 

Lottie Anne Wheeling 

Martin Harold Bristol 

Mary E. Wheeling 

Pauline Frame 

Russell Kenneth Beckley 

Warren B. Beckley 

William Andrew Morgantown 

William Howard Weston 

Williamson, Mary Elder Morgantown 

Willis, Mary Virginia Bluefield 

Wilmoth, Almonta Morgantown 

Wilmoth, Emily Josephine Elkins 

Wilson, Alma Virginia Morgantown 

Antoinette Clarksburg 

Eula Edith Parkersburg 

Fred Arnold Fairview 

Frederick Mark Marlinton 

George Darwin Wellsburg 

Glenn Vernon Pennsboro 

Helen Elisabeth Homestead, Pa 

Ilena Belington 



Williams, 
Williams, 
Williams, 
Williams, 
Williams, 
Williams, 
Williams, 
Williams, 
Williams, 
Williams, 
Williams, 
Williams, 
Williams, 
Williams, 
Williams, 



Wilson, 
Wilson, 
Wilson, 
Wilson, 
Wilson, 
Wilson, 
Wilson, 
Wilson, 



Jun., A. B. 
Jun., A. B. 
Soph., B. S. Agr. 
Grad., Education 
Sen., A. B. 
Soph., A- B. 
Pa. Fr., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 
Spec, Grad. 
Jun., A. B. 
Sen., A. B. 
Sen., B. S. H. E. 
Sen., B. S. C. E. 
Soph., B. S. H. E. 
Slice. A. & S. 
Jun., A. B. 
Soph., B. S. H. E. 
Grad., Education 
Soph., A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Grad., History 
Sen., A. B. 
Grad., Education 
r r., A. B. 
Spec, Grad. 
Soph., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Soph., B. S. E. E. 
Sen., A. B. 
Sen., B. S. C. E. 
Fr., A. B. 
Jun., B. S. Agr. 
Sen., B. S. E. E. 
Jun., A. B. 
Jun., B. S. H. E. 
Grad., Chemistry 
Grad., Education 
Sen., B. S. Agr. 
Sen., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Fr., B. S. Ch. E. 
Sen., B. S. Ind. Ed. 
Soph., B. S. Ch. E. 
Soph., A. B. 
Spec, Grad. 
Spec, A. & S. 
Grad., Education 
Jun., A. B. 
Jun., A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
Soph., B. S. Phys. Ed. 
Jun., A. B. 
Sen., A. B. 
Soph., B. S. Agr. 
Summer School 
Jun., A. B. 



424 



Students Enrolled, 1932-1933 



Wilson, James B. 
Wilson, James Clifton 
Wilson, John Frampton 
Wilson, John McLain 
Wilson, Juanita 
Wilson, Lawrence Mervyn 
Wilson, Lucille Thaxton 
Wilson, Margaret Virginia 
Wilson, Mary A. 
Wilson, Mary J. 
Wilson, Neal B. 
Wilson, Otis Guy 
Wilson, Philip Clarence 
Wilson, Robert Charles 
Wilson, Sylvia Katharine 
Wilson, Thomas Eber 
Wilson, William Bernard 
Wilson, William L. 
Wimer, Joseph W. 
Winger, Leland Henry 
Winter, Lawrence A. 
Wise, Berenice Claire 
Wise, Charles Chilton, Jr. 
Wiseman, Rebecca J. 
Wiseman, Scott 
Withers, Ruth Myron 
Withrow, Maxie Alva 
Wojcihovski, Victor 
Wolfe, Audley 
Wolfe, Charles Tregellas 
Wolfe, Ralph Howard 
Wolfe, Tranise Bernadine 
Wolverton, James Hanson 
Wolverton, Phyllis M. 
Wolverton, Ruth Grant 
Wolverton, Ruth Maxine 
Woodburn, Samuel Ralph 
Wooddell, William Sterl 
Woodford, Alberta 
Woodford, James B. 
Woodhull, Mary Louise 
Woodhull, Robert B. 
Woody, Mary Aurilla 
Woofter, Eliza Mae 
Woofter, Robert Austin 
Workman, Laura Louise 
Wotring, Earnest Howard 
Wotring, Herbert Ervine 
Wotring, Herman W. 
Wotring, Joseph W. 
Wotring, Margaret Ferrell 
Wotring, Mary Virginia 
Wotring, Richard Milburn 
Wotring, Vivian M. 
Wright, Florence Anna 
Wright, Gene O. 
Wright, Lela Susan 
Wright, Odell Estes 



Richwood 

Mineral City, Ohio 

Clarksburg 

Washington, D. C. 

Morgantown 

Kingwood 

Sissonville 

Wellsburg 

Fairmont 

Lewisburg 

Huntington 

Glenville 

Sissonville 

Rowlesburg 

I'dington 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Ilinton 

Cans, Pa. 

Siiinnston 

Charleston 

Cameron 

Moorfield 

S;unmersville 

Fairmont 

Grafton 

liewisburg 

Weston 

Clarksburg 

Grafton 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Piedmont 

Morgantown 

Piedmont 

Flkins 

Clarksburg 

Marlinton 

Huntington 

Philippi 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

McMechen 

Camden 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Terra Alta 

Morgantown 

Terra Alta 

Terra Alta 

Morgantown 

Terra Alta 

Wilkinson 

Cameron 

Fairmont 

Pieedy 

Pliny 



Jun., A. B. 
Grad., Education 
Sen., B. S. Ch. E. 
Fr., A. B. 
Sen., A. B. 
Fr., A. B. 
Summer School 
Fr., B. S. H. E. 
Spec, Grad. 
Soph., A. B. 
3rd Yr. Law 
Grad., Education 
Grad., Education 
Fr., A. B. 

Jun., B. S. Phys. Ed. 
Fr., A. B. 
Soph., B. S. E. E. 
Jun., B. S. Ch. E. 
Jun., B. S. Agr. 
,Jun., B. S. E. E. 
Soph., A. B. 
Soph., A. B. 
Sen., A. B. 
Spec, Grad. 
Grad., Education 
Sen., B. S. H. E. 
Grad., English 
Fr., A. B. 
Fr.. A. B. 
2nd Yr. Law 
Fr., A. B. 
Sen., B. S. H. E. 
Jun., A. B. 
Jun., B. S. Ed. 
Soph., A. B. 
Sen., B. S. Ed. 
Soph., B. S. Ch. E. 
Grad., Chemistry 
Grad., English 
Jun., B. S. Agr. 
Soph., A. B. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Jun., B. S. H. E. 
Sen., B. S. H. E. 
Soph., B. S. Ch. E. 
Fr., A. B. 
Spec, Grad. 
Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 
Jun., B. S. Ch. E. 
Spec, A. & S. 
Sen., B. S. H. E. 
Fr., B. S. H. E. 
Spec, Grad. 
Grad., English 
Grad., Education 
Soph., A. B. 
Jun., A. B. 
Grad., English 



List of Students 



425 



Wunschel, William Frederick 

Wyatt. John Benjamin 

Yandala, Gust 

Yesler, Milton 

Yoak, Maud 

Yoe, Harry Warner 

Yoke, Helen Lenhart 

Yokum, Virginia Randolph 

Charles M, 

Chesney 

Earl A. 

Grace Marie 

Harold B. 

John A. 

Li n wood Hall 

Mildred Gertrude 

Ralph A. 

James George 
Horace Louis 

Joseph Felix 
Esther Elizabeth 



Young, 

Young, 

Young. 

Young, 

Young, 

Young, 

Young, 

Young, 

Young, 

Zaidan, 

Zakary, 

Zaleski, 

Zearley, 

Zelic, George 

Zeller, Harold Fredrick 

Zimmerman, John H. 

Zinn, Lucile 

Zinn, Sylvia Ruth 

Zinn, Viola Pearl 

Zirbs, Charles 

Zobrist, John Carr 

Zogg, Mae Louise 

Zucchero, Frankie Hardman 

Zucchero, Peter Joseph 

Zulkoski, Bruno P. 



Wheeling 

Clarksburg 

Follansbee 

Irvington, N. J. 

Clarksburg 

Martinsburg 

Morgantown 

Beverly 

Morgantown 

Charleston 

Morgantown 

Clendenin 

Hastings 

Clendenin 

Fhilippi 

Hastings 

Clarksburg 

Mount Pleasant, Pa. 

Newburgh, N. Y. 

Paterson, N. J. 

Morgantown 

Benwood 

Morgantown 

Clarksburg 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Huntington 

Elkins 

Weston 

Wellsburg 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 



1st Yr. Law 

Fr., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

< rrad., English 

Soph., B. S. Agr. 

I rrad., Education 

Spec, Grad. 

Grad., Mathematics 

-nd Yr. Law 

Fr., A. B. 

Crad., English 

Jun., A.. B. 

Jun., A B. 

Sen., B. S. Agr. 

Fr., A. B. 

2nd Yr. Med. 

Soph., A. B. 

Sen., A. B. 

Fr., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Grad., Sociology 

Soph., A. B. 

Fr., A. B. 

2nd Yr. Med. 

Soph., B. S. H. E. 

Sen., A. B. 

Summer School 

Sen., B. S. Phys. Ed. 

Soph., B. S. Ch. E. 

Jun., A. B. 

Jun., A. B. 

Grad., Zoology 

Jun., B. S. Ch. E. 



426 Classified Enrollment 



CLASSIFIED ENROLLMENT SUMMARY 

Men Women Total Men Women Total 
I. Resident Instruction: 

1. In the Colleges, Schools, 
and Divisions: 

A. Summer Session, 

1932 1 629 519 1148 

B. Academic Session, 

1932-33 1 1845 811 2656 

Less names counted 
twice , 270 149 419 2204 1181 3385 

2. In Short Courses: 

Coal Mining 54 54 

Water Purification 

Conference 85 85 

Fire School 305 305 

Dairying 12 1 13 

Farm and Home Week .. 547 283 830 1003 284 1287 

II. Extension : 

Industrial Education 36 36 

Mining Extension 1233 1233 1269 1269 



Total 4476 1465 5941 



1 See page 427. 



Students Enrolled, 1932-1933 



427 





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Students Enrolled, 1932-1933 



GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF ENROLLMENT 

In the College, Schools, and Divisions 



BY STATES AND FOREIGN COUNTRIES 



Arkansas 1 

California 1 

Canada „ 1 

China 1 

Connecticut 5 

Delaware 1 

Florida 1 

Georgia 2 

Hawaii 1 

Indiana 1 

Iowa 2 

Kansas 1 

Kentucky 2 

Korea 1 

Maryland 17 

Massachusetts 4 

Michigan 1 



Missouri 2 

New Jersey 32 

New York 60 

North Carolina 2 

Ohio 19 

Pennsylvania 182 

Philippine Islands 2 

Porto Rico 9 

Rhode Island 2 

Rumania 1 

Tennessee 2 

Virginia 8 

Washington 1 

West Virginia 3020 

Total 3385 



BY WEST VIRGINIA COUNTIES 



Barbour 30 

Berkeley 42 

Boone 22 

Braxton 32 

Brooke 39 

Cabell 47 

Calhoun „ 10 

Clay 6 

Doddridge 22 

Fayette 76 

Gilmer 15 

Grant 7 

Greenbrier 55 

Hampshire 23 

Hancock 46 

Hardy 11 

Harrison 228 

Jackson 10 

Jefferson 11 

Kanawha 205 

Lewis 44 

Lincoln „ 3 

Logan 21 

McDowell 38 

Marion 198 

Marshall 72 

Mason 16 

Mercer 41 

Mineral 33 



Mingo 19 

Monongalia 763 

Monroe H 

Morgan 7 

Nicholas 31 

Ohio 150 

Pendleton 10 

Pleasants 16 

Pocahontas 19 

Preston 99 

Putnam „ 3 

Raleigh „ 46 

Randolph 53 

Ritchie 35 

Roane 23 

Summers 20 

Taylor 43 

Tucker 46 

Tyler 28 

Upshur 32 

Wayne 6 

Webster „... 6 

Wetzel 81 

Wirt 5 

Wood 53 

Wyoming 12 



Total 3020 



INDEX 



Abbreviations, 206. 

Absences, 82, 83. 

Administration, Council of, 9. 

Administration, Officers of: colleges, 
schools, and divisions, 9 ; Council of 
Administration, 9 ; dormitories and 
dining-halls, 10 ; general, 9 ; Gradu- 
ate Council, 10 ; list of, 9, 10 ; other 
administrative officers, 10 ; Student 
Health Service, 10. 

Admission : advanced standing, 69 ; 
certification of entrance units, 65 ; 
conditional, 68 ; credits, 65 ; entrance 
units defined, 65 ; general require- 
ments for all colleges, schools, and 
divisions, 65 ; Graduate School, 70 ; 
methods of, 65 ; prescribed and elec- 
tive units, 66 ; special requirements 
for education, 67, law, 67, medicine, 
68, music, 68 ; special students, 69 ; 
summer session, 62 ; undergraduate 
colleges, schools, and divisions, 65 ; 
units, 65. 

Advanced standing, 69. 

Adviser: agriculture, 108, 112; arts 
and sciences, 120 ; duties of, 72, 79 ; 
education, 67 ; fraternity, 34 ; gradu- 
ate work, 180 ; home economics, 113 ; 
pre-education, 52, 120 ; sorority, 32, 
34. 

Agriculture, 207. 

Agricultural chemistry, 207. 

Agricultural Council, 103. 

Agricultural economics, Curriculum in, 
109. 

Agricultural education, 208. 

Agricultural Experiment Station : de- 
scription, 50 : staff, 27. 

Agricultural Extension Division : or- 
ganization, 51 ; staff, 29. 

Agricultural journalism, 210. 

AGRICULTURE, COLLEGE OF: 
Admission, 65. 
Advanced standing, 69. 
Advisers, 108, 113. 
Agricultural chemistry, 207. 
Agricultural economics curriculum, 

109. 
Agricultural education, 208. 
Agricultural journalism, 210. 
Agriculture, 207. 
Agronomy and genetics, 210. 
Alpha Zeta, 101. 
Animal husbandry, 211. 
Animal industry curriculum, 110. 
Applied arts, 217. 
Athletics, 93. 

Basic two-year course, 108. 
Buildings, 39. 

Certification of teachers, 115. 
Classification of students, 80. 
Courses credited toward A. B. de- 
gree, 121. 
Courses in, 207. 
Credits required, 107, 113. 
Curricula, 109-114. 
Dairy husbandry, 213. 



Degrees, Requirements for, 107, 112 

Entomology, 214. 

Entrance requirements, 65. 

Examinations, 81. 

Experiment Station : organization, 

50 ; staff, 27. 

Extension Division : organization, 

51 ; staff, 29. 
Farm economics, 215. 
Farm mechanics, 216. 
Farms, Departmental, 39, 51. 
Fees, 74. 

Foods and nutrition, 216. 

Genetics, 211. 

General courses in home economics, 
218. 

Health and child care, 218. 

History of, 49. 

Home economics : curricular require- 
ments, 113 ; organization, 50. 

Home economics education, 218. 

Home management, 218. 

Honor points : description and 
schedule, 82 ; required, 78, 107, 
113. 

Honor societies, 100. 

Horticulture, 219. 

Instruction in, 49. 

Laboratories, 41. 

Officers of administration, 9. 

Optional curricula, third and fourth 
years, 109. 

Organizations, 34, 102-103. 

Plant industry curriculum, 110. 

Plant pathology, 220. 

Poultry husbandry, 221. 

Registration, 71. 

Required and elective subjects, 107. 

Requirements for degrees, 107. 

Short courses and special schools, 
51, 112. 

Staff of instruction, 11. 

Standing committees, 33. 

Student activities, 34, 86-93, 100- 
103. 

Student welfare, 86. 

Teacher training curricula, 111, 115. 

Teaching groups, 153. 

Textiles and clothing, 217. 

Vegetable gardening, 220. 

Veterinary science, 213. 

Vocational agriculture, Teaching of, 
109, 111, 117. 
Agronomy, 210. 
Aid to students, 93. 
Alpha Delta Pi, 102. 
Alpha Omega, 103. 
Alpha Phi, 102. 
Alpha Sigma Phi, 34, 102. 
Alpha Xi Delta, 102. 
Alpha Zeta, 101. 
Alphabetical list of faculty and staff, 

337. 
American Association of University 

Professors, 103. 
American Bankers Association Foun- 
dation in Economics, loan scholar- 
ships, 95. 
American history, 245. 



430 



Index 



American Institute of Electrical Engi- 
neers, 103. 
American Institute of Mining and 

Metallurgical Engineers, 103. 
American Law Book Company prize, 

98. 
American literature, 236. 
American Society of Civil Engineers, 

103. 
American Society of Mechanical Engi- 
neers, 103. 
Anatomy, 289. 
Animal husbandry, 211. 
Animal industry curriculum, 109. 
Annex, School of Music, 39. 
Annex, Woman's Hall, 39. 
Anthony Dairy Club, 103. 
Applied Arts, 217. 
Applied music, 195. 
Armory, 39, 59. 
Arrangement of courses, 206. 
Art and archaeology, 230. 
Arts and law course, 125. 
Arts and Medicine Course, 126. 
ARTS AND SCIENCES, COLLEGE 
OF: 

Acting and play production, 259. 
Admission, Requirements for, 65. 
Advisers, 120. 
Agriculture, 207. 
Agronomy, 210. 
American literature, 236. 
Animal husbandry, 211. 
Arts and law course, 125. 
Arts and medicine course, 126. 
Athletics, 93. 

Bachelor of Arts degree : arts and 
law course, 125 ; arts and medicine 
course, 126 ; pre-medical course, 
124 ; regular course, 122. 
Bachelor of Science degree : com- 
bined courses, 128 ; public health 
course, 127 ; science and medicine, 
128 ; science, pharmacy, and medi- 
cine, 129. 
Biology, 222. 

Botany: courses, 222; curricular re- 
quirements, 132. 
Buildings, 40. 
Bureau for Government Research, 

45. 
Business administration : courses, 

233 ; suggested curriculum, 133. 
Certificate, Junior, 44, 119-120. 
Certification of teachers, 120, 133, 

137, 150. 
Chemistry: courses, 224; depart- 
mental requirements, 132. 
Classical civilization, 230. 
Classics : courses, 229 ; teacher 

training curriculum, 133. 
Classification of students, 80. 
Combined courses, 125, 128, 129. 
Composition, 236. 
Courses in, 222. 

Curricula in : botany, 132 ; business 
administration, 134 ; economics, 
133; English, 135; geology, 138; 
home economics, 140 ; journalism, 
141 ; lower division, 122 ; medi- 
cine, 143; political science, 145; 
public health, 127 ; public speak- 
ing, 146 ; Romance languages, 
14 7 ; sociologj', 134 ; upper division, 
123 ; zoology, 148. 
Dairy husbandry, 213. 



Degrees, Requirements for: bachelor 
of arts, 121 ; bachelor of science, 
127. 

Departmental requirements, 132. 

Departments, 119, 132. 

Discipline, 83. 

Economics: courses, 231; curricular 
requirements, 133. 

Education: courses, 267; curricular 
requirements, 149. 

Electives in agriculture, education, 
engineering, law, music, and phys- 
ical education, 121. 

Electrical engineering: courses, 278. 

Engineering, 273. 

English: courses, 236; departmental 
requirements, 135 ; teacher training 
curriculum, 137. 

Entrance requirements, 65. 

Examinations, 81. 

Extension courses, 45. 

Farm economics, 215. 

French: courses, 262; departmental 
requirements, 146 ; teacher training 
requirements, 147. 

Funds, 42. 

Genetics, 211. 

Geography : courses, 240 ; depart- 
mental requirements, 138. 

Geology: courses, 240; departmental 
requirements, 138. 

Germanic languages and literatures : 
courses, 242 ; departmental re- 
quirements, 139. 

Greek: courses, 231; departmental 
requirements, 133. 

History: courses, 243; departmental 
requirements, 139. 

History of the Classics, 230. 

Home economics : courses, 216 ; de- 
partmental requirements, 139. 

Honor points : required, 78, 123 ; 
schedule of, 82. 

Honor societies, 100. 

Horticulture, 219. 

International law, 257. 

International relations, 258. 

Italian : courses, 265 ; departmental 
requirements, 146. 

Journalism : courses, 247 ; depart- 
mental requirements, 140. 

Junior certificate, 44, 119. 

Laboratories, 41. 

Languages and literatures : Classics, 
133, 229; English, 135, 236; 
German, 139, 242 ; Greek, 133, 
231 ; Latin, 133, 229 ; Romance, 
146, 262. 

Latin : courses, 229 ; departmental 
requirements, 133. 

Law courses, 286. 

Library training courses, 248. 

Literature, American, 236. 

Lower division, 122. 

Major subject, 119, 123. 

Mathematics: courses, 249; depart- 
mental requirements, 142. 

Maximum and minimum work, 72. 

Medicine : combined courses in, 126, 
128, 129 ; curriculum in, 188 ; 
courses, 289. 

Mineralogy: courses, 240; depart- 
mental requirements, 138. 

Mining engineering, 294. 

Music courses, 296. 



Index 



431 



Objectives, Main, 119. 

Officers of administration, 9. 

Oral interpretation courses in public 
speaking, 261. 

Organization, 44, 119. 

Periods and authors courses, 238. 

Philosophy : courses, 252 ; depart- 
mental requirements, 143. 

Physical education courses, 305. 

Physics: courses, 254; departmental 
requirements, 144. 

Plant pathology courses, 220. 

Political science : courses, 257 ; de- 
partmental requirements, 145. 

Poultry husbandry courses, 221. 

Pre-dental courses, 130. 

Pre-education course, 131. 

Pre-medical course, 124. 

Pre-professional courses not leading 
to degrees, 130. 

Psychology: courses, 253; depart- 
mental requirements, 143. 

Public health course, 127. 

Public speaking: courses, 259; de- 
partmental requirements, 146. 

Registration, 71. 

Requirements for degree, 121. 

Rhetoric courses, 236. 

Romance languages and literatures : 
courses. 262 ; departmental re- 
quirements, 146. 

Science and medicine — combined 
course, 128. 

Science, pharmacy, and medicine — 
combined course, 129. 

Sequence of courses: botany, 132 
business administration, 134 
chemistry, 132 ; economics, 134 
English, 136; geology, 138; Ger- 
man, 139 ; history, 139 ; home eco- 
nomics, 139 ; journalism, 141 ; 
mathematics, 142 ; philosophy and 
psychology, 143 ; physics, 144 ; 
political science, 145 ; psychology, 
143 ; public speaking, 146 ; Ro- 
mance languages, 147 ; sociology, 
134 ; zoology, 148. 

Sociology: courses, 234; depart- 
mental requirements, 134. 

Spanish : courses, 264 ; departmental 
requirements, 146. 

Speech composition and delivery 
courses, 260. 

Staff of instruction, 11. 

Standing committees : University, 
32 ; college, 33. 

Student welfare, 86. 

Teacher training, 120, 132, 133, 136, 
137, 139, 140, 146, 147, 148, 149, 
150-158. 

Tutorial courses, 246, 258. 

Upper division, 123. 

Welfare, Student, 86. 

Zoology: courses, 265; departmental 
requirements, 148. 
Assemblies, 86. 
Assistant professors, 15. 
Assistants, 20. 
Associate professors, 14. 
Associations, 87, 89, 100-104. 
Athletics : board of control, 32 ; staff, 

24 ; trophies, 99. 
Auditors, 73. 
Authors and periods: English, 238. 



Baccalaureate degrees : conferred, 1931- 
32, 315 ; list of, 80. 

Bachelor of Arts degree : arts and law, 
125 ; arts and medicine, 126 ; com- 
bined courses, 125, 126 ; conferred, 
1931-32, 318 ; regular course, 122. 

Bachelor of Law degrees : conferred, 
1931-32, 324; requirements for, 80, 
187. 

Bachelor of Music degrees : conferred, 
1931-32, 329 ; requirements for, 80, 
194. 

Bachelor of Science degrees : com- 
bined, 128; conferred, 1931-32, 323; 
public health course, 127 ; science 
and medicine, 128 ; science, phar- 
macy, and medicine, 129. 

Bachelor of Science in : agriculture, 
107, 327 ; chemical engineering, 162, 

326 ; civil engineering, 164, 326 ; 
education, 150, 329 ; electrical engi- 
neering, 166, 326 ; engineering of 
mines, 171, 330; home economics, 
113, 328 ; industrial education, 170, 

327 ; mechanical engineering, 168, 
327 ; mining engineering, 171, 330 ; 
pharmacy, 190, 330; physical edu- 
cation, 199, 330. 

Bacteriology, 290. 

Baker, George C, trophy, 99. 

Band music, 60. 

Band. University, 60, 103. 

Baptist student center, 88. 

Bar, Admission to, 187. 

Barbe, Waitman, memorial prize, 98. 

Basic two-year course in : agriculture, 

109 ; pharmacy, 190. 
Beowulf Gedryht, 103. 
Beta Pi Theta, 103. 
Beta Theta Pi, 34, 102. 
Biochemistry, 290. 
Biometry, 211. 
Biology, 222. 
Biology and general science teaching 

group, 153. 
Bird Club, 103. 
Block and Bridle Club, 103. 
B'nai B'rith trophy, 99. 
Board of Control, Athletic, 32. 
Board of Governors : members, 6 ; 

military essay prize, 98 ; military 

medals, 100. 
Board, Military and Gymnasium, 32. 
Board and lodging, 64. 
Boarding and rooming places, 64. 
Boards, Governing, 6. 
Books and periodicals, 41. 
Book store, 64. 
Botany: courses, 206; departmental 

requirements, 132. 
Boughner House, 39. 
Brown prize, The James F., 97. 
Bryan prize, Wiliam Jennings, 97. 
Buildings, 39. 

Bureau for Government Research, 45. 
Bureau of Recommendation, 94. 
Business administration: courses, 233; 

departmental suggestions, 134. 



Cadet band, 60, 103. 
Cadet corps, 57. 



432 



Index 



Cadet Hop Association, 103. 

Cafeteria, 39, 64. 

Calendar, 4, 5. 

Campus Club, 104. 

Campus, Map of, 2. 

Casteliers, Red Dragon, 103. 

Catholic religious center, 88. 

Ceramic engineering: courses, 273; 
departmental requirements, 162. 

Certificate, Junior, 44, 119. 

Certification of entrance units, 65. 

Certification of teachers : agriculture, 
111, 115, 150; arts and sciences, 
120, 132, 133, 136, 137, 139, 140, 146, 
147, 148, 149, 150-158; education, 
150-158 ; home economics, 115, 150, 
156 ; industrial education, 150, 177- 
178 ; physical education, 150, 203 ; 
requirements, 150-158. 

Chemical engineering: courses, 273; 
curriculum, 162. 

Chemistry : agricultural, 207 ; courses, 
224 ; departmental requirements, 
132 ; Hall of, 39 ; major subject, 132 ; 
sequences, 132, 224 ; teacher training, 
150, 153. 

Chi Beta Sigma, 89. 

Chi Omega, 102. 

Chi Sigma Delta, 103. 

Choir, University, 103. 

Christian associations, 89. 

Church centers, 89 

Civil engineering: courses, 276; 
curriculum, 164. 

Civil Engineers, American Society of, 
103. 

Class advisers, see Advisers. 

Classical civilization: courses, 230; de- 
partmental requirements, 136. 

Classics: courses, 229; departmental 
requirements, 136. 

Classification of students, 80. 

Club courts, 103. 

Coal mining: courses, 294; curriculum, 
161, 171. 

Coif, Order of the, 101. 

Coffin, Order of the, 103. 

Colleges, schools, and divisions, Officers 
of, 9. 

Combined courses in two colleges, 68, 
125, 128, 130. 

Commencement Hall, 39. 

Commercial subjects, Teacher training 
in, 154. 

Committee on scholarship, Duties of, 
85. 

Committees : college, 33 ; University, 
32. 

Composition and rhetoric, 236. 

Concerts and recitals, Standing Com- 
mittee on, 33. 

Conditional admission, 68. 

Conditions, 83. 

Conferences: electric meter, 56; water 
purification, 66. 

Contents, Table of, 3. 

Control, Board of, 6. 

Convocation, 86. 

Cornell Club, 104. 

Cosmopolitan Club, 89. 

Cost of a year's work, 77. 

Council of Administration, 9. 

Council, Graduate, 10. 

Council of Religious Agencies, 103. 

Council, Student, 87. 



Courses of instruction : abbreviations, 
206 ; agriculture, 207 ; arrangement 
of, 206 ; arts and sciences, 222 ; edu- 
cation, 267 ; engineering, 273 ; gradu- 
ate, 207-312; home economics, 216; 
law, 286 ; medicine, 289 ; military 
science, 293 ; mining, 294 ; music, 
296 ; numbering, plan for, 206 ; phar- 
macy, 3 02 ; physical education, 305. 
Courts, Student club, 103, 186. 
Credits, Definition of : college, 72 ; 

entrance, 65. 
Credits required for baccalaureate de- 
grees : agriculture, 80, 107, 113 ; all 
colleges, 80 ; arts and sciences, 80, 
121 ; combined courses in two col- 
leges, 68, 80, 125, 128 ; education, 
80, 150; engineering, 80, 160; home 
economics, 80, 113 ; law, 80, 187 ; 
medicine, 80, 188 ; mining, 80, 160, 
171 ; music, 80, 194 ; pharmacy, 80, 
190 ; physical education, 80, 199. 
Curricula in : 
Agriculture : 
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture, 

109-112. 
Bachelor of Science in Home Eco- 
nomics, 113-116. 
Arts and Sciences : 

Bachelor of Arts: botany, 132, 
chemistry, 132 ; Classics, 133 ; 
economics and business admin- 
istration, 133 ; English language 
and literature, 135-137 ; geology, 
138 ; Germanic languages and 
literatures, 139 ; history, 139 ; 
home economics, 140 ; jour- 
nalism, 140-142; law, 125-126; 
mathematics, 142 ; medicine, 
124, 126, 188 ; philosophy and 
psychology, 143 ; physics, 144 ; 
political science, 145 ; pre-medi- 
cal course, 124-125 ; public 
speaking, 146 ; Romance lan- 
guages and literatures, 146- 
148 ; zoology, 148. 
Bachelor of Science : public health 
course, 127-128 ; science and 
medicine, 124, 128, 188; science, 
pharmacy, and medicine, 129, 
188. 
Pre-professional courses, 130-131. 
Education — Bachelor of Science in 

Education, 150-158. 
Engineering and Mechanic Arts : 
Bachelor of Science (engineering 

electives), 176. 
Bachelor of Science in Chemical 

Engineering, 161-163. 
Bachelor of Science in Civil Engi- 
neering, 161, 164-165. 
Bachelor of Science in Electrical 

Engineering, 161, 166-167. 
Bachelor of Science in Industrial 

Education, 170-171. 
Bachelor of Science in Mechanical 
Engineering, 161, 168-169. 
Graduate School : 

Master of Arts and Master of 

Science, 180-182. 
Doctor of Philosophy, 182-183. 
Law — Bachelor of Laws, 186-187. 



Index 



433 



Medicine .Bachelor of Science: sci- 
ence and medicine, 124, 128 188- 
129 en is's pharmac y. and medicine', 
Mint's, School of: 

Bach< lor of Science (mining elec- 

tives). 1/G. 
Bachelor of Science in Engineer- 
ing ol Mines, 171-175. 
.Music : 

Bachelor of Music, 194-196 
Bachelor of Science in Music Edu- 
cation, 194, 197. 

Pharmacy— Bachelor of Science in 
Pharmacy, 190-193. 

Physical Education— Bachelor of Sci- 
ence in Physical Education, 199- 

I) 

Dairy husbandry, 213 

Dean of men, 86. 

Dean of women, 86 

Degrees, Baccalaureate, 77 

Degrees conferred, 1870-1932: bache- 

S;S a » 333; h °™. 

Degrees conferred, 1931-32- 
Bachelor of Arts, 318 
Bachelor of Laws, 324 
Bachelor of Music, 329 
Bachelor of Science. 323 

Ba eiSc1?; e s)°, f 32 S 7 CienCe 'Peering 

Ba £> h 7 e . lo ^,? f S . cie , nc e in : Agriculture, 
£?'» Chemical Engineering, 326; 

&J? te^ eri , n f; 326; Education 
^J , Electrical Engineering, 326 
Engineering of Mines, 330 ; Home 
Economics, 328; Industrial Edu- 

fne^7 327 if* IeCha ^ iciU Enginee?- 

n ,f' 3 % 7 > Mines, Engineering of, 

66Q, Pharmacy, 330; Physical 

Education. 330 ^".ysioai 

Civil Engineer, 318. 

Doctor of Philosophy, 315. 

Master of Arts, 315. 

Master of Science, 317 

Master of Science in: Civil Emri- 

SiT 1 "^ 31 ^ E,ectrical Enginefr- 
J n j|' 318 > Engineering of Mines, 

Pharmaceutical Chemist, 330 
corning 7 e 7 neral re ^ ul ations, con- 
Degrees, Graduate, 80 
Degrees in: agriculture, 80, 107 113- 

fion tS d i| C n ienC6S '- 80 ' • 121 • educal 
non 80, 150; engineering, 80, 160 • 
Graduate School, 80, 181-183 ; home* 
economics 80, 113; law, 80 186 
med.cine, SO, 188; mining, 80, 16o' 
ill: S^i, - 80 194; pharmacy, 80,' 
190. physical education, 80, 199 
Degrees, Professional engineering;' 81, 

Degrees, Residence requirements for ■ 
graduate, 181-183 ; undergraduate; 

Degrees, Undergraduate, 77-80 
Delinquent students, 84 
Delta Gamma, 102. 
Delta Nu Tau, 103 
Delta Phi Alpha, 103. 



Delta Sigma Rho, 103. 
Delta Tau Delta, 34, 102 

ing'T-lanV ^/ 1 " 1111 gradin ^ and pack- 
Demonstration High School building, 

Departmental farms, 39. 
Departmental requirements, arts and 

sciences, 132. 
Deposits, 76. 

Description of the University, 38 
Diplomacy, 258. 
Directed teaching, in* 272 
Discipline, 83. 
Dispensary, 93. 
1 >octpr's degree, 182. 
1,1 ;.'.!•! it ^ | , i i ; T s 'or women: description. 

Dramatic Club,' 103. 
Dramatics, 259. 
Drawing, 282. 

Duties of: advisers, 85; committee on 
scholarship, 85; instructors, 84. 



Economics, business administration 
and sociology: courses in, 231- 
curriculum, 133; loan scholarships 
133 : sequence of co urses suggested, 

Education Club, 102 

EDUCATION, COLLEGE OF ■ 
Administration, Educational, 268 
Admission, 65, 67. 
Advanced standing, 69. 
Adviser. I 're-education, 52, 67 120 
Agricultural education, 208 
Approved subject-matter curricula, 

Buildings, 39, 40. 
Bureau of recommendation, 94 
Certification of teachers, 150-158 
Classification of students, 80 
Courses credited in the College of 

Arts a .d Sciences, 121 
Courses m. 267. 
Credits, 150 
Curricula, 152. 

Degree, Requirem. nts for, 150 
Development and organization, 52, 

149. 
Education club, 102. 

Educational administration, 268 

Educational materials and methods, 
270. 

Educational psychology, 271. 

Educational supervision, 272 

Examinations, 81. 

Fees, 74. 

Functions, 149. 

Funds, 42. 

General education, 267. 

High School, University, 25, 39 
149. 

Higher education, 270. 

History and functions, 52, 149. 

Home economics, 117, 218 

Honor points, 78, 82, 150* 

H pi° r ?02 fraternity > Kappa Delta 

Industrial education, 170, 177. 280 

Kappa Delta Pi, 102 

Laboratories, 41. 

Materials and methods, 270 



434 



Index 



Officers of administration, 9. 

Organization, 149. 

Practice teaching, 149. 

Pre-education adviser, 52, 67, 120. 

Psychology, Educational, 271. 

Recommendation for teaching certif- 
icate, 150-158. 

Registration, 71. 

Requirements for graduation, 150. 

Staff of instruction, 11. 

Student welfare, 86. 

Supervision, Educational, 272. 

Teacher training requirements, 150- 
158. 

Teaching groups. 153. 
Educational administration, 268. 
Educational materials and methods, 

270. 
Educational psychology, 271. 
Educational supervision, 272. 
Elective courses, 121, 177. 
Electrical engineering : courses credited 

in College of Arts and Sciences, 121 ; 

courses in, 278 ; curriculum, 166. 
Electrical Engineers, American In- 
stitute of, 103. 
Elizabeth Moore Hall, 39, 88, 90. 
Embryology, 289. 

Employment bureau for teachers, 94. 
Empiovment service, 93. 
ENGINEERING AND MECHANIC 

ARTS, COLLEGE OF: 

Admission, 65. 

Athletics. 93. 

Building, 39, 40. 

Ceramic engineering, 162, 273, 275. 

Certification of teachers, 177, 150- 
152. 

Chemical engineering: courses, 273; 
curriculum, 162. 

Civil engineering : courses, 276 ; 
curriculum, 164. 

Classification of students, 80. 

Construction, Courses in, 281. 

Courses credited in the College of 
Arts and Sciences, 121. 

Courses in, 273. 

Curricula, 161. 

Degrees. Requirements for, 80, 160. 

Discipline, 83. 

Drawing, machine design, and con- 
struction, 281. 

Electrical engineering: courses, 278; 
curriculum, 166. 

Elective groups for students in other 
colleges, 121. 

Examinations, 81. 

Experiment Station, Engineering, 48. 

Extension in the industrial sciences, 
55. 

Extension, Vocational courses offered 
in, 55. 

Five-year curricula, 176. 

Fees, 74. 

Freshman schedule, 161. 

Funds, 42. 

General courses, 285. 

Geological engineering, 174. 

Highway engineering, 276. 

Honor societies, 100. 

Hydraulic engineering: courses, 276; 
curriculum, 164. 

Industrial education ; courses, 280 ; 
curriculum, 170. 

Inspection trips, 41. 



Irregular students, Special curricula 
for, 177. 

Laboratories, 41. 

Machine design courses, 281. 

Mechanical engineering : courses, 
281 ; curriculum, 168. 

Mechanics, courses, 284. 

Metallurgical engineering : courses, 
273. 

Mining engineering: courses, 294; 
curricula, 171. 

Mining extension : work, 55 ; staff, 
26. 

National societies, 102. 

Numbering courses, Plan for, 206. 

Oil and gas production, curriculum, 
174. 

Organization of, 47, 159. 

Partial curriculum for special stu- 
dents, 177. 

Power engineering courses, 281. 

Professional degrees, 81, 177. 

Publications, 104. 

Railway and highway engineering: 
courses, 276 ; curriculum. 164. 

Requirements for degrees, 80, 160. 

Sanitary engineering: courses, 277; 
curriculum, 164. 

Special engineering curriculum, 177. 

Special students, 69, 177. 

Standing committees : college, 33 ; 
University, 32. 

Structural engineering: courses, 276; 
curriculum, 164. 

Student welfare, 86. 

Substitutions, 160. 

Summer session, 62. 

Surveying, 276. 

Thesis requirements, 161. 

Tuition and fees, 74. 

Undergraduate degrees, 80, 160. 

Welfare, Student, 86. 

Work done in absence, 160. 
Engineering Society, 103. 
English : Club, 103 ; courses, 236 ; 

curricula, 135 ; history, 244 ; se- 
quences, 135 ; standing committee on 

University, 33 ; teacher training, 

120. 137, 150-158; Waitman B-arbe 

memorial prize in, 98. 
Enrollment, Summary of, 426. 
Ensemble courses, 296. 
Entomology courses, 214. 
Entrance : certification of entrance 

units, 65 ; credits, 65 ; requirements, 

see Admission ; standing committee 

on, 32. 
Episcopal, Protestant, religious center, 

88. 
Equipment, 39-41. 
Eta Sigma Phi, 103. 
European history courses, 24 3. 
Examination, Medical, 71. 
Examinations, 81. 
Exemptions, Military, 58. 
Expenses, 77. 
Experiment Station, Agricultural : 

branches, 51 ; buildings, 39-40 ; farms, 

39, 51 ; history, 50 ; staff, 27. 
Extension courses in : agriculture, 51 ; 

arts and sciences, 45 ; coal mining, 

55 ; industrial education, 55 ; mining, 

.">.", : home economics, 51. 



Index 



435 



Extension staff: agricultural, 29; in- 
dustrial, 26 ; mining, 26. 

Extension, Standing committee on Uni- 
versity, 33. 



Faculty, University : according to rank, 
11; alphabetical list of, 337; Club, 
103 ; Graduate School, 180 ; organ- 
izations, 103 ; rank, according to, 
11 ; visiting instructors in the sum- 
mer session, 23. 

Failure in course, 83. 

Farms, Departmental, 39, 51. 

Farm economics courses, 215. 

Farm mechanics courses, 216. 

Farm practice : courses, 207 ; require- 
ment in, 108. 

Farms : Reymann Memorial, Wardens- 
ville, 39 ; University, 39, 51. 

Fees, 74. 

Fi Bater Cappar, 103. 

Field courses in summer, 62. 

Field House, Men's, 39, 90. 

Finley, J. D., loan fund, 95. 

Foods and nutrition, courses, 216. 

Football trophy, 100. 

Foundation of University, 37, 42. 

Foundations and societies, Religious, 
87. 

Four-H Club, 103. 

Fraternities, 34, 102. 

Fraternity advisers, 34. 

Fraternity and student standing, Com- 
mittee on, 33. 

French : Club, 103 ; courses, 262 ; 
departmental requirements, 146 ; 
teacher training requirements, 120, 
147, 150-152, 155. 

Freshman and sophomore registration 
in education, 52, 131. 

Freshman week, 71. 

Friendly Society, Girls', 89. 

Fruit grading and packing plant, 51. 

Full-time student fees, 74. 

Funds, 42. 

G 

Gamma Phi Beta, 102. 

Gas engineering curriculum, 174. 

General courses in: engineering, 285; 
home economics, 218. 

General information, 35. 

General regulations, School of Music, 
53. 

General science and biology teaching 
combination, 153. 

Genetics : courses, 211. 

Geography: courses, 240 ; departmental 
requirements, 138. 

Geological engineering curriculum, 174. 

Geology, mineralogy, and geography : 
courses, 240 ; curriculum, 138 ; se- 
quence of courses, 138. 

Germanic languages and literatures : 
club, 103 ; courses, 242 ; sequences, 
139 ; teacher training, 120, 139, 150- 
152, 155. 

Girls' Friendly Society, 89. 

Girls' Glee Club, 103. 

Gold medal, Walter E. Dandy, 100. 

Governing boards, 6. 

Government associations, Student, 87. 



Government of the University, 43. 

Government Research, Bureau for, 45. 

Governors, Board of, 6. 

Grades, Reports on, 83. 

Grading, System of, 82. 

Graduate Council, 10. 

GRADUATE SCHOOL: 

Admission, 70. 

Advisers, 180. 

Buildings, 39. 

Courses of instruction, 207-312. 

Council, 10. 

Degrees, 80, 181-183. 

Doctor's degree, 182. 

Faculty, 180. 

General regulations, 180. 

Marking system, 82. 

Master's degree, 181. 

Organization, 57, 179. 

Requirements for degrees, 180. 

Residence requirements, 181-183. 

Standing committees, 32. 

Student body, 180. 
Grange, 103. 
Greek courses, 231. 
Greek Club, 103. 
Greek letter societies, 34, 102. 
Grey friars, 103. 
Grounds, 39. 



Hall of Chemistry, 39. 

Hare, Alfred Jarrett, trophy, 99. 

Health and child care courses, 218. 

Health Service, Student, 10, 92. 

Heating Plant, 39. 

High school certificates, 150. 

High School, University Demonstra- 
tion : building, 39 ; staff, 25 ; work 
of, 149. 

Highway engineering courses, 276. 

Hillel Foundation, 88. 

Histology courses, 289. 

History of the Classics, courses, 230. 

History of the University, 37. 

History: courses, 243; curriculum for 
majors, 139 ; sequences, 139, 243, 
244 ; tutorial courses, 246. 

Home economics : adviser, 113 ; aim 
and scope, 50 ; applied arts courses, 
217 ; certificate, 115, 216 ; classifica- 
tion of students, 80 ; club, 103 ; 
courses, 216 ; curriculum suggested, 

114, 140 ; degree requirements, 80, 
113 ; education courses, 218 ; en- 
trance requirements, 65 ; equipment, 
50; foods and nutrition courses, 216; 
general courses, 218 ; health and 
child care courses, 218 ; home 
management courses, 218 ; instruc- 
tion in, 50, 113 ; organization, 50 ; 
sequences, 113 ; teacher training, 

115, 150, 156 ; textiles and clothing 
courses, 217 ; vocational home eco- 
nomics certificate, 117. 

Home management courses, 218. 

Honor points, 82 ; required for gradua- 
tion, 78. 

Honor societies, 100. 

Horticulture, courses, 219. 

Hydraulic engineering: courses, 276; 
curriculum, 164. 



436 



Index 



In absentia work, 79. 

Industrial education : courses, 280 ; 

curriculum, 170. 
Industrial engineering: courses, 281; 

curriculum, 168. 
Infirmary, 39, 93. 
Inspection trips, 41. 
Instruction in : agriculture, 49, 107 ; 

home economics, 50, 113 ; law, 

method of, 185 ; medicine, 188 ; 

pharmacy, 190. 
Instruction, Staff of, 11. 
Instructors : duties of, 84 ; list of, 18. 
Instruments, Drawing, 77. 
Intercollegiate athletics, 93. 
Inter-fraternity scholarship trophies, 

99. 
International law courses, 257. 
International relations, courses, 258. 
Intramural athletics: for men, 91; for 

women, 92. 
Irregular students in engineering, 

Special curriculum for, 177. 
Italian courses, 265. 



Jewish religious center, 88. 

Johns Hopkins, West Virginia Alumni 

Association of, 104. 
Journaliers, 103. 
Journalism : agricultural, 210 ; courses, 

247 ; curriculum for majors, 140. 
Junior certificate, 44, 119. 



Kappa Alpha, 34, 102. 
Kappa Beta Pi, 103. 
Kappa Delta Pi, 102. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma, 102. 
Kappa Kappa Psi, 103. 
Kappa Phi, 89. 
Kappa Psi, 103. 
Kappa Psi prize, 98. 
Kappa Sigma, 34, 102. 
Kappa Tau Alpha, 102. 



La Tertulia, 103. 

Laboratory deposits, 76. 

Laboratories, 41. 

Languages and literatures : Classics, 

133, 229 ; English, 135, 236 ; German, 

139, 242; Romance, 146, 262. 
Late registration, 73. 
Latin : courses, 229 ; departmental re- 
quirements, 13 3 ; teacher training 

requirements, 120, 133, 150-152, 156. 
Law, American Law Book Company 

prize in, 98. 
LAW, COLLEGE OF: 

Admission, 65, 67. 

Advanced standing, 70. 

Athletics, 93. 

Bachelor of Laws, 187. 

Bar, Admission to, 187. 

Building, 39, 40. 

Classification of students, 80. 

Club courts, 103, 186. 

Combined courses in two colleges, 
125, 186. 



Courses, 286. 

Credits required, 80, 187. 

Degrees, Requirements for, 80, 186. 

Discipline, 83. 

Drafting of legal instruments, 41, 
186. 

Elective courses, 187. 

Entrance requirements, 65, 67. 

Examinations, grades, and credits, 
81. 

History and purpose, 46. 

Honor points, 78, 82, 187. 

Honor societies, 100. 

Law Quarterly notes, 186. 

Library, 42. 

Method of instruction, 185. 

Officers of administration, 9. 

Practice and procedure, 185. 

Practice court, 41, 185. 

Purpose, 46, 185. 

Registration, 71. 

Required courses, 187. 

Staff of instruction, 11. 

Standing committees, 32. 

Student club courts, 103, 186. 

Student welfare, 86. 

Students in other colleges admitted 
to law courses, 187. 

West Virginia Law Quarterly, 186. 
Law Library, 42. 

Law Quarterly, West Virginia, 186. 
Lehn and Fink medal, 100. 
Li-Toon-Awa, 103. 
Library training: courses, 248. 
Library : departmental collections, 42 ; 

general, 41; law, 42; new, 39, 41; 

old, 39 ; standing committee, 32. 
List of students, 365. 
Literary types, courses, 238. 
Literature, American, 236. 
Living accommodations for students, 

63. 
Loan funds : economics, 95 ; J. D. 

Finley loan fund, 95 ; revolving loan 

fund for men, 96 ; Theodore Smith 

loan fund, 95 ; Walter Haines 

South memorial, 95 ; women, loan 

funds for, 96. 
Location of the University, 38. 
Lodging, 64. 
Lower division, College of Arts and 

Sciences, 122. 

M 

Machine design and construction 

courses, 281. 
Main objectives, College of Arts and 

Sciences, 44, 119. 
Major subjects, College of Arts and 

Sciences : list of, 119 ; see also 

Curricula. 
Map of Campus, 2. 
Marking system, 82. 
Marriages, Student, 85. 
Martin Hall, 39. 
Master's degree conferred, 315. 
Mathematics : courses, 249 ; curriculum 

for majors, 142 ; sequences, 142 ; 

teacher training requirements, 120, 

150, 156. 
Matriculation, 71. 
Matrix, 103. 
Maximum and minimum work, 72. 



Index 



437 



Mechanical drawing and machine de- 
sign, courses, 282. 

Mechanical engineering: courses, 281; 
curriculum, 168. 

Mechanical Engineers, American Soci- 
ety of, 103. 

Mechanical Hall, 39. 

Mechanics, courses, 284. 

Medals, 100. 

Medical Building, 39. 

Medical examination, 71. 

Medical service, 92. 

MEDICINE. SCHOOL OF: 
Admission, 65, 68. 
Anatomy, 289. 
Athletics, 93. 
Bacteriology, 290. 
Biochemistry, 290. 
Building, 39, 40. 
Classification of students, 80. 
Combined course in two colleges, 

121, 128, 129. 
Courses in, 289. 
Curriculum, 188. 

Degree, Requirements for, 80, 188. 
Discipline, 83. 
Embryology, 289. 
Examinations, 81. 
Gross anatomy, 289. 
Histology and embryology, 289. 
History, 54. 

Instruction in, 54, 188, 289. 
Laboratories, 41. 
Medicine. 292. 
Neurology, 289. 
Obstetrics, 293. 
Officers, 9. 
Organization, 54. 
Pathology and bacteriology, 290. 
Pharmacology, 292. 
Pharmacy, 54, 190, 302. 
Physical diagnosis, 292. 
Physiology, 291. 
Registration, 71. 
Schedule of courses, 188. 
Scholarships, 94. 
Staff of instruction, 11. 
Standing committees, 32, 33. 
Student welfare, 86. 
Surgery, 293. 
Theoretical medicine, 293. 

Men, Dean of, 86. 

Men, Living accommodations for, 63. 

Men's Field House, 39, 90. 

Metallurgy, 275. 

Method of instruction in law, 185. 

Methodist Episcopal religious center, 
88, 89. 

Methods of admission, 65. 

Methods of registration, 71. 

Mid-semester reports, 81. 

Military and gymnasium board, 32. 

Military band, 60, 103. 

Military Science and Tactics, Division 
of : administration and instruction, 
59 ; advanced courses in, 294 
allowances, 60 ; basic courses in, 293 
building, 39, 59 ; courses in, 293 
curriculum, 60 ; exemptions, 58 
military and gymnasium board, 32 
provision for training in, 57 ; regu- 
lations concerning cadets, 57 ; re- 
quired training in, 57 ; special re- 
wards for excellence in, 60 ; staff of 
instruction, 24. 



Mineralogy : courses, 240 ; depart- 
mental requirements, 138. 
MINES, SCHOOL OF: 

Admission, 65. 

Building, 39, 40. 

Athletics, 93. 

Classification of students, 80. 

Coal mining : curriculum, 172 ; short 
course in, 55. 

Courses, 294. 

Curricula, 171. 

Degree, Requirements for, 160, 171. 

Discipline, 83. 

Electives for students in other col- 
leges, 121, 177. 

Examinations, 81. 

Five-year curriculum, 176. 

Fees, 74. 

Funds, 42. 

Gas engineering curriculum, 174. 

Geological engineering curriculum, 

History and organization, 54. 

Honor societies, 100. 

Mineralogy, 240. 

Minimum work, 72. 

Mining engineering, 172. 

Mining and industrial extension : or- 
ganization, 55 ; staff, 26. 

Oil and gas engineering curriculum, 
174. 

Officers, 9, 26. 

Organization, 54. 

Professional degrees, 81, 177. 

Registration, 71. 

Resident instruction, 54. 

Special curriculum for irregular stu- 
dents, 1 . 7. 

Staff of instruction, 26. 

Standing committees, 32, 33. 

Student welfare, 86. 

Substitutions, 160. 

Summer session work, 160. 

Thesis, 161. 

Vocational courses offered in : ex- 
tension, 56 ; summer session, 55. 
Maximum and minimum work, 72. 
Mining and Metallurgical Engineers, 

American Institute of, 103. 
Mining engineering: courses, 294; 

curriculum, 172. 
Mining engineering society, 103. 
Mining extension staff, 26. 
Mining, Summer course in, 55. 
Moore Hall, Elizabeth, 39, 86. 
Morgantown Post trophy, 99. 
Mortar Board, 103. 
Mountain, 103. 
Mountaineer Field, 39. 
Music Building, 39. 
MUSIC, SCHOOL OF: 

Admission, 65. 

Advanced standing, 69. 

Applied music, 195. 

Buildings and equipment, 39, 53. 

Classification of students, 80. 

Certification of teachers, 150-152, 
198. 

Concerts and recitals, 53. 

Courses in, 296. 

Curricula in : applied music, 195 ; 
public school music, 197. 

Degree, Requirements for, 80, 194. 

Discipline, 83. 



438 



Index 



Ensemble, 296. 

Examinations, 81. 

Fees, 74-76. 

Funds, 42. 

General regulations, 53, 77. 

Honor-points, 78, 82, 194. 

Music education, 298. 

Piano : courses, 296 ; curriculum^ 195. 

Pipe organ : courses, 296 ; curriculum, 

195. 
Public school music: courses, 298; 

curriculum, 197. 
Registration, 71. 

Requirements for graduation, 194. 
Special announcements, 53. 
Staff of instruction, 11. 
Standing committees, 32, 33. 
Student welfare, 86. 
Studios, 39, 41, 53. 
Teacher training requirements, 150- 

152, 197, 198. 
Theory of music, 299. 
Tuition in, 74. 
Violin: courses, 300; curriculum, 

195. 
Voice : courses, 301 ; curriculum, 196. 
Music education: courses, 299; curric- 
ulum, 197. 
Musical organizations, 53. 

N 

National Association of Drug Clerks' 

prize, 98. 
Neurology, 289. 
Newman Hall, 88. 
Numbering courses, Plan for, 72, 206. 



O 



Objectives, College of Arts and Sci- 
ences, 44, 119. 

Observation and inspection trips, Fa- 
cilities for, 41. 

Officers of the University, 9, 10. 

Oglebay Hall, 39. 

Oil and gas engineering curriculum, 
174 

Optional curricula, third and fourth 
years, agriculture, 109. 

Orchesis, 103. 

Orchestra, University, 103. 

Organization of the : Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station, 50 ; Agricultural 
Extension Division, 51 ; Bureau for 
Government Research, 45 ; College 
of Agriculture, 49 ; College of Arts 
and Sciences, 44 ; College of Edu- 
cation, 52 ; College of Engineering 
and Mechanic Arts, 47 ; College of 
Law, 46 ; Division of Physical Edu- 
cation, 61; Engineering Experiment 
Station, 48; Graduate School, 57; 
Home Economics Department, 50 ; 
Military Science and Tactics, Divis- 
ion of, 59 ; Pharmacy Department, 
54 ; School of Medicine, 54 ; School 
of Mines, 54 ; School of Music, 52 ; 
Summer Session, 62 ; University, 43 ; 
West Virginia Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station, 50. 

Organizations and societies, 34, 87-89, 
100-104. 

Other officers, 10. 



Package library service, 42. 

Pan-Hellenic Association, 102. 

Part-time student fees, 75. 

Pathology, 290. 

Periodicals, 41. 

Periods and authors, English, 238. 

Pharmacists' register, 94. 

Pharmacology, 292. 

Pharmacy, Department of : admission 
to, 65 ; basic two-year course re- 
quired of all students, 190 ; classi- 
fication of students, 80 ; courses in, 
302 ; curricula in, 190 ; degrees, re- 
quirements for, 80, 190 ; elective 
courses, 193 ; general requirements, 
190; history of department, 54; in- 
dustrial pharmacy, 192 ; instruction 
in, 54, 190 ; laboratories, 41 ; phar- 
macists' register, 94 ; retail phar- 
macy curriculum, 191 ; scholarships 
and prizes, 94. 

Pharmacy, University, 93. 

Phi Alpha, 34, 102. 

Phi Alpha Delta, 103. 

Phi Beta Kappa society, 100. 

Phi Beta Pi, 103. 

Phi Chi Delta, 89. 

Phi Delta Phi, 103. 

Phi Delta Theta, 34, 102. 

Phi Epsilon Phi, 101. 

Phi Kappa Psi, 34, 102. 

Phi Kappa Sigma, 34, 102. 

Phi Kappa Tau, 34, 102. 

Phi Lamba Upsilon, 101. 

Phi Mu, 102. 

Phi Sigma Delta, 34, 102. 

Phi Sigma Kappa, 34, 102. 

Phi Sigma Nu, 103. 

Phi Upsilon Omicron, 101. 

Philhellenic Club, 103. 

Philosophy: Club, 103; courses, 252; 
sequences, 143, 252 ; suggestions for 
majors, 143. 

Physical diagnosis, 292. 

Phvsical education, service programs, 
89 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION, DIVISION 
OF: 

Admission, 65. 
Athletics, 93. 

Buildings and equipment, 39, 90. 
Bureau of recommendation, 94. 
Certification of teachers, 150, 203. 
Classification of students, 80. 
Club, 103. 
Courses in, 305. 
Curricula, 200. 

Degree, Requirements for, 80, 199. 
Directed teaching, 200, 272. 
Discipline, 83. 
Elective courses, 199. 
Entrance requirements, 65. 
Examinations, 81. 
Facilities, 80. 
Fees, 74. 

For men: courses, 305, 310; curricu- 
lum, 201. 
For women : courses, 305, 310 ; 

curriculum, 202. 
Funds, 42. 
Health service, 92. 
History and purpose, 60. 
Honor-points, 78, 82. 



Index 



439 



Honor societies, 100. 

Intramural athletics, 91. 

Organization of, 61, 199. 

Professional courses, 309. 

Registration, 71. 

Required courses, 199. 

Required for degree, 78, 89. 

Requirements for graduation, 199. 

Service programs, 90, 305. 

Staff of instruction, 11. 

Standing committees, 32, 33. 

Student organizations, 34, 87-89, 
100-103. 

Student welfare, 86. 

Teacher training, 52, 150, 203, 306. 

Theory and practice of physical edu- 
cation, 306. 

Tuition fees and expenses, 74. 
Physical plant, 39. 
Physical training, 89. 
Physics : courses, 254 ; sequences, 144 ; 

suggestions for majors, 144 ; teacher 

training, 153. 
Physiological chemistry, 290. 
Physiologv, 291. 
Pi Beta Phi, 102. 
Pi Kappa Alpha, 34, 102. 
Pi Kappa Phi, 34, 102. 
Pi Lamba Phi, 34, 102. 
Piano : courses, 296 ; curriculum, 195. 
Pipe organ : courses, 296 ; curriculum, 

195. 
Placement bureau, Teachers', 94. 
Plan for numbering courses, 206. 
Plant industry curriculum, 110. 
Plant pathology, 220. 
Political science: Bryan prize in, 97; 

courses in, 257 ; curriculum for 

majors, 145 ; sequences, 145 ; tutorial 

courses, 258. 
Pomology, 219. 
Poultry husbandry, 221. 
Power engineering, 281. 
Practical arts, Teacher training re- 
quirements in, 177. 
Practical observation, Facilities for, 

41. 
Practice and procedure in law, Courses 

in, 185. 
Practice court, 41, 185. 
Practice teaching, 149, 272. 
Pre-education adviser, 52, 120. 
Pre-education course, 67, 131. 
Pre-law course, 125. 
Pre-medical course, 124, 126, 128, 129. 
Presbyterian religious center, 88, 89. 
Prescribed and elective entrance units, 

66. 
Press Club, 103. 
President's House, 39. 
Prizes: list of. 97; regulations, 97; 

standing committee on, 32. 
Probation rules, 84. 
Professional courses in physical edu- 
cation, 309. 
Professional degrees in engineering, 

81, 177. 
Professional societies, 103. 
Professors, 11. 
Professors, American Association of 

University, 103. 
Professors, Assistant, 15. 
Professors, Associate, 14. 
Protestant Episcopal religious center, 

88, 89. 



Provision for military training, 57. 

Psychology : courses in, 253 ; sugges- 
tions for majors, 143. 

Public exercises and entertainments, 
Standing committee on, 32. 

Public health, Course in, 127. 

Public school music: courses, 298; 
curriculum, 197. 

Public speaking: courses, 259; re- 
quirements for majors, 146 ; se- 
quences, 146. 

Publications, Student: committee on, 
32 ; list of, 104. 

Publications, University : committee 
on, 32 ; list of, 104. 



Railway and highway engineering : 
courses, 276; curriculum, 164. 

Recitals, 53. 

Recommendation, Bureau of, 94. 

Recommendation of teachers, 94. 

Recreation, 89. 

Red Dragon Casteliers, 103. 

Refunding of fees, 77. 

Register, Pharmacists', 94. 

Registration, 71. 

Registration fees, 74. 

Religious foundations and societies, 87. 

Reports of grades, 83. 

Required preparation in teaching 
groups, 153-158. 

Required work in military science, 57. 

Requirements for degrees, see Degrees. 

Research : Graduate Council, 10 ; 
Graduate School, 180 ; social sci- 
ences, 62. 

Reserve officers' training corps, 57. 

Residence requirements : Graduate 
School, 181-183 ; undergraduate col- 
leges, schools, and divisions, 78. 

Residence, Work done out of, 79. 

Revolving loan fund for men, 96. 

Reymann Memorial Farms, 39, 51. 

Rhetoric, 236. 

Rhododendron, 103. 

Road engineering: courses, 276; 
curriculum, 164. 

Romance languages and literatures : 
courses, 262 ; curriculum for majors, 
146; sequences, 146; teacher train- 
ing requirements, 120, 150-152, 155, 
158. 

Rooms and boarding places, 63, 64. 

Rowan Rifles, 103. 

Rules and regulations, 77-79, 81-86. 

Rural organization, 209. 

S 

Sanitary engineering: courses, 277; 
curriculum, 164. 

Scabbard and Blade, 103. 

Schedule of courses required, see 
Curricula. 

Scholarship, Standing college com- 
mittees on, 34. 

Scholarships, 94. 

Scholastic standing, 82. 

School of Mining, Summer, 55. 

School of Medicine: courses, 289; 
curricula, 126, 128, 188; organiza- 
tion, 54. 



440 



Index 



School of Music: courses, 296; curric- 
ula, 194 ; fees, 71, 7G ; organization, 
52. 

School of Music Annex, 39, 53. 

Science Hall, 39. 

Science and medicine course, 128. 

Science, pharmacy and medicine 
course, 129. 

Scientific Society, 103. 

Sequence of courses : botany, 132 ; 
chemistry, 132 ; economics, 133 ; 
English, 135; geology, 138; Ger- 
man, 139 ; history, 139, 243, 244 ; 
home economics, 139-140 ; mathe- 
matics, 142 ; philosophy and psycho- 
logy, 143; political science, 145; 
public speaking, 146 ; Romance lan- 
guages, 146 ; sociology, 134 ; zoology, 
148. 

Service programs in physical educa- 
tion, 90. 

Short courses and special schools, 51, 
55, 112. 

Sigma Gamma Epsilon, 101. 

Sigma Pi Psi, 103. 

Sigma Pi Sigma, 102. 

Sigma Chi, 34, 102. 

Sigma Nu, 34, 102. 

Sigma Phi Spsilon, 34, 102. 

Sigma Sigma Sigma, 102. 

Sigma Xi Club. 100. 

Smith, Theodore, loan fund, 95. 

Social center for women, 86. 

Social life of students, 86. 

Social affairs, Committee on. 32. 

Social studies, teacher training re- 
quirements, 157. 

Societies, 87. 89, 100-104. 

Societies, Honor, 100. 

Sociology: courses, 234; departmental 
requirements, 134. 

Soils. 210. 

Sororities, 34, 102. 

Sororitv supervision, 34. 

South, Walter Haines, memorial loan 
scholarship, 95. 

Spanish : courses, 264 ; sequences, 146; 
teacher training requirements, 120, 
150, 158. 

Spalding, A. G., trophy, 99. 

Special engineering curricula, 177. 

Special entrance requirements, 67. 

Special fees, 75. 

Special requirements for admission, 67. 

Special rewards for military excellence, 
60. 

Special students, 69. 

Sphinx, 103. 

Sport Shop trophy, 99. 

Spring football trophy, 100. 

Staff of instruction, research, and ex- 
tension : Agricultural Experiment- 
Station, 27 ; Agricultural Extension 
Division, 29 ; assistant professors, 
15 ; assistants, 20 ; associate pro- 
fessors, 14 ; athletic. 24 ; Athletic 
Board, 32 ; boys' and girls' club 
agents, 31 ; committees, college, 33, 
University, 32 ; county agents, 30 ; 
Experiment Station, 27 ; extension, 
agricultural. 29 ; extension, indus- 
trial, 26 ; fraternity advisers, 34 ; 
graduate assistants, 21 ; University 
Demonstration High School, 25 ; 
home demonstration agents, 31; in- 



dustrial extension, 26 ; instructors, 
18 ; lecturers, 20 ; library, 26 ; mili- 
tary, 24 ; mining and industrial ex- 
tension, 26 ; professors, 11 ; Uni- 
versity, 11 ; visiting instructors in 
the summer session, 23. 

Standing, Advanced, 69. 

Standing committees : college, 33 ; Uni- 
versity, 32. 

State Board of Control, 6. 

State Pharmaceutical Association prize, 
98. 

Structural engineering: courses, 277; 
curriculum, 164. 

Student aid, 93. 

Student and fraternity standing, Com- 
mittee on, 33. 

Student club courts, 103, 186. 

Student concerts, 53. 

Student Council, 87. 

Student courses and hours, Standing 
committee on, 34. 

Student deans, 86. 

Student English, Standing committee 
on, 33. 

Student government, 87. 

Student Government Association, 
Women's, 87. 

Student health service : description of, 
92 ; staff, 10. 

Student marriages, 85. 

Student organizations, 34, 87-89, 102- 
103. 

Student publications, 104. 

Student social life, 89. 

Student teaching, 149, 272. 

Student welfare. 86. 

Students, List of, 365. 

Substitution for required courses, 73. 

Summary of University enrollment, 

426 - 

Summer session : admission, 62 ; as- 
semblies, 62; clay modeling, 63; 
committee on, 32 ; courses for teach- 
ers, 62; education, courses in, 62; 
employment bureau for teachers, 
94 ; field courses in botany, ento- 
mology, geology, and zoology, 62 ; 
health service, 92 ; High School, 
University Demonstration, 25, 39, 
149; library training, 63, 248; maxi- 
mum credit allowed, 72 ; mining, 55 ; 
research in the social sciences, 62 ; 
teachers, work for, 62 ; visiting in- 
structors in, 23. 

Surgery, Introductory, 293. 

Surveying, 276. 

Suspensions, 84. 

Swimming Club, 103. 



Table of contents, 3. 

Tau Beta Pi, 101. 

Tau Epsilon Phi, 34, 102. 

Tau Kappa Epsilon, 34, 102. 

Tax Commission prize, 97. 

Teachers, Work for, 62. 

Teachers' bureau, 94. 

Teachers' certificates : agriculture, 111- 
112 ; arts and sciences, 120, 132, 133, 
136-137, 139, 140, 146, 147, 148; 
education, 149, 150-158; home eco- 
nomics. 115-118 ; industrial educa- 
tion, 177-178; music, 197-198; physi- 
cal education, 203-204. 

Teaching combinations required, 152. 



Index 



441 



Teacher training, see Teachers' certif- 
icates. 

Tenor voice, Scholarship in, 94. 

Textiles and clothing, 217. 

Theodore Smith loan fund, 95. 

Theory and practice of physical edu- 
cation, 306. 

Theory of music, 299. 

Theses, Engineering, 161. 

Theta Chi, 34, 102. 

Theta Epsilon, 89. 

Theta Kappa Psi, 103. 

Theta Upsilon, 102. 

Time and place of registration, 71. 

Torch and Serpent, 103. 

Trinity House, 88. 

Trips, Inspection, 41. 

Trophies, Inter-fraternity scholarship, 
99. 

Tuition, Rates of, 74. 
99. 

Tutorial courses, 246, 258. 



Undergraduate requirements for ad- 
mission, 65. 

Units, Entrance, 65. 

University : band, 103 ; Bird Club, 103 ; 
book store, 64 ; calendar, 5 ; choir, 
103; description of, 37; enrollment, 
summary of, 426 ; extension, stand- 
ing committee on, 33 ; farms, 39, 51 ; 
fees and expenses, 74 ; Four-H Club, 
103 ; Girls' Glee Club, 103 ; govern- 
ment and organization of, 43 ; 
library, 39, 41 ; location and history 
of, 37, 38 ; orchestra, 103 ; publica- 
tions, 104 ; Vo-Ag Club, 103. 

University Demonstration High School : 
building, 39 ; staff, 25 ; work of, 52, 
149. 

Upper division, arts and sciences, 123. 



Violin : courses, 300 ; curriculum, 195. 

Visiting instructors in the summer ses- 
sion, 23. 

Visitors, 73. 

Voice: courses, 301; curriculum, 196. 

Vo-Ag Club, 103. 

Vocational courses offered in : ex- 
tension, 56 ; summer session, 55. 

Vocational education, 109, 117. 

W 

Welfare, Student, 86. 

Wesley, Foundation, 88. 

West Virginia Agricultural Experiment 

Station : organization, 50 ; staff, 27. 
West Virginia Agricultural Extension 

Division staff, 29. 
West Virginia Alumni Association of 

Johns Hopkins, 104. 
West Virginia Law Quarterly, 186. 
West Virginia State Pharmaceutical 

Association prize, 98. 
Westminster Foundation, 88. 
Withdrawal from the University, 73. 
Woman's Hall, 39, 63. 
Woman's Hall Annex, 39, 63. 
Women, Dean of, 86. 
Women, Loan funds for, 96. 
Women's Athletic Council, 103. 
Women's Athletic Association, 103. 
Women, Living accommodations for, 

63. 
Women's Student Government Associa- 
tion, 87. 
Women students, Standing committee 

on, 32. 
Woodburn Hall, 39, 40. 
Work done in absence, Credit for, 79. 



Young Women's Christian Association, 
89. 



Varsity Club, 103. 
Vegetable gardening, 220. 
Veterinary science, 213. 



Zoology: courses, 265; curriculum for 
majors, 148 ; sequences, 148. 



29 

1933-193U